Quick Start Guide for Cisco Network Registrar, 7.0
Introducing the Setup Web UI
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Introducing the Setup Web UI

Table Of Contents

Introducing the Setup Web UI

Setup Functions

Setup Features and Navigation

Configuration Options

Mixed DHCP and DNS Scenarios

One-Machine Mixed Configuration

Two-Machine Mixed Configuration

Three-Machine Mixed Configuration

Four-Machine Mixed Configuration

DHCP-Only Scenarios

One-Machine DHCP Configuration

Two-Machine DHCP Configuration

DNS-Only Scenarios

One-Machine DNS Configuration

Two-Machine DNS Configuration

Three-Machine DNS Configuration


Introducing the Setup Web UI


The local cluster Network Registrar web UI, starting with Release 7.0, provides a setup environment in Basic user mode. The setup is in the form of a series of interview pages, very much like a wizard, based only on the selections you make.

Setup Functions

The setup pages provide these functions:

User password change

Dynamic host configuration:

Enable the Dynamic Host Configuration (DHCP) service

Set up DHCP failover between two servers

Set up classes of service

Enable Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) traps

Domain names and hosts:

Enable the Domain Name System (DNS) service

Set up High-Availability (HA) DNS servers

Set up zone distributions to coordinate primary and secondary servers

Manage forward and reverse zones

Configure access controls

Enable SNMP traps

DNS Update for dynamic hosts

Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) trap recipients

Trivial File Transport Protocol (TFTP) server

Setup Features and Navigation

The setup pages:

Take you out of Basic and Advanced user modes and into special Setup mode. Basic and Advanced modes are for more specialized configuration after you set up the environment using the setup interview. These modes (and the server concepts) are described in detail in the User Guide for Cisco Network Registrar.

Have an initial Set Up This Server page where you can enable and disable functions and which is the point of departure for all enabled function pages.

Include <<Back, Next>>, and Finish buttons on pages so that you can step through sequentially, except that the <<Back is not on the Set Up This Server page and the Next>> button is not on the Setup Interview Report page. The Finish button jumps directly to the Setup Interview Report page.


Note Do not use the browser's Back and Forward buttons to navigate through the setup process.


Include the Next>> button that opens further pages depending on the criteria you set. For example, if the DNS server is enabled, but the server is not indicated as primary, the setup pages bypass the High-Availability (HA) DNS server, zone distribution, and forward and backward zone configuration pages.

Provide a menu bar (Services, DHCP, DNS, DNS Update, Traps, and Report) so that you can access functions despite their enabled/disabled status on the Set Up This Server page. However, if a function is disabled on the Set Up This Server page, the function appears disabled on its setup page. You can change the status on the particular setup page, which resets the status on the Set Up This Server page.

Are sometimes transactional and sometimes not. In some cases (such as with creating clusters and keys), writes to the database occur immediately when you enter a value. In other cases, writes to the database occur only when you click Next>> or Finish.

Keep track of database writes and summarizes them on a report page when you click Finish.

Provide initial selection defaults, and persist changes to the next setup. (For subsequent setups, the previously configured values become the new defaults.)

Configuration Options

The sample configuration shown in this guide is based on the typical use cases described in the following sections.

Mixed DHCP and DNS Scenarios

You can set up Network Registrar for a mixed DHCP and DNS configuration with different numbers of machines.

One-Machine Mixed Configuration

Configure both DHCP and DNS servers on a single machine, initially enabling the servers as primaries, and enabling the TFTP server and SNMP traps. Then configure at least one forward zone and corresponding reverse zone, at least one scope, and DNS Update.

Two-Machine Mixed Configuration

A mixed DHCP configuration on two machines offers a few alternatives:

Configure one machine as primary DHCP and DNS servers, and the second machine as a secondary DNS server. Then configure a zone distribution and DNS access controls on the first machine and optionally access controls on the second machine.

Configure one machine as DHCP and DNS main servers and the second machine as DHCP and DNS backup servers. Perform minimal configuration on the backup machine (changing the password, enabling DHCP and DNS, and selecting partner backup roles). On the main machine, build the configuration, creating server pairs and scheduling synchronization tasks with the backup machine.

Configure one machine as a DHCP server and the second machine as a DNS primary, then configure either machine with DNS Update and push the configuration to the other machine.

Three-Machine Mixed Configuration

A mixed configuration on three machines offers a few additional alternatives:

Configure one machine as a DHCP server, the second machine as a DNS primary, and the third machine as a DNS secondary. Optionally revisit the machines to make the DHCP main the DNS backup, and make the DNS main the DHCP backup.

Configure one machine as DHCP failover and DNS High-Availability (HA) main servers, the second machine as DHCP failover and DNS HA backup servers, and the third machine as a DNS secondary server.

Four-Machine Mixed Configuration

A mixed configuration on four machines can include:

DHCP and DNS main and backup pairs, with the first machine as a DHCP main, the second machine as a DHCP backup, the third machine as a DNS main configured with DNS Update, and the fourth machine as a DNS backup.

An add-on to the three-machine scenario, with the first machine as a DHCP main, the second machine as a DNS main, the third machine as DHCP and DNS backups, and the fourth machine as a DNS secondary.

DHCP-Only Scenarios

A DHCP-only configuration can be on a single machine or two machines.

One-Machine DHCP Configuration

Initially configure just DHCP, skip the class-of-service and failover options, and revisit the setup to enable class-of-service and policy options.

Two-Machine DHCP Configuration

Configure the first machine as a DHCP main and the second machine as a backup, with minimal backup configuration (changing password, enabling DHCP, and selecting the backup role), and set up the first machine with failover load balancing, optionally scheduling failover synchronization tasks.

DNS-Only Scenarios

A DNS-only configuration can be on one, two, or three machines.

One-Machine DNS Configuration

Initially configure just DNS as a primary, secondary, or caching server.

Two-Machine DNS Configuration

Configure the first machine as a DNS primary and the second machine as a secondary, or the first machine as a main primary and the second machine as a backup primary.

Three-Machine DNS Configuration

Configure the first machine as a DNS main primary, the second machine as a backup primary, and the third machine as a secondary server.