Cisco WAN Manager User's Guide, 11.0
Networking
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Networking

Table Of Contents

Networking

Connecting to Cisco WAN Manager

Cisco WAN Manager Gateway Node

IP Relay

IP Relay Gateway

Link0 and Link1

Ports Used by CWM

CWM to Node (Outgoing)

Node to CWM (Incoming)

Configuring Network Management

In-Band Management

In-Band Management Without Routers

In-Band Management Across Routers

Out-of-Band Management

CWM Out-of-Band Management for MGX8850 (PXM45/1E)

Configuring a PXM1 Based MGX Switch Feeder Session

User Configurable Network IDs


Networking


The primary goal of your Cisco WAN Manager (CWM) network design is to build the simplest, most economical communication network possible while enabling both flat and tiered networks.

Determination of the number and placement of CWM workstations throughout the network is largely dependent on the amount of message traffic between CWM and the nodes within the network, and the ability of either CWM or the individual MGX™ 8850 series, BPX® 8600 series, or IGX™ 8400 series nodes to process the messages. As each component in the network owns indigenous factors that contribute to overall performance, a key issue becomes understanding the limitation of each component and determining which component is the limiting factor in the network design.

Connecting to Cisco WAN Manager

Each CWM workstation resident within a network must be able to communicate with all nodes within the network.

Each node can have two different IP addresses. The first is the network IP address. You configure the network IP address on a switch by invoking the cnfnwip command from the Switch Command Line Interface (CLI). The network IP address is used by CWM to communicate with all nodes in the network.

The second type of IP address, is the LAN IP address. It is configured on a switch by invoking the cnflan command from the Switch CLI. CWM uses the LAN IP address for communicating with a gateway node and all feeder nodes.


Note The network and LAN IP addresses should be configured on all of the nodes that are to communicate directly with CWM. All nodes that communicate with the CWM workstation through a gateway node do not need a LAN IP address. These nodes use the network address via the trunks between nodes and are in-band.


Following are descriptions of various components found in a CWM network:

Cisco WAN Manager Gateway Node

A Gateway node provides topology and other vital information about the network to CWM. The Gateway node name is specified in the /usr/users/svplus/config/network.conf file on the CWM workstation.

IP Relay

IP Relay is a proprietary protocol used by Cisco WAN switches to pass IP traffic within a Cisco WAN network. The IP Relay function stops at the gateway switch.

IP Relay Gateway

The IP Relay gateway is a node in the WAN network used to relay IP traffic for a group of nodes in the network. When the nodes in the network are geographically distributed, or when the network is large and you created subnets to manage the network, one node in each subnet can be used to relay the IP traffic to all the nodes in that subnet that are connected via trunks. IP Relay traffic will pass through a trunk's Statistical Reserve, but not pass over lines.

Link0 and Link1

CWM and MGX 8230, BPX 8600, or IGX 8400 series nodes use a proprietary protocol to exchange network management information. CWM establishes two types of links (Link0 and Link1) with MGX 8230, BPX 8600, or IGX 8400 series nodes. CWM establishes a Link0 link with the CWM Gateway node, and a Link1 link with all nodes in the network. A Link0 link is also established between CWM and IGX 8400 series feeder nodes.

Four types of network traffic flow between CWM and the Cisco WAN switches that CWM manages, and they are as follows:

Link0—consists of topology and maintenance messages between the CWM workstation and the CWM gateway node

Link1—consists of robust messages between the CWM gateway node and other WAN switches

TFTP—provides file transfers between nodes

SNMP—provides a communications path to monitor and control network devices, and to manage configurations, statistics collection, performance, and security

CWM only uses SNMP and TFTP to communicate with MGX 8220 nodes.

Ports Used by CWM

This section provides information about ports used by CWM for outgoing and incoming communications.

CWM to Node (Outgoing)

Table B-1 lists the outgoing ports CWM uses to communicate with the nodes.

Table B-1 Outgoing Ports Used by CWM 

Protocol
Port
Function

udp

161

SNMP get, set

udp

69

tftp server

tcp

23

telnet

tcp

13

daytime

udp

5120

link 0/1


Node to CWM (Incoming)

Table B-2 lists the incoming ports the nodes use to communicate with CWM.

Table B-2 Incoming Ports Used by CWM

Protocol
Port
Function

udp

162

SNMP Trap

udp

2500

rtm

udp

8161

snmpAgent

tcp

9999

HPOV Database daemon


Configuring Network Management

You have two options for configuring your network for network management. You can use in-band management or out-of-band management.

In-Band Management

When using in-band management, the network management traffic flows through the network you are managing. Switch software uses the proprietary IP Relay protocol to pass IP traffic over trunks in the WAN network for in-band management. To use in-band management, at least one node in the network that is to be managed by CWM must be connected by way of a LAN, to CWM. This node is called the Gateway node. All network management data from all other nodes in the network flows through the Gateway node to CWM. You can configure CWM to use in-band management using a basic hub attachment without a router or across routers.

In-Band Management Without Routers

Figure B-1 is an illustration of a typical network set up for in-band management without routers. The following configuration of workstation files is required to support in-band management of the network without routers.

Figure B-1 In-Band Management - Basic Hub Attachment Without Router


Note Use valid IP addresses for devices in your network and avoid using upper-case characters in the files. The addresses provided in the following examples should be replaced with your network's device addresses.



Step 1 Modify the /usr/users/svplus/config/network.conf file to include the name of the Gateway node in the third field to igx2, and change the last field (IP Reachability Flag) to nwip_off.

The options for the IP Reachability Flag are:

NWIP_OFF—for in-band management

NWIP_ON—for out-of-band management

The contents of the network.conf file should look similar to the following:

NETWORK:Network1
GATEWAYS:igx2	
DISCOVERY PROTOCOL:AUTOROUTE
IP REACHABILITY FLAG:NWIP_OFF

Step 2 Modify the /etc/hosts file to include (along with the file's usual contents) the IP addresses and device names described in Step 3.

Step 3

IP Address
Device Name

172.70.207.6

igx2-lan

192.0.0.6

igx2

192.0.0.7

igx3

192.0.0.8

bpx4

172.70.207.9

mgx1-lan

192.0.0.9

mgx1

172.70.207.10

mgx2-lan

192.0.0.10

mgx2


Modify the /etc/rc2.d/S72inetsvc file to add routes by adding a lines similar to the following:

/usr/sbin/route add net 192.0.0.0 172.70.207.6  1

Add this line after the line similar to the following:

/usr/sbin/route add -interface -netmask "240.0.0.0" "224.0.0.0" "$mcastif"

)&

Step 4 Verify your network structures by issuing "netstat -rn" and checking the results against the information contained in Table B-3.

Table B-3 Results of netstat -rn Command

Routing Table Destination
Gateway
Flags
Ref
Use
Interface

127.0.0.1

127.0.0.1

UH

0

6061

lo0

192.0.0.0

172.70.207.6

UG

0

461

172.70.207.0

172.70.207.5

U

3

1311

hme0

224.0.0.0

172.25.70.8

U

3

0

hme0


Table B-4 through Table B-7 provide node configuration information about the nodes shown in Figure B-1.

Table B-4 Node Configuration (IGX2) 

CLI Command
Data

cnfname

igx2

cnflan (IP address, subnet mask, default)

172.70.207.6

255.255.255.0

none

cnfnwip (IP address, subnet mask)

192.0.0.6

255.255.255.0

cnfstatmast

172.70.207.5

cnffwswinit

170.70.207.5

cnfswfunc

Configure/Save/Restore

cnffunc

Download/Remote/CWM

cnfsnmp

public, private, public


Table B-5 Node Configuration (MGX) 

CLI Command
Data

cnfname

mgx1

cnfifip (26 Ethernet, subnet mask, default)

172.70.207.9

255.255.255.0

none

cnfifip (37 ATM, subnet mask)

192.0.0.9

255.255.255.0

cnfstatmast

172.70.207.5

cnffwswinit

170.70.207.5


Table B-6 Node Configuration (IGX3) 

CLI Command
Data

cnfname

igx3

cnflan (IP address, subnet mask, default)

0.0.0.0

255.255.255.0

none

cnfnwip (IP address, subnet mask)

192.0.0.7

255.255.255.0

cnfstatmast

172.70.207.5

cnffwswinit

170.70.207.5

cnfswfunc

Configure/Save/Restore

cnffunc

Download/Remote/CWM

cnfsnmp

public, private, public


Table B-7 Node Configuration (MGX8220) 

CLI Command
Data

cnfname

mgx2

cnfifip (26 Ethernet, subnet mask, default)

172.70.207.10

255.255.255.0

none

cnfifip (37 ATM, subnet mask)

192.0.0.10

255.255.255.0

cnfstatmast

172.70.207.5

cnffwswinit

170.70.207.5


In-Band Management Across Routers

Figure B-2 is an illustration of a typical network set up for in-band management using routers. The following configuration of workstation files is required to support in-band management of the network using routers.

Figure B-2 In-Band Management Using an IP Relay Gateway


Note Use valid IP addresses for devices in your network and avoid using upper-case characters in the files. The addresses provided in the following examples should be replaced with your network's device addresses.



Step 1 Modify the /usr/users/svplus/config/network.conf file to include the name of the Gateway node in the third field to igx2, and change the last field (IP Reachability Flag) to nwip_off.

The options for the IP Reachability Flag are:

NWIP_OFF—for in-band management

NWIP_ON—for out-of-band management

The contents of the network.conf file should look similar to the following:

NETWORK:Network1
GATEWAYS:igx2	
DISCOVERY PROTOCOL:AUTOROUTE
IP REACHABILITY FLAG:NWIP_OFF

Step 2 Modify the /etc/hosts file to include the following (along with the usual contents of this file).

IP Address
Device Name

172.70.207.6

igx2-lan

192.0.0.6

igx2

192.0.0.7

igx3

192.0.0.8

bpx4

172.70.207.9

mgx1-lan

192.0.0.9

mgx1

172.70.207.10

mgx2-lan

192.0.0.10

mgx2


Step 3 Modify the /etc/defaultrouter file to include the following line:

172.70.106.1  1

Step 4 Modify the /etc/rc2.d/S72inetsvc file to add routes by including the following lines:

/usr/sbin/route add default 172.70.108.1  1

/usr/sbin/route add net 192.0.0.0 172.70.106.1  1

Add these lines after the line similar to the following:

/usr/sbin/route add -interface -netmask "240.0.0.0" "224.0.0.0" "$mcastif"

Step 5 Verify your network structures by entering netstat -rn and checking the results against Table B-8.

Table B-8 Results of netstat -rn Command 

Routing Table Destination
Gateway
Flags
Ref
Use
Interface

127.0.0.1

127.0.0.1

UH

0

6061

lo0

192.0.0.0

172.70.207.6

UG

0

461

 

172.70.207.0

172.70.207.5

U

3

1311

hme0

224.0.0.0

172.25.70.8

U

3

0

hme0

Default

172.70.106.1

       

Table B-9 through Table B-12 provide node configuration information about the nodes shown in Figure B-2.

Table B-9 Node Configuration (IGX2) 

CLI Command
Data

cnfname

igx2

cnflan (IP address, subnet mask, default)

172.70.207.6

255.255.255.0

172.70.207.1

cnfnwip (IP address, subnet mask)

192.0.0.6

255.255.255.0

cnfstatmast

172.70.207.5

cnffwswinit

170.70.207.5

cnfswfunc

Configure/Save/Restore


Table B-10 Node Configuration (MGX1) 

CLI Command
Data

cnfname

mgx1

ipifconfig (InPci Ethernet, subnet mask, default)

172.70.207.9

255.255.255.0

none

ipifconfig (atm0, subnet mask)

192.0.0.9

255.255.255.0

cnfstatmast

172.70.207.5

cnffwswinit

170.70.207.5


Table B-11 Node Configuration (IGX3) 

CLI Command
Data

cnfname

igx3

cnflan (IP address, subnet mask, default)

0.0.0.0

255.255.255.0

none

cnfnwip (IP address, subnet mask)

192.0.0.7

255.255.255.0

cnfstatmast

172.70.207.5

cnffwswinit

170.70.207.5

cnfswfunc

Configure/Save/Restore

cnffunc

Download/Remote/CWM

cnfsnmp

public, private, public


Table B-12 Node Configuration (MGX2) 

CLI Command
Data

cnfname

mgx2

ipifconfig (InPCI Ethernet, subnet mask, default)

172.70.207.10

255.255.255.0

none

ipifconfig (atm0, subnet mask)

192.0.0.10

255.255.255.0

cnfstatmast

172.70.207.5

cnffwswinit

170.70.207.5


Out-of-Band Management

With out-of-band management, the traffic flows directly from individual nodes to the Cisco CWM workstation without being routed through the Gateway node, as illustrated in Figure B-3. To configure Cisco CWM to use out-of-band management, the last field in the /usr/users/svplus/config/network.conf entry should be set to nwip_on and direct routes from Cisco CWM to all individual nodes should exist.

Figure B-3 Out-of-Band Management

CWM Out-of-Band Management for MGX8850 (PXM45/1E)

Release 11 of CWM always communicates with the Release 2 MGX 8850 nodes using the ATM in-band address. CWM uses the ATM in-band address for topology discovery, trap registration, configuration upload, as well as provisioning. In order to allow CWM to perform out-of-band communication with the switch via the switch's ethernet LAN interface, the static IP route should be configured (on the CWM station and on the router, if necessary) to forward IP traffic destined for an ATM in-band address to the node's ethernet LAN interface. Never configure the same IP address for both ethernet LAN and ATM interfaces.

Configuring a PXM1 Based MGX Switch Feeder Session

This section provides information on how to configure the MGX 8850 switch as a feeder. To set up an MGX 8850 feeder session, complete the following steps:


Step 1 Use the cnfname command to assign a name to the MGX 8850 node. The syntax for this command is: cnfname <node name>

> cnfname popeye3a

Step 2 Use the ipifconfig command to configure the internet address of the MGX 8850. The syntax for this command is: ipifconfig <interface> <IP address> <net mask> <broadcast address>

> ipifconfig InPci 172.29.37.78 255.255.255.000 0

> ipifconfig atm0 172.1.1.78 255.255.255.000 0

> cnfnwip 172.1.1.78

Step 3 Use the dspifip command to check LAN IP and NWIP

> dspifip

Interface        Flag  IP Address       Subnetmask       Broadcast Addr
---------------  ----  ---------------  ---------------  ---------------
 
Ethernet/lnPci0  UP    172.29.37.77     255.255.255.0    172.29.37.255
SLIP/sl0         DOWN  172.29.36.253    255.255.255.252  (N/A)
ATM/atm0         UP    192.9.200.1      255.255.255.128  0.0.0.0

Step 4 Use the addln command to configure a line. The syntax of this command is
addln -ds3 <line number> | -e3 <line number> | -sonet <line number>

> addln -sonet 7.1

Step 5 Use the upif command to add a logical interface to a broadband port on a PXM. The syntax for this command is upif <if_num> <lin_num> <pct_bw> <min_vpi> <max_vpi>

> upif 1 1 100 0 4095

Step 6 Use the addrscprtn command to specify the parameters for the resource partitions. The syntax for this command is addrscprtn <if_num> <ctrlr_num> <ingr_pct_bw> <egr_pct_bw> <min_vpi> <max_vpi> <min_vci> <max_vpi> <max_chans>

> addrscprtn 1 1 100 0 4095 0 65535 32767

Step 7 Use the cnfswfunc command to configure the node-level features of the MGX 8850 switch as a feeder node. The syntax of this command is: cnfswfunc [ <-vsvd enable(yes) | disable<no)> ] | [ <-ndtype> <fdr | routing>]

> cnfswfunc -ndtype fdr

Step 8 Use the cnfifastrk command to configure the interface as a feeder trunk. The syntax of this command is: cnfifastrk <slot.port><iftype>

> cnfifastrk 7.1 ftrk

Step 9 Telnet to the BPX® 8600 series switch. (This example assumes that the MGX 8850 trunk is connected to slot 9, line 1.)

> telnet xxxyyyzzz

Step 10 Use the uptrk command to bring up the trunk.

> uptrk 9.1

Step 11 Use the addshelf command tobring up the shelf.

> addshelf 9.1 x

Step 12 Use the dsptrks command to display the trunk status and verify that the trunk is clear.

> dsptrks

   TRK    Current Alarm Status       Other End

   7.1     Clear                        bpx4

Step 13 At the CWM workstation, enter the following to become the root user.

> su root <root password>

#

Step 14 Issue the route command to build the route between the 8850 feeder and the BPX.

# route add net 172.1.1.0 bpx_IP_address 1

Step 15 Issue a ping command to the MGX 8850 feeder.

# ping 172.1.1.78

If the ping command is successful, CWM can reach the MGX 8850 feeder node.


User Configurable Network IDs

A new feature in CWM 10.4 gives the user the ability to configure network IDs with a pre-defined network configuration that is specified in the file network.conf. In addition to the network name, gateway, and discovery protocol that are specified in this file, the user is able to specify the network ID for each network. The keyword for the network-ID parameter is NETWORK_ID.


Note The configurable network ID is only used in Autoroute and PNNI networks. For a standalone network ID, it will always be 32767.


The following is an example of a network configuration in the network.conf file:

NETWORK:network2
NETWORK_ID:1234
GATEWAYS:popeye2
DISCOVERY PROTOCOL:PNNI

Notes on the network-ID parameter include the following:

NETWORK must be the first parameter in defining the configuration for a network.

NETWORK_ID is optional. If NETWORK_ID is not specified in the network.conf file, one will be assigned automatically by CWM.

NETWORK_ID must be unique, numeric, and within the range of 1 to 32,000.

After NETWORK_ID is added, modified, or deleted, CWM needs to be cold started.

To make the CWM gateway work correctly, the same network.conf file must be used for the Primary and all Secondary CWM workstations.