User Guide for Cisco Unified Service Monitor 8.6
Administering the System and Managing Data
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Administering the System and Managing Data

Table Of Contents

Administering the System and Managing Data

Maintaining the Service Monitor Database

Configuring Low-Volume Schedule and Database Purging

Backing Up and Restoring the Database

Changing the Password for the Service Monitor Database

Understanding Sensor Archive File Purging

Managing Log Files

Understanding Cisco 1040 Sensor Syslog Handling

Maintaining the Cisco 1040 Sensor History Log File

Managing Log Files and Enabling and Disabling Debugging

Enabling E-Mail Notifications

Configuring an SMTP Server for E-Mail Notification

Configuring a Recipient for E-Mail Notification

Ensuring that E-Mail Is Not Blocked

Disabling the CWCS TFTP Service

Starting and Stopping Service Monitor Processes

Using SNMP to Monitor Service Monitor

Configuring Your System for SNMP Queries

Determining the Status of Windows SNMP Service

Installing and Uninstalling Windows SNMP Service

Enabling and Disabling Windows SNMP Service

Configuring Security for SNMP Queries

Viewing the System Application MIB Log File

Configuring the Service Monitor Server

Changing the Hostname on the Service Monitor Server

Changing the Hostname, Rebooting the Server, and Regenerating the Certificate

Reconfiguring Service Monitor After a Hostname Change

Changing the IP Address on the Service Monitor Server

Changing the Time on the Service Monitor Server

Finding the Build ID for an Installed Service Monitor


Administering the System and Managing Data


This section contains the following topics:

Maintaining the Service Monitor Database

Understanding Sensor Archive File Purging

Managing Log Files

Enabling E-Mail Notifications

Ensuring that E-Mail Is Not Blocked

Disabling the CWCS TFTP Service

Starting and Stopping Service Monitor Processes

Using SNMP to Monitor Service Monitor

Configuring the Service Monitor Server


Note For information about configuring security and users, see Installation Guide for Cisco Unified Service Monitor 8.6.


Maintaining the Service Monitor Database

Cisco Unified Service Monitor (Service Monitor) can receive, process, and store call metrics in its database from these sources:

The Cisco 1040s that are registered to it.

The Unified Communications Manager clusters that are configured to allow database access to Service Monitor or to send data to Service Monitor. For more information, see Unified Communications Manager Configuration, page B-1.

Service Monitor stores the data for up to a configurable number of days and runs a job daily to purge older data from the database. To see the number of days being retained in your Service Monitor database, see Configuring and Viewing Other Settings, page 3-34. To update the data purge schedule, see Configuring Low-Volume Schedule and Database Purging.

For more information, see the following topics:

Backing Up and Restoring the Database

Changing the Password for the Service Monitor Database

Configuring Low-Volume Schedule and Database Purging

During a low-volume schedule, Service Monitor handles roughly 20% of the number records that are processed during a peak period and performs database maintenance. Table 6-1 lists default schedules for low-volume processing and database purging and provides the information you need to update them.

.

Table 6-1 Service Monitor System Scheduling 

Activity
Daily Schedule
Notes and Configurable Properties

Database maintenance (low-volume schedule)

10PM through 6AM

(Default)

Service Monitor needs 8 hours of low-volume time during a day and midnight to 1AM must always be scheduled as low-volume time. To change the schedule, on the Service Monitor server, change the values of these properties in the NMSROOT\qovr\qovrconfig.properties file:

lowcallvolume-Mon=0-6,22-24
lowcallvolume-Tue=0-6,22-24
lowcallvolume-Wed=0-6,22-24
lowcallvolume-Thu=0-6,22-24
lowcallvolume-Fri=0-6,22-24
lowcallvolume-Sat=0-20,22-24
lowcallvolume-Sun=0-20,22-24

Note NMSROOT is the location where Service Monitor is installed. If you used the default location, it is C:\Program Files\CSCOpx.

You can configure more than one low-volume period as long as:

Midnight to 1AM is low-volume time.

The total amount of low-volume time during a day adds up to at least 8 hours.

Here are some examples:

lowcallvolume-Mon=0-1,4-6,7-8,17-18,19-23
lowcallvolume-Tue=0-6,21-22,23-24

To put changes into effect after you edit qovrconfig.properties, you must stop and start the QOVR process. While logged in to the server where Service Monitor is installed, from the command line, enter these commands:

pdterm QOVR
pdexec QOVR

Data purging

2AM through 6AM

(Default)

Service Monitor needs 4 hours data purge time. Data purging must occur during the low-volume schedule and must not run from midnight to 1AM. To change the schedule on the Service Monitor server, change the values of these properties in the NMSROOT\qovr\qovrconfig.properties file:

datapurge-Mon=2-6; 
datapurge-Tue=2-6;
datapurge-Wed=2-6;
datapurge-Thu=2-6;
datapurge-Fri=2-6;
datapurge-Sat=2-6;
datapurge-Sun=2-6;

Data purge need not run continuously for 4 hours. You can configure more than one data purge period as long as:

The total time adds up to 4 hours.

Data purging occurs during low-volume schedule.

No data purging occurs from midnight through 1AM.

Here are some examples:

datapurge-Mon=2-5;22-23;
datapurge-Tue=2-3;4-6;23-24

To put changes into effect after you edit qovrconfig.properties, you must stop and start the QOVR process. While logged in to the server where Service Monitor is installed, from the command line, enter these commands:

pdterm QOVR
pdexec QOVR

Important system operations

Midnight through 1 AM

(Cannot be changed)

During this time, do not perform data purging.



Note There are additional configurable properties in the qovrconfig.properties file. To view default values, see Configuring and Viewing Other Settings, page 3-34. For information on other settings, see Configuring Diagnostic Report Search and CSV Export Limit Settings, page 3-36.


Backing Up and Restoring the Database

If Service Monitor is installed on a server with Operations Manager, use the backup and restore procedures that are provided in Operations Manager documentation.

When Service Monitor is installed alone, 25 GB is preallocated to the database. If you use Common Services backup procedures, a time out occurs before the backup completes. Instead, use these procedures:

Database Backup

Database Restore

Database Backup


Note You will stop all Service Monitor processes during this procedure.



Step 1 Log in to the system where Service Monitor is installed.

Step 2 Stop the daemon manager using the following command:

net stop crmdmgtd

Step 3 From NMSROOT\databases\qovr, copy these files—qovr.db and qovrx.log— to a tape, an external drive, or a network directory (not a local directory). Doing so ensures data integrity in case of hardware failure and ensures that backup data does not exhaust local disk space.

Step 4 Restart the daemon manager using the following command:

net start crmdmgtd



Note To save copies of sensor archive files, see Understanding Sensor Archive File Purging.


Database Restore

You will stop all Service Monitor processes during this procedure.


Step 1 Log in to the system where Service Monitor is installed.

Step 2 Stop the daemon manager using the following command:

net stop crmdmgtd

Step 3 From the NMSROOT\databases\qovr directory, do one of the following:

To keep a copy of the current database, move these files—qovr.db and qovrx.log—to a location outside of NMSROOT. (We recommend a tape, an external drive, or a network drive to ensure data integrity in case of hardware failure, and to prevent running out of space on the local drive.)

Delete qovr.db and qovr.log.

Step 4 Copy the database files—qovr.db and qovrx.log—from the tape, external drive, or network drive where they are stored to NMSROOT\databases\qovr.

Step 5 Restart the daemon manager using the following command:

net start crmdmgtd



Note When you restore the database, logging settings return to the default value. As a result, only error messages are written to the log files. If you need additional information written to your log files to debug a problem, reset your logging settings. See Managing Log Files and Enabling and Disabling Debugging.


Changing the Password for the Service Monitor Database

A command line script is available to change database passwords, including the password for the Service Monitor database, qovr.db. Instructions are available in the Common Services online help.


Note The Common Services online help is only available through the Common Services pages, which are located in the Administration tab.

To access the Common Services online help, you can use the following procedure:

1. Select Administration > Server Administration (Common Services) > Security. The Setting up Security page appears.

2. Click Help. The online help opens.



Step 1 Open the Common Services online help.

Step 2 Select Index.

Step 3 In the search field that appears, enter database password.


Understanding Sensor Archive File Purging

Optionally, Service Monitor archives sensor call metrics data to files in a directory on the server. To enable and disable archiving, see Setting Up the Cisco 1040 Sensor Default Configuration, page 4-3.

When archiving is enabled, by default, Service Monitor does the following:

Creates a new data file daily at midnight.

Creates a new data file whenever the current data file size exceeds 3 MB. When a file reaches this limit, Service Monitor does the following:

Backs it up—Appends .n to the filetype; for example, .csv.1, .csv.2, and so on up to the limit of 50 per day.

Creates a new data file—Retains the original filetype: (.csv).

Retains the data files for 30 days before deleting them. If you want to retain the data files for a longer period, you can back up the Service Monitor data files using the same method you use to back up your file system.

Managing Log Files

This section includes the following topics:

Understanding Cisco 1040 Sensor Syslog Handling

Maintaining the Cisco 1040 Sensor History Log File

Managing Log Files and Enabling and Disabling Debugging

Understanding Cisco 1040 Sensor Syslog Handling

Service Monitor receives and processes syslog messages from Cisco 1040s. After processing syslog messages, Service Monitor writes them to the syslog file, syslog.log, in NMSROOT\log\qovr.

Maintaining the Cisco 1040 Sensor History Log File

The history log file, ServiceMonitorHistory.log, contains records of Cisco 1040 events such as Cisco 1040 reset, configuration update, and errors. The history log file accumulates records and grows in size. If the file becomes too large, you should rename it to enable Service Monitor to start a fresh history log file.


Note Service Monitor does not back up the history log file. If you want to back it up, use the same method you use to back up your file system.


Managing Log Files and Enabling and Disabling Debugging


Note Do not click the Debug All button unless you have been instructed by Cisco to do so.


This information is provided for troubleshooting purposes. Service Monitor log files are located in the NMSROOT\log\qovr directory.


Note NMSROOT is the folder where Service Monitor is installed on the server. If you selected the default directory during installation, it is C:\Program Files\CSCOpx.


Use this procedure to increase or decrease the type—and quantity—of messages written to log files.


Step 1 Select Administration > System Settings > Logging. The Logging: Level Configuration page appears.

Step 2 For each Service Monitor functional module, the Error check box is always selected; you cannot deselect it.


Note You cannot disable logging. Service Monitor always writes error and fatal messages to application log files.


Set the appropriate logging level as described in the following table.

Logging Level Action
Procedure

Change the logging level for individual modules

a. For each module that you want to change, select one (or deselect all) of the following logging levels:

Warning—Log error messages and warning messages

Informational—Log error, warning, and informational messages

Debug—Log error, warning, informational, and debug message


Note Deselecting all check boxes for a module returns it to Error, the default logging level.


b. Review your changes. To cancel your changes, click the Cancel button. Otherwise, click the Apply button. Clicking the Apply button starts immediately resetting the changed logging levels for the Service Monitor functional modules.

Set all modules to Error, which is the default

a. Click the Default button. A confirmation page is displayed.

b. Click OK. Service Monitor immediately starts setting logging levels to Error.

Set all modules to Debug

Click the Debug All button. Service Monitor immediately starts setting logging levels to Debug.

Note Remember to set logging back to default levels when you are done debugging.



Enabling E-Mail Notifications

To enable Service Monitor to send e-mail notification, you must configure an SMTP server and a user to receive the e-mail:

Configuring an SMTP Server for E-Mail Notification

Configuring a Recipient for E-Mail Notification

Service Monitor can send e-mail notifications in these circumstances:

Service Monitor initiates a server process restart in response to a problem. Service Monitor can send e-mail to notify you that the restart occurred and to list potential causes.

(Service Monitor does not send e-mail for user-initiated server process restarts. Service Monitor does not notify you after you do any of the following:

Stop and start the daemon manager.

Stop and start the qovr process.

Reboot your computer.)

Data credential verification fails during Service Monitor server process startup.

Each time that the Service Monitor server process starts up—whether due to a user-initiated restart or a Service Monitor-initiated restart—Service Monitor performs credential verification. If credential verification fails during startup, Service Monitor can send e-mail to notify you of the failure and to list the IP addresses for the data sources that have lost contact with Service Monitor.


Note Service Monitor sends this notification only during server process startup.


Configuring an SMTP Server for E-Mail Notification


Note If an SMTP server is not already configured, Service Monitor displays a message on the Data Source Credential page.


To configure the SMTP server for Service Monitor to use, do the following:

1. Select Administration > Configuration > Export Settings.

2. Enter an SMTP server in the SMTP Server field. (To configure a recipient for notifications, enter an e-mail address in the E-mail to field.)

Configuring a Recipient for E-Mail Notification

If you do not configure a recipient using this procedure, Service Monitor sends e-mail notification to the address in the E-Mail to field on the Export Settings page. If the E-Mail to field on the Export Settings page is blank and you do not configure a a recipient using this procedure, Service Monitor does not send notifications.


Step 1 Log in to the Service Monitor server as a Windows administrator.

Step 2 Go to the NMSROOT\qovr directory; for example:

C:\Program Files\CSCOpx\qovr

Note NMSROOT is the directory where you installed Service Monitor; its default location is C:\Program Files\CSCOpx.


Step 3 Edit the qovrconfig.properties file.

Step 4 Enter a value for SMDBMonitor_Email; for example:

SMDBMonitor_Email=johnsmith@xyz.com


Ensuring that E-Mail Is Not Blocked

If you have an antivirus application on the default SMTP server, verify that a port-blocking rule does not stop notification e-mail from being sent. Some antivirus applications use port-blocking to block mass-mailing worms. Delete the port-blocking rule if necessary. Service Monitor uses port 25 for SMTP.

Disabling the CWCS TFTP Service

The CWCS TFTP service runs on the Service Monitor server and can be used from remote hosts to read files on the Service Monitor server. Because Service Monitor does not use the CWCS TFTP service, we recommend that you disable it.


Step 1 As an Administrator, log into the Windows server where Service Monitor is installed.

Step 2 Open the Services window.

Step 3 Locate the entry CWCS tftp service, right-click it, and select Properties.

Step 4 In the Properties window:

a. Set the Startup type to Disabled.

b. Click the Stop button.

c. After the service stops, click OK.


Starting and Stopping Service Monitor Processes


Step 1 Select Administration > Server Administration (Common Services) > Administration > Process Management. The Process Management page appears.

Step 2 Select the check box next to the service that you want to start or stop.

Step 3 Click either Start or Stop.

Table 6-2 provides a complete list of Service Monitor-related processes.


Table 6-2 Service Monitor-Related Processes 

Name
Description
Dependency

QOVR

Service Monitor server

QOVRDbMonitor

Service Monitor database monitor

QOVRDbEngine

QOVRDbEngine

Service Monitor database

QOVRMultiProcLogger

Service Monitor process logging

SSHD

Service Monitor SFTP server


Table 6-3 provides a partial list of Common Services processes—as displayed in Windows Services—that run on the Service Monitor server.

Table 6-3 Common Services-Related Processes 

Process Name When Service Monitor and Operations Manager Are Installed Together
Equivalent Process Name When Service Monitor Is Installed Alone

CW2000 Daemon Manager

Service Monitor Daemon Manager

CW2000 Tomcat Servlet Engine

Service Monitor Tomcat Servlet Engine

CW2000 VisiBroker Smart Agent

Service Monitor VisiBroker Smart Agent

CW2000 Web Server

Service Monitor Web Server


Using SNMP to Monitor Service Monitor

Service Monitor supports the system application MIB. This support enables you to monitor Service Monitor using a third-party SNMP management tool, so that you can:

Consistently monitor multiple platforms—One platform on which Service Monitor resides and one or more on which applications in the Cisco Unified Management Suite reside.

Assess the application health using the system application MIB, which provides the following information:

Applications that Service Monitor installed.

Processes associated with applications and current process status.

Processes that ran previously and application exit state.

For MIB implementation details and sample MIB walk, see Appendix E, "Service Monitor Support for SNMP MIBs."


Note You cannot uninstall the MIB support; however, you can stop Windows SNMP service and set the startup type to either Manual or Disabled. See Enabling and Disabling Windows SNMP Service.


Configuring Your System for SNMP Queries

To enable SNMP queries, SNMP service must be installed and enabled.


Step 1 Verify that SNMP service is installed and enabled on the server where Service Monitor is installed. See Determining the Status of Windows SNMP Service.

Step 2 If you determined that SNMP service was not installed, install Windows SNMP Service; see Installing and Uninstalling Windows SNMP Service.


Determining the Status of Windows SNMP Service

Windows SNMP service is a Windows component that you can add or remove when you want to. To enable SNMP queries against the MIB that Service Monitor supports, SNMP service must be installed and enabled. You can verify the status of Windows SNMP service as follows.


Step 1 Open the Windows administrative tool Services window.

Step 2 Verify the following:

SNMP Service is displayed on the Windows administrative tool Services window; if so, Windows SNMP service is installed.


Note To install Windows SNMP service, see Installing and Uninstalling Windows SNMP Service.


SNMP Service startup type is Automatic or Manual; if so, Windows SNMP service is enabled.


Note To enable Windows SNMP service, see Enabling and Disabling Windows SNMP Service.



Installing and Uninstalling Windows SNMP Service

Windows online help provides instructions for adding and removing Windows components, such as Windows SNMP service. To locate the instructions, try selecting the Index tab in Windows online help and entering a keyword or phrase, such as installing SNMP service.

To uninstall Windows SNMP service, follow instructions in Windows help for removing Windows components.

Enabling and Disabling Windows SNMP Service

You can enable or disable Windows SNMP service using the Windows administrative tool Services. For instructions to open the Services window, see Windows online help.


Step 1 Locate SNMP Service in the Services window. The status and startup type are displayed.


Note If SNMP Service is not displayed, Windows SNMP service is not installed; see Installing and Uninstalling Windows SNMP Service.


Step 2 Right-click SNMP Service and select Properties. The SNMP Service Properties window opens:

To disable SNMP service, set Startup Type to Disable and click OK.

To enable SNMP service, set Startup Type to Automatic or Manual and click OK.


Note To start SNMP service after you enable it, right-click SNMP Service and select Start.



Configuring Security for SNMP Queries

To improve security, the SNMP set operation is not allowed on any object ID (OID). You should also modify the credentials for SNMP service to not use a default or well-known community string.


Note You do not need to restart SNMP service to modify credentials for it.


You can modify SNMP service credentials using the Windows administrative tool Services.


Step 1 Locate SNMP Service in the Services window

Step 2 Right-click SNMP Service and select Properties. The SNMP Service Properties window opens.

Step 3 Select the Security tab.

Step 4 Edit the accepted community names and click OK.


Viewing the System Application MIB Log File

The system application MIB log file, SysAppl.log, is located on the server where Service Monitor is installed in NMSROOT\log.


Note NMSROOT is the directory where Service Monitor is installed on your system. If you selected the default directory during installation, it is C:\Program Files\CSCOpx.


Configuring the Service Monitor Server

This topic includes the following:

Changing the Hostname on the Service Monitor Server

Changing the IP Address on the Service Monitor Server

Changing the Time on the Service Monitor Server

Changing the Hostname on the Service Monitor Server

To change the hostname for the Service Monitor server, you must update several files, reboot the server, and regenerate the self-signed security certificate. Afterward, you must update the configuration on Service Monitor.

Changing the Hostname, Rebooting the Server, and Regenerating the Certificate


Note You will reboot the server twice during this procedure. You will also stop the daemon manager to perform some steps.



Step 1 Change the hostname on the server as follows:

a. Stop the daemon manager by entering the following command:

net stop crmdmgtd

b. Change the hostname at My Computer > Properties > Computer Name > Change.

c. Prevent the daemon manager service from restarting after reboot. From Control Panel, or from Start, open Services and change the startup mode to Manual for the CW2000 Daemon Manager service.

d. Reboot the server.

Step 2 Change the hostname in the md.properties file (NMSROOT\lib\classpath\md.properties).


Note NMSROOT is the directory where you installed Service Monitor; its default location is C:\Program Files\CSCOpx.


Step 3 Change the hostname in the following registry entries:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Cisco\Resource Manager


Note Look for all the instances of the old hostname under these registry entries, and replace them with the new hostname.


Step 4 Change the hostname in these files:

regdaemon.xml (NMSROOT\MDC\etc\regdaemon.xml):

Note the old hostname. You will need it to complete Step 5.

Enter the new hostname in uppercase letters.

web.xml (NMSROOT\MDC\tomcat\webapps\classic\WEB-INF\web.xml).

Step 5 Create a file, NMSROOT\conf\cmic\changehostname.info, containing the old hostname and new hostname in uppercase letters in the following format:

OLDHOSTNAME:NEWHOSTNAME



Note Hostnames in this file are case-sensitive; they must be entered in uppercase letters; the new hostname must exactly match the hostname entered in regdaemon.xml.


Step 6 If Service Monitor alone is installed on the server, skip to Step 7. If Service Monitor is installed on the same server with Operations Manager, change all occurrences of the old hostname in the following files:

NMSROOT\objects\vhmsmarts\local\conf\runcmd_env.sh

NMSROOT\conf\dfm\Broker.info

Step 7 If you do not know the password for the cmf database, reset the password as follows:

a. Open a Command Prompt and go to NMSROOT\bin.

b. Enter the following command:

perl dbpasswd.pl dsn=cmf npwd=newpassword

where newpassword is the new password.


Note Remember this password. You will need it to complete Step 8.


Step 8 To ensure that devices added before you changed the hostname are properly classified in Device Center, enter the following command:

dbisqlc -c "uid=cmfDBA;pwd=dbpassword;eng=cmfEng;dsn=cmf;dbf=NMSROOT\databases\cmf\cmf.db" 
-q update PIDM_app_device_map SET app_hostname=`NewhostName' where 
app_hostname=`OldhostName'

where:

dbpassword is the Common Services database password.

NMSROOT is the directory where you installed Service Monitor.

NewhostName is the new hostname.

OldhostName is the old hostname.

Step 9 From the Control Panel, or from Start, open Services and change the startup mode to Automatic for the CW2000 Daemon Manager service.

Step 10 Reboot the server.

Step 11 Replace the old hostname with the new hostname in the self-signed security certificate and regenerate it by selecting Administration > Server Administration (Common Services) > Security > Certificate Setup.

Step 12 Reconfigure Service Monitor. See Reconfiguring Service Monitor After a Hostname Change.


Reconfiguring Service Monitor After a Hostname Change

You must complete this procedure after you complete the procedure Changing the Hostname, Rebooting the Server, and Regenerating the Certificate.


Step 1 If Service Monitor is configured to send traps to Operations Manager:

If Operations Manager is installed on the same server as Service Monitor, set up Service Monitor to send traps to the new hostname or IP address. See Setting Up the Cisco 1040 Sensor Default Configuration, page 4-3.

If Operations Manager is installed on another server, on Operations Manager, delete the Service Monitor and add it again. For more information, see Operations Manager online help.

Step 2 If you have Cisco 1040 sensors in your system, complete these steps:

a. Change the IP address or hostname in each of the following configuration files:

The default configuration file—See Setting Up the Cisco 1040 Sensor Default Configuration, page 4-3.

The specific configuration file for each Cisco 1040 managed by the Service Monitor—See Editing the Configuration for a Cisco 1040, page 4-9.

b. Reset the Cisco 1040s. See Resetting Cisco 1040s, page 4-10.

Step 3 If Service Monitor is monitoring a Unified Communications Manager version 6.x or later, update the IP address for Service Monitor configured as an Application Billing Server. For more information, see Adding Service Monitor to Unified Communications Manager 6.x and Later as a Billing Server, page B-4. (For Unified Communications Manager software versions that Service Monitor supports, see Supported Data Source Software Versions, page 3-7.)


Changing the IP Address on the Service Monitor Server


Step 1 Stop the daemon manager by entering the following command:

net stop crmdmgtd

Step 2 Change the IP address of the Service Monitor server.

Step 3 Allow 15 minutes to elapse from the time you completed step 1, then restart the daemon manager by entering the following command:

net start crmdmgtd

Step 4 Reconfigure Service Monitor. See Reconfiguring Service Monitor After a Hostname Change.


Changing the Time on the Service Monitor Server

After you change the time on the server where Service Monitor is installed, stop and start the daemon manager. From the command line, issue the following commands:

net stop crmdmgtd
net start crmdmgtd

Note Service Monitor sends the time to Cisco 1040s hourly; Cisco 1040s then update their clocks as needed. To synchronize Cisco 1040s immediately after changing the time on the Service Monitor server, reset the Cisco 1040s. See Resetting Cisco 1040s, page 4-10.


Finding the Build ID for an Installed Service Monitor

Occasionally for troubleshooting purposes, you might need to know which Service Monitor build is installed. You can find the build ID as follows:

1. Select Administration > Software Center (Common Services) > Software Update. A new window opens.

2. Click the appropriate link (Cisco Unified Service Monitor n.n where n.n is the software release version) under Products Installed. A new window opens.

3. See the value labeled "Build Id" at the top of the page; for example, Build Id: NT_SM2_2_20090925_1028.


Note NT_SM2_2_20090925_1028 is an example that illustrates the build ID format.