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Cisco Transport Manager ML Provisioning Methodology, 9.0

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Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 ML Provisioning Methodology

Table Of Contents

Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 ML Provisioning Methodology

Introduction

SNMPv1 and SNMPv2 Trap Destination Setup

SNMPv3 Configuration

Overview

CLI Configuration Details

Base Card Configuration

RPR Base Card Configuration

Point-to-Point Base Card Configuration

Packet over SONET, Ethernet, and Shared Packet Ring Port Provisioning

Enable

Disable

MTU Provisioning

Speed Provisioning

Duplex Provisioning

Flow Control (Send) Provisioning

Enable (No Shut)

Disable (Shutdown)

MTU Provisioning

Port Channel Provisioning

Creating or Modifying a Port Channel

Deleting a Port Channel

Creating or Modifying a Port Channel Member

Deleting a Port Channel Member

IEEE 802.17 RPR Base Card Configuration

Protection Support on ML-Series Cards

Wrap Status

Steering Status

Creating Service Connections

Using the Quality of Service Policy Template

1. Class Map Configuration

Configuring CIR/PIR Class Map

Configuring Best-Effort Class Map

Configuring Advanced Class Map

2. QoS Profile Configuration

CIR/PIR QoS Profile

Best-Effort QoS Profile

Advanced QoS Profile

Bandwidth Data Service Provisioning

3. Interface Configuration

Adding UNI QinQ Access

Removing UNI QinQ Access

Adding UNI dot1Q Access

Removing UNI dot1Q Access

Adding UNI Untagged Access

Adding NNI dot1Q Access

Removing NNI dot1Q Access

IP Service-Level Agreement on ML-Series Cards

1. Create a Managed VLAN

2. Create an IP SLA Session

3. Manage the IP SLA Session

Enabling or Disabling Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol

Enabling or Disabling Cisco Discovery Protocol

Creating a Layer 2 Service

Modifying Layer 2 Service Drops

Modifying Drops

ML Management Troubleshooting

ML Version Up

Enable L2 Service Command Enhancement

Related Documentation

Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request


Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 ML Provisioning Methodology


May 26, 2010

This document describes the methodology that Cisco Transport Manager (CTM) Release 9.0 uses to provision ML-series cards.

This document contains the following sections:

Introduction

SNMPv1 and SNMPv2 Trap Destination Setup

SNMPv3 Configuration

Overview

CLI Configuration Details

Base Card Configuration

Packet over SONET, Ethernet, and Shared Packet Ring Port Provisioning

Port Channel Provisioning

IEEE 802.17 RPR Base Card Configuration

Protection Support on ML-Series Cards

Wrap Status

Steering Status

Creating Service Connections

Using the Quality of Service Policy Template

IP Service-Level Agreement on ML-Series Cards

Enabling or Disabling Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol

Enabling or Disabling Cisco Discovery Protocol

ML Management Troubleshooting

ML Version Up

Enable L2 Service Command Enhancement

Related Documentation

Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request

Introduction

CTM is an advanced management system that provides functionality at the element and network management levels for Cisco network elements (NEs), routers, and switches. CTM supports fault, configuration, performance, and security management functional areas. CTM also serves as a foundation for integration into a larger overall operations support system (OSS) environment by providing northbound gateway interfaces to higher-layer management systems.

CTM supports data service provisioning over ML-series cards. Data service provisioning consists of provisioning the Layer 2 topology using optical circuits, and then provisioning the Layer 2 service on top of the Layer 2 topology.

Alarm notification and performance monitoring features on data cards (ML-series cards) are SNMP-based. To allow CTM to support alarm and event notification and performance monitoring on data cards, the SNMP trap forwarding mechanism must be set up on each node of the data card.

This document provides the set of Cisco IOS commands issued by CTM during Layer 2 topology and Layer 2 service provisioning, including provisioning of interface ports for ML data cards. The syntax used for the commands must be respected for services provisioned directly using Cisco IOS so that CTM recognizes the provisioned services.

SNMPv1 and SNMPv2 Trap Destination Setup

For the cards to have full CTM support, the SNMP trap destination must be set up for each node where there is a data card inserted:

The NE containing the ML-series card must have a valid SNMP community string. If the SNMP community string is not valid, a resynchronization failure occurs and is logged in the Audit Log.

The Cisco IOS startup-config file must contain the snmp-server enable traps command to receive traps from ML-series cards. See Overview for more information.

You must force resynchronization on the NE by marking it as Out of Service (OOS), and then back In Service (IS) when you change the trap destination in either Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) or CTM. This operation forces the registration of ML-series cards for traps.

You must set up the trap destination based on the SNMP version (SNMPv1 or SNMPv2) and the gateway NE/end NE (GNE/ENE) configuration of the node. Set the trap destination in the NE Explorer window (see Figure 1).

Figure 1 NE Explorer—SNMPv1 and SNMPv2 Trap Destination Setup

The following table lists the possible SNMP configurations.

Table 1 SNMP Configurations 

Node Setup
Allow SNMP Set
Use Generic MIB
Allow SNMP Proxy
IP Address
Community Name
UDP Port
Trap Version
Relay A IP Address
SNMPv1—NE R7.0 and later

GNE

Enable

Enable

Enable

CTM server IP address

Public

162

SNMPv1

ENE (with relay)

Enable

Enable

Enable

CTM server IP address

Public

162

SNMPv1

Active GNE's IP address

ENE (without relay)

Enable

Enable

Enable

GNE IP address

Public

391

SNMPv1

SNMPv2—NE R7.0 and later

GNE

Enable

Enable

Enable

CTM server IP address

Public

162

SNMPv2

ENE (with relay)

Enable

Enable

Enable

CTM server IP address

Public

162

SNMPv2

Active GNE's IP address

ENE (without relay)

Enable

Enable

Enable

GNE IP address

Public

391

SNMPv2

SNMPv1—NE releases earlier than R7.0

GNE

Enable

Enable

Enable

CTM server IP address

Public

162

SNMPv1

ENE (with relay)

Enable

Enable

Enable

CTM server IP address

Public

162

SNMPv1

Active GNE's IP address

ENE (without relay)

Enable

Enable

Enable

GNE IP address

Public

391

SNMPv1

SNMPv2—NE releases earlier than R7.0

GNE

Enable

Enable

Enable

CTM server IP address

Public

162

SNMPv2

ENE (with relay)

Enable

Enable

Enable

CTM server IP address

Public

162

SNMPv2

Active GNE's IP address

ENE (without relay)

Not supported.


When setting up an SNMPv1 or SNMPv2 trap destination:

1. Delete the GNE and ENE's SNMP trap destinations before performing GNE-ENE role changes. After a GNE-ENE role switch is complete, add the new SNMP trap destinations according to the new GNE-ENE roles.

2. If the ENE does not contain the GNE's SNMP community string, mark the ENE as Out of Service and then In Service.

3. Do not use an ONS 15600 as the GNE and an ONS 15454 as the ENE.

4. The GNE-ENE SNMP community string must be Public.

SNMPv3 Configuration

CTM R9.0 introduces support for SNMPv3 on CTC-based release 9.0 NEs. (SNMPv3 is not supported on ONS 15305, ONS 15305 CTC, or ONS 15327 NEs.)

As is the case for SNMPv1 and SNMPv2, to support SNMPv3, NEs with ML-series cards must have a valid SNMP configuration to guarantee correct initialization and management of Layer 2 parameters. If the SNMP configuration is invalid, the Audit Log records a resynchronization failure.

Configuring SNMPv3 is more complex than configuring SNMPv1 or SNMPv2, because the following tables must be filled in:

SNMPv3 NE User table—The SNMP users for each NE.

SNMPv3 User Group table—The grouping of NE SNMP users.

SNMPv3 Group View table—A view for any SNMPv3 user grouping.

SNMPv3 NE Trap Destination table—The SNMP trap configuration.

SNMPv3 NE Notification Filter table—The SNMP trap filtering, if needed.

SNMPv3 NE Proxy Forwarder table—The GNE/ENE GET/SET forwarding configuration.

SNMPv3 NE Proxy Trap Forwarder table—The GNE/ENE trap forwarding configuration.

For details about configuring SNMPv3, see the section "Managing SNMPv3—CTC-Based Release 9.0 NEs" in Chapter 8, "Managing Security" in the Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 User Guide.

Overview

A Layer 2 topology can be a point-to-point optical circuit; Resilient Packet Ring (RPR) or an IEEE802.17 RPR consisting of a chain of optical circuits; or hub and spoke, consisting of multiple optical circuits connected in a hub-and-spoke fashion. Hub-and-spoke topologies are supported as multiple point-to-point topologies.

For a point-to-point topology, the following card combinations are supported:

ML-1000-2/ML-100T-12/ ML-100T-8/ML-100-FX to ML-1000-2/ML-100T-12/ML-100T-8/ML-100-FX card

ML-1000-2/ML-100T-12/ ML-100T-8/ML-100-FX to CE-100T-8/CE-1000-4/CE-MR-6/CE-MR-10 card

ML-1000-2/ ML-100T-12/ML-100T-8/ML-100-FX to OC-N/STM-N/MRC/CTX card

ML-1000-2/ML-100T-12/ML-100T-8/ML-100-FX to G-series card

ML-1000-2/ML-100T-12/ML-100T-8/ML-100-FX to E-series card with LEX encapsulation (ONS 15327 NEs only)

When deployed as hub and spoke, the ML-series card can be placed at the spoke locations, with the G-series card providing an extension of the traffic to a Cisco 7600, which forms the hub of the architecture. This arrangement provides a cost-effective way to interface to the Cisco 7600. Alternatively, the ML-series card can be deployed at both the hub and the spoke sites.

When deployed as an RPR or DOT17RPR, all sites contain ML-series cards (ML-1000-2, ML-100T-12, or ML-100T-8). A minimum of two ML-series cards is required to configure an RPR.

You use CTM to provision ML-series cards by opening a Telnet session to each card. Before doing this, provision each ML-series card and create a password configuration that allows you to use CTM to log in. For this purpose, a barebone file is provided on the CTM server disk (Disk 1).

A different file is provided for the following cards:

ONS 15310 ML (bareboneCLI_Generic.txt)

ONS 15454 ML base microcode (barebone15454CLI_Security.txt)

ONS 15454 ML enhanced microcode (barebone15454CLI_Enhanced_Security.txt)


NoteIf you want to create a new topology or add a new ML card to an existing RPR topology, you must first download a new barebone file to the ML card, thereby reinitializing the card.

You can download a barebone file to multiple ML cards. For details, see the section "Initializing ML-Series Cards" in Chapter 7, "Provisioning Services and Connections" in the Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 User Guide.



Caution Do not remove any of the information from the barebone file provided by CTM. You can customize the username and password, but do not remove them; the username cannot be blank. Do not add the enable password < password > command, because CTM cannot interactively enable a password.

Reset the ML-series card after loading the barebone file and wait for 5 minutes before provisioning topologies and services. The login and password are reported in the Control Panel window. You can create other profiles on ML-series cards by using the IOS Users table (available under Administration > CTC-Based NEs > IOS Users Table).

After entering command-line interface (CLI) commands through the Telnet session, CTM issues a write or copy run start command to write the Cisco IOS configuration file to the Timing, Communications and Control (TCC) flash. When the Cisco IOS configuration file is written to the TCC flash (by CTM or by another user), CTM is notified. To verify that CTM has been notified, enter the write command after any CLI change.

CTM provides a GUI wizard to facilitate provisioning of L2 topologies and related L1 circuits. See the section "Provisioning Data Services" in Chapter 7, "Provisioning Services and Connections" in the Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 User Guide. Create an RPR or point-to-point topology involving some of the ML-series cards in the network. Based on the L2 topology circuit type and size that you specify, CTM creates related L1 circuits and installs a base card configuration on each ML-series card in the RPR ring.

The Create Layer 2 Service wizard guides you through the VLAN creation. There is no CLI to create a circuit VLAN. An RPR supports from 1 to 4095 VLANs, and these VLANs are enabled at all times. All that is required is to configure the endpoint to connect a ring VLAN to a port VLAN that is either an Ethernet port or a port channel. Only ML devices are supported on an RPR.

Point-to-point topologies are supported for ML-ML, ML-G1000, ML-OC, and ML-CE cards. Point-to-point topology creation is similar to RPR creation in that based on the L2 topology circuit type and size that you specify, CTM creates related L1 circuits and installs a base card configuration on each ML-series card in the point-to-point topology.

CLI Configuration Details

Note the following CLI conventions:

Notes are reported within brackets ( [ ] ). For example:

[notes]

Optional commands or parameters are reported within brackets ( [ ] ). For example:

[match any]

Configurable parameters are reported within left and right angle brackets (< >). For example:

<parameter>

Multiple parameters or commands are enclosed within braces ( { } ) and separated by a vertical bar ( | ). For example:

{parameter_1 | parameter_2 | parameter_3}

Base Card Configuration

The base card configuration is a set of commands entered during the L2 topology creation. The parameters are defined in the Create Layer 2 Topology wizard > Layer 2 Topology Bandwidth pane (see Figure 2).


Note CTM supports the setting of a single match cos command for each class-map command. If another match cos command is present on the card, CTM recognizes this additional match cos command incorrectly and displays a null string in the GUI. This additional match cos command must be removed during a modify bandwidth operation.


Figure 2 Create Layer 2 Topology Wizard

RPR Base Card Configuration

To create an RPR topology, you must apply the base card configuration to all ML-series cards in the RPR. The ring is not functional and is reported as L2 Not Ready until the base card configuration is applied to all cards. You can select an L2 Not Ready RPR in the L2 Topology table and enable the L2 service provisioning by choosing Configuration > Enable L2 Service.


Caution If the state is reported as L2 Not Ready, the base card configuration is missing. Choose Configuration > Enable L2 Service to apply the base configuration to the card. This operation affects traffic if the service has already been provisioned on the card.

CTM defines the unique card number within the ring. The actual range is from 1 to 251 in any order. Refer to the NE hardware documentation for the number of ML-series cards allowed per RPR.

cos priority-multicast <Class of Service> percent <Multicast Group %1> [If Multicast Group 
1 has been enabled]
cos priority-multicast <Class of Service> percent <Multicast Group %2> [If Multicast Group 
2 has been enabled]
class-map match-any SP_MANAGEMENT [If SP Management (%) is greater than 0]
match cos <SP Management Class of Service> [If SP Management (%) is greater than 0]
class-map match-any AVVID_VOICE_VIDEO
match cos <Low Latency Queue Class of Service>
class-map match-any AVVID_CONTROL [If AVVID Control (%) is greater than 0]
match cos <AVVID Control Class of Service> [If AVVID Control (%) is greater than 0]
class-map match-any CIR [If Committed Rate (%) is greater than 0]
match cos <Committed Rate Class of Service> [If Committed Rate (%) is greater than 0]
class-map match-all BEST_EFFORT
match any

Policy-map POLICY_QOS_OUT
class SP_MANAGEMENT [If SP Management (%) is greater than 0]
bandwidth percent <SP Management (%)> [If SP Management (%) is greater than 0]
class AVVID_VOICE_VIDEO
Priority 8 [Fixed values are not configurable]
class AVVID_CONTROL
bandwidth percent <AVVID Control (%)> [If AVVID Control (%) is greater than 0]
class CIR [If Committed Rate (%) is greater than 0]
bandwidth percent <Committed Rate (%)> [If Committed Rate (%) is greater than 0]
class BEST_EFFORT
Bandwidth percent <Default Best Effort (%)>

Cos commit <CoS Commit>

Vlan dot1q tag native

L2protocol-tunnel cos 2 [Fixed value] 

interface SPR1
Spr station-id <Card#> [The valid range is from 1 to 254; it is not Spr node <Card#>]
[The following commands are not issued by CTM; rather, these are default ML settings]
no ip address
no keep alive
hold-queue 150 in

Interface {FastEthernetN|GigabitEthernetM} [N=0 to 11 and M=0,1]
no ip route-cache

interface POS0
Spr-intf-id 1
Service-policy output POLICY_QOS_OUT
[The following commands are not issued by CTM; rather, these are default ML settings]
No ip address
No ip route-cache
Crc 32

interface POS1
Spr-intf-id 1
Service-policy output POLICY_QOS_OUT
[The following commands are not issued by CTM; rather, these are default ML settings]
No ip address
No ip route-cache
Crc 32


NoteCisco IOS software supports multiple match cos commands for each class-map command, but CTM supports only one for each.

The multicast/broadcast feature applies only to RPR topologies and requires the ONS 15310 R5.0 or ONS 15454 R5.0 or later.


Point-to-Point Base Card Configuration

For a point-to-point topology involved in at least one ML-series card, the other card can be ML, CE, OC, or G1000. The point-to-point base card configuration must be applied only on the ML-series card(s) involved in the topology.


NoteCTM does not enable spanning tree. Therefore, verify that there are no Layer 2 loops formed by bridged connections outside the ML network. Layer 2 loops in a network without spanning tree enabled might cause network instability.

If a G1000 card is one endpoint in the point-to-point topology, a Network-to-Network Interface (NNI) connection is assumed. That is, the class of service (CoS) coming into the G1000 is trusted (not overwritten).


cos priority-multicast <Class of Service> percent <Multicast Group %1> [If Multicast Group 
1 has been enabled]
cos priority-multicast <Class of Service> percent <Multicast Group %2> [If Multicast Group 
2 has been enabled]
class-map match-any SP_MANAGEMENT [If SP Management (%) is greater than 0]
match cos <SP Management Class of Service> [If SP Management (%) is greater than 0]
class-map match-any AVVID_VOICE_VIDEO
match cos <Low Latency Queue Class of Service>
class-map match-any AVVID_CONTROL [If AVVID Control (%) is greater than 0]
match cos <AVVID Control Class of Service> [If AVVID Control (%) is greater than 0]
class-map match-any CIR [If Committed Rate (%) is greater than 0]
match cos <Committed Rate Class of Service> [If Committed Rate (%) is greater than 0]
class-map match-all BEST_EFFORT
match any

Policy-map POLICY_QOS_OUT
class SP_MANAGEMENT [If SP Management (%) is greater than 0]
bandwidth percent <SP Management (%)> [If SP Management (%) is greater than 0]
class AVVID_VOICE_VIDEO
Priority 8 [Fixed values are not configurable]
class AVVID_CONTROL
bandwidth percent <AVVID Control (%)> [If AVVID Control (%) is greater than 0]
class CIR [If Committed Rate (%) is greater than 0]
bandwidth percent <Committed Rate (%)> [If Committed Rate (%) is greater than 0]
class BEST_EFFORT
Bandwidth percent <Default Best Effort (%)>

Cos commit <CoS Commit>

Vlan dot1q tag native

l2protocol-tunnel cos 2 [Fixed value]

[The following commands are not issued by CTM; rather, these are default ML settings]
Interface {FastEthernetN|GigabitEthernetM} [N=0 to 11 and M=0,1]
no ip route-cache

interface POS0
service-policy output POLICY_QOS_OUT
Crc {16|32} [Crc 16 between ML and E-series; otherwise Crc 32]
[The following commands are not issued by CTM; rather, these are default ML settings]
No ip address
No ip route-cache

interface POS1
service-policy output POLICY_QOS_OUT
Crc {16|32} [Crc 16 between ML and E-series; otherwise Crc 32]
[The following commands are not issued by CTM; rather, these are default ML settings]
No ip address
No ip route-cache


Note Cisco IOS software supports multiple match cos commands for each class-map command, but CTM supports only one for each.


Packet over SONET, Ethernet, and Shared Packet Ring Port Provisioning

You can use the Create Layer 2 Service wizard, Modify Ports dialog box, Modify VLANs dialog box, Add L2 Service Drops wizard, or Modify L2 Drops wizard to provision the parameters described in the following table.

Table 2 Port Provisioning Parameter Support 

Card and Port Types
MTU Size
Speed
Duplex
Flow Control (Send)
Flow Control (Receive)
Enable (No Shutdown)/Disable (Shutdown)

ML100T card

Ether

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Not supported

Supported

PoS1

Supported only for PTP

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Supported

SPR2

Supported only for RPR

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

ML1000 (Ether) card

Ether

Supported

Supported only for Auto

Supported only for Auto

Supported

Supported

Supported

PoS

Supported only for PTP

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Supported

SPR

Supported only for RPR

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

ML100FX card

Ether

Not supported

Only 100 is supported

Only Full is supported

Supported

Not supported

Supported

PoS

Supported only for PTP

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Supported

SPR

Supported only for RPR

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

ML100T-8 card

Ether

Not supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Not supported

Supported

PoS

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Supported

SPR

Only 1500 is supported

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

Not supported

1 PoS = Packet over SONET.

2 SPR = Shared Packet Ring.


Ethernet port provisioning involves configuring the following parameters (see Figure 3):

Enable/Disable Ethernet Ports (Administrative State/Link Control)—The ability to enable or disable an Ethernet port at any time is independent of other port provisioning. CTM automatically disables a port when the last connection is removed.

MTU Size—Maximum transmission unit (MTU) is the maximum packet size, in bytes, that a particular interface can handle.

Speed—Select the speed from the drop-down list, which displays three values: 10, 100, and Auto. For an ML1000 card, Auto is the only supported option.

Flow Control (Send)—Select the Flow Control (send) value from the drop-down list, which displays three values: Off, On, and Desired. These values are supported by both Fast Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet (GE) ports.

PoS port provisioning involves configuring the following parameters (see Figure 3):

Enable (No Shutdown)/Disable (Shutdown)—The ability to enable or disable a PoS port at any time is independent of other port provisioning. When the PoS port that is shut down is related to the L2 topology, the topology goes into wrap state. CTM automatically sends an alarm indicating that the L2 topology has entered wrap state.

MTU Size—Maximum packet size, in bytes, that a particular interface can handle.

Figure 3 Create Layer 2 Service—Modify Port Properties

Enable

Interface {FastEthernetN|GigabitEthernetM} [N = 0 to 11 and M = 0,1]
No shutdown

Disable

Interface {FastEthernetN|GigabitEthernetM} [N = 0 to 11 and M = 0,1]
shutdown

MTU Provisioning

Interface {FastEthernetN|GigabitEthernetM} [N = 0 to 11 and M = 0,1]
	mtu <MTU> [MTU = 64 to 9000]

Speed Provisioning

Interface {FastEthernetN|GigabitEthernetM} [N = 0 to 11 and M = 0,1]
speed <Speed> [Speed = 10/100/auto]

Duplex Provisioning

Interface {FastEthernetN|GigabitEthernetM} [N = 0 to 11 and M = 0,1]
duplex <Duplex> [Duplex = half/full/auto]

Flow Control (Send) Provisioning

Interface {FastEthernetN|GigabitEthernetM} [N = 0 to 11 and M = 0,1]
flowcontrol send <Flow Control(send)> [Flow Control = desired/off/on]

Enable (No Shut)

Interface {POSN} [N = 0 or 1]
No shutdown

Disable (Shutdown)

Interface {POSN} [N = 0 or 1]
	shutdown

MTU Provisioning

Interface {POSN} [N = 0 or 1]
	mtu <MTU> [MTU = 64 to 9000]

Port Channel Provisioning

ML-series cards offer port channel (also known as link aggregation) for Gigabit Ethernet and Fast Ethernet ports.

Port channel is a trunking technology that groups together multiple, full-duplex, IEEE 802.3 Gigabit Ethernet/Fast Ethernet interfaces to provide fault-tolerant, high-speed links between switches, routers, and servers.

Creating or Modifying a Port Channel

interface port-channel <channel_ID>
[no] shutdown
mtu <MTU_value> [The range is from 64 to 9000]
hold-queue <HI_queue_value> in [The range is from 0 to 4096]
hold-queue <HO_queue_value> out [The range is from 0 to 4096]

Deleting a Port Channel

no interface port-channel <channel_ID>

Creating or Modifying a Port Channel Member

interface { FastEthernetN | GigabitEthernetM } [N=0 to 11, and M=0,1]
no ip address
no mtu
no shutdown
channel-group <channel_ID> { mode [active | passive] }
lacp port-priority <port_priority> [The range is from 1 to 65535]

Deleting a Port Channel Member

interface { FastEthernetN | GigabitEthernetM } [N=0 to 11, and M=0,1]
no channel-group <channel_ID>
no lacp port-priority
shutdown

IEEE 802.17 RPR Base Card Configuration

The base card configuration is a set of commands you enter when creating the Layer 2 topology. Use the Create Layer 2 Topology wizard > Layer 2 Topology Bandwidth pane to define parameters for IEEE 802.17 RPR provisioning (see Figure 4).

Figure 4 Create Layer 2 Topology Wizard—IEEE 802.17 RPR Topology Creation

To create an RPR topology, apply the base card configuration to all ML-series cards in the RPR. The topology is reported as L2 Not Ready until the base card configuration is applied to all cards. Select an L2 Not Ready RPR in the L2 Topology table and choose Configuration > Enable L2 Service to enable the L2 service provisioning.

The IEEE 802.17 policy map configuration differs from the policy map configuration in the Cisco RPR. ML-series cards in 802.17 RPR mode support the following traffic classes:

Class A (A0/A1)

Class A0/A1 traffic is guaranteed low-latency traffic.

Class A0 conforms to the reserved rate on the ring.

Class A1 does not use the reserved bandwidth.

Class B (B-CIR/B-EIR)

Traffic that conforms to the B committed information rate (CIR) is not fairness-eligible.

Class B EIR traffic is fairness-eligible; it is distinguished from class C traffic at the add node only.

Class C traffic is best effort; it is always fairness-eligible.

You can modify the CoS value; the range is from 0 to 7.

Use the following commands to create the IEEE 802.17 RPR:

[Class map configuration]
class-map match-any AVVID_VOICE_VIDEO
match cos <Low Latency Queue Class of Service> 

class-map match-any SP_MANAGEMENT 
match cos <SP Management Class of Service> 

class-map match-any CIR 
match cos <Committed Rate Class of Service>

class-map match-any AVVID_CONTROL 
match cos <AVVID Control Class of Service> 

class-map match-all BEST_EFFORT
match any

[Policy map configuration]
policy-map POLICY_QOS_OUT
class AVVID_VOICE_VIDEO
set rpr-ieee service-class <Low Latency Queue> [Possible values are a, b, c]
class AVVID_CONTROL
set rpr-ieee service-class <AVVID Control> [Possible values are a, b, c]
class SP_MANAGEMENT
set rpr-ieee service-class <SP Management> [Possible values are a, b, c]
class CIR
set rpr-ieee service-class <Committed Rate> [Possible values are a, b, c]
class BEST_EFFORT
set rpr-ieee service-class <Default Best Effort> [Possible values are a, b, c]

[Absolute bandwidth configuration]
interface rpr-ieee 0
rpr-ieee protection pref jumbo
rpr-ieee tx-traffic rate-limit reserved <Class A> east [<Class A> range is from 0 to 
48 Mb/s]
rpr-ieee tx-traffic rate-limit reserved <Class A> west [<Class A> range is from 0 to 
48 Mb/s]
rpr-ieee tx-traffic rate-limit high <Class A1> east [<Class A1> range is from 1 to 
48 Mb/s]
rpr-ieee tx-traffic rate-limit high <Class A1> west [<Class A1> range is from 1 to 
48 Mb/s]
rpr-ieee tx-traffic rate-limit medium <Class B-CIR> east [<Class B-CIR> range is from 1 to 
48 Mb/s]
rpr-ieee tx-traffic rate-limit medium <Class B-CIR> west [<Class B-CIR> range is from 1 to 
48 Mb/s]
service-policy output POLICY_QOS_OUT


Note The Protection Frame field is always Jumbo; no other configurable options are supported. The Fairness Mode field is always Aggressive.


In the commands listed above, the upper limit of the range value depends on the circuit size. For example, if x is the maximum range value in megabits per second (Mb/s):

FOR_STS1 circuit, x = 48

FOR_STS3c_VC4 circuit, x = 149

FOR_STS6c_VC4_2c circuit, x = 299

FOR_STS9c_VC4_3c circuit, x = 488

FOR_STS12c_VC4_4c circuit, x = 598

FOR_STS24c_VC4_8c circuit, x = 1196

FOR_STS9c_VC4_3c circuit, COMMITTED bandwidth, x = 499

FOR_STS12c_VC4_4c circuit, COMMITTED bandwidth, x= 599

BW_FOR_STS24c_VC4_8c circuit, COMMITTED bandwidth, x = 1198

Protection Support on ML-Series Cards

You can select IEEE 802.17 RPR ML1000 cards for protection in the Create Layer 2 Topology wizard > Card Selection pane (see Figure 5).

To choose a working card, select any card in the Available Cards list and click Add Working.

To choose a protection card for a working card:

1. Select the working card.

2. Select the protection card from the Available Cards list.

3. Click Add Protect.


Note Protection is supported only on ML1000 cards; a working ML1000 card can be protected only by another ML1000 card.


Figure 5 Card Selection—Create Layer 2 Topology Wizard (IEEE 802.17 RPR)

After you select the protection, commands are issued on the active and protection ML1000 cards, as follows:

MAC addresses are configured on both the active and protection cards for the IEEE RPR interface:

Active card protection configuration

interface RPR-IEEE0
mac-address <MAC address of the interface> [MAC address range is from 
0000.1111.1111 to 0000.9999.9999]

Protection card protection configuration

interface RPR-IEEE0
mac-address <MAC address of the interface> [MAC address range is from 
0000.1111.1111 to 0000.9999.9999]

After the MAC address is configured, the following commands are present on the active and protection cards:

Active card protection configuration

interface RPR-IEEE0
rpr-ieee ri mode primary peer <MAC address of the active card> [MAC address range 
is from 0000.1111.1111 to 0000.9999.9999]

Protection card protection configuration

interface RPR-IEEE0
rpr-ieee ri mode secondary peer <MAC address of the protection card> [MAC address 
range is from 0000.1111.1111 to 0000.9999.9999]


Note Any MAC address with the first four digits beginning with 11 (11xx.xxxx.xxxx) is a malformed address and is denied; for example, 1100.2222.3333.


When changing ML1000 GE port states in a scenario with 802.17 RPR redundant interconnect protection configured, the primary ML card remains active if at least one GE port is up.

Conversely, if all GE ports are down, the redundant interconnect protection is triggered and the IEEE 0 interface shuts down on the primary card. When the IEEE 0 interface shuts down, the L2 topology state changes to Steering.

Wrap Status

When a PoS port in a Cisco RPR L2 topology shuts down, CTM raises an alarm to indicate that the L2 topology has entered the corresponding protection state, which is referred to as the wrap state. The status of the Layer 2 topology changes from the original state (Complete or Incomplete) to Complete-Wrapped or Incomplete-Wrapped (see Figure 6).

Figure 6 Layer 2 Topology Table—Complete-Wrapped State

The Alarm Browser (see Figure 7) displays a wrapped-state alarm.

Figure 7 Alarm Browser—Complete-Wrapped State


Note For alarms and circuits on ML cards that are configured with card mode 802.17 RPR, the ML card ports are referred to as port 0 for RPR-WEST and port 1 for RPR-EAST. This is also true when CTM communicates through the GateWay/CORBA interface.


Steering Status

When an RPR-EAST or RPR-WEST port in a standard 802.17 RPR shuts down, CTM raises an alarm to indicate that the L2 topology has entered the corresponding protection state, which is referred to as the Steering state. The status of the Layer 2 topology changes from the original state (Complete or Incomplete) to Complete-Steering or Incomplete-Steering (see Figure 8).

Figure 8 Layer 2 Topology Table—Complete-Steering State

The Alarm Browser (see Figure 9) displays an RPR Protection Is Active alarm.

Figure 9 Alarm Browser—Complete-Steering State


Note For Cisco RPRs, the L2 protection state (Wrapped or Steering) is not reflected in the L2 topology state through CTM GateWay/CORBA.


Creating Service Connections

CTM contains an L2 service provisioning wizard to facilitate provisioning of VLANs over a defined L2 topology. You can define each Ethernet port as User-Network Interface (UNI) or Network-Network Interface (NNI). VLANs on an Ethernet port are referred to as port VLANs. VLANs on PoS and SPR ports (and their connected circuits) are referred to as service provider VLANs (or circuit VLANs).

You cannot mix NNI and UNI connections on the same port. CTM supports the following types of service configurations:

UNI QinQ Access (user VLAN and protocol transparency)—Cannot be combined with other connection types on the same port.

UNI dot1q Access—Select an unused port VLAN from 1 to 4095. It can be combined with untagged connections on the same port. Each port VLAN can be used for only one connection.

UNI Untagged Access—Configure as Dot1q Access with port VLAN 1.

NNI dot1q Access—Select an unused port VLAN from 1 to 4095. It can be combined with untagged connections on the same port. Each port VLAN can be used for only one connection.

The circuit VLAN range is from 1 to 4095. On an RPR, all valid circuit VLANs can be used; however, due to limited bridge group resources, each ML-series card can access only 255 circuit VLANs. Due to limited card-level bridge group resources, only 255 circuit VLANs can be used on a point-to-point circuit.


Note VLAN ID 1 is reserved for untagged VLANs.


For VLAN configurations, the port channel interface is treated as a new, single logical interface, even though it consists of multiple interfaces. The following Cisco IOS commands are sent to the ML card to configure the IEEE 802.1Q encapsulation on the port channel interface. (IEEE 802.1Q encapsulation is the only supported encapsulation type in link aggregation.)

interface port-channel <port_channel_ID.VLAN_number>
encapsulation dot1Q <VLAN_number>
bridge-group <bridge_group_number> 

Port channel drops are of NNI type; therefore, no QoS policies are associated to port channel drops, as is true for any other NNI Ethernet drops.

Using the Quality of Service Policy Template

You must configure the following information in the L2 service provisioning and quality of service (QoS) profile wizards:

Port (FastEthernetM [FEM] or GigabitEthernetN [GIGEN] with M=0 to 11 and N=0,1)

Service connection type (UNI QinQ, UNI dot1Q, UNI untagged, or NNI dot1Q)

QoS parameters (selection of the QoS profile name defined in the QoS profile)

CTM assigns an unused bridge group (BG) to the card. The range is from 1 to 255.

The following table lists the configuration information for a best-effort QoS profile. You can select the predefined profile and customize it, or create a new customized profile by using the Advanced option.

Table 3 Configuration Settings for the Best-Effort QoS Profile 

QoS Template Name

Best_Effort

QoS Template Type

Best Effort

QoS Policy
Setting

Match Any

True

Match IP

False

IP Precedence Value

N/A

Match CoS

False

CoS Value

N/A

Match DSCP

False

DSCP Value

N/A

AND

N/A

CIR Type

N/A

Committed Rate

N/A

Committed Burst

N/A

Committed CoS Marking

Mark CoS

Committed CoS Value

0

Excess Traffic

Allow

Peak Rate

N/A

Peak Burst

N/A

Excess CoS Marking/Value

0

Violations

N/A

Violate CoS

N/A

Best Effort Type

Line Rate

Max Rate

96 kb/s

Max Burst

8000 bytes


The following table lists the configuration information for the committed information rate/peak information rate (CIR/PIR) QoS profile. You can select the predefined profile and customize it, or create a new customized profile by using the Advanced option.


Note If you select the CIR/PIR profile and want to modify it, you must configure your own advanced service before you can set the CIR type to Rate_Limited, CIR=PIR, and CIR Burst=PIR Burst.


Table 4 Configuration Settings for the CIR/PIR QoS Profile 

QoS Template Name

CIR_PIR

QoS Template Type

Advanced

QoS Policy
Setting

Match Any

True

Match IP

False

IP Precedence Value

N/A

Match CoS

False

CoS Value

N/A

Match DSCP

False

DSCP Value

N/A

AND

N/A

CIR Type

Rate_Limited

Committed Rate

96 kb/s

Committed Burst

8000 b/s

Committed CoS Marking

Mark CoS

Committed CoS Value

2

Excess Traffic

Allow

Peak Rate

96 kb/s

Peak Burst

8000 b/s

Excess CoS Marking/Value

2

Violations

Allow

Violate CoS

2

Best Effort Type

N/A

Max Rate

N/A

Max Burst

N/A


CTM allows you to define a QoS policy template, starting with the preceding predefined policies and customizing them within the following predefined ranges:

CIR_PIR

CIR—96,000 to 800,000,000 bits per second (b/s).

Max CIR Burst—8000 to 64000 bytes.

PIR—96,000 to 800,000,000 b/s. Cannot be less than CIR.

Max PIR Burst—8000 to 64000 bytes. Cannot be less than Max CIR Burst.

Traffic matching criteria is match-all.

Only one policy is allowed.

Best_Effort

Line Rate—CIR is 96000 b/s and CIR Burst is 8000 bytes.

Rate Limited—You configure the CIR and CIR Burst.

Traffic matching criteria is match-all.

Only one policy is allowed.

You can create your own advanced QoS policy by entering the customized QoS configuration based on the following parameters:

Traffic matching criteria.

CoS—The range is from 0 to 7.

DSCP—The range is from 0 to 63.

IP Precedence—The range is from 0 to 7.

CoS transmit values for CIR/PIR.

Exceed action and violate action and their CoS transmit values.

Up to eight QoS classes can be configured.

You must configure the following information in the L2 service provisioning and QoS profile wizards:

Port (FastEthernetM [FEM] or GigabitEthernetN [GIGEN] with M=0 to 11 and N=0,1).

Service connection type (UNI QinQ, UNI dot1Q, UNI untagged, or NNI dot1Q).

QoS parameters (selection of the QoS profile name defined in the QoS profile).

CTM assigns an unused bridge group to the card. The range is from 1 to 255.


Note The CLI commands in this section are written for services defined on the RPR topology. For services defined on point-to-point circuits, replace int spr 1 with int pos 0 or int pos 1, depending on which PoS will carry the service. The bridge x protocol command is never issued. Spanning tree is not enabled for RPR or point-to-point circuits. The L2protocol-tunnel all command is expanded to three separate lines when saved by the Cisco IOS router.


For any drop-applied QoS profile, CTM checks the available bandwidth and generates an error message if:

totalBW > GE_TOTBW (GE interfaces GE_TOTBW = 1 Gb/s)

totalBW > FE_TOTBW (FE interfaces FE_TOTBW = 100 Mb/s)

where the parameter totalBW is calculated as the sum of:

New CIR bandwidth reserved for applying the profile

CIR bandwidth already reserved on the selected drop by the previously created L2 service

Bandwidth reserved for multicast groups during topology creation

For each selected service drop, the configuration is done in three steps:

1. Class map configuration (not required for NNI-configured ports).

2. Policy map configuration (through QoS profiles; not required for NNI-configured ports).

3. Interface configuration (through the Create Layer 2 Service wizard).

The following sections describe the commands for each step.

1. Class Map Configuration

Configuring CIR/PIR Class Map

[Class map configuration for CIRPIR]

Class-map match-all CLASS_BG<BG>_CIRPIR
match bridge-group <BG>

Configuring Best-Effort Class Map

[Class map configuration for BESTEFFORT]

Class-map match-all CLASS_BG<BG>_BESTEFFORT
match bridge-group <BG>

Configuring Advanced Class Map

Figure 10 and Figure 11 show how to use the Create QoS Profile wizard to configure an advanced QoS profile.

Figure 10 Create QoS Profile Wizard—Advanced Class Map Configuration (1 of 2)

Figure 11 Create QoS Profile Wizard—Advanced Class Map Configuration (2 of 2)

Enter the following commands to create a QoS profile with advanced OR selection:

[Class map configuration for ADVANCED OR selection]

class-map match-any CLASS_BG<BG>_ADVANCED_<Service Drop Port>_N [N number of policies will 
be configured on the <Service Drop Port>=0,1 for GigaEthernet and <Service Drop Port>=0 to 
11 for FastEthernet]
[match ip dscp <Match DSCP>]
[If Match DSCP has been selected, the valid range is from 0 to 63]
[match ip precedence <Match IP Precedence>]
[If Match IP Precedence has been selected, the valid range is from 0 to 7]
[match cos <Match CoS>]
[If Match CoS has been selected, the valid range is from 0 to 7]


Note A profile with OR conditions can be applied only to a port with a single bridge group configured. CTM excludes the match bridge group statement from the OR class maps and applies class match-any.


2. QoS Profile Configuration

CIR/PIR QoS Profile

Figure 12 is an example of how to create a CIR/PIR QoS profile.

Figure 12 Create QoS Profile Wizard—CIR/PIR

Enter the following commands for policy map configuration of a CIR/PIR QoS profile:

[Policy map configuration command for the CIR/PIR QoS profile]

Policy-map POLICY_{GIGE|FE}<port>_IN
Class CLASS_BG<BG>_CIRPIR

[1. Case Line Rate selection]
Police 96000 8000 conform-action set-cos-transmit 2 exceed-action set-cos-transmit 2

[2. Case Rate Limited selection Excess Traffic Discarded]
Police <Committed Rate> <Committed Burst Size> conform-action set-cos-transmit 1 
exceed-action drop

[3. Case Rate Limited selection Excess Traffic Allowed]
Police <Committed Rate> <Committed Burst Size> <Peak Burst> pir <Peak Rate> 
conform-action set-cos-transmit 2 exceed-action set-cos-transmit 1 violate-action drop

Best-Effort QoS Profile

Figure 13 is an example of how to create a best-effort QoS profile.

Figure 13 Create QoS Profile Wizard—Best Effort

Enter the following commands to create a best-effort QoS profile:

[Policy map configuration for the BESTEFFORT QoS profile]

Policy-map POLICY_{GIGE|FE}<port>_IN 
Class CLASS_BG<BG>_BESTEFFORT

[1. Case Line Rate selection] 
Police 96000 8000 conform-action set-cos-transmit 0 exceed-action set-cos-transmit 0 

[2. Case Rate Limited selection] 
Police <Max Rate> <Max Burst> conform-action set-cos-transmit 0 exceed-action drop

Advanced QoS Profile

Figure 14 is an example of how to create an advanced QoS profile.

Figure 14 Create QoS Profile Wizard—Advanced

[Policy map configuration for the ADVANCED QoS profile]

Policy-map POLICY_{GIGE|FE}<port>_IN 
Class CLASS_BG<BG>_ADVANCED_<Service Drop Port>_N
[N number of policies will be configured on the <Service Drop Port> = 0,1 for Gigabit 
Ethernet and <Service Drop Port> = 0 to 11 for Fast Ethernet.]

police <Committed Rate> <Committed Burst Size> [<Peak Rate> pir <Peak Burst>] 
conform-action {transmit|set-cos-transmit <Committed CoS Marking Value>} 
[exceed-action {drop|set-cos-transmit <Excess CoS Marking Value>}][violate-action 
{drop|set-cos-transmit <Violation CoS Marking Value>}]

[[<Peak Rate> pir <Peak Burst>] is applied only if Excess Traffic is Allowed.] 
[exceed-action drop is applied only if Excess Traffic is Discarded.]
[Trust option is never selectable for Excess Traffic or Violation tab. Mark CoS option 
is always used when the Excess or Violations is Allowed.]
[violation-action drop is applied only if Excess Traffic is Allowed and Violate 
Traffic is Discarded.]

Bandwidth Data Service Provisioning

In the Control Panel > ONS NE Service pane for CTC-based NEs, select the Enable Bandwidth DSP check box to enable the bandwidth data service provisioning check during L2 service provisioning. The bandwidth utilization report shows available and used bandwidth for each L2 topology. Use this report during L2 service provisioning to verify whether the requested CIR is available on the topology. An error is returned if there is not enough bandwidth available for a drop port.

3. Interface Configuration

Adding UNI QinQ Access

Any port with mode dot1q-tunnel is a UNI QinQ access connection. Figure 15 and Figure 16 show how to add UNI QinQ access using the Create Layer 2 Service wizard.

Figure 15 Create Layer 2 Service Wizard—Adding UNI QinQ Access

Figure 16 Create Layer 2 Service Wizard—Configuring Service Drops

Enter the following commands to configure an interface:

[Interface configuration]

Interface {GigabitEthernet<port>|FastEthernet<port>}
Description <QoS profile name> 
[CTM issues the L2protocol-tunnel all command and the result is the following set of 
commands]
l2protocol-tunnel cdp
l2protocol-tunnel stp
l2protocol-tunnel vtp
no cdp enable

Mode dot1q-tunnel
Bridge-group <BG>
Service-policy input POLICY_{GIGE|FE}<port>_IN
Service-policy output POLICY_QOS_OUT
[The following command is not issued by CTM; rather, these are default ML settings] 
Bridge-group <BG> spanning-disable

Interface SPR1.<Service Provider VLAN>
Encapsulation dot1q <Service Provider VLAN>
Bridge-group <BG>
[The following command is not issued by CTM; rather, these are default ML settings] 
Bridge-group <BG> spanning-disable

Removing UNI QinQ Access

Enter the following commands to delete a UNI QinQ drop:

[Note the reverse order of commands]

Interface SPR1.<Service Provider VLAN>
No Bridge-group <BG>
No Encap dot1q <Service Provider VLAN>
No Interface SPR1.<Service Provider VLAN> [Ignore the warning message]
Interface {GigabitEthernet<port>|FastEthernet<port>}
No Bridge-group <BG> 
No Mode dot1q-tunnel 
No L2protocol-tunnel all
No description
No class-map CLASS_BG<BG>_{CIRPIR|BESTEFFORT|ADVANCED_<Service Drop Port>_N} 
[For Advanced QoS, remove all of the N number of class maps]
 
[When removing the last connection from a port]
No Policy-map POLICY_{GIGE|FE}<port>_IN
No Service-policy output POLICY_QOS_OUT

Adding UNI dot1Q Access

Figure 17 is an example of the Create Layer 2 Service wizard for adding UNI dot1Q access.

Figure 17 Create Layer 2 Service Wizard—Adding UNI dot1Q Access

The port is recognized as UNI if you enter the service-policy input command on the port interface; otherwise, the port is recognized as NNI. Every subinterface is a dot1q connection. The classification of UNI versus NNI is based on the port-level parsing. A connection is untagged if you enter the encap dot1q 1 command. The multiple class map and QoS policy configurations for advanced QoS are similar to the QinQ Access example shown in Figure 17.

Enter the following commands to create a UNI Dot1q:

[Interface configuration]

[First time only; first dot1q on this UNI port]
Interface {GigabitEthernet<port>|FastEthernet<port>}
Service-policy input POLICY_{GIGE|FE}<port>_IN
Service-policy output POLICY_QOS_OUT

Interface {FastEthernet<port>|GigabitEthernet<port>}.<Port VLAN>
Description <QoS profile name>
Encapsulation dot1q <Port VLAN>
Bridge-group <BG>
[In the following command executed by CTM, RSTP is not enabled]
Bridge-group <BG> spanning-disable

Interface SPR1.<Service Provider VLAN>
Encapsulation dot1q <Service Provider VLAN>
Bridge-group <BG>
[In the following command executed by CTM, RSTP is not enabled] 
Bridge-group <BG> spanning-disable

Removing UNI dot1Q Access

Enter the following commands to delete a UNI Dot1q:

[Note the reverse order of commands]

Interface SPR1.<Service Provider VLAN>
No Bridge-group <BG>
No Encap dot1q <Service Provider VLAN>
No Interface SPR1.<Service Provider VLAN> [Ignore the warning message]
Interface <port>.<Port VLAN>
No Bridge-group <BG>
No Encap dot1q <Port VLAN>
No description
No Interface <port>.<Port VLAN> [Ignore the warning message]
Policy-map POLICY_{GIGE|FE}<port>_IN 
No Class BG<BG>_{CIRPIR|BESTEFFORT|ADVANCED_<Service Drop Port>_N}
[For Advanced QoS, remove all of the N number of class maps]

No class-map CLASS_BG<BG>_{CIRPIR|BESTEFFORT|ADVANCED_<Service Drop Port>_N}
[For Advanced QoS, remove all of the N number of class maps]

[When removing the last connection from a port]
No Policy-map POLICY_{GIGE|FE}<port>_IN
No Service-policy output POLICY_QOS_OUT

Adding UNI Untagged Access

UNI untagged access is similar to UNI dot1Q access with port VLAN ID = 1.

Adding NNI dot1Q Access

Enter the following commands to create an NNI Dot1Q:

[Interface configuration]

[First time only; first connection on this port]
Interface {FastEthernet<port>|GigabitEthernet<port>}
Service-policy output POLICY_QOS_OUT

Interface {FastEthernet<port>|GigabitEthernet<port>}.<Port VLAN>
Encap dot1q <Port VLAN>

Bridge-group <BG>
Interface spr 1.<Server Provider VLAN>
Encap dot1q <Server Provider VLAN>
Bridge-group <BG>

Removing NNI dot1Q Access

Enter the following commands to delete an NNI Dot1Q:

[Note the reverse order of commands]

Interface spr 1.<Server Provider VLAN>
No Bridge-group <BG>
No Encap dot1q <Server Provider VLAN>
No Interface spr 1.<Circuit VLAN> [Ignore the warning message]
Interface <port>.<Port VLAN>
No Bridge-group <BG> 
No Encap dot1q <Port VLAN>
No Interface {FastEthernet<port>|GigabitEthernet<port>}.<Port VLAN> [Ignore the warning 
message]

[When removing the last connection from a port]
No Service-policy output POLICY_QOS_OUT

IP Service-Level Agreement on ML-Series Cards

IP SLA is an application embedded in Cisco IOS, which enables you to monitor service-level agreements (SLAs) on IP networks. Service levels are measured by downtime, bandwidth, latency, jitter, packet loss, and so on. Using the IP SLA application, you can verify service guarantees, increase network reliability by validating network performance, proactively identify network issues, and increase return on investment (ROI) by easing the deployment of new IP services.

IP SLA can be configured only on ML-series cards participating in point-to-point and RPR L2 topologies.


Note IP SLA is not supported on 802.17 RPR.


Three steps are required to enable IP SLA features:

1. Create a Managed VLAN.

2. Create an IP SLA Session.

3. Manage the IP SLA Session.

1. Create a Managed VLAN

Create a managed VLAN by selecting IP SLA Managed VLAN in the Layer 2 Service wizard (see Figure 18) to create a managed VLAN. You can create managed VLANs only on already existing point-to-point and RPR L2 topologies.

Figure 18 Layer 2 Service Wizard—Managed VLAN-Enable

In the Service Drops Configuration pane > IP SLA tab (see Figure 19), IP addresses are automatically generated and assigned to all of the service drop points that CTM manages.

Figure 19 Create Layer 2 Service Wizard—IP SLA

For information about commands that are issued based on the provisioning in the Service Drops and Port Attributes tabs, see Creating Service Connections.

The following commands are issued when you assign an IP address to the service drop and specify the routing protocol.

IP Address Assignment

ip address <IP Address> <Subnet> [<IP Address> range is from 192.168.0.1 to 
192.168.255.255. <Subnet> value is 255.255.0.0.] 

Routing Protocol Assignment

bridge <bridgegroupno> route ip [Unique bridgegroupno is created by CTM. The range is from 
1 to 255.]

2. Create an IP SLA Session

Create an IP SLA session between a pair of ML-series cards, or between an ML-series card and non-ML IP addresses. Select either Cisco-supported service points or external-destination IP addresses.

You can use the VLAN table (when a managed VLAN is selected) and with the Create IP SLA wizard (see Figure 20) to provision the IP SLA session.

Figure 20 Create IP SLA Wizard


Note CTM does not validate nonsupported external destination addresses. Ensure that the external destination is valid and that it responds to a ping command.


CTM automatically generates the IP SLA ID. The service drop points are displayed in the source and destination points, and you can pick up any drop point. You can specify a non-CTM supported destination. IP SLA can be enabled during or after creation of the IP SLA session.


Note The source and destination port cannot be the same.


Two types of probes are supported: jitter and echo. Based on the probe type you select in the Create IP SLA wizard, you must enter additional information.

If you select the jitter probe, enter a value for the following attributes (see Figure 21):

Destination Port—1 through 65535

NoOfPackets—1 through 60000

Interval—1 through 60000 (in milliseconds)

TOS (Type of Service)—0 through 255

Operation Frequency—1 through 604800 (seconds)

Figure 21 Create IP SLA Wizard—Jitter Probe

CTM issues the following commands on the source:

rtr <IPSLA ID> [IPSLA ID number range is from 1 to 2147483647]
type jitter dest-ipaddr <Destination IP Address> dest-port <Destination Port> 
num-packets <Number of Packets> interval <Interval>
tos <TOS> frequency <Operation Frequency>

The RTR responder is then configured on the destination for jitter operation. For a CTM-supported destination (any ML-series cards), CTM issues the following command on the destination:

rtr (responder)


Note For the IP SLA session to work correctly on a destination that CTM does not support, you must enter the rtr (responder) command on the destination.


If you select the echo probe, no additional information is required and CTM issues the following commands on the source:

rtr <IPSLA ID> [IP SLA number range is from 1 to 2147483647]

type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho <Destination IP Address> source-ipaddr <Source IP 
Address> [Destination IP Address could be a CTM-managed ML card or an external device. 
Source IP Address is always a CTM-managed ML card.]


Note Performance monitoring is disabled for the IP SLA echo operation. If you select an echo row in the IP SLA PM table, the Performance menu is disabled.


3. Manage the IP SLA Session

To begin collecting, enable the IP SLA session. The operation ends after 3600 seconds, but you can restart it from the Restart IP SLA menu.

Use the IP SLA table (see Figure 22) to enable, restart, and delete IP SLA.

Figure 22 IP SLA Table

Use the following commands to enable, restart, and delete IP SLA:

Enable IP SLA

rtr schedule <IPSLA ID> start-time now [IP SLA Number range is from 1 to 2147483647]

Restart IP SLA

rtr restart <IPSLA ID> [IP SLA Number range is from 1 to 2147483647]

Delete IP SLA

No rtr <IPSLA ID> [IP SLA Number range is from 1 to 2147483647]


Note The MIB uses SNMP to retrieve the performance monitoring (PM) statistics on IP SLA.


The following table lists the PM data retrieved on IP SLA for jitter. To view the statistics, choose IP SLA Table > Performance (see Figure 22).

Table 5 PM-Related Data for Jitter 

CTM Name
Field Supported

rttMonJitterStatsStartTimeIndex

The time at which the IP SLA was created.

rttMonJitterStatsCompletions

The number of jitter operations that were successful.

rttMonJitterStatsOverThresholds

The number of jitter operations that violate the threshold.

rttMonJitterStatsNumOfRTT

The number of successful round trips.

rttMonJitterStatsRTTSum

The sum of the round-trip values.

rttMonJitterStatsRTTSum2Low

The sum of the squares of the low round-trip values.

rttMonJitterStatsRTTSum2High

The sum of the squares of the high round-trip values.

rttMonJitterStatsRTTMin

The minimum number of round-trip times (RTTs) that were measured successfully.

rttMonJitterStatsRTTMax

The maximum number of RTTs that were measured successfully.

rttMonJitterStatsMinOfPositivesSD

The minimum positive jitter values from the source to the destination. Positive jitter values indicate delays in receiving time from one packet to another.

rttMonJitterStatsMaxOfPositivesSD

The maximum positive jitter values from the source to the destination.

rttMonJitterStatsNumOfPositivesSD

The number of jitter values from the source to the destination that are positive (that is, network latency increases for two consecutive test packets).

rttMonJitterStatsSumOfPositivesSD

The sum of the positive values.

rttMonJitterStatsSum2PositivesSDLow

The sum of the squares of the low positive values.

rttMonJitterStatsSum2PositivesSDHigh

The sum of the squares of the high positive values.

rttMonJitterStatsMinOfNegativesSD

The minimum negative jitter values from the source to the destination. The absolute value is given.

rttMonJitterStatsMaxOfNegativesSD

The maximum negative jitter values from the source to the destination. The absolute value is given.

rttMonJitterStatsNumOfNegativesSD

The number of jitter values from the source to the destination that are negative (that is, network latency decreases for two consecutive test packets).

rttMonJitterStatsSumOfNegativesSD

The sum of the negative values.

rttMonJitterStatsSum2NegativesSDLow

The sum of the squares of the negative low values.

rttMonJitterStatsSum2NegativesSDHigh

The sum of the squares of the negative high values.

rttMonJitterStatsMinOfPositivesDS

The minimum of all positive jitter values from packets sent from the destination to the source.

rttMonJitterStatsMaxOfPositivesDS

The maximum of all positive jitter values from packets sent from the destination to the source.

rttMonJitterStatsNumOfPositivesDS

The sum of numbers of all positive jitter values from packets sent from the destination to the source.

rttMonJitterStatsSumOfPositivesDS

The sum of RTTs of all positive jitter values from packets sent from the destination to the source.

rttMonJitterStatsSum2PositivesDSLow

The sum of squares of RTTs of all positive jitter values from packets sent from the destination to the source (low-order 32 bits).

rttMonJitterStatsSum2PositivesDSHigh

The sum of the squares of RTTs of all positive jitter values from packets sent from the destination to the source (high-order 32 bits).

rttMonJitterStatsMinOfNegativesDS

The minimum of all negative jitter values from packets sent from the destination to the source.

rttMonJitterStatsMaxOfNegativesDS

The maximum of all negative jitter values from packets sent from the destination to the source.

rttMonJitterStatsNumOfNegativesDS

The sum of numbers of all negative jitter values from packets sent from the destination to the source.

rttMonJitterStatsSumOfNegativesDS

The sum of RTTs of all negative jitter values from packets sent from the destination to the source.

rttMonJitterStatsSum2NegativesDSLow

The sum of the squares of RTTs of all negative jitter values from packets sent from the destination to the source (low-order 32 bits).

rttMonJitterStatsSum2NegativesDSHigh

The sum of the squares of RTTs of all negative jitter values from packets sent from the destination to the source (high-order 32 bits).

rttMonJitterStatsPacketLossSD

The number of packets that were lost from the source to the destination.

rttMonJitterStatsPacketLossDS

The number of packets that were lost from the destination to the source.

rttMonJitterStatsPacketOutOfSequence

The number of packets that were returned out of order.

rttMonJitterStatsPacketMIA

The number of packets that were lost where the direction (source-to-destination or destination-to-source) cannot be determined.

rttMonJitterStatsPacketLateArrival

The number of packets that arrived after the timeout.

rttMonJitterStatsError

The number of times an operation could not be started due to other internal failures.

rttMonJitterStatsBusies

The number of times the operation could not be started because the previously scheduled run was not finished.

rttMonJitterStatsOWSumSD

The sum of one-way times from the source to the destination.

rttMonJitterStatsOWSum2SDLow

The sum of the squares of one-way times from the source to the destination (low-order 32 bits).

rttMonJitterStatsOWSum2SDHigh

The sum of the squares of one-way times from the source to the destination (high-order 32 bits).

rttMonJitterStatsOWMinSD

The minimum of all one-way times from the source to the destination.

rttMonJitterStatsOWMaxSD

The maximum of all one-way times from the source to the destination.

rttMonJitterStatsOWSumDS

The sum of one-way times from the destination to the source.

rttMonJitterStatsOWSum2DSLow

The sum of the squares of one-way times from the destination to the source (low-order 32 bits).

rttMonJitterStatsOWSum2DSHigh

The sum of the squares of one-way times from the destination to the source (high-order 32 bits).

rttMonJitterStatsOWMinDS

The minimum number of all one-way times from the destination to the source.

rttMonJitterStatsOWMaxDS

The maximum number of all one-way times from the destination to the source.

rttMonJitterStatsNumOfOW

The number of one-way times that were measured successfully.

rttMonJitterStatsOWMinSDNew

The minimum number of all one-way times from the source to the destination. Replaces deprecated rttMonJitterStatsOWMinSD.


Enabling or Disabling Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol

You can enable Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) on UNI dot1Q, UNI Untagged, and NNI dot1Q ports by selecting the RSTP for the selected drop port and then checking the RSTP Enable check box (see Figure 23). To disable RSTP, select the RSTP for the selected drop port and uncheck the RSTP Enable check box.


Note RSTP can be enabled only on a drop where UNI/NNI dot1Q is selected and only on a subinterface (that is, UNI dot1Q drop) where no other QinQ drops were created for the same interface.


Figure 23 Create Layer 2 Service Wizard—RSTP Enable

Click Next to configure QoS parameters as required (see Figure 24).

Figure 24 Create Layer 2 Service Wizard—QoS Parameters

If the RSTP Enable check box is checked, CTM issues the following command specified for adding a drop:

[Configure RSTP; this command is issued once for VLANs]
bridge <BG> protocol rstp

[Enable RSTP on the selected drop]
Interface {FastEthernet<port>|GigabitEthernet<port>}.<Port VLAN>
Bridge-group <BG>

The following command is issued when you disable RSTP from a drop:

[Disable RSTP on the selected drop]
Interface {FastEthernet<port>|GigabitEthernet<port>}.<Port VLAN>
Bridge-group <BG> 
Bridge-group <BG> spanning-disabled [Disable RSTP on the selected drop]

NoteEnabling or disabling RSTP on a port basis is not valid if you configured a bridge group to the main Ethernet interface. By default, the CLI disables the dot1Q drop in the card.

If only the RSTP Enable check box is checked, the Spanning Tree Protocol remains disabled on the VLAN service drops.


Enabling or Disabling Cisco Discovery Protocol

You can enable or disable Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) when:

Creating a Layer 2 Service

Modifying Layer 2 Service Drops

Modifying Drops

Creating a Layer 2 Service

In the Create Layer 2 Service wizard > Port Attributes tab > CDP drop-down list (see Figure 25), choose enable or disable to enable or disable CDP.

Figure 25 Create Layer 2 Service Wizard—Enable or Disable CDP

Modifying Layer 2 Service Drops

In the Modify Layer 2 Service Drops wizard > Port Attributes tab > CDP drop-down list (see Figure 26), choose enable or disable to enable or disable CDP. Click Apply.

Figure 26 Modify Layer 2 Service Drops Wizard—Enable or Disable CDP

Modifying Drops


Step 1 In the Domain Explorer window, choose Configuration > CTC-Based SONET NEs or CTC-Based SDH NEs > L2 Topology Table.

Step 2 In the Layer 2 Topology table, choose Configuration > Show L2 Services.

Step 3 In the L2 Services table, select a service; then, choose Configuration > Show Drops. The L2 Service Drop Ports table opens, listing all the drops in the selected service.

Figure 27 Layer 2 Service Drop Ports Table

Step 4 Choose Configuration > Modify Ports. The Modify Ports dialog box opens (see Figure 28).

Figure 28 Modify Ports

Step 5 In the Enable/Disable Port > CDP drop-down list, choose enable or disable to enable or disable CDP.


CTM issues the following command when you enable CDP on a selected drop:

Interface {FastEthernet<port>|GigabitEthernet<port>}.<Port_VLAN>
cdp enable

CTM issues the following command when you disable CDP on a selected drop:

Interface {FastEthernet<port>|GigabitEthernet<port>}.<Port_VLAN>
no cdp enable

ML Management Troubleshooting

If a problem arises during the initial synchronization, you can resynchronize the Layer 2 topology by choosing Configuration > Resync L2 Topology in the Layer 2 Topology table (see Figure 29).


Note This feature only restarts the L2 topology resynchronization state. It does not forcefully apply any configuration on the ML-series card to complete the synchronization of the L2 topology.


Alternative methods of resynchronization are:

Mark the NEs participating in the L2 topology as Out of Service, and then In Service.

Restart the NE service.

Although effective, these methods cause a time lag that affects other functions, such as inventory collection and circuit discovery.

Figure 29 Layer 2 Topology Table—Resynchronize L2 Topology

ML Version Up

When you upgrade a node, you can choose to upgrade the software running on the ML-series cards at a later time. The Version Up feature allows you to delay upgrading the ML-series card, and to choose which ML-series card to upgrade to the new version. By using this feature, you can also view the state of the node with respect to the upgrade, which can be:

Complete upgrade—All the non-ML and ML-series cards have been upgraded to the new software release.

Partial upgrade—The ML-series cards have not all been upgraded to the new software release.

To enable the Version Up feature, complete the following steps:

1. Set the value for the parameter NODE.Software.AllowDelayedUpgrade in the Value column under the NE Defaults tab to TRUE (see Figure 30).

Figure 30 NE Explorer—NE Defaults Tab

2. Activate the NE software. Use the Bulk Software Activation wizard to activate the NE software (see Figure 31). For specific instructions, see the section "Scheduling Bulk Software Activation" in Chapter 4, "Maintaining an Efficient Network" in the Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 User Guide.

Figure 31 Bulk Software Activation Wizard

During NE software activation, you are asked if you want to delay the software upgrade on the ML-series cards (see Figure 32). For specific instructions, see the section "Delaying Software Activation on the ML-Series Cards" in Chapter 4, "Maintaining an Efficient Network" in the Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 User Guide.

Figure 32 Software Activation


NoteWhile ML-series cards on the NE are waiting to be upgraded, all provisioning operations and software downloads on the NE are disallowed.

You can upgrade the NE fully to the latest version by resetting all the ML-series cards to this version.


After a successful partial software activation on the NE, the NE Software table (see Figure 33) displays True in the Partial Upgrade column, which indicates that the activation is pending for ML-series cards.

3. Upgrade the ML-series cards to the current version by resetting them on the NE in either of the following ways:

Select multiple ML-series cards and choose Edit > Reset ML Cards in the NE Software table. For specific instructions, see the section "Activating a New NE Software Version on One or More ML-Series Card(s)" in Chapter 4, "Maintaining an Efficient Network" in the Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 User Guide.

For individual ML-series cards, use the NE Explorer.

The Partial Upgrade column in the NE Software table displays FALSE when all ML-series cards are upgraded to the current version.

Figure 33 NE Software Table—Reset ML Cards

Enable L2 Service Command Enhancement

The enable L2 service command has been enhanced. (See the section "Enabling Layer 2 Services" in Chapter 7, "Provisioning Services and Connections" in the Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 User Guide.)

The enable L2 service command is used only when the resynchronization status of the topology is L2 Service Not Ready, and its main purpose is to change the Layer 2 topology into a resynchronization status of Complete so that a VLAN can be created.

Instead of commanding the default base card configuration on all ML-series cards in the topology to be downloaded, this command downloads a customized base card configuration on only the selected Layer 2 topology ML-series cards that do not have the customized configuration and are in a synchronized configuration state (barebone file downloaded).

This command applies to point-to-point, Cisco RPR, and 802.17 RPR Layer 2 topologies.

Related Documentation


Note You can access the most current CTM R9.0 documentation online at http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/opticsw/ps2204/tsd_products_support_series_home.html.


The CTM documentation set comprises the following guides:

Release Notes for Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0—Describes the caveats for CTM.

Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 Installation Guide—Explains how to install CTM and how to upgrade from previous releases.

Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 User Guide—Describes how to use the CTM software, which consists of user applications and tools for network discovery, network configuration, connection management, fault management, system administration, and security management.

Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 GateWay/CORBA User Guide and Programmer Manual—Describes the CTM GateWay/CORBA northbound interface product that is available for CTM. This document serves as a reference for developers of OSS applications that work with the CTM GateWay/CORBA interface.

Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 Database Schema—Describes the database schema that CTM uses to store information in a Structured Query Language (SQL) database such as the Oracle database. The document is designed for users who need to create their own reports without using CTM.

Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 High Availability Installation Guide—Explains how to install CTM in a high availability (HA) environment.


Note The Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 High Availability Installation Guide is not available online. Contact your Cisco account representative to obtain this guide.


Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 ML Provisioning Methodology—This document.

Cisco Transport Manager Release 9.0 Basic External Authentication—Describes how CTM supports basic external authentication.

Migration Matrix for Cisco Transport Manager Service Pack Releases—Describes the migration matrix for CTM service pack releases.

Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request

For information on obtaining documentation, submitting a service request, and gathering additional information, see the monthly What's New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and revised Cisco technical documentation, at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/general/whatsnew/whatsnew.html

Subscribe to the What's New in Cisco Product Documentation as a Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feed and set content to be delivered directly to your desktop using a reader application. The RSS feeds are a free service and Cisco currently supports RSS version 2.0.