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Release Notes for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor Release 1.0 on Solaris and Windows

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Release Notes for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor Release 1.0 on Solaris and Windows

Table Of Contents

Release Notes for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor Release 1.0 on Solaris and Windows

NCM Documentation

Additional Information Online

Network Connectivity Monitor Overview

NCM Components

Device Support

Uninstalling the FLEXlm License

Uninstalling the VHM Adapter and Additional DFM Adapters

Copying Customized DFM and/or VHM Consoles to NCM

Known and Resolved Problems

Obtaining Documentation

Cisco.com

Documentation CD-ROM

Ordering Documentation

Documentation Feedback

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco.com

Technical Assistance Center

Cisco TAC Website

Cisco TAC Escalation Center

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information


Release Notes for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor Release 1.0 on Solaris and Windows


These release notes are for use with CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor (NCM) running on a Solaris or Windows platform. Supported platforms are:

Solaris 2.7 and 2.8

Windows 2000 (Professional, Server, and Advanced Server)

Windows XP (console only)

These release notes provide:

NCM Documentation

Additional Information Online

Network Connectivity Monitor Overview

Uninstalling the FLEXlm License

Uninstalling the VHM Adapter and Additional DFM Adapters

Copying Customized DFM and/or VHM Consoles to NCM

Known and Resolved Problems

Obtaining Documentation

Obtaining Technical Assistance

NCM Documentation


Note Although every effort has been made to validate the accuracy of the information in the printed and electronic documentation, you should also review the NCM documentation on Cisco.com for any updates.


The following documents are provided in PDF on your product CDs:

Quick Start Guide for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor 1.0

Installation Guide for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor

User Guide for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor


Note Adobe Acrobat Reader 4.0 or later is required.


The following documents are provided as hardcopy with the product:

Licensing Notes for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor

Release Notes for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor Release 1.0 on Solaris and Windows

Quick Start Guide for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor

Use these publications to learn how to install and use NCM:

Installation Guide for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor (DOC-7815279=)—Provides instructions for installing and setting up NCM.

User Guide for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor (DOC-7815278=)—Provides information for configuring, administering, and operating NCM.

Additional Information Online

You can download the Readme for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor Integration Package on Solaris and Readme for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor Integration Package on Windows at http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/tablebuild.pl/cw2000-ncm.

You can download the Readme for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor Multiple DFM Integration Package on Solaris and Readme for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor Multiple DFM Integration Package on Windows at http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/tablebuild.pl/cw2000-ncm.

For information about NCM supported devices, refer to the following URL, or check the documentation on Cisco.com for the correct location.

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/rtrmgmt/cw2000/ncm/ncm_dev/index.htm

You can download device packages for new devices from Cisco.com and find information about all supported devices by logging into Cisco.com at http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/tablebuild.pl/cw2000-ncm.

Device packages are released cumulatively; that is, new device packages contain the contents of any previous packages.

You can also obtain any published patches from the download site.

Network Connectivity Monitor Overview

See the following sections for information about NCM:

NCM Components

Device Support

NCM Components

NCM consists of:

NCM domain manager, which performs network-wide discovery, monitoring, and root cause analysis of device and connectivity failures.

NCM domain consolidation, which consolidates analysis and topology from the NCM domain manager. Optionally, analysis and topology may be obtained and consolidated from CiscoWorks Device Fault Manager (DFM), and CiscoWorks Voice Health Monitor (VHM).

Global Console, which displays the consolidated event notifications and provides the ability to launch an Administration Console to configure an underlying NCM domain manager.

SNMP Trap Adapter (Receiver), for importing DFM traps.

Open Integration Server, for processing DFM traps and passing them as events to the Global Manager.

NCM Broker, which maintains information such as the name, location and status of each NCM domain manager and NCM domain consolidation Global Manager.

Device Support

NCM is designed to monitor Cisco devices. Therefore, NCM domain manager provides full support for certified Cisco devices that are based on the following object identifiers (OIDs):

1.3.6.1.4.1.9.* (Cisco)

1.3.6.1.4.1.2467.* (ArrowPoint)

1.3.6.1.4.1.311.1.1.3.1.2 (Windows NT Server for voice devices)

Devices which do not match the listed OIDs are diagnosed for availability only, without giving any details about their connectivity or inventory. The analysis is based on ICMP pinging and SNMP polling. SNMP polling is performed only for the MIB-II portion of the supported MIBs. Non-Cisco devices are classified as nodes and displayed in the Map Console as generic boxes.

Uninstalling the FLEXlm License

Before you can uninstall NCM components, you must first uninstall the FLEXlm license server from your system. The FLEXlm license server runs as a daemon on UNIX and as a service on Windows. These automatically start the license server.

You must have administrative privileges on Windows or root privileges on Solaris to uninstall the license server.

To manually stop the license server on Solaris, do the following:


Step 1 Stop the FLEXlm License Manager service; enter:

# /etc/init.d/SMARTS-License stop

Step 2 Delete the FLEXlm license server; enter:

# rm /etc/init.d/SMARTS-License

Step 3 Uninstall NCM components as described in the Installation Guide for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor.


To manually stop the license server on Windows, do the following:


Step 1 Stop and delete the FLEXlm license server service by entering the following command:

BASEDIR\smarts\bin\sm_ntservice --force --remove "FLEXlm License
Manager"

where BASEDIR is the NCM domain consolidation installation directory; by default, it is C:\InCharge5.

Step 2 Uninstall NCM components as described in the Installation Guide for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor.


Uninstalling the VHM Adapter and Additional DFM Adapters

Before you can uninstall NCM components, you must first uninstall the VHM adapter and any additional DFM adapters you added to NCM. These adapters run as daemons on UNIX and as services on Windows and automatically start at system startup.

You must have administrative privileges on Windows or root privileges on Solaris to uninstall the VHM adapter and any additional DFM Adapters.

To manually remove the adapter, do the following:


Step 1 Stop the VHM adapter; enter:

On Solaris:

# /etc/init.d/adapter_startup_script stop

On Windows :

BASEDIR\smarts\bin\sm_ntservice --kill adapter_service_name

where adapter_startup_script (on Solaris) is the name of the adapter script to start and stop the adapter, and adapter_service_name (on Windows) is the service name of the Windows 2000 service. If you added DFM adapters, you must use the name of the adapter script and the name of the DFM adapter you used when you installed the adapter. To find this information in Windows, see the Service Name field in the Properties window that is launched from the Control Panel Services window.

For example, to remove the VHM adapter, you would enter:

On Solaris:

# /etc/init.d/ncm_vhm_adapter stop

On Windows :

c:\InCharge\smarts\bin\sm_ntservice --kill sm_adapter_vhm


Note Because VHM can only run on Windows, the VHM adapter also only runs on Windows.



Note On Windows, uninstallation can be completed in one step; for example, you can remove the license server using an NCM domain consolidation BASEDIR command. Although the adapters are installed in the NCM domain manager installation directory, you can remove them using the NCM domain consolidation utility sm_ntservice, which has the --force option to kill services and remove adapters in one step. The command is: BASEDIR\smarts\bin\sm_ntservice --force --remove sm_adapter_vhm.
For example:
c:\InCharge5\smarts\bin\sm_ntservice --force --remove sm_adapter_vhm


Step 2 Delete the adapter startup script; enter:

Solaris:

# rm /etc/init.d/adapter_startup_script

Windows:

BASEDIR\smarts\bin\sm_ntservice --remove adapter_service_name

where adapter_startup_script (on Solaris) is the name of the adapter script and BASEDIR (on Windows) is the NCM domain manager installation directory. For example, to remove the VHM adapter, you would enter:

Solaris:

# rm /etc/init.d/ncm_vhm_adapter

Windows :

c:\InCharge\smarts\bin\sm_ntservice --remove sm_adapter_vhm

Step 3 Uninstall NCM components as described in the Installation Guide for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor.


Copying Customized DFM and/or VHM Consoles to NCM

You must copy your customized console definition files from the DFM/VHM machine to the NCM machine if all three of the following conditions exist:

You are integrating DFM and/or VHM with NCM

You have customized DFM/VHM console layouts

You want to preserve your customized DFM/VHM consoles

To copy your customized console definition files from DFM/VHM to NCM:


Step 1 Use any file transfer or copy program to copy all the files, which have the .iccon file extension, from:

NMSROOT/CSCOpx/objects/smarts/consoles/startup (on the DFM machine), where NMSROOT is the CiscoWorks installation directory

to:

BASEDIR/smarts/consoles/startup (on the NCM machine), where BASEDIR is the NCM domain consolidation installation directory.

For example, you would copy the .iccon files from:

C:\Program Files\CSCOpx\objects\smarts\consoles\startup (on Windows)

/opt/CSCOpx/objects/smarts/consoles/startup (on Solaris)

to:

C:\InCharge5\smarts\consoles\startup (on Windows)

Solaris: /opt/InCharge5/smarts/consoles/startup (on Solaris)


If you are integrating multiple DFM machines with NCM, and each DFM/VHM machine has different customized consoles, please contact the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC).

Known and Resolved Problems

Table 1 describes problems known to exist in this release. Table 2 describes problems specific to NCM domain manager. Table 3 describes problems specific to NCM domain consolidation.


Note In this document, the term BASEDIR represents the location where NCM software is installed. For NCM Disk 1 (NCM domain manager), the term BASEDIR represents the /opt/InCharge directory for Solaris, the C:\InCharge directory for Windows, or your specified path. For NCM Disk 2 (NCM domain consolidation), the term BASEDIR represents the /opt/InCharge5 directory for Solaris, the C:\InCharge5 directory for Windows, or your specified path. The NCM software resides in the BASEDIR/smarts subdirectory.



Note To obtain more information about known problems, access the Cisco Software Bug Toolkit at http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/Support/Bugtool/home.pl. (You will be prompted to log into Cisco.com.)


Table 1 Known Problems in NCM 1.0 

Bug ID
Summary
Explanation

CSCea71513

NCM server exits when agent behaves erratically

The NCM server exits under certain conditions during which an SNMP agent responds with a valid SNMP response but with no data.

CSCea69415

Catalysts 4000 and 4507 should be categorized as switches, not routers

Catalysts 4000 and 4507 are categorized as routers with interfaces; however, they should be reported as switches with ports.

CSCea25232

sm_server.exe pops up every time computer reboots
(Windows)

Every time the NCM Global Manager on Windows starts (either upon rebooting or restarting the Global Manager), a DOS command window pops up on the screen if Administrator is logged in. This window should be minimized. Closing this window will not stop the Global Manager; however, server side tools (such as Ping or Ping-All) will not run, because they require service interactive access, which this window provides.

CSCea60435

Global console install instructions incorrect

The instructions for the global console only installation in the NCM installation guide and quick start guide state that a prompt appears, asking you to install the NCM broker as a service. This prompt does not appear.

CSCea28101

Host is not a good name for ClassName of SNMP trap

When DFM pass-through traps are displayed in the NCM Notification Log Console, they will be classified as hosts. To obtain the actual class name of the device that generated the SNMP trap, see the ElementClass field of the notification. See the Class and Element Class fields in the following example.


********* snmp link down trap event  *********

ClassName: Host
InstanceName: 172.20.5.2
EventName: linkDown
Class: Host
Name: 172.20.5.2
Event: linkDown
Element Class: Switch
Element Name: 172.20.5.2
Source: Trap Processor
Active: true
Count: 1
First Notify: Mon Feb 24 17:13:24 PST 2003
Last Notify: Mon Feb 24 17:13:24 PST 2003
Last Clear: Wed Dec 31 16:00:00 PST 1969
Last Change: Mon Feb 24 17:13:24 PST 2003
IsRoot: true
Acknowledged: false
Event Type: DURABLE
Event State: ACTIVE
Event Text: Varbinds: 107 FastEthernet5/45 6 Keepalive 
failed
Severity: 1
Impact: 0
--More--(93%)

CSCea61928

NCM processes not installed as services

By default, the NCM processes (ic-broker, ic-icoi-server, ic-sam-server, and ic-trapd-receiver) are not installed as services during the installation process.

To work around the problem, if you did not install the NCM processes as services during the installation of Disk 2, you can install them as services without reinstalling all of the software.

To install NCM processes on Solaris, do the following:

1. Locate the scripts needed to run the services (ic-broker, ic-icoi-server, ic-sam-server, ic-trapd-receiver). The scripts are in the BASEDIR/local/script/ directory (where BASEDIR is /opt/InCharge5).

2. With root privileges, copy the needed files into /etc/init.d/ and symbolically link them in the start and kill directories, as in the following example:

cp BASEDIR/local/script/ic-broker /etc/init.d
ln -s /etc/init.d/ic-broker /etc/rc3.d/S90ic-broker
ln -s /etc/init.d/ic-broker /etc/rc0.d/K96ic-broker
ln -s /etc/init.d/ic-broker /etc/rc1.d/K96ic-broker

To install NCM processes on Windows, do the following:

1. Use the _install.cmd scripts, located in BASEDIR\smarts\local\script, to install the services as in the following example (where BASEDIR is C:\InCharge5):

BASEDIR\smarts\local\script\ic-broker_install

CSCea61957

Need to modify default trap port 162 on NCM server

By default, NCM is configured to listen for traps forwarded from DFM on port 162. This well-known UDP port for SNMP traps may not always be available.

The port setting can be changed in the service. Or, a port can be specified in the trapd.conf file. The file is located in:

BASEDIR/smarts/local/conf/icoi/trapd.conf

The port setting in the service command line always overrides the setting in the configuration file.

To work around the problem, change the port setting.

To change the port setting on Solaris, do the following:

1. Edit the service script /etc/init.d/ic-trapd-receiver and change the value in the line PORT=162

Or, to use the value in the configuration file, comment out the following line and modify it from:

sm_trapd --daemon -s ${REMOTE_DMNAME} -n

${DMNAME} --port=${PORT} --config=${CONFDIR} 
--rules=${RULESET} --ascii -M sm_actions 
--output=${DMNAME}

to:

sm_trapd --daemon -s ${REMOTE_DMNAME} -n
${DMNAME} --config=${CONFDIR} --rules=${RULESET} 
--ascii -M 
sm_actions --output=${DMNAME} ]

2. Start and stop the service to enable the new value.

CSCea61957

Need to modify default trap port 162 on NCM server
(continued)

To change the port setting on Windows, do the following:

1. Remove the service:

bin\sm_ntservice --remove --force ic-trapd-receiver

2. Modify the install script local\script\ic-trapd-receiver_install.cmd:

c:/opt/InCharge5/smarts\bin\sm_ntservice 
--dname="NCM SNMP Trap Adapter" --startmode=auto 
--name=ic-trapd-receiver
--install --sm_trapd -s NCM-OI -n TRAP-NCM-OI 
--port=162
--config=icoi 
--rules=icoi-trapd\\trap_mgr_parse.asl ascii -M
sm_actions --output=TRAP-NCM-OI

Insert the value set in the DFM trap forwarder in place of
- -port=162, or remove this phrase to use the PORT value in BASEDIR\smarts\local\conf\icoi\trapd.conf.

c:/opt/InCharge5/smarts\bin\sm_ntservice 
--dname="NCM SNMP Trap Adapter" --startmode=auto 
--name=ic-trapd-receiver
--install --sm_trapd -s NCM-OI -n TRAP-NCM-OI 
--config=icoi
--rules=icoi-trapd\\trap_mgr_parse.asl --ascii -M 
sm_actions
--output=TRAP-NCM-OI

3. Install the service by running this command file (where BASEDIR is C:\InCharge5):

BASEDIR\smarts\local\script\ic-trapd-receiver_insta
ll

If the - -port=162 phrase is removed, the PORT value in the trapd.conf file must be changed from PORT:9000 to the required value.

4. Start the service with the new values via Windows service or by this command:

net start ic-trapd-receiver

CSCea30969

NCM install displays incorrect options
(Windows)

On Disk 2, the Product Selection menu displays the following options:

Service Assurance Manager (SAM)
Basic SMART Adapters for SAM
Global Console

These options are incorrect. They should be displayed as follows:

Domain Consolidation
SNMP Trap Adapter
Global Console

Also, the installation program displays the following choices as services to be installed:

NCM Broker
Service Assurance Manager
Basic SMART Adapter 
Trap Receiver

The choices should be as follows:

NCM Broker
Domain Consolidation
SNMP Trap Adapter 
Open Integration Server

CSCea61960

NCM server should not be installable on Windows XP

NCM supports only the console on Windows XP. The installation process does not prevent the installation of other NCM components or applications even though they are unsupported. In the Select Components Window, select only the check box for Console.

If you started the installation process with additional components selected, cancel it. If other components are installed on hosts running the Windows XP operating system, use Add/Remove Programs from the Control Panel to remove the installed components. For instructions to uninstall NCM, see the Installation Guide for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor.

CSCea61964

Client connection attempt times out after 60 seconds

When <PROMPT> is specified for the NCM username field of the clientConnect.conf file, a user must type a username, and possibly a password, when invoking a client program. If the username and password (if required) are not entered within 60 seconds, the operation will timeout and report an I/O error. This timeout only affects clients started from the command line; it does not affect the Global Console.

To work around this problem, type the username and password before 60 seconds elapse. If the operation cannot be completed before the timeout, you can reinvoke the command. If 60 seconds elapse, you will also have to restore the terminal's echo state by entering the following command:

% stty echo icanon

Because the terminal echo is disabled, you will not be able to see the command as you type it.

CSCea61967

Echo disabled if user exits unexpectedly (Solaris)

When the clientConnect.conf file is configured to prompt the user for a password, the terminal echo is disabled so that the typed password is not displayed. If the client program exits during the password prompt, the terminal's echo state is not reset.

To work around this problem, restore the terminal's echo state by entering the following command:

% stty echo icanon

Because the terminal echo is disabled, you will not be able to see the command as you type it.


Table 2 Known Problems in NCM Domain Manager 

Bug ID
Summary
Explanation

CSCea61977

MACs not removed when deleting device

During the Bridge probe of a switch, a MAC object is created for each valid MAC address in the bridge forwarding table. BridgedVia relationships to the Port object are also established. If the MAC address is found to belong to a system through the interface table or the ARP cache (for devices that do not support SNMP), the Layer 2 connectivity is built between the system and the switch. The BridgedVia relationship between the port and the MAC is kept untouched during post processing so that NCM domain manager can build connectivity without rediscovery of the switch. For example, if a host that has a MAC address associated with a switch port is added to the topology, only the host needs to be discovered in order to build Layer 2 connectivity between the host and the switch.

However, this practice prevents discovery from building more accurate Layer 2 topology because one of the conditions to build the cable between a port and an interface is that the port must correspond to only one MAC object. It is not unusual for the bridge forwarding table to contain MAC addresses that are totally irrelevant to the networks that are being managed by NCM.

If a MAC object does not belong to any system, empty its BridgedVia relationship. This is required to discover or rediscover all of the neighboring devices in order to build the connectivity correctly. Regularly scheduled full rediscovery should be sufficient.

To work around this problem, use the following command to revert to the old behavior:

dmctl -s <server> invoke 
ICF_TopologyManager::ICF-TopologyManager insertParameter 
PruneSystemlessMAC FALSE

To enable again, use:

dmctl -s <server> invoke 
ICF_TopologyManager::ICF-TopologyManager insertParameter 
PruneSystemlessMAC TRUE

CSCea62390

Misconfigured DNS causes name resolution problems

The discovery of Windows-based devices may use NetBIOS to resolve the IP addresses of these devices to names. When NCM domain manager resolves the NetBIOS name, it may resolve to an IP address through which the SNMP agent is not reachable. As a result, if the device does not respond to SNMP requests, it is added to the Pending Devices List with the message No Response from SNMP Agents.

To work around this problem, check the Non-SNMP box in the Pending Devices List and then select Discover Pending from the Topology menu of the Administration Console. This will cause the discovery process to use the IP address of the device instead of resolving the NetBIOS name.

Note We recommend that you disable NetBIOS over TCP/IP on systems where NCM domain manager is running. If that is not possible, NetBIOS names should be made consistent with DNS names.

CSCea62396

Diagnosis of Card Down problem on LS1010 switches

To diagnose a Card Down problem, the NCM domain manager needs to query the MIB variable ciscoLS1010ModuleOperStatus. However, this MIB variable is often not implemented on LS1010 switches. As a result, diagnosis of Card Down problems is disabled.

If the MIB variable ciscoLS1010ModuleOperStatus is available in the SNMP agent, contact Cisco TAC for assistance.

CSCea62402

Card status not updated when card is reinserted

After discovering a switch, the NCM domain manager uses the ModuleInsertion trap to monitor the status of cards within the switch. When NCM receives a ModuleDown trap, it marks the card as OperationallyDown. When NCM receives a ModuleUp trap, it adds the switch to the Pending Devices List so that the switch is rediscovered and the status of the card is updated. Upon reinsertion of the card, the status may not be updated.

NCM domain manager currently supports the ModuleInsertion trap for Cisco switches.

If you have a switch where the status of a card in not updated when it is reinserted, contact Cisco TAC. Cisco routinely adds support for new devices through Incremental Device Update (IDU) releases.

CSCea62410

Responsive device is reported as Down

The NCM domain manager may generate a Down notification for a device even though there is a responsive IP endpoint or agent.

All IP endpoints or agents must be unresponsive in order for a Down notification to be generated for a device. If at least one IP endpoint is responsive, the device is active and, depending upon the topology, the NCM domain manager generates IP Down notifications for the individual IP endpoints.

CSCea62413

Administratively disabled subinterfaces display Interface Down status

The physical interface of a router may have multiple subinterfaces. Ideally, these subinterfaces should assume the same status as their associated interface. But, on some routers, when the physical interface is administratively disabled (AdminStatus DOWN), the subinterfaces do not assume that DOWN state. Instead, the subinterfaces retain their AdminStatus UP state, which results in an Interface Down notification in NCM domain manager.

Subinterfaces now assume the same status as their associated interface. On routers, when the physical interface is administratively disabled (AdminStatus DOWN), the subinterfaces also assume the DOWN state. As a result, an Interface Down notification is not generated, because NCM domain manager does not consider disabling an element via an explicit user request to be a reportable condition.

To work around this problem, you can configure NCM domain manager to generate an Interface Disabled notification by enabling the DisabledNotificationMode parameter of the Connectivity setting. See the User Guide for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor for information about the DisabledNotificationMode parameter.

CSCea62420

Subinterfaces do not correspond with physical Interface Down status

When the physical interface of a router is operationally down (AdminStatus UP and OperStatus DOWN), all of its subinterfaces become operationally down. As a result, the underlying NCM domain manager might generate multiple Interface Down notifications for certain interface configurations.

If the physical interface of a router is down, NCM generates one Interface Down notification for the physical interface as long as the NCM domain manager can associate subinterfaces with their physical interface based on the information in the SNMP MIB. Multiple Interface Down notifications for the subinterfaces are not displayed.

CSCea62428

InstallShield error Insufficient Memory
(Windows)

For Windows only, NCM Disk 1 SETUP.EXE fails on systems with large amounts of extended memory (greater than 2 GB of RAM). The error code is 111, Insufficient memory available to run Setup, even though there is sufficient memory available.

To work around this problem, do the following:

1. First, determine whether your system has sufficient memory. Refer to the Installation Guide for CiscoWorks Network Connectivity Monitor for hardware and software requirements.

2. If your system has sufficient memory, you can disable the InstallShield memory check routine. Specify the following command from your CD-ROM drive:

\windows\setup.exe -z

The -z option prevents the SETUP.EXE from reporting any errors due to available memory during the initialization process. We strongly recommend that you verify your system's available memory before using this option.

For more information, consult the InstallShield document Insufficient Memory Error Occurs When Launching Setup.exe on Systems with Too Much Extended Memory (Document ID Q101828) at the InstallShield Web site.


Table 3 Known Problems in NCM Domain Consolidation 

Bug ID
Summary
Explanation

CSCea62787

Global Console applet does not work on localhost

If you start the NCM Global Console applet, you cannot log in to the Global Manager if:

You use either localhost or the loopback IP address (127.0.0.1) for the server name

The hostname does not resolve through DNS

To work around this problem, use the NCM Global Console instead.

CSCea62447

Domain consolidation does not represent same class as domain managers

NCM domain consolidation classes represent a top-level abstraction of all underlying domain managers. For example, a CallManager class in VHM may be abstracted as a Host or CallManager class in NCM.

CSCea62454

Map Console not supported in NCM Console applet

The Map Console is not supported with the Java applet for any platform.

CSCea62464

Client tool may not stop if ignoring SIGTERM

For client tools, when you press the Stop button in the Tool Output window, the client process may not stop. Processes (such as shell scripts) that do not respond to a SIGTERM signal will not stop.

To work around this problem, use a script that responds to a SIGTERM signal. Or, terminate the client process manually from the command line or by using the Task Manager.

CSCea62470

Cannot launch NCM admin console from console applet

You cannot launch the NCM Administration Console from the Global Console Java applet.

CSCea62485

Server tool does not work with X-Window

If you are running the Global Console as a Java applet, server tools that open an X Window on the client are not supported. For example, the sample Telnet tool program is not supported for applet clients.

CSCea62694

Recommending Windows Diagnostics tool
(Windows)

If you are running domain consolidation on Windows, we recommend that you use the Dr. Watson diagnostic tool as your debugger. Dr. Watson gathers information about your computer when a problem occurs with a program, and is typically the default tool on computers running Windows operating systems. If Dr. Watson is not currently set as your computer's diagnostic tool, you can set it with the command:

c:\>drwtsn32 -i

If you are using a different diagnostic tool, Cisco TAC may not be able to acquire as much diagnostic information if problems occur.

For more information about Dr. Watson, refer to your Microsoft documentation.

CSCea62700

Ping and Telnet tools have access constraints

The sample scripts for ping and Telnet server tools, located in your BASEDIR/smarts/local/actions/server directory, may not work properly in all cases.

For example, the sample scripts do not take firewalls into account. If an underlying NCM domain manager generates an IP Down notification and a firewall exists between the device and the domain consolidation global manager, the domain consolidation Ping tool cannot ping the IP address. The ping script is invoked from the same host as the global manager.

The ping and Telnet tools are sample scripts. You need to customize them to meet the needs of your environment.

CSCea62703

Some notifier configuration parameters are ignored

Values specified for the MinimumCertainty and eventSmoothingInterval parameters in the configuration file of E-Mail Notifier, File Notifier, SNMP Trap Notifier, Script Notifier, and automated actions are ignored.

In the configuration file of the affected adapters, the MinimumCertainty and eventSmoothingInterval parameters are not supported.

You can define a notification list with notification list filters and minimum certainty in the global manager's configuration file (ics.conf) and apply them to adapters. You cannot define a smoothing interval using the adapter's configuration file.

For minimum certainty, you can specify a notification list filter that matches the Certainty field against a numeric value.

For example,

match("Certainty", "<30->")

results in a minimum certainty of 30%.

The name of a notification list in the global manager's configuration file (ics.conf) must match the NLName parameter value in the adapters' configuration file. Adapters receive notifications as determined by the notification list name specified for the NLName parameter.

CSCea62715

Use sm_sched instead of or other Windows scheduler

Users might experience some problems running processes or commands at regularly scheduled intervals in Windows (for example, jobs stop running and scheduled jobs do not start).

To work around this problem, use the sm_sched utility to schedule jobs on any operating system. You can use this standalone utility for processes or commands that you typically run with the Solaris cron scheduling facility or the Windows at command. For instructions about how to use the sm_sched utility, refer to BASEDIR/smarts/doc/html/usage/index.html.

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Adjusting memory for java dynamic memory allocation

The host machine is experiencing degraded performance due to memory swapping.

The -H option for the sm_gui command enables you to adjust the maximum amount of memory space ("heap size") that Java uses for dynamic memory allocation. The default value for the maximum "heap size" is 256 MB.

To work around this problem, you can improve performance by specifying the sm_gui command with the -H option:

sm_gui -H valueM

Specify the -H option once. One space after the -H is required. The value you specify can be greater or less than the 256 MB default, depending upon the host machine. The character "M" (uppercase or lowercase) is required; do not insert a space between the value and the M.

The heap size can be up to the following approximate values:

Solaris 2.6 (5.6)—2000 MB

Solaris 7 and 8 (5.7, 5.8)—4000 MB

Windows NT and 2000—2000 MB

For example, if the available memory for a host machine is 256 MB, you can specify 100 MB for the heap size:

sm_gui -H 100m

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Improving performance of a remote console over WAN link

If you are running the console remotely over a WAN connection you may experience degraded performance. This is due to inefficiencies in the underlying Java implementation.

To work around this problem, improve performance in this situation by specifying the sm_gui command with the -d option. For example:

sm_gui -d

This command reduces the amount of data passed. Only use it if you are experiencing poor performance.

Note When running the console locally, the -d option will degrade performance and is not recommended.

The -d option disables double buffering, so painting of screen updates may be more noticeable. Also, entries in the topology tree may "spill over" into the right side of the Topology Browser.

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Default user profile is required for login

When you log in to a global manager, if the specified username (for example, admin or operator) does not correspond to a user profile defined in the ics.conf file for the global manager, the default user profile is used instead. If the default user profile does not exist, you receive an error message and the Global Console does not open. This is expected behavior.

If you are already attached to a global manager and you attempt to attach to a second global manager that does not have a default user profile, you may observe the following types of behavior:

The second global manager appears to be attached; its name is listed in the Global Manager pull-down menu of the Notification Log Console. However, the Notification Log view is blank.

If you switch and select the first global manager in the Global Manager pull-down menu, notifications that previously displayed in the view no longer appear. (To redisplay the notifications, detach from the second global manager.)

If you detach and reattach to the second global manager, you may receive messages that the console cannot attach to the global manager or that the console is already is attached. If you continue to try to detach and reattach, None is listed repeatedly in the Global Manager pull-down menu.

Cisco provides two user profiles, default and maint, in the UserSection of the ics.conf file. Neither profile should be deleted, especially the default. You must have a default user profile defined in the ics.conf file of every global manager. Or, create a profile in the ics.conf file for every username that is allowed to access the global manager. The file is located in the BASEDIR/smarts/local/conf/ics directory.

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Global Managers need unique names to start

The domain consolidation installation procedure installs a Global Manager with the default name NCM-dc. If the global manager is started and another global manager (with the same name) is already running, the global manager will not start properly. For Windows, a log file is not written and messages are not reported to the Event Viewer. For Solaris, a log file is written.

To work around the problem, do the following:

1. Check the NCM Broker to determine if the NCM-dc Global Manager is running on the correct host.

2. If the Global Manager is not running, you can do one of the following:

a. Stop the other copy of NCM-dc and restart the correct global manager.

b. Change the names of the global managers to eliminate the conflict.

To change the global manager name in the Windows registry, do the following:

1. Use the sm_ntservice command to remove the global manager service:

BASEDIR\smarts\bin\sm_ntservice --remove 
sm_sam_server

2. Register the global manager with a new name. Type the command as one line:

BASEDIR\smarts\bin\sm_ntservice --autostart  
--dname="Global Manager" --install sm_sam_server 
--output --confdir=BASEDIR\smarts\conf\ics 
--name=New_name

To change the global manager name on Solaris, edit the DMNAME=NCM-dc parameter in the ic-sam-server or S92ic-sam-server file, depending upon your Solaris platform. The file is located in the following start-up directory: /etc/init.d/ic-sam-server.


Obtaining Documentation

Cisco provides several ways to obtain documentation, technical assistance, and other technical resources. These sections explain how to obtain technical information from Cisco Systems.

Cisco.com

You can access the most current Cisco documentation on the World Wide Web at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/home/home.htm

You can access the Cisco website at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com

International Cisco web sites can be accessed from this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/public/countries_languages.shtml

Documentation CD-ROM

Cisco documentation and additional literature are available in a Cisco Documentation CD-ROM package, which may have shipped with your product. The Documentation CD-ROM is updated monthly and may be more current than printed documentation. The CD-ROM package is available as a single unit or through an annual subscription.

Registered Cisco.com users can order the Documentation CD-ROM (product number DOC-CONDOCCD=) through the online Subscription Store:

http://www.cisco.com/go/subscription

Ordering Documentation

You can find instructions for ordering documentation at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/es_inpck/pdi.htm

You can order Cisco documentation in these ways:

Registered Cisco.com users (Cisco direct customers) can order Cisco product documentation from the Networking Products MarketPlace:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/ordering/index.shtml

Registered Cisco.com users can order the Documentation CD-ROM (Customer Order Number DOC-CONDOCCD=) through the online Subscription Store:

http://www.cisco.com/go/subscription

Nonregistered Cisco.com users can order documentation through a local account representative by calling Cisco Systems Corporate Headquarters (California, U.S.A.) at 408 526-7208 or, elsewhere in North America, by calling 800 553-NETS (6387).

Documentation Feedback

You can submit comments electronically on Cisco.com. On the Cisco Documentation home page, click Feedback at the top of the page.

You can email your comments to bug-doc@cisco.com.

You can submit your comments by mail by using the response card behind the front cover of your document or by writing to the following address:

Cisco Systems
Attn: Customer Document Ordering
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, CA 95134-9883

We appreciate your comments.

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco provides Cisco.com, which includes the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) Website, as a starting point for all technical assistance. Customers and partners can obtain online documentation, troubleshooting tips, and sample configurations from the Cisco TAC website. Cisco.com registered users have complete access to the technical support resources on the Cisco TAC website, including TAC tools and utilities.

Cisco.com

Cisco.com offers a suite of interactive, networked services that let you access Cisco information, networking solutions, services, programs, and resources at any time, from anywhere in the world.

Cisco.com provides a broad range of features and services to help you with these tasks:

Streamline business processes and improve productivity

Resolve technical issues with online support

Download and test software packages

Order Cisco learning materials and merchandise

Register for online skill assessment, training, and certification programs

To obtain customized information and service, you can self-register on Cisco.com at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com

Technical Assistance Center

The Cisco TAC is available to all customers who need technical assistance with a Cisco product, technology, or solution. Two levels of support are available: the Cisco TAC website and the Cisco TAC Escalation Center. The avenue of support that you choose depends on the priority of the problem and the conditions stated in service contracts, when applicable.

We categorize Cisco TAC inquiries according to urgency:

Priority level 4 (P4)—You need information or assistance concerning Cisco product capabilities, product installation, or basic product configuration.

Priority level 3 (P3)—Your network performance is degraded. Network functionality is noticeably impaired, but most business operations continue.

Priority level 2 (P2)—Your production network is severely degraded, affecting significant aspects of business operations. No workaround is available.

Priority level 1 (P1)—Your production network is down, and a critical impact to business operations will occur if service is not restored quickly. No workaround is available.

Cisco TAC Website

You can use the Cisco TAC website to resolve P3 and P4 issues yourself, saving both cost and time. The site provides around-the-clock access to online tools, knowledge bases, and software. To access the Cisco TAC website, go to this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/tac

All customers, partners, and resellers who have a valid Cisco service contract have complete access to the technical support resources on the Cisco TAC website. Some services on the Cisco TAC website require a Cisco.com login ID and password. If you have a valid service contract but do not have a login ID or password, go to this URL to register:

http://tools.cisco.com/RPF/register/register.do

If you are a Cisco.com registered user, and you cannot resolve your technical issues by using the Cisco TAC website, you can open a case online at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/support/index.html

If you have Internet access, we recommend that you open P3 and P4 cases through the Cisco TAC website so that you can describe the situation in your own words and attach any necessary files.

Cisco TAC Escalation Center

The Cisco TAC Escalation Center addresses priority level 1 or priority level 2 issues. These classifications are assigned when severe network degradation significantly impacts business operations. When you contact the TAC Escalation Center with a P1 or P2 problem, a Cisco TAC engineer automatically opens a case.

To obtain a directory of toll-free Cisco TAC telephone numbers for your country, go to this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/687/Directory/DirTAC.shtml

Before calling, please check with your network operations center to determine the level of Cisco support services to which your company is entitled: for example, SMARTnet, SMARTnet Onsite, or Network Supported Accounts (NSA). When you call the center, please have available your service agreement number and your product serial number.

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information

Information about Cisco products, technologies, and network solutions is available from various online and printed sources.

The Cisco Product Catalog describes the networking products offered by Cisco Systems as well as ordering and customer support services. Access the Cisco Product Catalog at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/products_catalog_links_launch.html

Cisco Press publishes a wide range of networking publications. Cisco suggests these titles for new and experienced users: Internetworking Terms and Acronyms Dictionary, Internetworking Technology Handbook, Internetworking Troubleshooting Guide, and the Internetworking Design Guide. For current Cisco Press titles and other information, go to Cisco Press online at this URL:

http://www.ciscopress.com

Packet magazine is the Cisco monthly periodical that provides industry professionals with the latest information about the field of networking. You can access Packet magazine at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/about/ac123/ac114/about_cisco_packet_magazine.html

iQ Magazine is the Cisco monthly periodical that provides business leaders and decision makers with the latest information about the networking industry. You can access iQ Magazine at this URL:

http://business.cisco.com/prod/tree.taf%3fasset_id=44699&public_view=true&kbns=1.html

Internet Protocol Journal is a quarterly journal published by Cisco Systems for engineering professionals involved in the design, development, and operation of public and private internets and intranets. You can access the Internet Protocol Journal at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/about/ac123/ac147/about_cisco_the_internet_protocol_journal.html

Training—Cisco offers world-class networking training, with current offerings in network training listed at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/learning/le31/learning_recommended_training_list.html