Cisco Active Network Abstraction Administrator Guide, 3.7.2
Basic AVM and VNE Administration Tasks
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Basic AVM and VNE Administration Tasks

Table Of Contents

Basic AVM and VNE Administration Tasks

Overview of AVMs

Understanding AVM Status

Creating AVMs, Viewing, and Editing AVM Properties

Verifying That AVMs Are Operating Properly

Changing AVM Status (Start or Stop)

Moving and Deleting AVMs

Viewing VNE Status

Moving VNEs to a Different AVM

Deleting a VNE


Basic AVM and VNE Administration Tasks


These topics describe the basic management tasks that you can perform on Cisco ANA AVMs and VNEs:

Overview of AVMs

Understanding AVM Status

Creating AVMs, Viewing, and Editing AVM Properties

Verifying That AVMs Are Operating Properly

Changing AVM Status (Start or Stop)

Moving and Deleting AVMs

Viewing VNE Status

Moving VNEs to a Different AVM

Deleting a VNE

See these topics for information on advanced VNE administration:

VNE Administration: VNE Lifecycle and Creating VNEs, page 19-1

Troubleshooting VNE Modeling, page 20-1

VNE Updates, page 21-1

Overview of AVMs

AVMs are Java processes (independent JVMs) with their own dedicated memory. AVMs are mostly used to provide the necessary distribution support platform for executing and monitoring multiple VNEs. The following AVMs are always created on the gateway; some are also created on units.

You can add AVMs to units or directly to a gateway, using any number (that is unique to the unit) between 101-999. Every AVM requires a dedicated TCP port, and the port is created using the following naming convention:

AVM-ID + 2000

For example, if you created AVM 711, it would use port 2711. The appropriate TCP port must be available or the AVM creation will fail, unless you stop the application that is using the port before you create the AVM. (A complete list of ports used by Cisco ANA is provided in the Cisco Active Network Abstraction 3.7.2 Installation Guide.) Every AVM has its own log in $ANAHOME/Main/logs.

The Cisco ANA Watchdog Protocol monitors the AVM processes to make sure any AVMs that have stopped are restarted. For information on the Watchdog Protocol, see Managing the Watchdog Protocol, page 17-12.

Reserved AVMs

The following Cisco ANA AVMs are reserved and cannot be edited or deleted. For information on how to use the anactl command to check AVM status, see Starting and Stopping the Gateway, page 2-3.

Table 4-1 Reserved AVMs 

AVM #
Purpose
Is installed on...
Can be checked using 1 ...
GW
Unit
GUI
anactl

AVM 0

High Availability/Switch AVM—Enables communication between the unit and other units, as well as the gateway. See Unit Server High Availability and AVM Protection, page 17-1.

X

X

X

AVM 11

Gateway AVM—Manages the gateway server and other processes running on it. See Basic Gateway Server Administration Tasks, page 2-1.

X

X

AVM 25

Event persistence AVM—Processes event information (in each unit), including updates and new correlation information, and generates new tickets when required. See Managing the ANA Event Collector (AVM 100), page 15-1.

X

X

X

X

AVM 66

Workflow engine AVM—Defines rules and dependencies to activate business and network processes. See Workflow Administration Tasks, page 13-1.

X

X

X

AVM 77

Reserved for use by Cisco ANA Configuration and Image Management (when installed).

X

X

X

AVM 78

VNE topology AVM—Distributes topology information among VNEs.

X

X

X

AVM 83

TFTP Server—Reserved for use by Cisco ANA Configuration and Image Management (when installed) if using TFTP.

X

X

X

AVM 84

Reports AVM—Manages the reporting framework.

X

X

AVM 99

Management AVM—Manages the unit and the other AVMs running on the unit (or gateway, if there are no separate units). See Basic Unit Server Administration Tasks, page 3-1.

X

X

X

AVM 100

ANA Event Collector (AEC) AVM—Listens for and receives traps and syslog notifications from devices, and forwards them to corresponding VNEs. See Managing the ANA Event Collector (AVM 100), page 15-1.

X

X

X

X

1 You can also check AVM status using the system health and diagnostics tool; see Obtaining Diagnostic Information Using Graphs, page 10-2.


To check the basic system health of AVMs, see Obtaining Diagnostic Information Using Graphs, page 10-2.

Understanding AVM Status

AVM status describes the condition of the AVM process on the unit or gateway. AVM status is determined by a combination of the AVM's administrative and operational modes:

AVM administrative mode indicates whether or not Cisco ANA should recognize or ignore administration instructions sent to the AVM. This mode is entirely user-directed. You can control this mode from the ANA Servers branch. See Changing AVM Status (Start or Stop).

AVM operational mode describes the health and condition of the AVM process on the gateway (for example, whether the gateway can reach the AVM).


Note The AVM Admin and Oper modes are not displayed in Cisco ANA Manage; they are implicit in the overall status. Only the overall AVM status is displayed in the GUI.


Table 4-2 describes how the combination of AVM administrative and operational modes determine the overall AVM status.

Table 4-2 AVM Status 

AVM Status
Description

Starting Up

When a Start (command) option is issued.

Up

The AVM process is reachable, was loaded, and has started. This is the status when the AVM is created (and you selected Activate Upon Creation), and no problems are encountered.

Shutting Down

When a Stop (command) option is issued and, while the command is being run, some processes are still running, the status of the AVM is Shutting Down.

Down

The AVM process is reachable, but was stopped. This is the status when a Stop (command) is issued. The AVM is both operationally and administratively down.

Unreachable

The AVM process cannot be reached by the gateway, so the AVM cannot be managed.

Disconnected

The AVM is on a unit that was disconnected from the gateway (the unit has a Disconnected status).


When moving an AVM, its status has a bearing on whether the process is automatically reloaded. If its status is Up, it is reloaded; if its status is down, it is not reloaded. For more information about moving AVMs, see Moving and Deleting AVMs.

Creating AVMs, Viewing, and Editing AVM Properties, shows how you can check the status of AVMs. You can also get AVM diagnostic information using the system health and diagnostics tool; see Obtaining Diagnostic Information Using Graphs, page 10-2.

Creating AVMs, Viewing, and Editing AVM Properties

When you right-click an AVM in the navigation tree and choose Properties, Cisco ANA displays the AVM properties, as shown in Figure 4-1 and described in Table 4-3. You must have Administrator privileges (user access role) to use this and all other functions in Cisco ANA Manage.

Figure 4-1 AVM Properties Dialog Box

Table 4-3 AVM Properties 

Field
Description

Key

The name of the AVM as defined in Cisco ANA. The key uniquely identifies an AVM in the system, across all units, thus enabling a transparent failover scenario in the system. Note that the key can be different from the ID (AVM number); the ID is listed in the AVMs table when you select the parent unit or gateway server.

This field is editable.

Status

The status of the unit: Up, Down, Unreachable, Disconnected.

To find out how long the AVM has been Up, check the AVMs table, which is displayed when you select the parent unit or gateway server.

Up

The unit process is reachable, was loaded, and has started.

Down

The unit is reachable, but was stopped. This is the status when an anactl stop command is issued. The unit is both operationally and administratively down.

Unreachable

The unit cannot be reached by the gateway, so it cannot be managed.

Disconnected

The unit was disconnected from the gateway (normally a temporary measure to address a problem).

Unit Data

IP Address

The IP address of the parent unit.

Available Memory

The amount of memory that is currently available on the parent unit (note time stamp).

Allocated Memory

The amount of memory that is allocated to the AVM.

This field is editable.

Enable AVM Protection

If the check box is checked, AVM protection (the watchdog protocol) is enabled. For more information, see Managing the Watchdog Protocol, page 17-12.

Note It is highly recommended that you do not disable this option if unit high availability is enabled. If you change the option when the AVM is up, you must disable and re-enable the AVM for the change to take effect.

This field is editable.


The following procedure explains how to add new AVMs to a unit. By default, every AVM in the Cisco ANA fabric is managed by the watchdog protocol. Cisco ANA enables the administrator to define AVMs for units, and allows the administrator to enable or disable the watchdog protocol on the AVM.

You must have Administrator privileges (user access role) to use this and all other functions in Cisco ANA Manage.

Before You Begin

If you need deployment information and recommendations, such as AVM memory requirements, contact your Cisco account representative.

Decide which unit you want to use to install the AVM. The unit must be installed and connected to the transport network.

Confirm that AVM 0, AVM 99, and AVM 100 are running. For more information on the status of AVMs, see Changing AVM Status (Start or Stop).


Note AVM numbers 0-100 are reserved, and cannot be used. In addition, there might be other reserved AVM numbers.


To create or view an AVM:


Step 1 Expand the ANA Servers branch and select the required entity.

Step 2 Open the New AVM dialog box by right-clicking the required unit (or gateway), then choose New AVM. To view an existing AVM, right-click the AVM and select Properties.

Step 3 Enter the following information to create a new AVM. The unit does not have to be up to create the AVM.

Field
Description

ANA Unit

IP address of the unit on which the AVM will run.

Unit Available Memory

Available memory in the unit on which the AVM will run.

ID

The name (a number) of the AVM as defined in Cisco ANA. It must be a unique number between 101-999. AVMs 0-100 are reserved and cannot be used.

The AVM will use the TCP port (AVM_xxx + 2000). For example, if you create AVM 711, port number 2711 will be dedicated to that AVM. The appropriate TCP port must be available or the AVM creation will fail, unless you stop the application that is using the port before you create the AVM. (A complete list of ports used by Cisco ANA is provided in the Cisco Active Network Abstraction 3.7.2 Installation Guide.)

Key

A string that uniquely identifies an AVM in the system, across all units, thus enabling a transparent failover scenario in the system. If you do not enter a key, the default key, ID+time_stamp, is used.

Allocated Memory

The maximum memory allocated to the AVM, in megabytes. The default is 256. If you need deployment information and recommendations, such as AVM memory requirements, contact your Cisco account representative.

Activate on Creation

Loads the AVM into the bootstrap of the unit. This changes the administrative status of the AVM to Up and ensures that the AVM is loaded on subsequent restarts of the unit. By default this option is unchecked, and the newly created AVM has an administrative status of Down.

Enable AVM Protection

By default this check box is checked, enabling the watchdog protocol on the AVM. For more information, see Managing the Watchdog Protocol, page 17-12.

Note It is highly recommended that you do not disable this option. If you change the option when the AVM is up, you must disable and re-enable the AVM for the change to take effect.


Step 4 Click OK. The new AVM is added to the selected unit, is displayed in the content area, and is activated.

If you edited an existing AVM property you have to restart the AVM for your changes to take effect.


Creating a new AVM results in Cisco ANA providing the registry information of the new AVM in the specified unit. The AVM can now host VNEs.

Verifying That AVMs Are Operating Properly

Cisco ANA provides a web-based diagnostics tool that provides information about AVMs, such as Java heap, dropped messages, CPU usage, and so forth. This data is provided in the form of graphs so you can quickly identify problems.


Step 1 Enter https://gateway_ip:1311/graphs in your browser where gateway_ip is the gateway IP address.

A security alert is displayed regarding the site certificate.

Step 2 Click Yes, and enter the username and password.

By default, the diagnostics tool displays load statistics collected during the past hour for the gateway and unit servers (the MC Loads graphs). You can select a sampling period by choosing from the Period drop-down list and clicking Submit.

Step 3 Click the hyperlink for the gateway or unit that contains the AVMs in which you are interested. (The gateway is always 127.0.0.1; units are represented by their IP address.)

This launches a display of information for each AVM on the gateway or unit.

The first row displays aggregated AVM information for the unit. The rows that follow displays information about one AVM (units listed before the gateway).

Each column displays one graph type.


For information on the graph types and how to interpret them, see Obtaining Diagnostic Information Using Graphs, page 10-2.

Changing AVM Status (Start or Stop)

You can use the Cisco ANA Manage GUI to start or stop an AVM.

Start—Starts the AVM process. The VNE will move through a status of Starting Up to Up. When the AVM is Up, its process is running and it is reachable.

Stop—Stops the AVM process. The AVM will move through a status of Shutting Down to Down. Stopping an AVM stops all the VNEs in the AVM. Any VNEs that were in maintenance mode will move to Down, and the Maintenance indicator in the AVMs window will display false.


Note Any change in status of the AVMs may take some time to be applied. For example, when running the Stop command, it may take several minutes before the status changes from Shutting Down to Down.


You must have Administrator privileges (user access role) to use this and all other functions in Cisco ANA Manage.

To start or stop an AVM:


Step 1 Expand the ANA Servers branch, then select the required AVM.

Step 2 Start or stop the AVM in one of the following ways:

Right-click the AVM, then choose Actions > Start or Actions > Stop.

In the toolbar, click Start or Stop.


The AVM is started or stopped, and the appropriate status is displayed in the content area.


Note When the AVM status is displayed as Down, the status remains Down and no reload occurs.


Moving and Deleting AVMs

You can move an entire AVM between units. You can also move groups of AVMs to the same unit in one operation. AVMs 0-100 are reserved and cannot be moved.

If the AVM is up, it is stopped, and then it is moved to the target unit. After the move is completed, the AVM is reloaded, maintaining the status it was in before the move.


Note Alarm persistency information is saved when you move an AVM to another unit. For more information, see Persistency Overview, page 26-1.


When you move an AVM, VNEs that were in maintenance mode will be moved to the VNE Down state; their Maintenance indicator in the AVMs window will change from true to false.

If you want to delete an AVM that is running, it is stopped before being removed. This procedure deletes the registry information of the AVM in the specified unit. If there are VNEs running in the AVM, then an error message is displayed, and you cannot delete the AVM. For more information, see Deleting a VNE. You cannot delete reserved AVMs (see Overview of AVMs)

You must have Administrator privileges (user access role) to use this and all other functions in Cisco ANA Manage.

To move an AVM:


Step 1 In Cisco ANA Manage, right-click the selected AVM, then choose Move AVM.

The Move To dialog box appears, displaying a tree-and-branch representation of the selected Cisco ANA server and its units, excluding the unit in which the AVM is currently located. The highest level of the navigation tree displays the Cisco ANA server. The branches can be expanded and collapsed to display and hide information.

Step 2 Browse to and select the unit (branch) where you want to move the AVMs.

Step 3 Click OK. The AVM is moved and now appears beneath the selected unit.


Note Because the system is asynchronous, changes may not appear in the GUI immediately. It may be a few minutes until the GUI client receives a notification from the server and is updated.



For information about moving VNEs, see Moving VNEs to a Different AVM.

Use the following procedure to delete an AVM.

Before You Begin

Remove all VNEs from the AVM, or the deletion will fail. See Deleting a VNE.

To delete an AVM:


Step 1 Select the required AVM in the navigation tree. You may select multiple rows.

Step 2 Right-click to display the menu, then choose Delete. A warning message is displayed.

Step 3 Click Yes. A confirmation message is displayed.

Step 4 Click OK. The selected AVM is deleted from the selected unit.


Note Because the system is asynchronous, changes may not appear in the GUI immediately. It may be a few minutes until the GUI client receives a notification from the server and is updated.



Viewing VNE Status

VNE status indicates the administrative condition of the VNE: Starting Up, Up, Shutting Down, Down. If the gateway server cannot communicate with the VNE, the VNE status will be Unreachable. (Remember that this is the status of the entity that models the device, not the device itself. The device may still be processing network traffic; it is just not connecting to Cisco ANA.) This information is displayed in Cisco ANA Manage when you select an AVM (see Figure 4-2).

Figure 4-2 VNE Status in AVM Window

Starting and stopping VNEs is entirely user-directed, as explained in Changing VNE Status and Lifecycle (Start, Stop, Maintenance), page 19-38. Table 4-4 lists the possible VNE status values that you may see in a table of VNEs.

Table 4-4 VNE Status 

VNE Status
Description

Starting Up

A Start (command) option was issued.

Up

The VNE process is reachable, was loaded, and has started. This is the status when a Start command is issued (or when you create a VNE and choose Start as its initial status), and no problems are encountered (such as an overloaded server).

Shutting Down

A Stop (command) option was issued and, while the command is being run, some processes are still running, the status of the VNE is Shutting Down.

Down

The VNE process is reachable, but was stopped. This is the status when a Stop command is issued. The VNE is both operationally and administratively down.

VNEs that were in maintenance mode will move to the Down state in the following circumstances:

The VNE was moved.

The AVM was restarted or moved.

The unit was disconnected or was switched to a standby server.

The gateway was restarted.

Unreachable

The VNE cannot be reached by the gateway, so the VNE cannot be managed. (Note that this is the VNE status, not the device status; the device may be fully reachable. See Creating VNEs and Viewing and Editing VNE Properties, page 19-11.)

Disconnected

The VNE is on a unit that was disconnected from the gateway (the unit has a Disconnected status).



Moving VNEs to a Different AVM

When you move a VNE to a different AVM, the moved VNE are unloaded. The status of the VNEs is maintained after they are reloaded, except for VNEs that were in maintenance mode; those VNEs will be moved to Down (and the Maintenance indicator in the AVMs window will display false). You must have Administrator privileges (user access role) to use this and all other functions in Cisco ANA Manage.


Note When you move a VNE to another AVM, the VNE alarm persistency information is saved. Persistency information is data that is stored for later use. For information on the VNE persistency mechanism, see Persistency Overview, page 26-1.


To move one or more VNEs:


Step 1 Expand the ANA Servers branch, and select the required AVM in the navigation tree. The VNEs are displayed in the content area.

Step 2 Select one or more VNEs using the mouse or keyboard, then right-click one of the selected VNEs.

Step 3 Choose Move VNEs from the shortcut menu. The Move To dialog box is displayed.

The Move To dialog box displays a tree-and-branch representation of the selected Cisco ANA server, its units, and AVMs, excluding the AVM in which the VNE is currently located. The highest level of the navigation tree displays the Cisco ANA server. The branches can be expanded and collapsed to display and hide information.

Step 4 In the Move To dialog box, browse to and select the AVM where you want to move the VNEs.

Step 5 Click OK. The VNE is moved to its new location, and now appears beneath the selected AVM in the VNEs Properties table.



Note You can verify that the VNE has been moved by selecting the appropriate AVM in the navigation tree and viewing the moved VNE in the VNEs Properties table.



Note The VNE that is moved is automatically unloaded and reloaded if its status was Up before the move (because its status is maintained).


Deleting a VNE

When you delete a running VNE from a unit and AVM, the VNE is stopped and all VNE references are deleted from the system and Golden Source. This includes the registry information of the VNE in the specified unit. A VNE that has been removed no longer appears in any future system reports.


Note VNE information is deleted only if the VNE is Up when you perform the delete operation. If after deleting a VNE you are still seeing tickets and alarms related to the VNE, you should remove the VNE information manually, as described in the procedure that follows.


When you delete a VNE, you also delete all Layer 3 VPN site and virtual router business element data associated with the VNE. You can delete business elements separately by using Cisco ANA NetworkVision. For more information about deleting business elements using Cisco ANA NetworkVision, see the Cisco Active Network Abstraction 3.7.2 User Guide.

Since all VNE information is deleted, adding the VNE again requires you to reenter all VNE information.

You must have Administrator privileges (user access role) to use this and all other functions in Cisco ANA Manage.


Note A VNE that has static links configured cannot be deleted without first removing all static links configured for the VNE. Dynamic links are automatically removed.


To delete a VNE:


Step 1 Expand the ANA Servers branch, then select the required AVM.

Step 2 Right-click the required VNE in the VNEs Properties table, then choose Delete. A confirmation prompt is displayed.

Step 3 Click Yes to delete the VNE or No to retain the VNE. If you click Yes, a dialog box appears, asking if you want to delete all Layer 3 VPN business element data for the VNE from Cisco ANA.

Step 4 Do one of the following:

Click Yes to remove all Layer 3 VPN site and virtual router business element data from Cisco ANA. This option removes all VPN business elements associated with the selected VNE from Cisco ANA. Cisco ANA updates the VPN topology views in Cisco ANA NetworkVision accordingly by removing the deleted business elements.

Click No to retain the Layer 3 VPN site and virtual router business element data in Cisco ANA. This option retains the VPN business element associated with the selected VNE in Cisco ANA. Cisco ANA updates the VPN topology views in Cisco ANA NetworkVision; the orphaned business elements are identified by a white X on a red background (). To remove these orphaned business elements, delete them manually in Cisco ANA NetworkVision.

Click Cancel to exit the procedure without deleting the VNE and its Layer 3 VPN site and virtual router business element data.

Step 5 If the VNE was not running when you deleted it from Cisco ANA, manually delete any remaining VNE data. Otherwise Cisco ANA may generate tickets and alarms related to that VNE, and they will never clear.

Remove the following files, where avm-id is the AVM hosting the VNE, and vne-ip is the IP address of the VNE that was removed. (Note that you should remove all files and directories in the instrumentor-persistency directory.)

$ANAHOME/unit/avm-id/persistency/alarm/vne-ip.per 
$ANAHOME/unit/avm-id/persistency/event/vne-ip.per 
$ANAHOME/unit/avm-id/instrumentor-persistency/vne-ip/* 


For more information about Layer 3 VPNs and Cisco ANA NetworkVision, see the Cisco Active Network Abstraction 3.7.2 Theory of Operations.