Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide, Release 3.3
Chapter 1 - Introduction to Cisco IOS XR Software
Downloads: This chapterpdf (PDF - 376.0KB) The complete bookPDF (PDF - 6.76MB) | Feedback

Introduction to Cisco IOS XR Software

Table Of Contents

Introduction to Cisco IOS XR Software

Contents

Supported Standalone System Configurations

Cisco CRS-1 Multishelf System Overview

Router Management Interfaces

Command-Line Interface

Craft Works Interface

Extensible Markup Language API

Simple Network Management Protocol

Selecting and Identifying the Designated Shelf Controller

Selecting and Identifying the DSC on Cisco CRS-1 Routers

Selecting and Identifying the DSC on Cisco CRS-1 Multishelf Systems

Selecting and Identifying the DSC on Cisco XR 12000 and 12000 Series Routers

Connecting to the Router Through the Console Port

Where to Go Next


Introduction to Cisco IOS XR Software


This chapter introduces the routers that support Cisco IOS XR software and the user interfaces you can use to manage routers that run Cisco IOS XR software.

Contents

This chapter contains the following sections:

Supported Standalone System Configurations

Cisco CRS-1 Multishelf System Overview

Router Management Interfaces

Selecting and Identifying the Designated Shelf Controller

Connecting to the Router Through the Console Port

Where to Go Next

Supported Standalone System Configurations

The Cisco IOS XR software runs on the following standalone systems:

Cisco CRS-1 8-Slot Line Card Chassis (LCC)

Cisco CRS-1 16-Slot LCC

Cisco XR 12006 Router

Cisco XR 12008 Router

Cisco XR 12010 Router

Cisco XR 12012 Router

Cisco XR 12016 Router

Cisco XR 12404 Router

Cisco XR 12406 Router

Cisco XR 12410 Router

Cisco XR 12416 Router


Note Many cards operate in both Cisco XR 12000 Series routers and in Cisco 12000 Series routers. For the latest information on which cards are supported by the Cisco IOS XR software in Cisco XR 12000 Series routers and Cisco 12000 Series routers, see Release Notes for Cisco IOS XR Software Release 3.3.


The Cisco IOS XR software also runs on Cisco CRS-1 Multishelf Systems, which are described in the following section.

Cisco CRS-1 Multishelf System Overview

The multishelf system enables multiple Cisco CRS-1 LCCs to act as a single system. This release of the multishelf system supports two 16-slot LCCs and one, two, or four fabric card chassis (FCCs) to provide a total switching capacity of up to 1.28 terabits per second (Tbps). Two external Cisco Catalyst switches provide control-plane connectivity between the chassis.

Figure 1-1 shows the single-FCC multishelf system, Figure 1-2 shows the two-FCC multishelf system, and Figure 1-3 shows the four-FCC multishelf system.

Figure 1-1 Single-FCC Multishelf System

1

Cisco CRS-1 16-Slot Line Card Chassis (two required)

3

Cisco Catalyst 6509 Switch (two suggested)

2

Cisco CRS-1 Fabric Card Chassis (one required)

   

Figure 1-2 Two-FCC Multishelf System

1

Cisco CRS-1 16-Slot Line Card Chassis (two required)

3

Cisco Catalyst 6509 Switch (two suggested)

2

Cisco CRS-1 Fabric Card Chassis (two required)

   

Figure 1-3 Four-FCC Multishelf System

1

Cisco CRS-1 16-Slot Line Card Chassis (two required)

3

Cisco Catalyst 6509 Switch (two suggested)

2

Cisco CRS-1 Fabric Card Chassis (four required)

   

For more information on multishelf systems, see Chapter 3 "Bringing Up the Cisco IOS XR Software on a Multishelf System."

Router Management Interfaces

Because new routers are not yet configured for your environment, you must start configuration using the command-line interface (CLI). This guide provides instructions on using the CLI to configure basic router features. The Cisco IOS XR software supports the following router management interfaces, which are described in the following sections:

Command-Line Interface

Craft Works Interface

Extensible Markup Language API

Simple Network Management Protocol

Command-Line Interface

The CLI is the primary user interface for configuring, monitoring, and maintaining routers that run the Cisco IOS XR software. The CLI allows you to directly and simply execute Cisco IOS XR commands.

All procedures in this guide use the CLI. Before you can use other router management interfaces, you must first use the CLI to install and configure those interfaces. Guidelines for using the CLI are presented in the following chapters:

Chapter 4 "Configuring General Router Features"

Chapter 5 "Configuring Additional Router Features"

Chapter 6 "CLI Tips, Techniques, and Shortcuts"

For information on CLI procedures for other tasks, such as hardware interface and software protocol management, see the Cisco IOS XR software documents listed in the "Related Documents" section.

Craft Works Interface

The Craft Works Interface (CWI) is a client-side application used to configure and manage routers that run the Cisco IOS XR software. CWI includes advanced CLI features and a graphical user interface, and it is included with the Cisco IOS XR Manageability package.

The CWI is a desktop used to launch management and configuration applications. The management and configuration features include fault management, configuration management, performance management, security management, and inventory management, with an emphasis on speed and efficiency. For more information, see the Cisco IOS XR software documents listed in the "Related Documents" section.

Extensible Markup Language API

The Extensible Markup Language (XML) application programming interface (API) is an XML interface used for rapid development of client applications and perl scripts to manage and monitor the router. Client applications can be used to configure the router or request status information from the router by encoding a request in XML API tags and sending it to the router. The router processes the request and sends the response to the client in the form of encoded XML API tags. The XML API supports readily available transport layers, including Telnet, Secure Shell (SSH), and Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA). The Secure Socket Layer (SSL) transport is also supported by the XML API.

For more information, see the Cisco IOS XR software documents listed in the "Related Documents" section.

Simple Network Management Protocol

Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is an application-layer protocol designed to facilitate the exchange of management information between network devices. By using SNMP-transported data (such as packets per second and network error rates), network administrators can more easily manage network performance, find and solve network problems, and plan for network growth.

The Cisco IOS XR software supports SNMP v1, v2c, and v3. SNMP is part of a larger architecture called the Internet Network Management Framework (NMF), which is defined in Internet documents called RFCs. The SNMPv1 NMF is defined by RFCs 1155, 1157, and 1212, and the SNMPv2 NMF is defined by RFCs 1441 through 1452.

SNMP is a popular protocol for managing diverse commercial internetworks and those used in universities and research organizations. SNMP-related standardization activity continues even as vendors develop and release state-of-the-art, SNMP-based management applications. SNMP is a relatively simple protocol, yet its feature set is sufficiently powerful to handle the difficult problems presented in trying to manage the heterogeneous networks of today.

For more information, see the Cisco IOS XR software documents listed in the "Related Documents" section.

Selecting and Identifying the Designated Shelf Controller

The designated shelf controller (DSC) controls a standalone router or a multishelf System. A DSC is a role that is assigned to one route processor (RP) card or performance route processor (PRP) card in each router or multishelf system. RP cards operate in Cisco CRS-1 routers, and PRP cards operate in Cisco XR 12000 and 12000 Series routers.


Note Throughout this guide, the term RP is used to refer to the RP cards supported on Cisco CRS-1 routers and the PRP cards supported on Cisco XR 12000 Series Routers. If a feature or an issue applies to only one platform, the accompanying text specifies the platform.


Although each router or multishelf system can have multiple RP cards, only one can serve as the DSC and control the router or multishelf system. The DSC provides system-wide administrative functions, including:

User configuration using a terminal connection or network connection

Distribution of software to each node in the router or system

Coordination of software versioning and configurations for all nodes in the router or system

Hardware inventory and environmental monitoring

The first step in setting up a new router is to select or identify the DSC because the initial router configuration takes place through the DSC. The following sections describe how to select and identify the DSC on different routers and the multishelf system:

Selecting and Identifying the DSC on Cisco CRS-1 Routers

Selecting and Identifying the DSC on Cisco CRS-1 Multishelf Systems

Selecting and Identifying the DSC on Cisco XR 12000 and 12000 Series Routers

Selecting and Identifying the DSC on Cisco CRS-1 Routers

A Cisco CRS-1 router supports up to two RPs. If only one RP is installed, that RP automatically becomes the DSC. If two RPs are installed, the default configuration selects RP0 as the DSC. To select RP1 to become the DSC for a new installation, install RP1 first, apply power to the system, and wait for RP1 to start up. When the Primary LED on the RP1 front panel lights, RP1 is operating as the DSC, and you can install RP0.


Tip After the router starts for the first time, you can use the redundancy reddrv command to select which RP becomes the DSC during a restart.


The active RP and DSC lights the Primary LED on the RP front panel. The alphanumeric LED display on the active RP displays ACTV RP. By default, the other RP becomes the standby RP, displays STBY RP on the alphanumeric display, and takes over if the DSC fails.

To visually determine which RP is operating as the DSC in a Cisco CRS-1 router, look for the RP on which the Primary LED is lit. You can also look for the RP that displays the ACTV RP message on the alphanumeric display.

Selecting and Identifying the DSC on Cisco CRS-1 Multishelf Systems

A Cisco CRS-1 Multishelf System supports up to two RPs in each LCC. Each LCC must have at least one RP, so a multishelf system supports between two and four RPs. The RPs in a multishelf system operate much like the RPs in a standalone router. The difference is that only one LCC can host the DSC.

During the initial startup of a multishelf system, the DSC is RP0 in the LCC with the lowest configured rack number, which is usually Rack 0. If you want to select RP1 within Rack 0 to become the DSC, install RP1 first, and wait for RP1 to start up. When the Primary LED on the RP1 front panel lights (or the alphanumeric display shows ACTV RP), RP1 is operating as the DSC, and you can install RP0. If you are setting up a new multishelf system, the instructions in Chapter 3 "Bringing Up the Cisco IOS XR Software on a Multishelf System," specify the appropriate time to bring up and configure the DSC.


Tip After the router starts for the first time, you can use the redundancy reddrv command to select which Rack 0 RP becomes the DSC during a restart.


The active RP and DSC lights the Primary LED on the RP front panel. The alphanumeric LED display on the active RP displays ACTV RP. By default, the other RP becomes the standby RP, displays STBY RP on the alphanumeric display, and takes over if the DSC fails.

After the DSC starts up in Rack 0, the DSC remains in Rack 0 while at least one RP in Rack 0 is operating properly. If both RPs in Rack 0 fail, the active RP in the other rack becomes the DSC. The process of moving the DSC function from one rack to another is called DSC migration. For more information on DSC migration, see the Cisco IOS XR System Management Configuration Guide, Release 3.4.


Note Any LCC can host the DSC. The FCC cannot host the DSC function.


Selecting and Identifying the DSC on Cisco XR 12000 and 12000 Series Routers

A Cisco XR 12000 or 12000 Series router supports multiple PRPs. When the router is started for the first time, the PRP in the lowest-numbered slot becomes the active or primary PRP and is identified by the alphanumeric display: PRI RP. The active PRP serves as the DSC. If another PRP is configured as a standby PRP for the DSC, that PRP can assume the DSC role if the DSC fails.

To have a PRP in a higher-numbered slot become the DSC, you must bring up the router with only that PRP installed. After the chosen PRP becomes the DSC, it remains the DSC after subsequent restarts and you can add the other PRPs.


Note Additional PRPs can be installed to host secure domain routers (SDRs), which are introduced in Chapter 4 "Configuring General Router Features." To configure general router features, you must connect to the DSC. To configure SDR features, you must connect to the PRP for the appropriate SDR.


Connecting to the Router Through the Console Port

The first time you connect to a new router with Cisco IOS XR software, you must connect through the Console port on the DSC. Although typical router configuration and management take place using an Ethernet port on the DSC, this port must be configured for your local area network before it can be used.

Figure 1-4 shows the RP connections on the Cisco CRS-1 16-Slot Line Card Chassis, and Figure 1-5 shows the RP connections on the Cisco CRS-1 8-Slot Line Card Chassis. Figure 1-6 shows the PRP-2 connections on the Cisco XR 12000 Series Router.

Figure 1-4 Communication Ports on the RP for a Cisco CRS-1 16-Slot LCC

Figure 1-5 Communication Ports on the RP for a Cisco CRS-1 8-Slot LCC

Figure 1-6 Communication Ports on the PRP-2 for a Cisco XR 12000 Series Router

To connect to the router, perform the following procedure.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. Power on the standalone router, or power on Rack 0 in a multishelf system.

2. Identify the DSC.

3. Connect a terminal to the Console port of the DSC.

4. Start the terminal emulation program.

5. Press Enter.

6. Log in to the router.

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

Power on the standalone router, or power on Rack 0 in a multishelf system.

Starts the router or Rack 0.

This step is required only if the power is not on.

For information on power installation and controls, see the hardware documentation listed in the "Related Documents" section.

Step 2 

Identify the DSC.

Identifies the RP to which you must connect in the next step.

For more information, see the "Selecting and Identifying the Designated Shelf Controller" section.

Step 3 

Connect a terminal to the Console port of the DSC.

Establishes a communications path to the router.

During the initial setup, you can communicate with the router only through the Console port of the DSC.

The router Console port is designed for a serial cable connection to a terminal or a computer that is running a terminal emulation program.

The terminal settings are:

Bits per second: 9600/9600

Data bits: 8

Parity: None

Stop bit: 2

Flow control: None

For information on the cable requirements for the Console port, see the hardware documentation listed in the "Related Documents" section.

Step 4 

Start the terminal emulation program.

(Optional.) Prepares a computer for router communications.

The step is not required if you are connecting through a terminal.

Terminals send keystrokes to and receive characters from another device. If you connect a computer to the Console port, you must use a terminal emulation program to communicate with the router. For instructions on using the terminal emulation program, see the documentation for that program.

Step 5 

Press Enter.

Initiates communication with the router.

If no text or router prompt appears when you connect to the console port, press Enter to initiate communications.

If no text appears when you press Enter, give the router more time to complete the initial boot procedure, then press Enter.

If the prompt gets lost among display messages, press Enter again.

If the router has no configuration, the router displays the prompt: Enter root-system username:

If the router has been configured, the router displays the prompt: Username:

Step 6 

Log in to the router.

Establishes your access rights for the router management session.

Enter the root-system username and password or the username and password provided by your system administrator.

After you log in, the router displays the CLI prompt, which is described in the "CLI Prompt" section.

If the router prompts you to enter a root-system username, the router is not configured, and you should follow one of the bring up procedures mentioned in the next section.

Where to Go Next

If you have logged into the router or multishelf system, you are ready to perform general router configuration as described in Chapter 4 "Configuring General Router Features."

If the router is prompting you to enter a root-system username, bring up the router or multishelf system as described in the appropriate chapter:

Chapter 2 "Bringing Up the Cisco IOS XR Software on a Standalone Router"

Chapter 3 "Bringing Up the Cisco IOS XR Software on a Multishelf System"