Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide, Release 3.3
Chapter 4 - Configuring General Router Features
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Configuring General Router Features

Table Of Contents

Configuring General Router Features

Contents

Secure Domain Routers

Connecting and Communicating with the Router

Establishing a Connection Through the Console Port

Establishing a Connection Through a Terminal Server

Establishing a Connection Through the Management Ethernet Interface

Logging In to a Router or an SDR

CLI Prompt

User Access Privileges

User Groups, Task Groups, and Task IDs

Predefined User Groups

Displaying the User Groups and Task IDs for Your User Account

Examples

Navigating the Cisco IOS XR Command Modes

Identifying the Command Mode in the CLI Prompt

Summary of Common Command Modes

Entering EXEC Commands from a Configuration Mode

Command Mode Navigation Example

Managing Configuration Sessions

Displaying the Active Configuration Sessions

Starting a Configuration Session

Examples

Starting an Exclusive Configuration Session

Displaying Configuration Details with show Commands

Displaying the Running Configuration

Displaying a Sanitized Version of the Running Configuration

Displaying the Target Configuration

Displaying a Combined Target and Running Configuration

Displaying Configuration Error Messages and Descriptions

Displaying Configuration Error Messages Without Descriptions

Displaying Configuration Error Messages Produced While Loading a Configuration

Saving the Target Configuration to a File

Loading the Target Configuration from a File

Loading an Alternative Configuration at System Startup

Clearing All Changes to a Target Configuration

Committing Changes to the Running Configuration

Examples

Reloading a Failed Configuration

Exiting a Configuration Submode

Ending a Configuration Session

Aborting a Configuration Session

Configuring the SDR Hostname

Configuring the Management Ethernet Interface

Specifying the Management Ethernet Interface Name in CLI Commands

Displaying the Available Management Ethernet Interfaces

Configuring the Management Ethernet Interface

Prerequisites

Examples

Manually Setting the Router Clock

Examples

Related Documents

Where to Go Next


Configuring General Router Features


This chapter describes how to communicate with the router using the command-line interface (CLI), and it describes basic Cisco IOS XR software configuration management.

Contents

The chapter contains the following sections:

Secure Domain Routers

Connecting and Communicating with the Router

Logging In to a Router or an SDR

CLI Prompt

User Access Privileges

Navigating the Cisco IOS XR Command Modes

Managing Configuration Sessions

Configuring the SDR Hostname

Configuring the Management Ethernet Interface

Manually Setting the Router Clock

Where to Go Next

Secure Domain Routers

Cisco CRS-1 routers and Cisco XR 12000 Series Routers can be partitioned into multiple, independent routers known as secure domain routers (SDRs). Every router ships with a default SDR, which is called the owner SDR because it by default owns all RPs and line cards installed in the routing system. To build additional SDRs, you must create each SDR using configuration commands, name the SDR, assign RP, DRP, and line cards to the SDR, and then configure the interfaces on the line cards on the new SDR. An SDR is a group of cards within a router that is configured to operate as an independent router. SDRs that are created with configuration commands are called named SDRs and are configured with custom names to distinguish them from the owner SDR and other named SDRs.

SDRs perform routing functions in the same manner as a physical router, but share some chassis resources with the rest of the system. For example, the applications, configurations, protocols, and routing tables assigned to an SDR belong to that SDR only, but other functions, such as chassis control, switch fabric, and partitioning, are shared with the rest of the system.

To manage the owner SDR, you must connect to the active RP for the owner SDR. In administration configuration mode, you can define new SDRs and assign resources to them (such as DRPs, MSCs, and line cards.) In configuration mode, you can configure the operation of the owner SDR. Although you can reassign cards from one SDR to another, you cannot configure and manage cards assigned to a named SDR. To manage cards assigned to a named SDR, you must connect to the appropriate named SDR.

When you manage a named SDR, you must connect to the active RP for that named SDR. You can connect to the named SDR using any of the connection methods you use for the owner SDR (for example, you can connect through the console port or the Management Ethernet interface), and you have control over only the cards assigned to that named SDR. For example, you cannot configure and manage interfaces on line cards assigned to the owner SDR or other SDRs unless you connect directly to those SDRs.


Note Cisco IOS XR Software releases 2, 3, and 3.2 support only one SDR on the Cisco CRS-1 router. Cisco IOS XR Software Release 3.2 supports multiple SDRs on Cisco XR 12000 Series Routers, and Cisco IOS XR Software Release 3.3 supports multiple SDRs on the Cisco CRS-1 router s and Cisco XR 12000 Series Routers. For more information, see Cisco IOS XR System Management Configuration Guide.


Connecting and Communicating with the Router

To manage or configure a router running the Cisco IOS XR software, you must first connect to the router using a terminal or a PC. Before you connect to the router, you must determine which router entity you want to manage. You can manage the following router entities:

Owner SDR. Connect to the designated shelf controller (DSC).

Router or multishelf system hardware. Connect to the DSC.

Named SDR. For Cisco CRS-1 routers, connect to the RP or DRP that serves as the designated SDR system controller (DSDRSC) for that named SDR. For Cisco XR 12000 Series Routers, connect to the RP that serves as the DSDRSC for that named SDR.

Connections are made either through a direct physical connection to the Console port of the DSC or DSDRSC or from a remote location using a modem or an Ethernet connection that leads to the DSC or DSDRSC.

Figure 4-1 shows the RP connections on the Cisco CRS-1 16-Slot Line Card Chassis, and Figure 4-2 shows the RP connections on the Cisco CRS-1 8-Slot Line Card Chassis.

Figure 4-3 shows the DRP PLIM connections.

Figure 4-4 shows the performance route processor 2 (PRP-2) connections for a Cisco XR 12000 Series Router.

Figure 4-1 Communication Ports on the RP for a Cisco CRS-1 16-Slot Line Card Chassis

The first time a router is started, you must use a direct connection to the DSC Console port to connect to the router and enter the initial configuration. When you use a direct connection to the Console port, CLI commands are entered at a terminal or at a computer running terminal emulation software. A direct Console port connection is useful for entering initial configurations and performing some debugging tasks.

This chapter describes some of the tasks you might want to perform during your initial configuration. One of those tasks is the configuration of the Management Ethernet interface, which is described in the "Configuring the Management Ethernet Interface" section. After the Management Ethernet interface is configured, most router management and configuration sessions take place over an Ethernet network connected to the Management Ethernet interface. SNMP agents and the CWI also use the network connection.

The modem connection can be used for remote communications with the router and serves as an alternate remote communications path if the Management Ethernet interface fails.

Figure 4-2 Communication Ports on the RP for a Cisco CRS-1 8-Slot Line Card Chassis

Figure 4-3 Communication Ports on the DRP PLIM

Figure 4-4 Communication Ports on the PRP-2 for a Cisco XR 12000 Series Router

The following sections describe three ways to connect to a DSC or DSDRSC:

Establishing a Connection Through the Console Port

Establishing a Connection Through a Terminal Server

Establishing a Connection Through the Management Ethernet Interface

Establishing a Connection Through the Console Port

To connect to the router through the console port, perform the following procedure.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. Identify the active RP or DRP.

2. Connect a terminal to the Console port of the active RP or DRP.

3. Start the terminal emulation program.

4. Press Enter.

5. Log in to the router.

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

Identify the active RP or DRP.

Identifies the RP or DRP to which you must connect in the next step.

This step is not required when the router hosts only one RP.

On a Cisco CRS-1 router, the active RP or DRP is identified by a lighted Primary LED on the RP front panel.

On a Cisco XR 12000 Series Router, the active RP is identified by the alphanumeric display: PRI RP.

Step 2 

Connect a terminal to the Console port of the active RP or DRP.

Establishes a communications path to the router.

During the initial setup, you can communicate with the router only through the Console port of the active RP.

The router Console port is designed for a serial cable connection to a terminal or a computer that is running a terminal emulation program.

The terminal settings are:

Bits per second: 9600/9600

Data bits: 8

Parity: None

Stop bit: 2

Flow control: None

For information on the cable requirements for the Console port, see the hardware documentation listed in the "Related Documents" section.

Step 3 

Start the terminal emulation program.

(Optional) Prepares a computer for router communications.

The step is not required if you are connecting through a terminal.

Terminals send keystrokes to and receive characters from another device. If you connect a computer to the Console port, you must use a terminal emulation program to communicate with the router. For instructions on using the terminal emulation program, see the documentation for that program.

Step 4 

Press Enter.

Initiates communication with the router.

If no text or router prompt appears when you connect to the Console port, press Enter to initiate communications.

If no text appears when you press Enter and the router has been started recently, give the router more time to complete the initial boot procedure, then press Enter.

If the router has no configuration, the router displays the prompt: Enter root-system username:. If a standalone router is starting up for the first time, see Chapter 2 "Bringing Up the Cisco IOS XR Software on a Standalone Router." If a multishelf system is starting up for the first time, see Chapter 3 "Bringing Up the Cisco IOS XR Software on a Multishelf System."

If the router has been configured, the router displays the prompt: Username:

Step 5 

Log in to the router.

Establishes your access rights for the router management session.

Enter your username and password, as described in the "Logging In to a Router or an SDR" section.

After you log in, the router displays the CLI prompt, which is described in the "CLI Prompt" section.

Establishing a Connection Through a Terminal Server

A terminal server connection provides a way to access the Console port from a remote location. It is less expensive to connect to the router through the Management Ethernet interface (because you do not have the additional cost of a terminal server). However, if you need to perform tasks that require Console port access from a remote location, a terminal server is the best connection method.

The procedure for connecting to the router through a terminal server is similar to the procedure for directly connecting through the Console port. For both connection types, the physical connection takes place through the Console port. The difference is that the terminal server connects directly to the Console port, and you must use a Telnet session to establish communications through the terminal server to the router.

To establish a connection through a terminal server, perform the following procedure:

SUMMARY STEPS

1. Install and configure the terminal server.

2. Connect the terminal server to the Console port of the target RP or DRP.

3. Power on the router.

4. Identify the target RP or DRP.

5. telnet access-server-address port

6. Press Enter.

7. Log in to the router.

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

Install and configure the terminal server.

Prepares the terminal server for communications with the router and with Telnet clients.

This step is usually preformed once.

For router access, users need the Telnet server IP address and port number for each RP they access.

For additional information on configuring terminal services, including terminal servers and templates, see the Cisco IOS XR System Management Configuration Guide.

Step 2 

Connect the terminal server to the Console port of the target RP or DRP.

Establishes a communications path between the terminal server and the router.

During the initial router setup, you can communicate with the router only through the Console port of the primary RP.

The router Console port is designed for a serial cable connection to a terminal or terminal server.

The terminal settings are:

Bits per second: 9600/9600

Data bits: 8

Parity: None

Stop bit: 2

Flow control: None

For information on the cable requirements for the Console port, see the hardware documentation listed in the "Related Documents" section.

To enable terminal server connections to the Console ports on multiple RPs and DRPs, install a cable between each Console port and the terminal server.

Step 3 

Power on the router.

Starts the router.

This step is required only if the router power is not on.

For information on power installation and controls, see the hardware documentation listed in the "Related Documents" section.

Step 4 

Identify the target RP or DRP.

Identifies the RP or DRP to which you connect in the next step.

This step is not required when the router hosts only one RP or DRP.

On a Cisco CRS-1 router, the active RP or DRP is identified by a lighted Primary LED on the RP front panel.

On a Cisco XR 12000 Series Router, the active RP is identified by the alphanumeric display: PRI RP.

If you cannot look at the RPs, use a Management Ethernet interface connection to determine which RP is active, or establish terminal server connections to both RPs and then try both.

Step 5 

telnet access-server-address port

Establishes a Telnet session with the terminal server.

Replace access-server-address with the IP address of the terminal server, and replace port with the terminal server port number that connects to the target RP Console port.

Step 6 

Press Enter.

(Optional) Initiates communications with the RP or DRP.

If no text or router prompt appears when you start the Telnet session, press Enter to initiate communications.

If the router has no configuration, the router displays the prompt: Enter root-system username: Enter the root-system username and password when prompted.

If the router has been configured, the router displays the prompt: Username:

Step 7 

Log in to the router.

Establishes your access rights for the router management session.

Enter a username and password when prompted.

Establishing a Connection Through the Management Ethernet Interface

The Management Ethernet interface allows you to manage the router using a network connection. Before you can use the Management Ethernet interface, the interface must be configured, as described in the "Configuring the Management Ethernet Interface" section.

Once configured, the network connection takes place between client software on a workstation computer and a server process within the router. The type of client software you use depends on the server process you want to use. The Cisco IOS XR software supports the following client and server services:

Telnet clients can connect to a Telnet server in the router. The Telnet server is disabled by default and can be enabled with the telnet ipv4 server or telnet ipv6 server command in global configuration mode.

Secure Shell (SSH) clients can connect to an SSH server in the router. The SSH server is disabled by default and can be enabled with the ssh server command in global configuration mode. The SSH server handles both Secure Shell Version 1 (SSHv1) and SSHv2 incoming client connections for both IPv4 and IPv6 address families.

To start a Telnet network connection, you start the Telnet client software with a command similar to the following:

telnet ManagementEthernetInterfaceIPaddress

For specific instructions on connecting to the router through a Telnet or SSH client, see the instructions for that software.

Ask your system administrator for the IP address of the Management Ethernet interface.

When the Telnet session is established, the router prompts you to log in, as described in the "Logging In to a Router or an SDR" section.

Logging In to a Router or an SDR

The login process can require users to enter a password or a username and password before accessing the router CLI. The user groups to which your username is assigned determine which commands you can use.

If you log in to a router with a single SDR configured (this is the default configuration), you can manage the entire router. If you log in to the owner SDR on a system with multiple SDRs, you can manage general features that apply to the entire system and the interfaces assigned to the owner SDR. If you log in to a named SDR, you can manage only that SDR. For more information on SDRs, see the "Secure Domain Routers" section.

When you log in, the username and password may be validated by any of the following services:

Usernames configured on the router (username command in global configuration mode)

Root-system usernames configured on the owner SDR

Passwords configured for the router console and auxiliary ports (password or secret command in line configuration mode)

A RADIUS server

A TACACS+ server

The username and password validation method that your router uses is determined by the router configuration. For information on configuring username and password validation methods, see the Cisco IOS XR System Security Configuration Guide. For information on which username and password to use, see your system administrator.

To log in to the router, enter your username and password when prompted. For example:

User Access Verification
 
   
Username: iosxr
Password: password
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router#
 
   

Note Passwords are case sensitive. If you want to log in to an SDR using a root-system username from the owner SDR, enter the username in the following format: username@admin.


After you log in, the router displays the CLI prompt, which is described in the "CLI Prompt" section. The command set that you can use is determined by the privileges assigned to your username. For information on how privileges are assigned to usernames, see the Cisco IOS XR System Security Configuration Guide.

CLI Prompt

After you log in, you see the CLI prompt for the Cisco IOS XR software. This prompt identifies the router or SDR to which you are issuing commands. The CLI prompt represents the path, through the router, to the CPU that executes the commands you enter. The syntax for the CLI prompt is: type/rack/slot/module: router-name#. The CLI prompt is described in Table 4-1.

Table 4-1 CLI Prompt Description 

Prompt Syntax Components
Description

type

Type of interface or card with which you are communicating. For most user communication tasks, the type is "RP."

rack

Rack number. In a standalone router, the rack number is always "0." In a multishelf system, the range for LCC rack numbers is 0 to 255, and the range for FCC rack numbers is F0 to F7.

slot

Slot in which the RP or DRP is installed. In a Cisco CRS-1 router, the RP physical slot number is "RP0" or "RP1." In a Cisco XR 12000 Series Router, the physical slot number can be 0 to 15, and there can be multiple SDRs, each of which is represented by an RP.

module

Entity on a card that executes user commands or communicates with a port (interface). For executing commands from the EXEC prompt, the module is the "CPU0" of the RP. "CPU0" also controls the forwarding and operating system (OS) functions for the system. DRPs have two processors: CPU0 and CPU1.

router-name

Hostname of the router or SDR. The hostname is usually defined during initial configuration of the router, as described in the "Configuring the SDR Hostname" section.


For example, the following prompt indicates that the CLI commands are executed on the RP in rack 0, slot RP0, by the "CPU0" module on a router named "router:"

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# 

User Access Privileges

When you log in to the router, your username and password are used to determine if you are authorized to access the router. After you successfully log in, your username is used to determine which commands you are allowed to use. The following sections provide information on how the router determines which commands you can use:

User Groups, Task Groups, and Task IDs

Predefined User Groups

Displaying the User Groups and Task IDs for Your User Account

User Groups, Task Groups, and Task IDs

The commands that each user can use are defined by the user groups to which he or she belongs. Within the Cisco IOS XR software, the commands for a particular feature, such as access control lists, are assigned to tasks, which are uniquely identified by task IDs. If a user wants to use a particular command, his or her username must be associated with the appropriate task ID.

The association between a username and a task ID takes place through two intermediate entities, the user group and task group.

The user group is basically a logical container that can be used to assign the same task IDs to multiple users. Instead of assigning task IDs to each user, you can assign them to the user group, and then assign users to the user group. When a task is assigned to a user group, you can define the access rights for the commands associated with that task. These rights include "read," "write," "execute," and "notify."

The task group is also a logical container, but it is used to group tasks. Instead of assigning task IDs to each user group, you assign them to a task group, which allows you to quickly enable access to a specific set of tasks by assigning a task group to a user group.

To summarize the associations, usernames are assigned to user groups, which are then assigned to task groups. Users can be assigned to multiple user groups, and each user group can be assigned to one or more task groups. The commands that a user can execute are all those commands assigned to the tasks within the task groups that are associated with the user groups to which the user belongs.

Users are not assigned to groups by default and must be explicitly assigned by an administrator.

You can display all task IDs available on the system with the show task supported command. For example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show task supported
bgp
ospf
hsrp
isis
route-map
route-policy
static
vrrp
cef
lpts
iep
rib
multicast
mpls-te
mpls-ldp
mpls-static
ouni
fabric
bundle
network
transport
ppp
hdlc
 --More--

Note Only the root-system users, root-lr users, or users associated with the WRITE:AAA task ID can configure task groups. (The root-lr user has the highest level of privileges in an SDR. In previous releases, SDRs were called logical routers (LRs).)


Predefined User Groups

The Cisco IOS XR software includes a set of predefined user groups that meets the needs of most organizations. The predefined user groups are described in Table 4-2.

Table 4-2 Predefined User Group Descriptions 

User Group
Privileges

root-system

Display and execute all commands for all SDRs in the system.

root-lr

Display and execute all commands within a single SDR.

sysadmin

Perform system administration tasks for the router, such as maintaining where the core dumps are stored or setting up the Network Time Protocol (NTP) clock.

netadmin

Configure network protocols, such as Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) and Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) (usually used by network administrators).

operator

Perform day-to-day monitoring activities, and have limited configuration rights.

cisco-support

Debug and troubleshoot features (usually used by Cisco support personnel).


Although the predefined user groups are sufficient for the needs of most organizations, administrators can configure their own groups. For more information, see Cisco IOS XR System Security Configuration.

Displaying the User Groups and Task IDs for Your User Account

To display the user groups and task IDs associated with your account, enter the show user command in EXEC mode. Table 4-3 summarizes the options available for this command.

Table 4-3 Options to Display Information About Your Account 

Command
Description

show user

Displays your user name.

show user group

Displays the user groups assigned to your account.

show user tasks

Displays the task IDs assigned to your account.

show user all

Displays all user groups and task ID information for your account.

show aaa usergroup group-name

Displays the task IDs assigned to a user group.


Examples

To display your username, enter the show user command:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1# show user
 
   
cisco
 
   

To display the tasks assigned to your account and your rights to those tasks, enter the show user tasks command:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1# show user tasks
 
   
Task:                  aaa  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  acl  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                admin  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  atm  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:       basic-services  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 bcdl  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  bfd  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  bgp  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 boot  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:               bundle  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  cdp  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  cef  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:          config-mgmt  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:      config-services  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:               crypto  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 diag  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:              drivers  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                eigrp  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:           ext-access  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:               fabric  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:            fault-mgr  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:           filesystem  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:             firewall  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                   fr  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 hdlc  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:        host-services  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 hsrp  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:            interface  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:            inventory  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:          ip-services  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 ipv4  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 ipv6  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 isis  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:              logging  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 lpts  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:              monitor  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:             mpls-ldp  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:          mpls-static  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:              mpls-te  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:            multicast  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:              netflow  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:              network  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 ospf  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 ouni  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:             pkg-mgmt  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:              pos-dpt  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  ppp  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  qos  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  rib  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  rip  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:              root-lr  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG (reserved)
Task:          root-system  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG (reserved)
Task:            route-map  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:         route-policy  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  sbc  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 snmp  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:            sonet-sdh  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:               static  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:               sysmgr  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:               system  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:            transport  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:           tty-access  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:               tunnel  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:            universal  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG (reserved)
Task:                 vlan  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 vrrp  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
 
   

To display the user groups assigned to your user account, enter the show user group command:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1# show user group
 
   
root-system
 
   

To display the rights assigned to a user group, enter the show aaa usergroup group-name command:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1# show aaa usergroup root-system
 
   
User group 'root-system'
  Inherits from task group 'root-system'
 
   
User group 'root-system' has the following combined set
  of task IDs (including all inherited groups):
Task:                  aaa  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  acl  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                admin  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  atm  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:       basic-services  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 bcdl  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  bfd  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  bgp  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 boot  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:               bundle  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  cdp  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  cef  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:          config-mgmt  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:      config-services  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:               crypto  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 diag  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:              drivers  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                eigrp  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:           ext-access  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:               fabric  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:            fault-mgr  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:           filesystem  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:             firewall  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                   fr  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 hdlc  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:        host-services  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 hsrp  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:            interface  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:            inventory  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:          ip-services  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 ipv4  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 ipv6  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 isis  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:              logging  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 lpts  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:              monitor  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:             mpls-ldp  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:          mpls-static  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:              mpls-te  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:            multicast  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:              netflow  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:              network  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 ospf  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 ouni  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:             pkg-mgmt  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:              pos-dpt  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  ppp  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  qos  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  rib  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  rip  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:              root-lr  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG (reserved)
Task:          root-system  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG (reserved)
Task:            route-map  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:         route-policy  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                  sbc  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 snmp  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:            sonet-sdh  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:               static  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:               sysmgr  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:               system  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:            transport  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:           tty-access  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:               tunnel  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:            universal  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG (reserved)
Task:                 vlan  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
Task:                 vrrp  : READ    WRITE    EXECUTE    DEBUG
 
   

Navigating the Cisco IOS XR Command Modes

The CLI for the Cisco IOS XR software is divided into different command modes. Each mode provides access to a subset of commands used to configure, monitor, and manage the router. Access to a mode is determined by your user group assignments. The following sections describe the navigation of the command modes:

Identifying the Command Mode in the CLI Prompt

Summary of Common Command Modes

Entering EXEC Commands from a Configuration Mode

Command Mode Navigation Example

Figure 4-5 illustrates the basic command mode navigation for the CLI. Only a small sample of the possible configuration submodes is shown.

Figure 4-5 Example of Command Mode Navigation in Cisco IOS XR software

Identifying the Command Mode in the CLI Prompt

The command mode is identified in the CLI prompt after the router name.

For example, when the router enters global configuration mode from the EXEC mode, the CLI prompt changes to include "(config)" after the router name:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)#
 
   

When the router enters interface configuration submode, the prompt changes to include "(config-if)" after the router name:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface POS 0/2/0/0
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)#
 
   

Summary of Common Command Modes

Table 4-4 summarizes the most common command modes of the Cisco IOS XR software and the associated CLI prompts.

Table 4-4 Common Command Modes and CLI prompts 

Command Mode
Description

EXEC

Logging in to an SDR running the Cisco IOS XR software automatically places the router in EXEC mode.

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router#
 
        

EXEC mode enables a basic set of commands to display the operational state of an SDR and the Cisco IOS XR software. Most CLI commands in EXEC mode do not change the SDR operation. The most common EXEC commands are show commands (to display SDR configuration or operational data) and clear commands (to clear or reset SDR counters).

In EXEC mode, you can display the configuration of an SDR but not the configuration of the system. The difference is that SDRs are defined in administration configuration mode, which is a submode of administration EXEC mode. SDRs are configured in global configuration mode.

Additional commands are available depending on the access privileges (user groups) assigned to your username. Minimal privileges also include a small set of EXEC commands for connecting to remote devices, changing terminal line settings on a temporary basis, and performing basic tests.

Administration EXEC

Administration EXEC mode is used to manage system resources. In administration EXEC mode, you can display the configuration of the system but not the configuration of an SDR. The difference is that SDRs are defined in administration configuration mode, which is a submode of administration EXEC mode. SDRs are configured in global configuration mode.

Administration EXEC mode is used primarily to display system-wide parameters, configure the administration plane over the control Ethernet, and configure SDR. These operations are available only to users with the required root level access.

From EXEC mode, use the admin command to enter administration EXEC mode:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# admin
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(admin)#
 
        

administration configuration mode

Administration configuration mode allows you to create SDRs and assign system resources to SDRs. Multishelf systems are also configured in administration configuration mode.

From administration EXEC mode, use the configure command to enter administration configuration submode:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(admin)# configure
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(admin-config)#
 
        

Global configuration

Global configuration mode is the starting point for SDR configuration. Commands entered in this mode affect the SDR as a whole, rather than just one protocol or interface. Global configuration mode is also used for entering configuration submodes to configure specific elements, such as interfaces or protocols.

To enter global configuration mode, enter the configure command at the EXEC command prompt:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# 
 
        

Note The system prompt changes to "router(config)" to indicate that the router is now in global configuration mode.

Configuration submodes

From the global configuration mode, you can also enter other, more specific command modes. These modes are available based on your assigned access privileges and include protocol-specific, platform-specific, and feature-specific configuration modes.

In the following example, MPLS LDP configuration mode is entered from global configuration mode. The prompt for MPLS LDP configuration submode appears as config-ldp. The following command syntax is used for entering configuration MPLS LDP submode:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router#
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# mpls ldp
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-ldp)
 
        

Note The availability of any particular mode depends on the router features and the access rights of the individual user. For example, a configuration mode for configuring access servers is not available on most routers.

Interface configuration

The interface configuration submode is used to select and configure a hardware interface, such as a Packet-over-SONET/SDH (POS) interface. To enter interface configuration mode from global configuration mode, use an interface command. An interface configuration command always follows an interface global configuration command, which defines the interface type. The following command syntax is used for entering interface configuration submode:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface POS 0/2/0/0
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)#

Router configuration

The router configuration submode is used to select and configure a routing protocol, such as BGP, OSPF, or IS-IS. The following command syntax is used for entering router configuration submode:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# router <protocol> <protocol_options>
 
        

Replace protocol with the keyword for the protocol you want to configure. Replace protocol_options with any keywords and arguments required for that protocol. In the following example, the router enters the router configuration mode for BGP:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# router bgp 140
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-bgp)#

Router submode configuration

Router configuration submodes are accessed from router configuration mode. The following command syntax is used for entering router address family configuration submode:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# router bgp 140
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-bgp)# address-family ipv4 multicast
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-bgp-af)#
 
        

For more information, see the following Cisco Systems documents:

Cisco IOS XR Routing Configuration Guide

Cisco IOS XR Routing Command Reference

ROM Monitor (ROMMON) mode

The ROM Monitor is a bootstrap program that initializes the hardware and boots the system when a router is powered on or reset. ROM Monitor mode is also known as "ROMMON," which reflects the CLI prompt for the mode.

rommon B1>
 
        

During normal operation, users do not interact with ROMMON. This mode is accessed only by manually interrupting the boot process and placing the system in ROMMON. Once in ROMMON, you can perform ROM Monitor tasks, including reinstallation of the Cisco IOS XR software, password recovery, and other diagnostic tasks.

The ROM Monitor CLI mode is accessible only from a terminal connected directly to the Console port of the primary RP, a terminal-modem connection to the AUX port, or through a terminal server.

See Cisco IOS XR ROM Monitor Guide for information and instructions on using ROM Monitor mode.


Entering EXEC Commands from a Configuration Mode

EXEC commands can be executed from any configuration mode by preceding the command with the do keyword. Executing EXEC commands from a configuration mode allows you to display the state of the system without exiting the configuration mode. For example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# do show version
 
   
Cisco IOS-XR Software, Version 1.0.0
Copyright (c) 2004 by cisco Systems, Inc.
 
   
ROM: System Bootstrap, Version 1.15(20040120:002852) [ROMMON],
 
   
router uptime is 1 hour, 40 minutes
1000592k bytes of ATA PCMCIA card at disk 0 (Sector size 512 bytes).
 
   
Configuration register is 0x2
 
   
--More--
 
   

Command Mode Navigation Example

The following steps provide an example of command mode navigation:


Step 1 Start a session by logging in to the router and entering EXEC mode, as shown in the following example:

router con0_RP0_CPU0 is now available
 
   
 
   
Press RETURN to get started.
 
   
 
   
User Access Verification
 
   
Username: iosxr
Password:<secret>
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router#
 
   

From EXEC mode you can issue EXEC commands or enter global configuration mode. Examples of EXEC commands are the show commands used to display system status and clear commands to clear counters or interfaces.

Step 2 Enter a question mark at the end of the prompt, or after a command, to display the available options:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show ?
 
   
  aaa                   Show AAA configuration and operational data
  adjacency             Adjacency information
  aliases               Display alias commands
  aps                   SONET APS information
  arm                   IP ARM information
  arp                   ARP table
  as-path-access-list   List AS path access lists
  asic-errors           ASIC error information
  auto-rp               Auto-RP Commands
  bgp                   BGP show commands
  buffer-manager        Show all buffer manager memory related information
  calendar              Display the system calendar
  cdp                   CDP information
  cef                   Cisco Express Forwarding
  cetftp                CRS-1 control plane ethernet TFTP server
  checkpoint            Show checkpoint services
  cinetd                Cisco inetd services
  clns                  Display CLNS related information
  clock                 Display the system clock
  commit                Show commit information
  community-list        List community-list
  configuration         Contents of Non-Volatile memory
--More--

Note The commands available to you depend on the router mode and your user group assignments.


Step 3 If you belong to a user group that has configuration privileges, you can place the router in the global configuration mode by entering the configure command:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# 
 
   

Step 4 From global configuration mode, you can place the router in a configuration submode, such as interface configuration mode or a protocol-specific configuration mode.

In the following example, the router enters interface configuration mode and the user selects a POS interface for configuration. The command syntax is interface type rack/slot/module/port.

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface POS 0/2/0/4
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# 
 
   

The command mode prompt changes from "(config)" to "(config-if)" and you can now enter configuration commands for the specified interface.

Step 5 To exit interface configuration mode and return to global configuration mode, enter the exit command. To return to EXEC mode, enter the end command.


Managing Configuration Sessions

In the Cisco IOS XR software, the running (active) configuration can never be altered directly. All configuration changes are entered into an inactive target configuration. When the target configuration is ready for use, you can apply that configuration to the router with the commit command. This two-stage process allows configuration changes to be made, edited, and verified before the actual running state of the router is impacted.

Figure 4-6 illustrates the two-stage configuration process.

Figure 4-6 Two-Stage Configuration Process

Global configuration mode is used to configure SDR features, such as routing protocols and interfaces. Administration configuration mode is used to assign hardware components to SDRs and to configure multishelf systems.

The following sections describe the management options for configuration sessions:

Displaying the Active Configuration Sessions

Starting a Configuration Session

Starting an Exclusive Configuration Session

Displaying Configuration Details with show Commands

Saving the Target Configuration to a File

Loading the Target Configuration from a File

Loading an Alternative Configuration at System Startup

Clearing All Changes to a Target Configuration

Committing Changes to the Running Configuration

Reloading a Failed Configuration

Exiting a Configuration Submode

Ending a Configuration Session

Aborting a Configuration Session

Displaying the Active Configuration Sessions

Before you start a configuration session, you might want to check to see if there are other configuration sessions in progress. More than one user can open a target configuration session at a time, allowing multiple users to work on separate target configurations.

The procedure for viewing the active configuration sessions depends on the type of configuration session. For administration configuration sessions, which assign hardware components in SDRs and multishelf systems, you must be in administration EXEC mode to view the active administration configuration sessions. For SDR configuration sessions, you must be in EXEC mode to view the active SDR configuration sessions.

To view the active administration configuration sessions, connect to the DSC and enter the show configuration sessions command in administration EXEC mode, as shown in the following example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1# admin 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1(admin)# show configuration sessions 
 
   
Session                     Line        User      Date                      Lock
00000201-002180dd-00000000  vty0        cisco     Thu Mar 16 14:47:08 2006   
 
   

To view the active SDR configuration sessions, connect to the appropriate SDR and enter the show configuration sessions command in EXEC mode, as shown in the following example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show configuration sessions
 
   
Session                     Line        User      Date                      Lock
00000201-002180dd-00000000  vty0        test      Thu Mar 16 13:16:17 2006  
00000201-001b307a-00000000  vty2        cisco     Thu Mar 16 13:16:17 2006  *
 
   

If an asterisk (*) appears in the Lock column, the user is using an exclusive configuration session and you cannot start a configuration session until the exclusive configuration session is closed. For more information, see the "Starting an Exclusive Configuration Session" section.


Note Configuration sessions for the administration configuration and each SDR are managed independently. For example, if a user locks the administration configuration, you can still configure an SDR if other users have not locked a configuration session for that SDR.


Starting a Configuration Session

When you place the router in global configuration mode or administration configuration mode using the configure command, a new target configuration session is created. The target configuration allows you to enter, review, and verify configuration changes without impacting the running configuration.


Note The target configuration is not a copy of the running configuration; the target configuration contains only the configuration commands entered during the target configuration session.


While in configuration mode, you can enter all Cisco IOS XR software commands that are supported in that configuration mode. Each command is added to the target configuration. You can view the target configuration by entering the show configuration command in configuration mode. The target configuration is not applied until you enter the commit command, as described in the "Committing Changes to the Running Configuration" section.

Target configurations can be saved to disk as nonactive configuration files. These saved files can be loaded, further modified, and committed at a later time. For more information, see the "Saving the Target Configuration to a File" section.

Examples

This example shows a simple owner SDR configuration session in which the target configuration is created and previewed in global configuration mode:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface POS 0/2/0/1 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# description faq 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 10.10.10.10 255.0.0.0 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# show configuration 
 
   
Building configuration... 
interface POS0/0/0/1 
 description faq 
 ipv4 address 10.10.10.10 255.0.0.0 
end 
 
   

The following example shows a simple administration configuration session in which the target configuration is created and previewed in administration configuration mode:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1# admin
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1(admin)# configure
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1(admin-config)# sdr test
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1(admin-config-sdr:test)# location 0/1/SP
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1(admin-config-sdr:test)# show configuration
 
   
Building configuration...
sdr test
 location 0/1/SP 
!
end
 
   

Starting an Exclusive Configuration Session

An exclusive configuration session allows you to configure the administration configuration or an SDR and lock out all users from committing configuration changes until you are done. Other users can still create and modify a target configuration, but they cannot commit those changes to the running configuration until you exit your exclusive configuration session.

During regular configuration sessions, the running configuration is locked whenever a commit operation is being performed. This automatic locking ensures that each commit operation is completed before the next one begins. Other users receive an error message if they attempt to commit a target configuration while another commit operation is under way.

To start an exclusive configuration session for an SDR, connect to that SDR and enter the configure exclusive command:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure exclusive
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# 
 
   

Note If the configuration is already locked by another user, the configure exclusive command fails. To display locked and unlocked configuration sessions, see the "Displaying the Active Configuration Sessions" section.


To start an exclusive configuration session for the administration configuration, connect to the DSC and enter the configure exclusive command in administration EXEC mode:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# admin
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(admin)# configure exclusive
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(admin-config)# 
 
   

The running configuration is unlocked when the user who started the exclusive configuration session exits the configuration mode, as described in the "Ending a Configuration Session" section.

Displaying Configuration Details with show Commands

The following sections describe the following tasks:

Displaying the Running Configuration

Displaying a Sanitized Version of the Running Configuration

Displaying the Target Configuration

Displaying a Combined Target and Running Configuration

Displaying Configuration Error Messages and Descriptions

Displaying Configuration Error Messages Without Descriptions

Displaying Configuration Error Messages Produced While Loading a Configuration

Displaying the Running Configuration

The running configuration is the committed configuration that defines the router operations, and it is divided into the administration configuration and an SDR configuration for each SDR. The portion of the running configuration that you can view depends on the current CLI mode and SDR connection.

In EXEC and global configuration mode, you can view the SDR configuration for the SDR to which you are connected. When you are connected to the DSC and operating in administration EXEC and administration configuration mode, you can view the administration configuration, which includes hardware assignments for SDRs and multishelf systems.

To display the SDR portion of the running configuration, connect to the appropriate SDR and enter the show running-config command in EXEC or global configuration mode, as shown in the following example:

RP/0/RP1/CPU0:router(config)# show running-config
 
   
Building configuration...
!! Last configuration change at 11:05:38 UTC Mon May 02 2005 by cisco
!
hostname router
logging console debugging
telnet ipv4 server max-servers 5
username iosxr
 password 7 011F0706
 group root-system
 group cisco-support
!
ntp
 interface Loopback99
  broadcast
 !
 interface Loopback999
  broadcast
 !
 interface Loopback9999
  broadcast
 !
 authenticate
 max-associations 2000
!
interface Loopback0
 ipv4 address 10.1.2.3 255.255.0.0
 load-interval 0
!
interface Loopback1
 ipv4 address 10.4.5.6 255.255.0.0
!
interface Loopback7
 load-interval 0
!
interface Loopback2000
 load-interval 0
!
interface Loopback2001
 load-interval 0
!
interface Loopback2003
 load-interval 0
!
interface MgmtEth0/RP1/CPU0/0
 ipv4 address 10.11.12.13 255.255.0.0
!
interface POS0/0/0/0
 shutdown
!
interface POS0/0/0/1
 shutdown
!
interface POS0/0/0/2
 shutdown
!
interface POS0/0/0/3
 shutdown
!
interface POS0/3/0/0
 shutdown
!
interface POS0/3/0/1
 shutdown
!
interface POS0/3/0/2
 shutdown
!
interface POS0/3/0/3
 shutdown
!
interface preconfigure MgmtEth0/RP0/CPU0/0
 shutdown
!
router static
 address-family ipv4 unicast
 0.0.0.0/0 MgmtEth0/RP1/CPU0/0
 !
!
end
 
   

To display the administration portion of the running configuration, connect to the DSC and enter the show running-config command in administration EXEC or administration configuration mode, as shown in the following example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1(admin)# show running-config 
Building configuration...
sdr test
 location 0/1/* primary 
!
username cisco
 secret 5 $1$SegP$9jcoyk09S5cM.h/tX36yj. 
 group root-system 
!
end
 
   

Displaying a Sanitized Version of the Running Configuration

A sanitized running configuration report displays the contents of the running configuration without installation specific parameters. Some configuration details, such as IP addresses, are replaced with different addresses. The sanitized configuration can be used to share a configuration without exposing the configuration details.

In EXEC and global configuration mode, you can view the sanitized SDR configuration for the SDR to which you are connected. When you are connected to the DSC and operating in administration EXEC and administration configuration mode, you can view the sanitized administration configuration, which includes hardware assignments for SDRs and multishelf systems.

To display the sanitized SDR portion of the running configuration, enter the show running-config sanitized command in EXEC or global configuration mode, as shown in the following example:

RP/0/RP1/CPU0:router(config)# show running-config sanitized
 
   
Building configuration...
!! Last configuration change at 11:05:38 UTC Mon May 02 2005 by <removed>
!
hostname <removed>
logging console debugging
telnet ipv4 server max-servers 5
username <removed>
 password 7 <removed>
 group root-system
 group cisco-support
!
ntp
 interface Loopback99
  broadcast
 !
 interface Loopback999
  broadcast
 !
 interface Loopback9999
  broadcast
 !
 authenticate
 max-associations 2000
!
interface Loopback0
 ipv4 address 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
 load-interval 0
!
interface Loopback1
 ipv4 address 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
!
interface Loopback7
 load-interval 0
!
interface Loopback2000
 load-interval 0
!
interface Loopback2001
 load-interval 0
!
interface Loopback2003
 load-interval 0
!
interface MgmtEth0/RP1/CPU0/0
 ipv4 address 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
!
interface POS0/0/0/0
 shutdown
!
interface POS0/0/0/1
 shutdown
!
interface POS0/0/0/2
 shutdown
!
interface POS0/0/0/3
 shutdown
!
interface POS0/3/0/0
 shutdown
!
interface POS0/3/0/1
 shutdown
!
interface POS0/3/0/2
 shutdown
!
interface POS0/3/0/3
 shutdown
!
interface preconfigure MgmtEth0/RP0/CPU0/0
 shutdown
!
router static
 address-family ipv4 unicast
 0.0.0.0/0 MgmtEth0/RP1/CPU0/0
 !
!
end
 
   

To display the sanitized administration portion of the running configuration, connect to the DSC and enter the show running-config sanitized command in administration EXEC or administration configuration mode, as shown in the following example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1(admin)# show running-config sanitized
Building configuration...
sdr <removed>
 location 0/1/* primary 
!
username <removed>
 secret 5 <removed> 
 group root-system 
!
end
 
   

Displaying the Target Configuration

The target configuration includes the configuration changes that have been entered but not yet committed. These changes are not yet part of the running configuration.

You can view the target configuration in global configuration and administration configuration modes. You cannot view the target configuration in EXEC modes because the target configuration must be committed or abandoned before returning to EXEC or administration EXEC mode.

To display the target configuration changes you have entered for an SDR, enter the show configuration command in global configuration mode or in any submode, as shown in the following example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# show configuration 
 
   
Building configuration... 
interface POS0/3/0/3 
 description faq 
 ipv4 address 10.1.1.1 255.0.0.0 
end 
 
   

To display the target administration configuration changes you have entered, enter the show configuration command in administration configuration mode or in any submode, as shown in the following example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1(admin-config-sdr:test)# show configuration 
Building configuration...
sdr test
 location 0/1/* primary 
!
end
 
   

Displaying a Combined Target and Running Configuration

Although the target and running configurations remain separate until the target configuration is committed, you can preview the combined target and running configuration without committing the changes. The combined configuration shows what the new running configuration will look like after the changes from the target configuration are committed. It does not represent the actual running configuration.

You can preview the combined configuration in global configuration and administration configuration modes. You cannot preview the combined configuration in EXEC modes because the target configuration must be committed or abandoned before returning to EXEC or administration EXEC mode.

To display the combined target and running configuration, enter the show configuration merge command in any configuration mode.


Note The merge option does not appear in command help until the target configuration contains at least one configuration change.


The following example shows how to display the active SDR configuration (show running-config), configure an interface, and display the "merged" configuration:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running-config
 
   
Building configuration... 
!! Last configuration change at 16:52:49 UTC Sun March 10 2004 by cisco 
! 
hostname router 
shutdown 
end
 
   
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface POS 0/3/0/3 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# description faq 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 10.1.1.1 255.0.0.0 
 
   
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# show configuration merge 
Building configuration... 
!! Last configuration change at 16:52:49 UTC Sun March 10 2004 by cisco 
! 
hostname router 
interface POS0/3/0/3 
 description faq 
 ipv4 address 10.1.1.1 255.0.0.0 
 shutdown 
end

Displaying Configuration Error Messages and Descriptions

Configuration changes are automatically verified during the commit operation, and a message is displayed if one or more configuration entries fail. To display an error message and description for a failed configuration, enter the show configuration failed command.


Note You can view configuration errors only during the current configuration session. If you exit configuration mode after the commit operation, the configuration error information is lost.


In the following example, an error is introduced in global configuration mode and the error information is displayed after the commit operation fails:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# taskgroup bgp
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-tg)# description this is a test of an invalid taskgroup
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-tg)# commit
 
   
% Failed to commit one or more configuration items. Please use 'show configurati
on failed' to view the errors
 
   
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-tg)# show configuration failed
 
   
!! CONFIGURATION FAILED DUE TO SEMANTIC ERRORS
taskgroup bgp
!!% Usergroup/Taskgroup names cannot be taskid names
!
 
   

Displaying Configuration Error Messages Without Descriptions

Configuration changes are automatically verified during the commit operation, and a message is displayed if one or more configuration entries fail. To display only the error message (without a description) for a failed configuration, enter the show configuration failed noerror command, as shown in the following example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-tg)# show configuration failed noerror
 
   
!! CONFIGURATION FAILED DUE TO SEMANTIC ERRORS
taskgroup bgp
!
 
   

Note You can view configuration errors only during the current configuration session. If you exit configuration mode after the commit operation, the configuration error information is lost.


Displaying Configuration Error Messages Produced While Loading a Configuration

To display any syntax errors found in a configuration loaded with the load command, enter the show configuration failed load command.

Saving the Target Configuration to a File

Target configurations can be saved to a separate file without committing them to the running configuration. Target configuration files can then be loaded at a later time and further modified or committed.

To save the configuration changes in the target configuration to a file, enter the save configuration device: command. Replace the device argument with the name of the device on which you want to store the file (for example, disk0). After you enter this command, the router prompts you to enter a filename. If you enter only a filename, the file is stored in the root directory of the device. To store the file in a directory, enter the directory path and filename when prompted. We recommend that you specify the cfg file extension for easy identification. This suffix is not required, but it can help locate target configuration files. Example: myconfig.cfg

In the following example, a target configuration file is saved to the usr/cisco directory of disk0:

RP/0/RP1/CPU0:CRS-8_P1(admin-config)# save configuration disk0: 
Destination file name (control-c to abort): [/running-config]?/usr/cisco/test.cfg
Building configuration.
1 lines built in 1 second
[OK]
 
   

Note You can also save a configuration to a file using the show configuration | file filename command.


Loading the Target Configuration from a File

To populate the target configuration with the contents of a previously saved configuration file, go to global configuration or administration configuration mode and Enter the load filename command. Consider the following when entering the filename argument:

The filename argument specifies the configuration file to be loaded into the target configuration.

If the full path of the file is not specified, the router attempts to load the file from the root directory on the device.

In the following example, a target configuration file is loaded into the current configuration session. The current configuration session is therefore populated with the contents of the file:

RP/0/RP1/CPU0:CRS-8_P1(config)# load disk0:/usr/cisco/test.cfg
Loading.
77 bytes parsed in 1 sec (76)bytes/sec
 
   

Loading an Alternative Configuration at System Startup

When a router is reset or powered on, the last running configuration is loaded and used to operate the router.

You can load an alternative configuration during system boot. See Cisco IOS XR ROM Monitor Guide for information and instructions on this process.

Clearing All Changes to a Target Configuration

To clear changes made to the target configuration without terminating the configuration session, enter the clear command in global configuration mode or administration configuration mode. This command deletes any configuration changes that have not been committed.

In the following example, the user configures an interface but does not commit it. After reviewing the changes to the target configuration with the show configuration command, the user decides to remove the changes and start over by entering the clear command:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface POS 0/3/0/1 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# description this is my interface 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 10.1.1.1 255.0.0.0 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# shutdown 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# exit 
 
   
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# show configuration 
 
   
Building configuration... 
interface POS0/3/0/1 
 description this is my interface 
 ipv4 address 10.1.1.1 255.0.0.0 
 shutdown 
end 
 
   
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# clear 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# show configuration
Building configuration... 
end 
 
   

Committing Changes to the Running Configuration

The changes in the target configuration do not become part of the running configuration until you enter the commit command. When you commit a target configuration, you can use the commit command to do either of the following:

Merge the target configuration with the running configuration to create a new running configuration.

Replace the running configuration with the target configuration.


Note If you try to end a configuration session without saving your changes to the running configuration with the commit command, you are prompted to save the changes. See the "Ending a Configuration Session" section for more information.


To commit target configuration changes to the running configuration, enter the commit command by itself or with one or more of the options described in Table 4-5.

Table 4-5 Commit Command Options 

Command
Description

commit

(Default) Merges the target configuration with the running configuration and commits changes only if all changes in the target configuration pass the semantic verification process. If any semantic errors are found, none of the configuration changes takes effect.

commit best-effort

Merges the target configuration with the running configuration and commits only valid changes (best effort). Some configuration changes might fail due to semantic errors.

commit comment line

(Optional) Assigns a comment to a commit.

This text comment is displayed in the commit entry displayed with the show configuration commit list [detail] command.

The line argument is the text for the optional comment or label.

The comment option must appear at the end of the command line. If multiple options are entered, all text after the comment option is treated as a comment.

commit confirmed seconds

(Optional) Commits the configuration in global configuration mode on a trial basis for a minimum of 30 seconds and a maximum of 300 seconds (5 minutes).

During the trial configuration, enter commit to confirm the configuration. If you do not enter the commit command, the router reverts to the previous configuration when the trial time period expires.

The confirmed option is not available in administration configuration mode.

commit label line

(Optional) Assigns a meaningful label. This label is displayed in the output for the show configuration commit list [detail] command instead of the numeric label.

The line argument is the text for the optional comment or label.

commit force

(Optional) Merges the target configuration with the running configuration and allows a configuration commit in low-memory conditions.

A low-memory warning occurs when a user attempts to commit a target configuration that exceeds the default capacity of the router.

The recommended resolution to such a warning is to remove configurations using the no commands.


Caution The force option can cause the router to experience severe problems if low-memory conditions occur. The force option should be used only to remove configurations.

commit replace

(Optional) Replaces the contents of the running configuration with the target configuration.


Examples

In the following example, the default commit command is entered in global configuration mode:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface POS 0/0/0/2
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# description faq 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 10.1.1.1 255.0.0.0 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit 
 
   
RP/0/0/0:Aug  6 09:26:17.781 : %LIBTARCFG-6-COMMIT Configuration committed by user 
`cisco'.   Use 'show configuration commit changes 1000000124' to view the changes.
 
   

Note The preceding message is stored in the log and appears only if logging is configured to display on screen.


In the next example, the commit command is entered with the label and comment options in administration configuration mode:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1# admin
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1(admin)# configure 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1(admin-config)# sdr test
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1(admin-config-sdr:test)# location 0/1/* primary
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1(admin-config-sdr:test)# commit label test comment This is a test
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1(admin-config)# show configuration commit list detail
 
   
   1) CommitId: 2000000018                 Label: test
      UserId:   jbowman                    Line:  vty1
      Client:   CLI                        Time:  23:45:40 UTC Tue Mar 07 2006
      Comment:   This is a test 
.
.
.
 
   

Note Configuration files are stored on the same flash disk as the boot image. Access these configurations only through the CLI commands for configuration management, history, and rollback. Direct modification or deletion of these files can result in lost router configurations.


Reloading a Failed Configuration

If the router displays a configuration failure message when you attempt to commit a configuration change, the configuration changes are not lost. While you remain in global configuration mode or administration configuration mode, you can load the configuration changes into the target configuration, correct the errors, and commit the changes. To load a failed configuration, go to global configuration or administration configuration mode and enter the load configuration failed commit command, as shown in the following example:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config)# load configuration failed commit
 
   
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config)# show configuration
 
   
Building configuration...
taskgroup bgp
!
end
 
   

In the preceding example, the show configuration command displays the target configuration, which includes the failed configuration.


Note The failed configuration is discarded if you exit global configuration mode or administration configuration mode without recovering the configuration. After recovery, correct and commit the configuration or save it to a file to avoid losing it.


Exiting a Configuration Submode

When you have finished configuration changes in a configuration submode, such as the interface or SDR configuration submodes, you can return to return to the previous configuration mode and continue making configuration changes. To exit a configuration submode, enter the exit command, as shown in the following example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface POS 0/3/0/1 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# description this is my interface 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 10.1.1.1 255.0.0.0 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# exit 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# 
 
   

Note If you use the exit command to exit global configuration or administration configuration mode, the router prompts you to save changes, discard changes, or cancel the action, as described in the next section.


Ending a Configuration Session

You can use any of the following methods to end a configuration session:

Enter the exit command in global configuration or administration configuration mode.

Enter the end command in any configuration mode or submode

Press Ctrl-Z.


Note If you enter the exit command in a configuration submode, the command returns you to the parent configuration level.


If you end a configuration session without committing the configuration changes, the router prompts you to save changes, discard changes, or cancel the action, as shown in the following example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:CRS-8_P1(config-if)# end
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? [cancel]:
 
   

Respond to the prompt by entering one of the following options:

yes, commit the configuration changes and exit configuration mode

no, exit configuration mode without committing the configuration changes

cancel, remain in configuration mode without committing the configuration changes


Note In EXEC mode, the exit command logs the user out of the system.


Aborting a Configuration Session

When you abort a configuration session, any changes are discarded and the configuration session ends. No warning is given before the configuration changes are deleted.

In global configuration mode, the abort command discards configuration changes and returns to EXEC mode. In administration configuration mode, the abort command discards configuration changes and returns to administration EXEC mode. To abort a configuration session, enter the abort command, as shown in the following example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# hostname host1 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface POS 0/2/0/2 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# description this is my interface 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 10.1.1.1 255.0.0.0 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# shutdown 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# abort 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# 
 
   

Configuring the SDR Hostname

The hostname identifies an SDR on the network. Although devices can be uniquely identified by their Layer 2 and Layer 3 addresses (such as an IP address), it is often simpler to remember network devices by an alphanumeric "hostname." This name is used in the CLI prompt and default configuration filenames and to identify the SDR on the network.

To configure the hostname, enter the hostname command with the SDR name as shown in the following example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# hostname SDR_SJ
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# commit
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:Apr  7 00:07:33.246 : config[65669]: %LIBTARCFG-6-COMMIT : Configu
ration committed by user 'user_a'.   Use 'show configuration commit changes 1000000067' to 
view the changes.
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:new_name(config)#
 
   

The preceding example sets the SDR name to SDR_SJ.


Note No blanks or spaces are permitted as part of a name. Do not expect case to be preserved. Upper- and lowercase characters look the same to many Internet software applications. It may seem appropriate to capitalize a name the same way you might if you were writing, but conventions dictate that computer names appear all lowercase. For more information, see RFC 1178, Choosing a Name for Your Computer.


Configuring the Management Ethernet Interface

The Management Ethernet interface on the RPs is used to connect the router to a network for remote management using a Telnet client, the Craft Works Interface (CWI), the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), or other management agents. The following sections provide information on the Management Ethernet interface:

"Specifying the Management Ethernet Interface Name in CLI Commands"

"Displaying the Available Management Ethernet Interfaces"

"Configuring the Management Ethernet Interface"

Specifying the Management Ethernet Interface Name in CLI Commands

Before you can configure the Management Ethernet interface, you must know the Management Ethernet interface name, which is defined using the following syntax: typerack/slot/module/port. Table 4-6 describes the Management Ethernet interface name syntax.

Table 4-6 Management Ethernet Interface Name Syntax Description 

Syntax Components
Description

type

Interface type for a Management Ethernet port is "MgmtEth."

rack

Chassis number of the rack. In a single-shelf system, the rack is always "0." In a multishelf system, the LCC rack number range is 0 to 255.

slot

Physical slot of the RP or DRP on which the interface is located. For a Cisco CRS-1 router, the RP slot is "RP0" or "RP1" and the DRP slot is a number in the range of 0 to 7 (8-slot chassis) or 0 to 15 (16-slot chassis). For a Cisco XR 12000 Series Router, the PRPs may be installed in slots 0 through 15, depending on the router model.

module

On an RP, the module is "CPU0." DRPs have two processors, so the module is either "CPU0" and "CPU1."

port

On Cisco XR 12000 Series Routers, there are three Ethernet ports on PRP-2 cards. The Ethernet ports are labeled ETH 0, ETH 1, and ETH 2. For the ETH 0 port, specify 0, for the ETH 1 port, specify 1, and for the ETH 2 port, specify 2.

On a Cisco CRS-1 router, one Ethernet port labeled MGMT ETH exists on each RP, and one port exists for each DRP processor. Specify 0 for the MGMT ETH interface on an RP or DRP.


Table 4-6 provides examples of Management Ethernet interface names for a single-shelf system.

Table 4-7 Management Ethernet Interface Names for Single-Shelf Systems 

Management Interface
Interface Name
Example

Cisco CRS-1 RP in slot RP0

MgmtEth0/RP0/CPU0/0

router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/RP0/CPU0/0

Cisco CRS-1 RP in slot RP1

MgmtEth0/RP1/CPU0/0

router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/RP1/CPU0/0

Cisco CRS-1 DRP CPU0 in slot 5

MgmtEth0/5/CPU0/0

router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/5/CPU0/0

Cisco CRS-1 DRP CPU1 in slot 5

MgmtEth0/5/CPU1/0

router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/5/CPU1/0

Cisco XR 12000 Series Router PRP in slot 0, port ETH0

MgmtEth0/0/CPU0/0

router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/0/CPU0/0

Cisco XR 12000 Series Router PRP in slot 0, port ETH1

MgmtEth0/0/CPU0/1

router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/0/CPU0/1

Cisco XR 12000 Series Router PRP in slot 1, port ETH0

MgmtEth0/1/CPU0/0

router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/1/CPU0/0

Cisco XR 12000 Series Router PRP in slot 1, port ETH1

MgmtEth0/1/CPU0/1

router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/1/CPU0/1


Displaying the Available Management Ethernet Interfaces

To display the router interfaces, enter the show interfaces brief command in EXEC mode as follows:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show interfaces brief
 
   
               Intf        Intf         LineP              Encap  MTU       BW
               Name        State        State               Type (byte)   (Kbps)
 
   
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
   
                Nu0           up           up               Null  1500   Unknown
 
   
       Mg0/0/CPU0/0           up           up               ARPA  1514    100000
 
   
       Mg0/0/CPU0/1   admin-down   admin-down               ARPA  1514     10000
 
   
          PO0/3/0/0   admin-down   admin-down               HDLC  4474    155520
 
   
          PO0/3/0/1   admin-down   admin-down               HDLC  4474    155520
 
   
          PO0/3/0/2   admin-down   admin-down               HDLC  4474    155520
 
   
          PO0/3/0/3   admin-down   admin-down               HDLC  4474    155520
 
   
          PO0/3/0/4   admin-down   admin-down               HDLC  4474    155520
 
   
          PO0/3/0/5   admin-down   admin-down               HDLC  4474    155520
 
   
          PO0/3/0/6   admin-down   admin-down               HDLC  4474    155520
 
   
          PO0/3/0/7   admin-down   admin-down               HDLC  4474    155520
.
.
.
 
   

The Management Ethernet interfaces are listed with the prefix Mg in the Intf Name column.

Configuring the Management Ethernet Interface

To use the Management Ethernet interface for system management and remote communication, you must configure an IP address and a subnet mask for the interface. If you want the interface to communicate with devices on other networks (such as remote management stations or TFTP servers), you need to configure a default route for the router.


Tip For information on additional configuration options for the Management Ethernet interface, see the Cisco IOS XR Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide.


Prerequisites

To configure the Ethernet Management port for network communications, you must enter the interface network addresses and subnet mask. Consult your network administrator or system planner for this information.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. interface MgmtEthrack/slot/CPU0/port

3. ipv4 address ipv4-address subnet-mask

4. no shutdown

5. exit

6. router static address-family ipv4 unicast 0.0.0.0/0 default-gateway

7. commit

8. end

9. show interfaces MgmtEthrack/slot/CPU0/port

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure
 
        

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

interface MgmtEthrack/slot/CPU0/port

Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface 
MgmtEth0/RP0/CPU0/0 

Enters interface configuration mode and specifies the Management Ethernet interface of the primary RP.

The syntax is
interface typerack/slot/module/port:

The command parameters are described in Table 4-6.

Step 3 

ipv4 address ipv4-address subnet-mask

Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 10.1.1.1 
255.0.0.0

Assigns an IP address and subnet mask to the interface.

Step 4 

no shutdown

Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no shutdown

Places the interface in an "up" state.

Step 5 

exit

Exits the Management Ethernet interface configuration mode.

Step 6 

router static address family ipv4 unicast 0.0.0.0/0 default-gateway

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router (config)# router static address-family ipv4 unicast 0.0.0.0/0 12.25.0.1

Configures a default route to use for communications with devices on other networks.

Replace default-gateway with the IP address of the local gateway that can be used to reach other networks.

This default route applies to all interfaces. You might need to configure additional static routes to support your network. For more information on configuring static routes, see the Cisco IOS XR Routing Configuration Guide.

Step 7 

commit

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# commit

Commits the target configuration to the running configuration.

Step 8 

end

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# end

Ends the configuration session and returns to EXEC mode.

Step 9 

show interfaces MgmtEthrack/slot/CPU0/port

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show interfaces MgmtEth0/RP0/CPU0/0

Displays the interface details to verify the settings.

Examples

In the following example, the Management Ethernet interface on the RP in slot RP1 is configured with an IP address:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/RP1/CPU0/0
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no shutdown
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router#
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show interfaces mgmtEth 0/RP0/CPU0/0
MgmtEth0/RP0/CPU0/0 is up, line protocol is up 
  Hardware is Management Ethernet, address is 0011.93ef.e8ea (bia 0011.93ef.e8e)
  Description: Connected to Lab LAN
  Internet address is 10.1.1.1/24
  MTU 1514 bytes, BW 100000 Kbit
     reliability 255/255, txload Unknown, rxload Unknown
  Encapsulation ARPA,  loopback not set,
  ARP type ARPA, ARP timeout 04:00:00
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     375087 packets input, 22715308 bytes, 87 total input drops
     0 drops for unrecognized upper-level protocol
     Received 297320 broadcast packets, 0 multicast packets
              0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles, 0 parity
     48 input errors, 43 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     89311 packets output, 6176363 bytes, 0 total output drops
     Output 53 broadcast packets, 0 multicast packets
     0 output errors, 0 underruns, 0 applique, 0 resets
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
     0 carrier transitions
 
   

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Additional information on configuring management interfaces

Cisco IOS XR Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide


Manually Setting the Router Clock

Generally, if the system is synchronized by a valid outside timing mechanism, such as a Network Time Protocol (NTP) or VINES clock source, you need not set the software clock. Use the clock set command for initial configuration or if a network time source is not available.

The clock timezone command should be entered before the clock is set because it defines the difference between the system time and Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). When you set the time, you set the system time, and the router uses the clock timezone command setting to translate that time to UTC. The system internally keeps time in UTC. When you enter the show clock command, the router displays the system time.

To manually set the router clock, complete the following steps:

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. clock timezone zone hours-offset

3. commit

4. end

5. clock set hh:mm:ss dd mm yyyy

6. clock update-calendar

7. show clock

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

clock timezone zone hours-offset

Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# clock timezone pst -8

Sets the time zone for the router clock.

The clock timezone command should be entered before the clock is set because it defines the difference between the system time and UTC.

Note The system time is the time that appears when you enter the show clock command.

zone: Name of the time zone to be displayed when standard time is in effect.

hours-offset: Difference in hours from UTC.

For detailed information about setting the system clock, including the configuration of a network time server, see the following Cisco documents:

Cisco IOS XR System Management Configuration Guide

Cisco IOS XR System Security Command Reference

Step 3 

commit

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Commits the target configuration to the running configuration.

Step 4 

end

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

Ends the configuration session and returns to EXEC mode.

Step 5 

clock set hh:mm:ss dd mm yyyy

Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# clock set 14:12:00 10 feb 2004
 
        

Sets the system software clock.

Step 6 

clock update-calendar

Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# clock update-calendar

Updates the hardware clock (calendar clock) with the new clock settings.

The hardware clock is battery operated and runs continuously, even if the router is powered off or rebooted.

Step 7 

show clock

Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show clock

Displays the clock setting.

Use this command to verify the settings.

Examples

In the following example, the manual system clock is configured:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# clock timezone pst -8
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# commit
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# end
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# clock set 14:12:00 10 feb 2004
14:12:00.090 PST Tue Feb 10 2004
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# clock update-calendar
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show clock
14:12:00.090 PST Tue Feb 10 2004
 
   

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Descriptions of the clock commands available in the Cisco IOS XR software

Cisco IOS XR System Management Command Reference

Commands used to configure the NTP

Cisco IOS XR System Management Command Reference

Configuration of the NTP on the Cisco IOS XR software

Cisco IOS XR System Management Configuration Guide


Where to Go Next

When you have completed the configuration procedures in this chapter, consider the following resources for additional configuration documentation:

For information on configuring additional general router features, see Chapter 5 "Configuring Additional Router Features."

For information on using the Cisco IOS XR software more efficiently, see Chapter 6 "CLI Tips, Techniques, and Shortcuts."

For information on configuring interfaces, see the hardware documents listed in the "Related Documents" section.