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Configuring Header Compression Using IPHC Profiles

Table Of Contents

Configuring Header Compression Using IPHC Profiles

Finding Feature Information

Contents

Prerequisites for Using IPHC Profiles

Restrictions for Using IPHC Profiles

Information About Using IPHC Profiles

Benefits of Using IPHC Profiles

IPHC Profile Types

Configurable Header Compression Features and Settings

Tasks for Using IPHC Profiles

How to Configure Header Compression Using IPHC Profiles

Creating an IPHC Profile

Prerequisites

Restrictions

What to Do Next

Enabling the Options for van-jacobson IPHC Profile Type Header Compression

Prerequisites

What to Do Next

Enabling the Options for ietf IPHC Profile Type Header Compression

Prerequisites

Attaching the IPHC Profile

Attaching an IPHC Profile to an Interface

Attaching an IPHC Profile to a Frame Relay PVC

Displaying the IPHC Profile Statistics

Prerequisites

Configuration Examples for Using IPHC Profiles

Example: Creating an IPHC Profile

Example: Enabling TCP Header Compression

Example: Enabling Non-TCP Header Compression

Example: Attaching the IPHC Profile

Example: Reporting IPHC Profile Statistics

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance

Feature Information for Configuring Header Compression Using IPHC Profiles


Configuring Header Compression Using IPHC Profiles


First Published: June 19, 2006
Last Updated: December 18, 2008

Header compression is a mechanism that compresses the IP header in a packet before the packet is transmitted. Header compression reduces network overhead and speeds up the transmission of either Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) or Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) packets.

One method of configuring header compression on your network is to use an IP header compression (IPHC) profile. An IPHC profile is a kind of template within which you can configure the type of header compression that you want to use, set all of the optional features and parameters for header compression, and then apply the profile to an interface, subinterface, or Frame Relay permanent virtual circuit (PVC).

This module describes the concepts and tasks for configuring header compression using IPHC profiles.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest feature information and caveats, see the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the "Feature Information for Configuring Header Compression Using IPHC Profiles" section.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco IOS and Catalyst OS software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Contents

Prerequisites for Using IPHC Profiles

Restrictions for Using IPHC Profiles

Information About Using IPHC Profiles

How to Configure Header Compression Using IPHC Profiles

Configuration Examples for Using IPHC Profiles

Command Reference, page 20

Feature Information for Configuring Header Compression Using IPHC Profiles

Prerequisites for Using IPHC Profiles

Before using IPHC profiles to configure header compression, read the information in the "Header Compression" module.

Restrictions for Using IPHC Profiles

IPHC profiles are not supported on L2TP networks.

Information About Using IPHC Profiles

Benefits of Using IPHC Profiles

IPHC Profile Types

Configurable Header Compression Features and Settings

Tasks for Using IPHC Profiles

Benefits of Using IPHC Profiles

An IPHC profile provides a flexible means of enabling header compression and the options associated with header compression. For example, header compression (and the header compression options) can be enabled once in an IPHC profile, and then the IPHC profile can be applied to one or more of the following:

An interface

A subinterface

A Frame Relay PVC

IPHC Profile Types

You use the iphc-profile command to create the IPHC profile. When you create an IPHC profile, you must specify the IPHC profile type. The IPHC profile choices are Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) or van-jacobson. You specify the IPHC profile type with the ietf keyword or the van-jacobson keyword of the iphc-profile command.

The ietf profile type conforms with and supports the standards established with RFC 2507, RFC 2508, RFC 3544, and RFC 3545 and is typically associated with non-TCP header compression (for example, RTP header compression). The van-jacobson profile type conforms with and supports the standards established with RFC 1144 and is typically associated with TCP header compression.

Considerations When Specifying the IPHC Profile Type

When specifying the IPHC profile type, consider whether you are compressing TCP traffic or non-TCP (that is, RTP) traffic. Also consider the header compression format capabilities of the remote network link to which you will be sending traffic.

The IPHC profile type that you specify directly affects the header compression format used on the remote network links to which the IPHC profile is applied. Only TCP traffic is compressed on remote network links using a van-jacobson IPHC profile, whereas both TCP and non-TCP (for example, RTP) traffic is compressed on remote network links using an ietf IPHC profile.


Note The header compression format in use on the router that you are configuring and the header compression format in use on the remote network link must match.


Configurable Header Compression Features and Settings

The specific header compression features and settings that you can configure (that is, enable or modify) are determined by the IPHC profile type that you select (either van-jacobson or ietf) when you create the IPHC profile. There is one set of features and options for the van-jacobson IPHC profile type and another set for the ietf IPHC profile type. Both sets are listed below.

Features and Settings for van-jacobson IPHC Profile Type Header Compression

If you specify van-jacobson as the IPHC profile type, you can enable TCP header compression and set the number of TCP contexts. Table 1 lists the van-jacobson IPHC profile type header compression features and settings that are available and the command used to enable that feature or setting.

Table 1 van-jacobson IPHC Profile Type Header Compression Features and Settings

Feature or Setting
Command

TCP header compression

tcp

Number of contexts available for TCP header compression

tcp contexts


Features and Settings for ietf IPHC Profile Type Header Compression

If you specify ietf as the IPHC profile type, you can enable non-TCP header compression (that is, RTP header compression), along with a number of additional features and settings. Table 2 lists the ietf IPHC profile type header compression features and settings that are available and the command used to enable that feature or setting.

Table 2 ietf IPHC Profile Type Header Compression Features and Settings

Feature or Setting
Command

Non-TCP header compression

non-tcp

Number of contexts available for non-TCP header compression

non-tcp contexts

RTP header compression

rtp

Enhanced Compressed Real-Time Transport Protocol (ECRTP) on an interface

recoverable-loss

Context refresh (full-header refresh) options, such as the amount of time to wait before a full-header is refreshed

refresh max-time
refresh max-period
refresh rtp

Context-status feedback messages from the interface or link

feedback

Maximum size of the compressed IP header

maximum header

TCP header compression

tcp

Number of contexts available for TCP header compression

tcp contexts


Tasks for Using IPHC Profiles

The tasks for configuring header compression using an IPHC profile are described below.

1. Create the IPHC profile and specify the IPHC profile type (ietf or van-jacobson) that you want to use.

2. Enable or set the header compression features available for the IPHC profile type that you specified when you created the IPHC profile. The header compression features vary by IPHC profile type.

3. Attach the IPHC profile to an interface, subinterface, or Frame Relay PVC.

4. Display information about the IPHC profiles that you have created.

Figure 1 illustrates the high-level processes for configuring header compression using IPHC profiles.

Figure 1 Flowchart for Configuring Header Compression Using IPHC Profiles

How to Configure Header Compression Using IPHC Profiles

Creating an IPHC Profile (required)

Enabling the Options for van-jacobson IPHC Profile Type Header Compression (required)

or

Enabling the Options for ietf IPHC Profile Type Header Compression (required)

Attaching the IPHC Profile (required)

Displaying the IPHC Profile Statistics (optional)

Creating an IPHC Profile

The first task is to create an IPHC profile. When you create an IPHC profile, you can create either an ietf IPHC profile or a van-jacobson IPHC profile, by using the corresponding keyword of the iphc-profile command.

To create either an ietf IPHC profile or a van-jacobson IPHC profile, complete the following steps.

Prerequisites

Before completing the steps listed below, determine the type of IPHC profile that you want to create: ietf or van-jacobson. The IPHC profile type that you create directly affects the header compression options available for you.

For more information about IPHC profile types and considerations for selecting one or the other, see the "IPHC Profile Types" section.

Restrictions

The IPHC profile name must be unique and cannot be longer than 32 characters. IPHC profile names exceeding this maximum are truncated to 32 characters.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. iphc-profile profile-name {ietf | van-jacobson}

4. end

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

iphc-profile profile-name {ietf | van-jacobson}

Example:

Router(config)# iphc-profile profile2 ietf

Creates an IPHC profile and enters IPHC-profile configuration mode.

Enter the IPHC profile name and the IPHC profile type keyword.

Step 4 

end

Example:

Router(config-iphcp)# end

(Optional) Exits IPHC-profile configuration mode.

What to Do Next

So far you have created either an ietf IPHC profile or a van-jacobson IPHC profile.

The next step is to enable or set any additional header compression features or options available for the type of IPHC profile that you created.

Choose one of the following:

To enable or set any of the header compression features available for a van-jacobson IPHC profile, complete the steps in the "Enabling the Options for van-jacobson IPHC Profile Type Header Compression" section below.

To enable or set any of the header compression features available for an ietf IPHC profile, complete the steps in the "Enabling the Options for ietf IPHC Profile Type Header Compression" section.

Enabling the Options for van-jacobson IPHC Profile Type Header Compression

If you created a van-jacobson IPHC profile, you can enable TCP header compression and set the number of TCP contexts.


Note If you created an ietf IPHC profile, the header compression options available to you are documented in the "Enabling the Options for ietf IPHC Profile Type Header Compression" section.


To enable TCP header compression set the number of TCP contexts, complete the following steps.

Prerequisites

The IPHC profile must exist.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. iphc-profile profile-name

4. tcp

5. tcp contexts {absolute number-of-contexts | kbps-per-context kbps}

6. end

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

iphc-profile profile-name

Example:

Router(config)# iphc-profile profile2

Specifies the IPHC profile and enters IPHC-profile configuration mode.

Enter the IPHC profile name.

Step 4 

tcp

Example:

Router(config-iphcp)# tcp

(Optional) Enables TCP header compression.

Step 5 

tcp contexts {absolute number-of-contexts | kbps-per-context kbps}

Example:

Router(config-iphcp)# tcp contexts absolute 25

(Optional) Sets the number of TCP contexts.

Enter either the absolute keyword and the fixed number or the kbps-per-context keyword and the number of kbps to allow for each context.

Step 6 

end

Example:

Router(config-iphcp)# end

(Optional) Exits IPHC-profile configuration mode.

What to Do Next

The next step is to attach the IPHC profile to an interface, a subinterface, or a Frame Relay PVC. For the instructions to follow, see the "Attaching the IPHC Profile" section.

Enabling the Options for ietf IPHC Profile Type Header Compression


Note If you created a van-jacobson IPHC profile, complete the tasks in the "Enabling the Options for van-jacobson IPHC Profile Type Header Compression" section.


If you created an ietf IPHC profile, you can enable or set a variety of header compression options. These options include enabling non-TCP header compression, enabling RTP header compression, and enabling ECRTP. For a list of the additional header compression features or settings available with an ietf IPHC profile, see the "Features and Settings for ietf IPHC Profile Type Header Compression" section.

Prerequisites

The IPHC profile must exist.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. iphc-profile profile-name

4. non-tcp

5. non-tcp contexts {absolute number-of-contexts | kbps-per-context kbps}

6. rtp

7. recoverable-loss {dynamic | packet-drops}

8. refresh max-period {number-of-packets | infinite}

9. refresh max-time {length-of-time | infinite}

10. refresh rtp

11. feedback

12. maximum header max-header-size

13. tcp

14. tcp contexts {absolute number-of-contexts | kbps-per-context kbps}

15. end

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

iphc-profile profile-name

Example:

Router(config)# iphc-profile profile3

Specifies the IPHC profile and enters IPHC-profile configuration mode.

Enter the IPHC profile name.

Step 4 

non-tcp

Example:

Router(config-iphcp)# non-tcp

(Optional) Enables non-TCP header compression.

Step 5 

non-tcp contexts {absolute number-of-contexts | 
kbps-per-context kbps}
Example:

Router(config-iphcp)# non-tcp contexts absolute 75

(Optional) Sets the number of contexts available for non-TCP header compression.

Enter either the absolute keyword and the fixed number or the kbps-per-context keyword and the number of kbps to allow for each context.

Step 6 

rtp

Example:

Router(config-iphcp)# rtp

(Optional) Enables RTP header compression.

Note This command automatically enables non-TCP header compression.

Step 7 

recoverable-loss {dynamic | packet-drops}

Example:

Router(config-iphcp)# recoverable-loss 5

(Optional) Enables ECRTP.

Step 8 

refresh max-period {number-of-packets | infinite}

Example:

Router(config-iphcp)# refresh max-period 700

(Optional) Sets the number of packets sent between full-header refresh occurrences.

Enter the number of packets sent between full-header refresh occurrences, or enter the infinite keyword to indicate no limitation on the number of packets sent between full-header refresh occurrences.

Note Non-TCP header compression must be enabled first.

Step 9 

refresh max-time {length-of-time | infinite}

Example:

Router(config-iphcp)# refresh max-time infinite

(Optional) Sets the amount of time to wait before a full-header refresh occurrence.

Enter the length of time, in seconds, to wait before a full-header refresh occurrence, or enter the infinite keyword to indicate no limitation on the time between full-header refreshes.

Note Non-TCP header compression must be enabled first.

Step 10 

refresh rtp

Example:

Router(config-iphcp)# refresh rtp

(Optional) Enables a context refresh for RTP header compression.

Note RTP header compression must be enabled first.

Step 11 

feedback

Example:

Router(config-iphcp)# feedback

(Optional) Disables the context-status feedback messages from the interface or link.

Note TCP or non-TCP header compression must be enabled first.

Step 12 

maximum header max-header-size

Example:

Router(config-iphcp)# maximum header 75

(Optional) Specifies the maximum size of the compressed IP header.

Enter the maximum size of the compressed IP header, in bytes.

Note TCP or non-TCP header compression must be enabled first.

Step 13 

tcp

Example:

Router(config-iphcp)# tcp

(Optional) Enables TCP header compression.

Step 14 

tcp contexts {absolute number-of-contexts | 
kbps-per-context kbps}
Example:

Router(config-iphcp)# tcp contexts absolute 75

(Optional) Sets the number of contexts available for TCP header compression.

Enter either the absolute keyword and the fixed number or the kbps-per-context keyword and the number of kbps to allow for each context.

Step 15 

end

Example:

Router(config-iphcp)# end

(Optional) Exits IPHC-profile configuration mode.

Attaching the IPHC Profile

You can attach the IPHC profile (either an ietf IPHC profile or a van-jacobson IPHC profile) to an interface, a subinterface, or a Frame Relay PVC.

Choose one of the following:

To attach the IPHC profile to an interface or subinterface, complete the steps in the "Attaching an IPHC Profile to an Interface" section below.

To attach the IPHC profile to a Frame Relay PVC, complete the steps in the "Attaching an IPHC Profile to a Frame Relay PVC" section.

Attaching an IPHC Profile to an Interface

To attach an IPHC profile to an interface or subinterface, complete the following steps.

Prerequisites

The IPHC profile must exist.

IP must be enabled on the interface or subinterface.

The type of encapsulation in use on the interface or subinterface must support header compression. Two types of encapsulation that typically support header compression are PPP and HDLC encapsulation.

Header compression must not already be enabled.

The interface or subinterface must have sufficient memory.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface type number [name-tag]

4. iphc-profile profile-name

5. end

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface type number [name-tag]

Example:

Router(config)# interface fastethernet0

Configures an interface type and enters interface configuration mode.

Enter the interface type and the interface number.

Step 4 

iphc-profile profile-name

Example:

Router(config-if)# iphc-profile profile1

Attaches the IPHC profile to the interface.

Enter the IPHC profile to be attached to the interface specified in Step 3.

Step 5 

end

Example:

Router(config-if)# end

(Optional) Exits IPHC-profile configuration mode.

Attaching an IPHC Profile to a Frame Relay PVC

To attach an IPHC profile to a Frame Relay PVC, complete the following steps.

Prerequisites

The IPHC profile must exist.

On a network that is using Frame Relay encapsulation, IPHC profiles are supported only in the Frame Relay map-class infrastructure.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. map-class frame-relay map-class-name

4. frame-relay iphc-profile profile-name

5. exit

6. interface type number [name-tag]

7. encapsulation frame-relay

8. ip address ip-address mask

9. frame-relay interface-dlci dlci

10. class name

11. end

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

map-class frame-relay map-class-name

Example:

Router(config)# map-class frame-relay mapclass1

Creates a map class and enters static map class configuration mode.

Enter the Frame Relay map class name.

Step 4 

frame-relay iphc-profile profile-name

Example:

Router(config-map-class)# frame-relay iphc-profile profile2

Attaches the IPHC profile to the Frame Relay map class.

Enter the IPHC profile to be attached to the Frame Relay map class created in Step 3.

Step 5 

exit

Example:

Router(config-map-class)# exit

Exits static map class configuration mode.

Step 6 

interface type number [name-tag]

Example:

Router(config)# interface serial2/0

Configures an interface type and enters interface configuration mode.

Enter the interface type and the interface number.

Step 7 

encapsulation frame-relay
Example:

Router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay

Enables Frame Relay encapsulation on the interface.

Step 8 

ip address ip-address mask

Example:

Router(config-if)# ip address 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.224

Sets a primary IP address for an interface.

Enter the IP address and mask for the associated IP subnet.

Step 9 

frame-relay interface-dlci dlci

Example:

Router(config-if)# frame-relay interface-dlci 100

Assigns a data-link connection identifier (DLCI) to a specified Frame Relay interface on the router or access server and enters Frame Relay DLCI configuration mode.

Enter the DLCI number to be used on the specified interface.

Step 10 

class name

Example:

Router(config-fr-dlci)# class mapclass1

Associates a map class with a specified DLCI.

Enter the name of the map class to associate with the specified DLCI.

Step 11 

end

Example:

Router(config-fr-dlci)# end

(Optional) Exits Frame Relay DLCI configuration mode.

Displaying the IPHC Profile Statistics

In this task, you can display statistical information about the IPHC profiles that you have created and configured. Displaying the IPHC profile statistics allows you to confirm that the IPHC profile is configured as you intended.

Information reported includes the IPHC profile name and profile type, the type of header compression enabled, whether any optional header compression features (such as the number of contexts) are enabled, and the name of the interface to which the IPHC profile is attached (if applicable).

To display the IPHC profile statistics, complete the following steps.

Prerequisites

The IPHC profile must exist.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. show iphc-profile [profile-name]

3. end

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

show iphc-profile [profile-name]

Example:

Router# show iphc-profile profile1

Displays configuration information for one or more IPHC profiles.

(Optional) Enter the name of the IPHC profile you want to display. If you do not specify an IPHC profile name, all IPHC profiles are displayed.

Step 3 

end

Example:

Router# end

(Optional) Exits privileged EXEC mode.

Configuration Examples for Using IPHC Profiles

This section provides the following configuration examples:

Example: Creating an IPHC Profile

Example: Enabling TCP Header Compression

Example: Enabling Non-TCP Header Compression

Example: Attaching the IPHC Profile

Example: Reporting IPHC Profile Statistics

Example: Creating an IPHC Profile

In the following example, a van-jacobson IPHC profile called profile1 has been created.

Router> enable

Router# configure terminal

Router(config)# iphc-profile profile1 van-jacobson

Router(config-iphcp)# end


In the following example, an ietf IPHC profile called profile2 has been created.

Router> enable

Router# configure terminal

Router(config)# iphc-profile profile2 ietf

Router(config-iphcp)# end

Example: Enabling TCP Header Compression

In the following example, TCP header compression has been enabled in a van-jacobson IPHC profile called profile1. Additionally, the number of TCP contexts has been set to 25.

Router> enable

Router# configure terminal

Router(config)# iphc-profile profile1

Router(config-iphcp)# tcp

Router(config-iphcp)# tcp contexts absolute 25

Router(config-iphcp)# end

Example: Enabling Non-TCP Header Compression

In the following example, RTP header compression has been enabled in an ietf IPHC profile called profile2. Additionally, ECRTP has been enabled with the recoverable-loss command, and the size of the compressed IP header has been set to 75 bytes.

Router> enable

Router# configure terminal

Router(config)# iphc-profile profile2

Router(config-iphcp)# rtp

Router(config-iphcp)# recoverable-loss 5

Router(config-iphcp)# maximum header 75

Router(config-iphcp)# end


Example: Attaching the IPHC Profile

In the following example, an IPHC profile called profile1 is attached to serial interface 0.

Router> enable

Router# configure terminal

Router(config)# interface serial0

Router(config-if)# iphc-profile profile1

Router(config-if)# end


In the following example, an IPHC profile called profile2 is attached to a Frame Relay map class called mapclass1.

Router> enable

Router# configure terminal

Router(config)# map-class frame-relay mapclass1

Router(config-map-class)# frame-relay iphc-profile profile2

Router(config-map-class)# exit

Router(config)# interface serial2/0

Router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay

Router(config-if)# ip address 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.224

Router(config-if)# frame-relay interface-dlci 100

Router(config-fr-dlci)# class mapclass1

Router(config-fr-dlci)# end

Example: Reporting IPHC Profile Statistics

The following is sample output from the show iphc-profile command. In this output, information about two IPHC profiles, profile21 and 20, is displayed.

Router# show iphc-profile

IPHC Profile "profile21"
Type: VJ
  Compressing: TCP 
  Contexts   : TCP fixed at 150 
  Controlled interfaces: (1)
    Se3/1
IPHC Profile "profile20"
Type: IETF
  Compressing: TCP NON-TCP (RTP)
  Contexts   : TCP 1 for each 0 kbits NON-TCP 1 for each 0 kbits 
  Refresh    : NON-TCP and RTP every 5 seconds or 256 packets
  Controlled interfaces: (1)
    Se3/0

Additional References

The following sections provide references related to IPHC profiles.

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Cisco IOS commands

Cisco IOS Master Commands List, All Releases

QoS commands: complete command syntax, command modes, command history, defaults, usage guidelines, and examples

Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Command Reference

QoS functionality overview

"Quality of Service Overview" module

Header compression overview

"Header Compression" module

RTP header compression

"Configuring RTP Header Compression" module

TCP header compression

"Configuring TCP Header Compression" module

Class-based RTP and TCP header compression

"Configuring Class-Based RTP and TCP Header Compression" module


Standards

Standard
Title

No new or modified standards are supported, and support for existing standards has not been modified.


MIBs

MIB
MIBs Link

No new or modified MIBs are supported, and support for existing MIBs has not been modified.

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs


RFCs

RFC
Title

RFC 1144

Compressing TCP/IP Headers for Low-Speed Serial Links

RFC 2507

IP Header Compression

RFC 2508

Compressing IP/UDP/RTP Headers for Low-Speed Serial Links

RFC 3544

IP Header Compression over PPP

RFC 3545

Enhanced Compressed RTP (CRTP) for Links with High Delay, Packet Loss and Reordering


Technical Assistance

Description
Link

The Cisco Support and Documentation website provides online resources to download documentation, software, and tools. Use these resources to install and configure the software and to troubleshoot and resolve technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. Access to most tools on the Cisco Support and Documentation website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

http://www.cisco.com/cisco/web/support/index.html


Feature Information for Configuring Header Compression Using IPHC Profiles

Table 3 lists the release history for this feature.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and software image support. Cisco Feature Navigator enables you to determine which software images support a specific software release, feature set, or platform. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.


Note Table 3 lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.


Table 3 Feature Information for Configuring Header Compression Using IPHC Profiles

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

IPHC Profiles

12.4(9)T

The IPHC Profiles feature allows you to configure header compression in a kind of template ("profile") and to apply the profile to interfaces, subinterfaces, or Frame Relay PVCs.

The following sections provide information about this feature:

Information About Using IPHC Profiles

How to Configure Header Compression Using IPHC Profiles

The following commands were introduced by this feature: feedback, iphc-profile, maximum header, non-tcp, non-tcp contexts, recoverable-loss, refresh max-period, refresh max-time, refresh rtp, rtp, show iphc-profile, tcp, tcp contexts.