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Configuring Cisco Performance Monitor

Table Of Contents

Configuring Cisco Performance Monitor

Finding Feature Information

Contents

Information About Cisco Performance Monitor

Overview of Cisco Performance Monitor

Prerequisites for Configuring Cisco Performance Monitor

Configuration Components of Cisco Performance Monitor

Data That You Can Monitor Using Cisco Performance Monitor

SNMP MIB Support for Cisco Performance Monitor

How to Configure, Troubleshoot, and Maintain Cisco Performance Monitor

Configuring a Flow Exporter for Cisco Performance Monitor

Restrictions

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuring a Flow Record for Cisco Performance Monitor

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuring a Flow Monitor for Cisco Performance Monitor

Restrictions

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuring a Flow Class for Cisco Performance Monitor

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuring a Flow Policy for Cisco Performance Monitor Using an Existing Flow Monitor

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuring a Flow Policy for Cisco Performance Monitor Without Using an Existing Flow Monitor

Troubleshooting Tips

Applying a Cisco Performance Monitor Policy to an Interface Using an Existing Flow Policy

Troubleshooting Tips

Applying a Cisco Performance Monitor Policy to an Interface Without Using an Existing Flow Policy

Verifying That Cisco Performance Monitor Is Collecting Data

Prerequisites

Displaying the Peformacne Monitor Cache and Clients

Displaying the Clock Rate for Cisco Performance Monitor Classes

Displaying the Current Status of a Flow Monitor

Prerequisites

Verifying the Flow Monitor Configuration

Prerequisites

Verifying That Cisco IOS Flexible NetFlow and Cisco Performance Monitor Is Enabled on an Interface

Displaying the Flow Monitor Cache

Prerequisites

Displaying the Current Status of a Flow Exporter

Verifying the Flow Exporter Configuration

Enabling Debugging

Configuration Example For Cisco Performacne Monitor

Example: Monitor for Lost RTP Packets and RTP Jitter

Where to Go Next

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance

Feature Information for Cisco Performance Monitor


Configuring Cisco Performance Monitor


First Published: November 17, 2010
Last Updated: June 16, 2011

This document contains information about and instructions for configuring Cisco Performance Monitor.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest feature information and caveats, see the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the "Feature Information for Cisco Performance Monitor" section.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco softwareimage support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Contents

Information About Cisco Performance Monitor

How to Configure, Troubleshoot, and Maintain Cisco Performance Monitor

Configuration Example For Cisco Performacne Monitor

Where to Go Next

Additional References

Feature Information for Cisco Performance Monitor

Information About Cisco Performance Monitor

Overview of Cisco Performance Monitor

Prerequisites for Configuring Cisco Performance Monitor

Configuration Components of Cisco Performance Monitor

Data That You Can Monitor Using Cisco Performance Monitor

SNMP MIB Support for Cisco Performance Monitor

Overview of Cisco Performance Monitor

Cisco Performance Monitor enables you to monitor the flow of packets in your network and become aware of any issues that might impact the flow before it starts to significantly impact the performance of the application in question. Performance monitoring is especially important for video traffic because high quality interactive video traffic is highly sensitive to network issues. Even minor issues that may not affect other applications can have dramatic effects on video quality.

Because Cisco Performance Monitor uses similar software components and commands as Cisco NetFlow and Cisco Flexible NetFlow, familiarity with these products will help you to understand how to configure Cisco Performance Monitor. These products provide statistics on packets flowing through a router and are the standard for acquiring IP operational data from IP networks. They provide data to support network and security monitoring, network planning, traffic analysis, and IP accounting. For more information about Cisco NetFlow and Cisco Flexible NetFlow, see the documents listed in the "Related Documents" section.

Prerequisites for Configuring Cisco Performance Monitor

The following prerequisites must be met before you can configure Cisco Performance Monitor:

You are familiar with the information in the "Overview of Cisco Performance Monitor" section. Because many of the concepts for configuring Cisco Performance Monitor are similar to those for Cisco IOS Flexible NetFlow, it would be helpful to also be familiar with the information presented in the Overview and configuration sections of the Flexible NetFlow Configuration Guide

The networking device must be running a Cisco IOS release that supports Cisco Performance Monitor. See the "Feature Information for Cisco Performance Monitor" section for a list of Cisco IOS software releases that support Cisco Performance Monitor.

IPv4 Traffic

The networking device must be configured for IPv4 routing.

One of the following must be enabled on your router and on any interfaces on which you want to enable Cisco Performance Monitor: Cisco Express Forwarding or distributed Cisco Express Forwarding.

Configuration Components of Cisco Performance Monitor

To configure Cisco Performance Monitor, configure many of the same basic elements that you normally configure for Flexible NetFlow:

Interface

Policy

Class

Flow monitor

Flow record

Flow exporter.

Figure 1 shows how these elements are related to each other. The elements at the bottom of the figure are configured first.

Figure 1

Cisco Performance Monitor Components

As shown above, a policy includes one or more classes. Each class has a flow monitor associated with it, and each flow monitor has a flow record and an optional flow exporter associated with it. These elements are configured in the following order:

1. Configure a flow record to specify the key and non-key fields that you want to monitor. This is configured using match and collect commands. You can also optimally configure a flow exporter to specify the export destination. For Cisco Performance Monitor, you must configure a performance-monitor type flow record.

2. Configure a flow monitor that includes the flow record and flow exporter. For Cisco Performance Monitor, you must configure a performance-monitor type flow monitor.

3. Configure a class to specify the filtering criteria using the class-map command.

4. Configure a policy to include one or more classes and one or more performance-monitor type flow monitors using the policy-map command. For Cisco Performance Monitor, you must configure performance-monitor type policies.

5. Associate a performance-monitor type policy to the appropriate interface using the service-policy type performance-monitor command.

Data That You Can Monitor Using Cisco Performance Monitor

You can monitor the following information by configuring a flow record with collect or match commands for the corresponding non-key fields:


Tip For more information about these statistics, see the show performance monitor status command in the Cisco Media Monitoring Command Reference.


IP Packet Count

IP TTL

IP TTL minimum

IP TTL maximum

Flow to Interface Mapping

IP Flow destination address and port, source address and port, and protocol

RTP Synchronization Source (SSRC)

IP Octets Count

Media Stream Packet Count

Media Stream Octect Count

Media Byte Rate

Media Byte Count

Media Packet Rate

Media Packet Loss Count

Media Packet Loss Rate

Packets Expected Count

Measured Rate

Media Loss Event Count

Round Trip Time (RTT)

Interarrival Jitter (RFC3550) max

Interarrival Jitter (RFC3550) min 2

Interarrival Jitter (RFC3550) mean

Media Rate Variation

Monitor Event

Media Error

Media Stop

IP Byte Count

IP Byte Rate

IP Source Mask

IP Destination Mask

Epoch of A Monitoring Interval

Packet Forwarding Status

Packet Drops

DSCP and IPv6 Traffic Class

SNMP MIB Support for Cisco Performance Monitor

Cisco Performance Monitor provides support for the use of the industry-standard Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) to monitor media streams. This support is implemented with the addition of the following Cisco proprietary SNMP Management Information Base (MIB) modules:

CISCO-FLOW-MONITOR-TC-MIB—Defines the textual conventions common to the following MIB modules.

CISCO-FLOW-MONITOR-MIB—Defines the framework that describes the flow monitors supported by a system, the flows that it has learned, and the flow metrics collected for those flows.

CISCO-RTP-METRICS-MIB—Defines objects that describe the quality metrics collected for RTP streams, similar to those described by an RTCP Receiver Report packet (RFC 3550).

CISCO-IP-CBR-METRICS-MIB—Defines objects that describe the quality metrics collected for IP streams that have a Constant Bit Rate (CBR).

For detailed information about these MIBs, and to locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs.

This feature also includes two new command-line interface (CLI) commands and one modified CLI command. The commands are as follows:

snmp-server host—Enables the delivery of flow monitoring SNMP notifications to a recipient.

snmp-server enable traps flowmon—Enables flow monitoring SNMP notifications. By default, flow monitoring SNMP notifications are disabled.

snmp mib flowmon alarm history—Sets the maximum number of entries maintained by the flow monitor alarm history log.

For more information about these commands, see the Cisco IOS Master Command List.

How to Configure, Troubleshoot, and Maintain Cisco Performance Monitor

To configure Cisco Performance Monitor using either predefined record format or your own record format, perform the following tasks:

Configuring a Flow Exporter for Cisco Performance Monitor (required)

Configuring a Flow Record for Cisco Performance Monitor (required)

Configuring a Flow Monitor for Cisco Performance Monitor (required)

Configuring a Flow Class for Cisco Performance Monitor (required)

Configuring a Flow Policy for Cisco Performance Monitor Using an Existing Flow Monitor (required)

Configuring a Flow Policy for Cisco Performance Monitor Without Using an Existing Flow Monitor (required)

Applying a Cisco Performance Monitor Policy to an Interface Using an Existing Flow Policy (required)

Applying a Cisco Performance Monitor Policy to an Interface Without Using an Existing Flow Policy (required)

To troubleshoot and maintain Cisco Performance Monitor using, perform the following tasks:

Verifying That Cisco Performance Monitor Is Collecting Data (optional)

Displaying the Peformacne Monitor Cache and Clients (optional)

Displaying the Clock Rate for Cisco Performance Monitor Classes (optional)

Displaying the Current Status of a Flow Monitor (optional)

Verifying the Flow Monitor Configuration (optional)

Verifying That Cisco IOS Flexible NetFlow and Cisco Performance Monitor Is Enabled on an Interface (optional)

Displaying the Flow Monitor Cache (optional)

Displaying the Current Status of a Flow Exporter (optional)

Verifying the Flow Exporter Configuration (optional)

Enabling Debugging (optional)


Note Many of the Flexible NetFlow commands, keywords, and arguments used in used in these tasks are available in previous releases. For more information about these existing Flexible NetFlow commands, keywords, and arguments, refer to the Cisco IOS Flexible NetFlow Command Reference.


Configuring a Flow Exporter for Cisco Performance Monitor

Flow exporters are used to send the data that you collect with Cisco Performance Monitor to a remote system such as a NetFlow Collection Engine. Flow exporters use user datagram protocol (UDP) as the transport protocol and use the Version 9 export format.

To configure a flow exporter for the flow monitor, in order to export the data that is collected by Cisco Performance Monitor to a remote system for further analysis and storage, perform the following optional task. For Cisco Performance Monitor, flow exporters are configured the same way as they are configured for Cisco IOS Flexible NetFlow. For more information. see Configuring Data Export for Cisco IOS Flexible NetFlow with Flow Exporters.

Restrictions

Each flow exporter supports only one destination. If you want to export the data to multiple destinations, you must configure multiple flow exporters and assign them to the flow monitor.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. flow exporter exporter-name

4. description description

5. destination {ip-address | hostname} [vrf vrf-name]

6. export-protocol netflow-v9

7. dscp dscp

8. source interface-type interface-number

9. option {exporter-stats | interface-table | sampler-table} [timeout seconds]

10. output-features

11. template data timeout seconds

12. transport udp udp-port

13. ttl seconds

14. end

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

flow exporter exporter-name

Example:

Router(config)# flow exporter EXPORTER-1

Creates the flow exporter and enters Flexible NetFlow flow exporter configuration mode.

This command also allows you to modify an existing flow exporter.

Step 4 

description description

Example:

Router(config-flow-exporter)# description Exports to the datacenter

(Optional) Configures a description to the exporter that will appear in the configuration and the display of the show flow exporter command.

Step 5 

destination {ip-address | hostname} [vrf vrf-name]

Example:

Router(config-flow-exporter)# destination 172.16.10.2

Specifies the IP address or hostname of the system to which the exporter sends data.

Step 6 

export-protocol netflow-v9

Example:

Router(config-flow-exporter)# export-protocol netflow-v9

Specifies the version of the NetFlow export protocol used by the exporter. Only the default value (netflow-v9) is supported.

Step 7 

dscp dscp

Example:

Router(config-flow-exporter)# dscp 63

(Optional) Configures differentiated services code point (DSCP) parameters for datagrams sent by the exporter.

The range for the dscp argument is from 0 to 63. Default: 0.

Step 8 

source interface-type interface-number

Example:

Router(config-flow-exporter)# source ethernet 0/0

(Optional) Specifies the local interface from which the exporter will use the IP address as the source IP address for exported datagrams.

Step 9 

option {exporter-stats | interface-table | sampler-table} [timeout seconds]

Example:

Router(config-flow-exporter)# option exporter-stats timeout 120

(Optional) Configures options data parameters for the exporter.

You can configure all three options concurrently.

The range for the seconds argument is 1 to 86,400. Default: 600.

Step 10 

output-features

Example:

Router(config-flow-exporter)# output-features

(Optional) Enables sending export packets using quality of service (QoS) and encryption.

Step 11 

template data timeout seconds

Example:

Router(config-flow-exporter)# template data timeout 120

(Optional) Configure resending of templates based on a timeout.

The range for the seconds argument is 1 to 86400 (86400 seconds = 24 hours).

Step 12 

transport udp udp-port

Example:

Router(config-flow-exporter)# transport udp 650

Configures UDP as the transport protocol and specifies the UDP port on which the destination system is listening for exported datagrams.

The range for the udp-port argument is from 1 to 65536.

Step 13 

ttl seconds

Example:

Router(config-flow-exporter)# ttl 15

(Optional) Configures the time-to-live (TTL) value for datagrams sent by the exporter.

The range for the seconds argument is from 1 to 255.

Step 14 

end

Example:

Router(config-flow-exporter)# end

Exits flow exporter configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Troubleshooting Tips

To check the configuration and status of your flow exporter, use the show flow exporter command.

For more information about this command, see the "Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco Performance Monitor" section on page 32.

Configuring a Flow Record for Cisco Performance Monitor

The basic concepts and techniques for configuring a flow record for Cisco Performance Monitor are the same as flow records for Flexible NetFlow. The flow record specifies how the data collected data is aggregated and presented. The only significant difference is that, for Cisco Performance Monitor, the command includes type performance-monitor.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. flow record type performance-monitor record-name

4. match ipv4 {destination {address | prefix [minimum-mask mask]} | protocol | source {address | prefix [minimum-mask mask]}

5. match transport {destination-port | rtp [ssrc] | source-port}

6. collect application media {bytes {rate | counter [long]} | packets {rate [variation] | counter [long]} | events}

7. collect counter {bytes [long | rate] | packets [dropped [long] | long]}

8. collect interface {input | output}

9. collect ipv4 {destination mask [minimum-mask mask] | dscp | source mask [minimum-mask mask] | ttl [minimum | maximum]}

10. collect monitor event

11. collect routing forwarding-status [reason]

12. collect timestamp internal

13. collect transport {event packet-loss counter | packets {expected counter | lost {counter | rate}} | round-trip-time | rtp jitter {minimum | mean | maximum}}

14. collect flow direction

15. end

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

flow record type performance-monitor record-name

Example:

Router(config)# flow record type performance-monitor record-8

Creates a flow record and enters flow record configuration mode.

This command also allows you to modify an existing flow record.

Step 4 

match ipv4 {destination {address | prefix [minimum-mask mask]} | protocol | source {address | prefix [minimum-mask mask]}

Example:

Router(config-flow-record)# match ipv4 destination address

Specifies that one or more of the IPv4 fields will be used as a key field.

Step 5 

match transport {destination-port | rtp [ssrc] | source-port}

Example:

Router(config-flow-record)# match transport destination-port

Specifies that one or more of the transport layer fields will be used as a key field, including the Synchronization Source (SSRC) field in the Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) packet header.

Step 6 

collect application media {bytes {rate | counter} | packets {rate | counter} | events}

Example:

Router(config-flow-record)# collect application media events

Specifies that the application media bytes, packets, or events will be used as a nonkey field. An application event occurs when either one of the thresholds specified by a react statement for the flow was crossed at least once in the monitoring interval or no media packets were seen.

Step 7 

collect counter {bytes [long | rate] | packets [dropped [long] | long]}

Example:

Router(config-flow-record)# collect counter bytes long

Specifies the number of bytes or packets that will be used as a nonkey field.

Step 8 

collect interface {input | output}

Example:

Router(config-flow-record)# collect interface input

Specifies that the input or output interface will be used as a nonkey field.

Step 9 

collect ipv4 {destination mask [minimum-mask mask]} | dscp | source mask [minimum-mask mask] | ttl [minimum | maximum]}

Example:

Router(config-flow-record)# collect ipv4 dscp

Specifies that the IPv4 differentiated services code point (DCSP) field or the IPv4 time-to-live (TTL) field will be used as a nonkey field.

Step 10 

collect monitor event

Example:

Router(config-flow-record)# collect monitor event

Specifies that the monitor event field will be used as a nonkey field. A monitor event occurs when no media application packets were seen

Step 11 

collect routing forwarding-status [reason]

Example:

Router(config-flow-record)# collect routing forwarding-status

Specifies that the one or more of the routing attributes will be used as a nonkey field.

Step 12 

collect timestamp internal

Example:

Router(config-flow-record)# collect timestamp internal

Specifies that the system timestamp of the first seen or last seen packet in a flow will be used as a nonkey field.

Step 13 

collect transport {event packet-loss counter | packets {expected counter | lost {counter | rate}} | round-trip-time | rtp jitter {minimum | mean | maximum}}

Example:

Router(config-flow-record)# collect transport packets expected counter

Specifies that one or more of the transport layer fields will be used as a nonkey field. These fields include metrics for:

Packet-loss counter

Expected packets counter

Jitter

Step 14 

collect flow direction

Example:

Router(config-flow-record)# collect flow direction

Specifies that the flow direction field will be used as a nonkey field.

Step 15 

end

Example:

Router(config-flow-record)# end

Exits flow record configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Troubleshooting Tips

To check the configuration and status of your flow record, use the show flow record type performance-monitor command.

For more information about this command, see the "Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco Performance Monitor" section on page 32.

Configuring a Flow Monitor for Cisco Performance Monitor

The basic concepts for configuring a flow monitor for Cisco Performance Monitor are the same as flow monitors for Flexible NetFlow. Each flow monitor has a separate cache assigned to it and requires a record to define the contents and layout of its cache entries.

When you configure a flow monitor, you must use either:

An existing flow record that you configured

One of the following default predefined records:

The default RTP record (default-rtp)

The default TCP record (default-tcp)

Restrictions

To modify a flow record, you must remove it from all flow monitors it is associated with.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. flow monitor type performance-monitor monitor-name

4. description description

5. exporter exporter-name

6. record {record-name | default-rtp | default-tcp}

7. end

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

flow monitor type performance-monitor monitor-name

Example:

Router(config)# flow monitor type performance-monitor FLOW-MONITOR-2

Creates a flow monitor and enters flow monitor configuration mode.

This command also allows you to modify an existing flow monitor.

Step 4 

description description

Example:

Router(config-flow-monitor)# description Used for monitoring IPv4 traffic

(Optional) Creates a description for the flow monitor.

Step 5 

exporter exporter-name

Example:

Router(config-flow-monitor)# exporter export-4

Specifies the flow exporter for the flow monitor.

Step 6 

record {record-name | default-rtp | default-tcp}

Example:

Router(config-flow-monitor)# record default-rtp

Specifies the flow record for the flow monitor.

Step 7 

end

Example:

Router(config-flow-monitor)# end

Exits flow monitor configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Troubleshooting Tips

To check the configuration and status of your flow monitor, use the show flow monitor type performance-monitor command and the show running-config flow monitor command.

For more information about these commands, see the "Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco Performance Monitor" section on page 32.

Configuring a Flow Class for Cisco Performance Monitor

The basic concepts and techniques for configuring a class for Cisco Performance Monitor are the same as for any other type of class. The class specifies the filter that determines which flow traffic to monitor. The filter is configured using various match commands in class-map mode.

If you do not already have a flow monitor configured, you can either:

Configure a flow monitor. See the "Configuring a Flow Monitor for Cisco Performance Monitor" section.

Use the flow monitor inline option. See the "Configuring a Flow Policy for Cisco Performance Monitor Using an Existing Flow Monitor" section.


Note Nested class maps are not supported. In other words, you cannot use the class-map command while in class-map configuration mode (config-cmap).


SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. class-map class-name

4. description description

5. match {access-group {access-group | name access-group-name} | any | cos cos-value | destination-address mac address | discard-class class-number | dscp dscp-value | flow {direction | sampler} | fr-de | fr-dlci dlci-number | input-interface interface-name | ip {rtp starting-port-number port-range | precedence | dscp} | mpls experimental topmost number | not match-criterion | packet length {max maximum-length-value [min minimum-length-value] | min minimum-length-value [max maximum-length-value]} | precedence {precedence-criteria1 | precedence-criteria2 | precedence-criteria3 | precedence-criteria4} | protocol protocol-name | qos-group qos-group-value | source-address mac address-destination | vlan {vlan-id | vlan-range | vlan-combination}}

6. rename class-name

7. end

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

class-map class-name

Example:

Router(config)# class-map class-4

Specifies a class to include in the policy. Repeat this command for each class that you want to include in the policy.

Step 4 

description description

Example:

Router(config-cmap)# description match any packets

(Optional) Creates a description for the flow class.

Step 5 

match {access-group {access-group | name access-group-name} | any | cos cos-value | destination-address mac address | discard-class class-number | dscp dscp-value | flow {direction | sampler} | fr-de | fr-dlci dlci-number | input-interface interface-name | ip {rtp starting-port-number port-range | precedence | dscp} | mpls experimental topmost number | not match-criterion | packet length {max maximum-length-value [min minimum-length-value] | min minimum-length-value [max maximum-length-value]} | precedence {precedence-criteria1 | precedence-criteria2 | precedence-criteria3 | precedence-criteria4} | protocol protocol-name | qos-group qos-group-value | source-address mac address-destination | vlan {vlan-id | vlan-range | vlan-combination}}

Example:

Router(config-cmap)# match any

Specifies the classification criteria.

For more information and examples, see the Cisco Media Monitoring Command Reference.

Step 6 

rename class-name

Example:

Router(config-cmap)# rename class-4

Specifies a new name for the flow class.

Step 7 

end

Example:

Router(config-cmap)# end

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Troubleshooting Tips

To check the configuration and status of your flow class, use the show policy-map type performance-monitor or show class-mpacommand.

For more information about this command, see the "Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco Performance Monitor" section on page 32.

Configuring a Flow Policy for Cisco Performance Monitor Using an Existing Flow Monitor

The basic concepts and techniques for configuring a class for Cisco Performance Monitor are the same as for any other type of class. The class specifies which flow monitor is included. The only significant difference is that, for Cisco Performance Monitor, the policy-map command includes type performance-monitor.

If you do not already have a flow monitor configured or do not want to use any of your existing flow monitors for a new class, you can configure it using the flow monitor inline option and specifying which flow record and flow exporter are included.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map type performance-monitor policy-name

4. class {class-name | class-default}

5. flow monitor monitor-name

6. monitor metric ip-cbr

7. rate layer3 {byte-rate {bps | kbps | mbps | gbps} | packet}

8. exit

9. monitor metric rtp

10. clock-rate {type-number | type-name | default} rate

11. max-dropout number

12. max-reorder number

13. min-sequential number

14. ssrc maximum number

15. exit

16. monitor parameters

17. flows number

18. interval duration number

19. history number

20. timeout number

21. exit

22. react ID {media-stop | mrv | rtp-jitter-average | transport-packets-lost-rate}

23. action {snmp | syslog}

24. alarm severity {alert | critical | emergency | error | info}

25. alarm type {discrete | grouped {count number | percent number}

26. threshold value {ge number | gt number | le number | lt number | range rng-start rng-end}

27. description description

28. end

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map type performance-monitor policy-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map type preformance-monitor FLOW-MONITOR-4

Creates a policy and enters policy configuration mode.

This command also allows you to modify an existing policy.

Step 4 

class {class-name | class-default}

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class-4

Specifies a class to include in the policy. Repeat this command for each class that you want to include in the policy.

Step 5 

flow monitor monitor-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# flow monitor FLOW-MONITOR-4

Enters flow monitor configuration mode. If you do not want to use an existing flow monitor, you can use the inline option to configure a new one, as described in the "Configuring a Flow Policy for Cisco Performance Monitor Without Using an Existing Flow Monitor" section.

Step 6 

monitor metric ip-cbr

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# monitor metric ip-cbr

(Optional) Enters IP-CBR monitor metric configuration mode.

Step 7 

rate layer3 {byte-rate {bps | kbps | mbps | gbps} | packet}

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mipcbr)# rate layer3 248 mbps

(Optional) Specifies the rate for monitoring the metrics.

byte-rate—Data rate in Bps, kBps, mBps, or gBps. The range is 1 to 65535.

packet—Packet rate in packets per second.

Step 8 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mipcbr)# exit

Returns to policy class configuration mode.

Step 9 

monitor metric rtp

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# monitor metric rtp

Enters RTP monitor metric configuration mode.

Step 10 

clock-rate {type-number | type-name | default} rate

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mrtp)# clock-rate 8 9600

Specifies the clock rate used to sample RTP video-monitoring metrics.

For more information about the clock-type numbers and names, see the Cisco Media Monitoring Command Reference.

The range for rate is 1 kHz to 192 kHz.

Step 11 

max-dropout number

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mrtp)# max-dropout 2

Specifies the maximum number of dropouts allowed when sampling RTP video-monitoring metrics.

Step 12 

max-reorder number

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mrtp)# max-reorder 4

Specifies the maximum number of reorders allowed when sampling RTP video-monitoring metrics.

Step 13 

min-sequential number

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mrtp)# min-sequential 2

Specifies the minimum number of sequental packets required to identify a stream as being an RTP flow.

Step 14 

ssrc maximum number

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mrtp)# ssrc maximum 20

Specifies the maximum number of SSRCs that can be monitored within the same flow. A flow is defined by the protocol, source/destination address, and source/destination port).

Step 15 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mrtp)# exit

Returns to policy class configuration mode.

Step 16 

monitor parameters

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# monitor parameters

Enters monitor parameters configuration mode.

Step 17 

flows number

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mparam)# flows 40

Specifies the maximum number of flows for each monitor cache.

Step 18 

interval duration number

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mparam)# interval duration 40

Specifies the interval, in seconds, between samples taken of video-monitoring metrics.

Step 19 

history number

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mparam)# history 4

Specifies the number of historical buckets of collected video-monitoring metrics.

Step 20 

timeout number

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mparam)# timeout 20

Specifies the number of intervals before a stopped flow is removed from the database.

Step 21 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mparam)# exit

Returns to policy class configuration mode.

Step 22 

react ID {media-stop | mrv | rtp-jitter-average | transport-packets-lost-rate}

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# react 41 rtp-jitter-average

Enters a mode where you can specify what reaction occurs when a threshold is violated for the following metrics:

ID—ID for react configuration. Range is 1 to 65535.

media-stop—No traffic is found for the flow.

mrv—Ratio calculated by dividing the difference between the actual rate and the expected rate, by the expected rate.

rtp-jitter-average—Average jitter.

transport-packets-lost-rate—Ratio calculated by dividing the number of lost packets by the expected packet count.

Step 23 

action {snmp | syslog}

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-react)# action syslog

Specifies how violations of the thresholds with be reported.

Step 24 

alarm severity {alert | critical | emergency | error | info}

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-react)# alarm severity critical

Specifies which level of alarm will be reported.The default setting is info.

Step 25 

alarm type {discrete | grouped {count number | percent number}

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-react)# alarm type discrete

Specifies which types of levels are considered alarms that require reporting. The default setting is discrete.

Step 26 

threshold value {ge number | gt number | le number | lt number | range rng-start rng-end}

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-react)# threshold value ge 20

Specifies which types of levels values are considered alarms that require reporting.

Step 27 

description description

Example:

Router(config-cmap-c-react)# description rtp-jitter-average above 40

(Optional) Creates a description for the reaction.

Step 28 

end

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-react)# end

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Troubleshooting Tips

To check the configuration and status of your flow policy, use the show policy-map type performance-monitor command.

For more information about this command, see the "Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco Performance Monitor" section on page 32.

Configuring a Flow Policy for Cisco Performance Monitor Without Using an Existing Flow Monitor

The basic concepts and techniques for configuring a class for Cisco Performance Monitor are the same as for any other type of class. The class specifies which flow monitor is included. The only significant difference is that, for Cisco Performance Monitor, the policy-map command includes type performance-monitor.

If you do not already have a flow monitor configured or do not want to use any of your existing flow monitors for a new class, you can configure it under the class configuration mode, by specifying which flow record and flow exporter are included.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map type performance-monitor policy-name

4. class {class-name | class-default}

5. flow monitor inline

6. record {record-name | default-rtp | default-tcp}

7. exporter exporter-name

8. exit

9. monitor metric ip-cbr

10. rate layer3 {byte-rate {bps | kbps | mbps | gbps} | packet}

11. exit

12. monitor metric rtp

13. clock-rate {type-number | type-name} rate

14. max-dropout number

15. max-reorder number

16. min-sequential number

17. ssrc maximum number

18. exit

19. monitor parameters

20. flows number

21. interval duration number

22. history number

23. timeout number

24. exit

25. react ID {media-stop | mrv | rtp-jitter-average | transport-packets-lost-rate}

26. action {snmp | syslog}

27. alarm severity {alert | critical | emergency | error | info}

28. alarm type {discrete | grouped {count number | percent number}

29. threshold value {ge number | gt number | le number | lt number | range rng-start rng-end}

30. end

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map type performance-monitor policy-name class class-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map type preformance-monitor FLOW-MONITOR-4

Creates a policy and enters policy configuration mode.

This command also allows you to modify an existing policy.

Step 4 

class {class-name | class-default}

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class-4

Specifies a class to include in the policy. Repeat this command for each class that you want to include in the policy.

Step 5 

flow monitor inline

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# flow monitor inline

Enters inline mode and enables you to configure a new flow monitor.

Step 6 

record {record-name | default-rtp | default-tcp}

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-flowmon)# record default-tcp

Specifies a flow record to associate with the flow monitor.

Step 7 

exporter exporter-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-flowmon)# exporter exporter-4

Specifies a flow record to associate with the flow exporter.

Step 8 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-flowmon)# exit

Returns to policy class configuration mode.

Step 9 

monitor metric ip-cbr

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# monitor metric ip-cbr

(Optional) Enters IP-CBR monitor metric configuration mode.

Step 10 

rate layer3 {byte-rate {bps | kbps | mbps | gbps} | packet}

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mipcbr)# rate layer3 248 mbps

(Optional) Specifies the rate for monitoring the metrics.

byte-rate—Data rate in Bps, kBps, mBps, or gBps. The range is 1 to 65535.

packet—Packet rate in packets per second.

Step 11 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mipcbr)# exit

Returns to policy class configuration mode.

Step 12 

monitor metric rtp

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# monitor metric rtp

Enters RTP monitor metric configuration mode.

Step 13 

clock-rate {type-number | type-name} rate

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mrtp)# clock-rate 8 9600

Specifies the clock rate used to sample RTP video-monitoring metrics.

For more information about the clock-type numbers and names, see the Cisco Media Monitoring Command Reference.

The range for rate is 1 kHz to 192 kHz.

Step 14 

max-dropout number

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mrtp)# max-dropout 2

Specifies the maximum number of dropouts allowed when sampling RTP video-monitoring metrics.

Step 15 

max-reorder number

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mrtp)# max-reorder 4

Specifies the maximum number of reorders allowed when sampling RTP video-monitoring metrics.

Step 16 

min-sequential number

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mrtp)# min-sequential 2

Specifies the minimum number of sequental packets required to identify a stream as being an RTP flow.

Step 17 

ssrc maximum number

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mrtp)# ssrc maximum 20

Specifies the maximum number of SSRCs that can be monitored within the same flow. A flow is defined by the protocol, source/destination address, and source/destination port).

Step 18 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mrtp)# exit

Returns to policy class configuration mode.

Step 19 

monitor parameters

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# monitor parameters

Enters monitor parameters configuration mode.

Step 20 

flows number

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mparam)# flows 40

Specifies the maximum number of flows for each monitor cache.

Step 21 

interval duration number

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mparam)# interval duration 40

Specifies the duration of the intervals, in seconds, for collecting monitoring metrics.

Step 22 

history number

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mparam)# history 4

Specifies the number of historical intervals of collected monitoring metrics to display.

Step 23 

timeout number

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mparam)# timeout 20

Specifies the number intervals before a stopped flow is removed from the database.

Step 24 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-mparam)# exit

Returns to policy class configuration mode.

Step 25 

react ID {media-stop | mrv | rtp-jitter-average | transport-packets-lost-rate}

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# react 41 rtp-jitter-average

Enters a mode where you can specify what reaction occurs when a threshold is violated for the following metrics:

ID—ID for react configuration. Range is 1 to 65535.

media-stop—No traffic is found for the flow.

mrv—Ratio calculated by dividing the difference between the actual rate and the expected rate, by the expected rate.

rtp-jitter-average—Average jitter.

transport-packets-lost-rate—Ratio calculated by dividing the number of lost packets by the expected packet count.

Step 26 

action {snmp | syslog}

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-react)# action syslog

Specifies how violations of the thresholds with be reported.

Step 27 

alarm severity {alert | critical | emergency | error | info}

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-react)# alarm severity critical

Specifies which level of alarm will be reported.The default setting is info.

Step 28 

alarm type {discrete | grouped {count number | percent number}

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-react)# alarm severity critical

Specifies which types of levels are considered alarms that require reporting. The default setting is discrete.

Step 29 

threshold value {ge number | gt number | le number | lt number | range rng-start rng-end}

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-react)# threshold value ge

Specifies which types of levels values are considered alarms that require reporting.

Step 30 

description description

Example:

Router(config-cmap-c-react)# description rtp-jitter-average above 40

(Optional) Creates a description for the reaction.

Step 31 

end

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c-react)# end

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Troubleshooting Tips

To check the configuration and status of your flow policy, use the show policy-map type performance-monitor command.

For more information about this command, see the "Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco Performance Monitor" section on page 32.

Applying a Cisco Performance Monitor Policy to an Interface Using an Existing Flow Policy

Before it can be activated, a Cisco Performance Monitor policy must be applied to at least one interface. To activate a Cisco Performance Monitor policy, perform the following required task.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface type number

4. service-policy type performance-monitor {input | output} policy-name

5. end

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface type number

Example:

Router(config)# interface ethernet 0/0

Specifies an interface and enters interface configuration mode.

Step 4 

service-policy type performance-monitor {input | output} policy-name


Example:

Router(config-if)# service-policy type performance-monitor input mypolicy-map-4


Attaches a policy map to an input interface or virtual circuit (VC), or an output interface or VC, to be used as the service policy for that interface or VC.

input—Attaches the specified policy map to the input interface or input VC.

output—Attaches the specified policy map to the output interface or output VC.

policy-name—name of a service policy map (created by the policy-map command) to be attached. The name can be a maximum of 40 alphanumeric characters.

Step 5 

end

Example:

Router(config-if)# end

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Troubleshooting Tips

To check the configuration and status of your service policy, use the follwoign comands:

show performance monitor history

show performance monitor status

show policy-map ypre performance-monitor interface

For more information about these commands, see the "Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco Performance Monitor" section on page 32.

Applying a Cisco Performance Monitor Policy to an Interface Without Using an Existing Flow Policy

Before it can be activated, a Cisco Performance Monitor policy must be applied to at least one interface. To activate a Cisco Performance Monitor policy, perform the following required task.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface type number

4. service-policy type performance-monitor inline {input | output}

5. match {access-group {access-group | name access-group-name} | any | cos cos-value | destination-address mac address | discard-class class-number | dscp dscp-value | flow {direction | sampler} | fr-de | fr-dlci dlci-number | input-interface interface-name | ip {rtp starting-port-number port-range | precedence | dscp} | mpls experimental topmost number | not match-criterion | packet length {max maximum-length-value [min minimum-length-value] | min minimum-length-value [max maximum-length-value]} | precedence {precedence-criteria1 | precedence-criteria2 | precedence-criteria3 | precedence-criteria4} | protocol protocol-name | qos-group qos-group-value | source-address mac address-destination| vlan {vlan-id | vlan-range | vlan-combination}}

6. flow monitor {monitor-name | inline}

7. record {record-name | default-rtp | default-tcp}

8. exporter exporter-name

9. exit

10. monitor metric ip-cbr

11. rate layer3 {byte-rate {bps | kbps | mbps | gbps} | packet}

12. exit

13. monitor metric rtp

14. clock-rate {type-number | type-name} rate

15. max-dropout number

16. max-reorder number

17. min-sequential number

18. ssrc maximum number

19. exit

20. monitor parameters

21. flows number

22. interval duration number

23. history number

24. timeout number

25. exit

26. react ID {media-stop | mrv | rtp-jitter-average | transport-packets-lost-rate}

27. action {snmp | syslog}

28. alarm severity {alert | critical | emergency | error | info}

29. alarm type {discrete | grouped {count number | percent number}}

30. threshold value {ge number | gt number | le number | lt number | range rng-start rng-end}

31. end

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface type number

Example:

Router(config)# interface ethernet 0/0

Specifies an interface and enters interface configuration mode.

Step 4 

service-policy type performance-monitor inline {input | output}


Example:

Router(config-if)# service-policy type performance-monitor inline input

Attaches a policy map to an input interface or virtual circuit (VC), or an output interface or VC, to be used as the service policy for that interface or VC.

input—Attaches the specified policy map to the input interface or input VC.

output—Attaches the specified policy map to the output interface or output VC.

Step 5 

match {access-group {access-group | name access-group-name} | any | class-map class-map-name | cos cos-value | destination-address mac address | discard-class class-number | dscp dscp-value | flow {direction | sampler} | fr-de | fr-dlci dlci-number | input-interface interface-name | ip {rtp starting-port-number port-range | precedence | dscp} | mpls experimental topmost number | not match-criterion | packet length {max maximum-length-value [min minimum-length-value] | min minimum-length-value [max maximum-length-value]} | precedence {precedence-criteria1 | precedence-criteria2 | precedence-criteria3 | precedence-criteria4} | protocol protocol-name | qos-group qos-group-value | source-address mac address-destination| vlan {vlan-id | vlan-range | vlan-combination}}

Example:

Router(config-if-spolicy-inline)# match any

Specifies the classification criteria.

For more information and examples, see the Cisco Media Monitoring Command Reference.

Step 6 

flow monitor {monitor-name | inline}

Example:

Router(config-if-spolicy-inline)# flow monitor inline

Specifies an existing flow monitor to associate with a flow policy. If you do not want to use an existing flow monitor, you can use the inline option to configure a new one.

If needed, you can also use the inline option to specify a flow record and flow exporter.

Step 7 

record {record-name | default-rtp | default-tcp}

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-flowmon)# record default-tcp

(Optional) If you do not want to use an existing flow monitor, and instead used the inline option, use this command to configure a flow record.

Step 8 

exporter exporter-name

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-flowmon)# exporter exporter-4

(Optional) If you do not want to use an existing flow monitor, and instead used the inline option, use this command to configure a flow exporter.

Step 9 

exit

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-flowmon)# exit

Returns to service-policy inline configuration mode.

Step 10 

monitor metric ip-cbr

Example:

Router(config-if-spolicy-inline)# monitor metric ip-cbr

Enters IP-CBR monitor metric configuration mode.

Step 11 

rate layer3 {byte-rate {bps | kbps | mbps | gbps} | packet}

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-mipcbr)# rate layer3 248 mbps

Specifies the rate for monitoring the metrics.

byte-rate—Data rate in Bps, kBps, mBps, or gBps. The range is 1 to 65535.

packet—Packet rate in packets per second.

Step 12 

exit

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-mipcbr)# exit

Returns to service-policy inline configuration mode.

Step 13 

monitor metric rtp

Example:

Router(config-if-spolicy-inline)# monitor metric rtp

Enters RTP monitor metric configuration mode.

Step 14 

clock-rate {type-number | type-name} rate

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-mrtp)# clock-rate 8 9600

Specifies the clock rate used to sample RTP video-monitoring metrics.

For more information about the clock-type numbers and names, see the Cisco Media Monitoring Command Reference.

The range for rate is 1 kHz to 192 kHz.

Step 15 

max-dropout number

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-mrtp)# max-dropout 2

Specifies the maximum number of dropouts allowed when sampling RTP video-monitoring metrics.

Step 16 

max-reorder number

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-mrtp)# max-reorder 4

Specifies the maximum number of reorders allowed when sampling RTP video-monitoring metrics.

Step 17 

min-sequential number

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-mrtp)# min-sequential 2

Specifies the minimum number of sequental packets required to identify a stream as being an RTP flow.

Step 18 

ssrc maximum number

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-mrtp)# ssrc maximum 20

Specifies the maximum number of SSRCs that can be monitored within the same flow. A flow is defined by the protocol, source/destination address, and source/destination port).

Step 19 

exit

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-mrtp)# exit

Returns to service-policy inline configuration mode.

Step 20 

monitor parameters

Example:

Router(config-if-spolicy-inline)# monitor parameters

Enters monitor parameters configuration mode.

Step 21 

flows number

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-mparam)# flows 40

Specifies the maximum number of flows for each monitor cache.

Step 22 

interval duration number

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-mparam)# interval duration 40

Specifies the duration of the intervals, in seconds, for collecting monitoring metrics.

Step 23 

history number

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-mparam)# history 4

Specifies the number of historical intervals of collected monitoring metrics to display.

Step 24 

timeout number

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-mparam)# timeout 20

Specifies the number of intervals before a stopped flow is removed from the database.

Step 25 

exit

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-mparam)# exit

Returns to service-policy inline configuration mode.

Step 26 

react ID {media-stop | mrv | rtp-jitter-average | transport-packets-lost-rate}

Example:

Router(config-if-spolicy-inline)# react 6 rtp-jitter-average

Enters a mode where you can specify what reaction occurs when a threshold is violated for the following metrics:

ID—ID for react configuration. Range is 1 to 65535.

media-stop—No traffic is found for the flow.

mrv—Ratio calculated by dividing the difference between the actual rate and the expected rate, by the expected rate.

rtp-jitter-average—Average jitter.

transport-packets-lost-rate—Ratio calculated by dividing the number of lost packets by the expected packet count.

Step 27 

action {snmp | syslog}

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-react)# action syslog

Specifies how violations of the thresholds with be reported.

Step 28 

alarm severity {alert | critical | emergency | error | info}

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-react)# alarm severity critical

Specifies which level of alarm will be reported.

Step 29 

alarm type {discrete | grouped {count number | percent number}}

Example:

Router(config-pspolicy-inline-react)# alarm severity critical

Specifies which types of levels are considered alarms that require reporting.

Step 30 

threshold value {ge number | gt number | le number | lt number | range rng-start rng-end}

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-react)# threshold value ge

Specifies which types of levels values are considered alarms that require reporting.

Step 31 

end

Example:

Router(config-spolicy-inline-react)# end

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

To check the configuration and status of your service policy, use the show performance monitor status command and show performance monitor history command.

For more information about these commands, see the "Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco Performance Monitor" section on page 32.

Verifying That Cisco Performance Monitor Is Collecting Data

To verify that Cisco Performance Monitor is collecting data, perform the following optional task.

If no data is being collected, complete the remaining tasks in this section.

Prerequisites

The interface to which you applied the input flow monitor must be receiving traffic that meets the criteria defined by the original flow record before you can display the flows in the flow monitor cache.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. show policy-map type performance-monitor [interface interface-name] [class class-name] [input | output]

3. show performance monitor status [interface interface name [filter] | policy policy-map-name class class-map-name [filter]} | filter | sort {bitrate-max | loss-event | rtt-max}]

where filter = {ip {source-addr source-prefix | any} {dst-addr dst-prefix | any} | {tcp | udp} {source-addr source-prefix | any} {[eq | lt | gt number | range min max | ssrc {ssrc-number | any} | {{dst-addr dst-prefix | any} eq | lt | gt number | range min max | ssrc {ssrc-number | any}}

4. show performance monitor history [interval {all | number [start number]} | interface interface name [filter] | policy policy-map-name class class-map-name [filter]} | filter ]

where filter = {ip {source-addr source-prefix | any} {dst-addr dst-prefix | any} | {tcp | udp} {source-addr source-prefix | any} {[eq | lt | gt number | range min max | ssrc {ssrc-number | any} | {{dst-addr dst-prefix | any} eq | lt | gt number | range min max | ssrc {ssrc-number | any}}

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 enable

The enable command enters privileged EXEC mode (enter the password if prompted).

Router> enable
Router#

Step 2 show policy-map type performance-monitor [interface interface-name] [class class-name] [input | output]

For a description of the fields displayed by this command, see Table 1.

The following example shows the output for one flow policy:

  Policy Map type performance-monitor PM-POLICY-4
    Class PM-CLASS-4
      flow monitor PM-MONITOR-4
        record PM-RECORD-4
        exporter PM-EXPORTER-4
      monitor parameters
        interval duration 30
        timeout 10
        history 10
        flows 8000
      monitor metric rtp
        min-sequential 5
        max-dropout 5
        max-reorder 5
        clock-rate default 90000
        ssrc maximum 5

Table 1 show policy-map type performance-monitor Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Policy Map type performance-monitor

Name of the Cisco Performance Monitor flow policy.

flow monitor

Name of the Cisco Performance Monitor flow monitor.

record

Name of the Cisco Performance Monitor flow record.

exporter

Name of the Cisco Performance Monitor flow exporter.

monitor parameter

Parameters for the flow policy.

interval duration

The configured duration of the collection interval for the policy.

timeout

The configured amount of time wait for a response when collecting data for the policy.

history

The configured number of historical collections to keep for the policy.

flows

The configured number of flows to collect for the policy.

monitor metric rtp

RTP metrics for the flow policy.

min-sequential

The configured mimimum number of packets in a sequence used to classify an RTP flow.

max-dropout

The configured maximum number of packets to ignore ahead of the current packet in terms of sequence number.

max-reorder

The configured maximum number of packets to ignore behind the current packet in terms of sequence number.

clock-rate default

The configured clock rate for the RTP packet timestamp clock that is used to calculate the packet arrival latency.

ssrc maximum

The configured maximum number of SSRCs that can be monitored within the same flow. A flow is defined by the protocol, source/destination address, and source/destination port. The range is from 1 to 50.


Step 3 show performance monitor status [interface interface name [filter] | policy policy-map-name class class-map-name [filter]} | filter | sort {bitrate-max | loss-event | rtt-max}]

where filter = {ip {source-addr source-prefix | any} {dst-addr dst-prefix | any} | {tcp | udp} {source-addr source-prefix | any} {[eq | lt | gt number | range min max | ssrc {ssrc-number | any} | {{dst-addr dst-prefix | any} eq | lt | gt number | range min max | ssrc {ssrc-number | any}}

This command displays the cumulative statistics for the specified number of most recent intervals. The number of intervals is configured using the history command. The default settings for this commands is 10 of the most recent collection intervals. The duration of collection intervals is specified by the interval duration command.

To view statistics for other intervals, use the show performance monitor history command as described in the next step. For a description of the fields displayed by both commands, see Table 2. For more information about these commands, see the Cisco Media Monitoring Command Reference

Step 4 show performance monitor history [interval {all | number [start number]} | interface interface name [filter] | policy policy-map-name class class-map-name [filter]} | filter ]

where filter = {ip {source-addr source-prefix | any} {dst-addr dst-prefix | any} | {tcp | udp} {source-addr source-prefix | any} {[eq | lt | gt number | range min max | ssrc {ssrc-number | any} | {{dst-addr dst-prefix | any} eq | lt | gt number | range min max | ssrc {ssrc-number | any}}

This command displays the statistics collected by Cisco Performance Monitor during any or all intervals, including the current one. The duration of collection intervals is specified by the interval duration command.

For a description of the fields displayed by this command, Table 2. For more information about this command, see the Cisco Media Monitoring Command Reference.

The following example shows the output for the show performance monitor history command:


Codes: *   - field is not configurable under flow record
       NA  - field is not applicable for configured parameters

Match: ipv4 src addr = 1.1.1.1, ipv4 dst addr = 7.7.7.2, ipv4 prot = udp, trns src port = 
20001, trns dst port = 10000, SSRC = 4294967291
 Policy: RTP_POL, Class: RTP_CLASS, Interface: GigabitEthernet0/4, Direction: input
 
  start time                                           14:57:34    
                                                       ============
 *history bucket number                              : 1           
 *counter flow                                       : 1           
  counter bytes                                      : 0           
  counter bytes rate                           (Bps) : NA          
 *counter bytes rate per flow                  (Bps) : NA          
 *counter bytes rate per flow min              (Bps) : NA          
 *counter bytes rate per flow max              (Bps) : NA          
  counter packets                                    : 0           
 *counter packets rate per flow                      : 0           
  counter packets dropped                            : 0           
  routing forwarding-status reason                   : Unknown     
  interface input                                    : NA          
  interface output                                   : NA          
  monitmeters                                      : true        
  ipv4 dscp                                          : 0           
  ipv4 ttl                                           : 57          
  application media bytes counter                    : 0           
  application media packets counter                  : 0           
  application media bytes rate                 (Bps) : NA          
 *application media bytes rate per flow        (Bps) : NA          
 *application media bytes rate per flow min    (Bps) : NA          
 *application media bytes rate per flow max    (Bps) : NA          
  application media packets rate               (pps) : 0           
  application media event                            : Stop        
 *transport rtp flow count                           : 0           
  transport rtp jitter mean                   (usec) : NA          
  transport rtp jitter minimum                (usec) : NA          
  transport rtp jitter maximum                (usec) : NA          
 *transport rtp payload type                         : 0           
  transport event packet-loss counter                : NA          
 *transport event packet-loss counter min            : NA          
 *transport event packet-loss counter max            : NA          
  transport packets expected counter                 : NA          
  transport packets lost counter                     : NA          
 *transport packets lost counter minimum             : NA          
 *transport packets lost rate                  ( % ) : NA          
 *transport packets lost rate min              ( % ) : NA          
 *transport packets lost rate max              ( % ) : NA          
*transport packets lost rate max              ( % ) : 0.00
 *transport tcp flow count                           : 1
 *transport round-trip-time sum               (msec) : 32
 *transport round-trip-time samples                  : 1
  transport round-trip-time                   (msec) : 32
 *transport round-trip-time min               (msec) : 32
 *transport round-trip-time max               (msec) : 32

Table 2 show performance monitor status and show performance-monitor history Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

history bucket number

Number of the bucket of historical data collected.

counter flow

Number of flows collected.

counter bytes

Total number of bytes collected for all flows.

counter bytes rate

Average number of bytes processed by the monitoring system per second during the monitoring interval for all flows.

counter bytes rate per flow

Average number of bytes processed by the monitoring system per second during the monitoring interval for each flow.

counter bytes rate per flow min

Minimum for the average number of bytes processed per second for each flow.

counter bytes rate per flow max

Maximum threshold for the average number of packets or bits processed per second for each flow.

counter packets

Total number of IP packets processsed for all flows.

counter packets rate per flow

Avrage number of IP packets processed by the monitoring system per second during the monitoring interval for each flow.

counter packets dropped

IP packet drops by monitoring system for this flow.

routing forwarding-status reason

Forwarding status is encoded using eight bits with the two most significant bits giving the status and the six remaining bits giving the reason code.

Status is either unknown (00), Forwarded (10), Dropped (10) or Consumed (11).

The following list shows the forwarding status values for each status category.

Unknown

0

Forwarded

Forward 64

Forwarded Fragmented 65

Forwarded not Fragmented 66

Dropped

Unknown 128

Drop ACL Deny 129

Drop ACL drop 130

Drop Unroutable 131

Drop Adjacency 132

Drop Fragmentation & DF set 133

Drop Bad header checksum 134

Drop Bad total Length 135

Drop Bad Header Length 136

Drop bad TTL 137

Drop Policer 138

Drop WRED 139

Drop RPF 140

Drop For us 141

Drop Bad output interface 142

Drop Hardware 143

Consumed

Unknown 192

Terminate Punt Adjacency 193

Terminate Incomplete Adjacency 194

Terminate For us 195

interface output

Outgoing interface name.

interface input

Incoming interface name.

monitor event

Bit 1 indicates that one of the thresholds specified by a react statement for the flow was crossed at least once in the monitoring interval. Bit 2 indicates that there was a loss-of-confidence in measurement.

ipv4 dscp

IPv4 differentiated services code point (DCSP).

ipv4 ttl

IPv4 time-to-live (TTL).

application media bytes counter

Number of IP bytes from media applications processed for a specific media stream.

application media packets counter

Number of IP packets from media applications processed for a specific media stream.

application media bytes rate

Average media byte rate (Bps) for all flows during the monitoring interval.

application media bytes rate per flow

Average media byte rate (Bps) for each flow during the monitoring interval.

application media bytes rate per flow min

Minimum rate of application media bytes, in Bps, collected per flow.

application media bytes rate per flow max

Maximum rate of application media bytes, in Bps, collected per flow.

application media event

Bit 1 is not used. Bit 2 indicates that no media application packets were seen, in other words, a Media Stop Event occured.

transport rtp flow count

Number of RTP flows collected.

transport rtp jitter mean

Mean deviation of the difference in packet spacing at the receiver compared to the sender for a pair of packets.

transport rtp jitter minimum

Minimum deviation of the difference in packet spacing at the receiver compared to the sender for a pair of packets.

transport rtp jitter maximum

Maximum deviation of the difference in packet spacing at the receiver compared to the sender for a pair of packets.

transport rtp payload type

Code for the payload format. Payload type codes can be defined dynamically or codes for default audio and video format can be used as defined in RFC 3551. An RTP source can change the payload type during a session, but a receiver MUST ignore packets with payload types that it does not understand. Therefore, some measurements taken during monitoring may not be accurate.

transport event packet-loss counter

Number of loss events (number of contiguous sets of lost packets).

transport event packet-loss counter min

Minimum number of packet loss events.

transport event packet-loss counter max

Maximum number of packet loss events.

transport packets expected counter

Number of packets expected.

transport packets lost counter

Number of packets lost.

transport packets lost counter minimum

Minimum threshold for the number of packets lost.

transport packets lost counter maximum

Maximum threshold for the number of packets lost.

transport packets lost rate

Rate of packets lost, in percent .

transport packets lost rate min

Minimum threshold for the percent of packets lost.

transport packets lost rate max

Maximum threshold for the percent of packets lost.



Displaying the Peformacne Monitor Cache and Clients

To display the cache and the clients for Cisco Performance Monitor, perform the following optional task.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. show performance monitor cache [policy policy-map-name class class-map-name] [interface interface name]

3. show performance monitor clients {detail {client-ID | all} | list}

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 enable

The enable command enters privileged EXEC mode (enter the password if prompted).

Router> enable
Router#

Step 2 show performance monitor cache [policy policy-map-name class class-map-name] [interface interface name]

MMON Metering Layer Stats:
  static pkt cnt: 3049 
  static cce sb cnt: 57 
  dynamic pkt cnt: 0 

  Cache type:                            Permanent
  Cache size:                                 2000
  Current entries:                               8
  High Watermark:                                9

  Flows added:                                   9
  Updates sent            (  1800 secs)          0

IPV4 SRC ADDR    IPV4 DST ADDR    IP PROT  TRNS SRC PORT  TRNS DST PORT  

ipv4 ttl ipv4 ttl min ipv4 ttl max  ipv4 dscp bytes long perm pktslong perm  user space vm

==========================================================================================
10.1.1.1         10.1.2.3              17           4000           1967
0             0             0  0x00                         80
1 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000

10.1.1.1         10.1.2.3              17           6000           1967
0             0             0  0x00                         80
1  0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000

10.1.1.1         10.1.2.3              17           4000           2000
0             0             0  0x00                         44
1  0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000
10.1.1.1         10.1.2.3               6           6000           3000
0             0             0  0x00                         84
2  0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000
10.1.1.1         10.1.2.3              17           1967           6001
0             0             0  0x00                         36
1  0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000
10.1.1.1         10.1.2.3              17           1967           4001
0             0             0  0x00                         36
1  0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000
10.1.1.1         10.1.2.3               6           3001           6001
0             0             0  0x00                        124
3  0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000
10.1.1.1         10.1.2.3              17           2001           4001
0             0             0  0x00                         44
1  0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000 0x00000000
0x00000000


Step 3 show performance monitor clients detail all


Client name for ID 1 : Mediatrace-131419052
   Type: Mediatrace
   Age: 443 seconds
   Monitor Object: _MMON_DYN_-class-map-69
        Flow spec: (dvmc-acl#47) 10.10.130.2 1000 10.10.132.2 2000 17
        monitor parameters
                interval duration 60
                timeout 2
                history 1
                flows 100
        monitor metric rtp
                min-sequential 10
                max-dropout 5
                max-reorder 5
                clock-rate 112 90000
                clock-rate default 90000
                ssrc maximum 20
        monitor metric ip-cbr
                rate layer3 packet 20
        Flow record: dvmc_fnf_fdef_47
                Key fields:
                        ipv4 source address
                        ipv4 destination address
                        transport source-port
                        transport destination-port
                        ip protocol
                Non-key fields:
                        monitor event
                        application media event
                        routing forwarding-status
                        ip dscp
                        ip ttl
                        counter bytes rate
                        application media bytes rate
                        transport rtp jitter mean
                        transport packets lost counter
                        transport packets expected counter
                        transport event packet-loss counter
                        transport packets lost rate
                        timestamp interval
                        counter packets dropped
                        counter bytes
                        counter packets
                        application media bytes counter
                        application media packets counter
        Monitor point: _MMON_DYN_-policy-map-70 GigabitEthernet0/3 output
        Classification Statistic:
                matched packet: 545790
                matched byte: 64403220

Displaying the Clock Rate for Cisco Performance Monitor Classes

To display the clock rate for one or more classes, perform the following optional task.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. show performance monitor clock rate [policy policy-map-name class class-map-name]

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 enable

The enable command enters privileged EXEC mode (enter the password if prompted).

Router> enable
Router#

Step 2 show performance monitor clock rate [policy policy-map-name class class-map-name]

If no class name is specified, information for all classes are displayed.

Router# show performance monitor clock rate policy all-apps class telepresence-CS4

Load for five secs: 6%/2%; one minute: 5%; five minutes: 5% Time source is NTP, 
17:41:35.508 EST Wed Feb 16 2011

RTP clock rate for Policy: all-apps, Class: telepresence-CS4 
     Payload type     Clock rate(Hz)

     pcmu    (0  )     8000
     gsm     (3  )     8000
     g723    (4  )     8000
     dvi4    (5  )     8000
     dvi4-2  (6  )     16000
     lpc     (7  )     8000
     pcma    (8  )     8000
     g722    (9  )     8000
     l16-2   (10 )     44100
     l16     (11 )     44100
     qcelp   (12 )     8000
     cn      (13 )     8000
     mpa     (14 )     90000
     g728    (15 )     8000
     dvi4-3  (16 )     11025
     dvi4-4  (17 )     22050
     g729    (18 )     8000
     celb    (25 )     90000
     jpeg    (26 )     90000
     nv      (28 )     90000
     h261    (31 )     90000
     mpv     (32 )     90000
     mp2t    (33 )     90000
     h263    (34 )     90000
             (96 )     48000
             (112)     90000
     default           90000

Displaying the Current Status of a Flow Monitor

To display the current status of a flow monitor, perform the following optional task.

Prerequisites

The interface to which you applied the input flow monitor must be receiving traffic that meets the criteria defined by the original flow record before you can display the flows in the flow monitor cache.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. show flow monitor type performance-monitor

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 enable

The enable command enters privileged EXEC mode (enter the password if prompted).

Router> enable
Router#

Step 2 show flow monitor type performance-monitor

The show flow monitor type performance-monitor command shows the current status of the flow monitor that you specify.

Router# show flow monitor type performance-monitor

Flow Monitor type performance-monitor monitor-4:
  Description:           User defined
  Flow Record:           record-4
  Flow Exporter:         exporter-4
  No. of Inactive Users: 0
  No. of Active Users:   0

Verifying the Flow Monitor Configuration

To verify the configuration commands that you entered, perform the following optional task.

Prerequisites

The interface to which you applied the input flow monitor must be receiving traffic that meets the criteria defined by the original flow record before you can display the flows in the flow monitor cache.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. show running-config flow monitor

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 enable

The enable command enters privileged EXEC mode (enter the password if prompted).

Router> enable
Router#

Step 2 show running-config flow monitor

The show running-config flow monitor command shows the configuration commands of the flow monitor that you specify.

Router# show running-config flow monitor

Current configuration:
!
flow monitor FLOW-MONITOR-1
 description Used for basic IPv4 traffic analysis
 record netflow ipv4 original-input
!
!
flow monitor FLOW-MONITOR-2
 description Used for basic IPv6 traffic analysis
 record netflow ipv6 original-input
!

Verifying That Cisco IOS Flexible NetFlow and Cisco Performance Monitor Is Enabled on an Interface

To verify that Flexible NetFlow and Cisco Performance Monitor is enabled on an interface, perform the following optional task.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. show flow interface type number

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 enable

The enable command enters privileged EXEC mode (enter the password if prompted).

Router> enable
Router#

Step 2 show flow interface type number

The show flow interface command verifies that Flexible NetFlow and Cisco Performance Monitor is enabled on an interface.

Router# show flow interface ethernet 0/0

Interface Ethernet0/0
  FNF:  monitor:         FLOW-MONITOR-1
        direction:       Input
        traffic(ip):     on
  FNF:  monitor:         FLOW-MONITOR-2
        direction:       Input
        traffic(ipv6):   on


Displaying the Flow Monitor Cache

To display the data in the flow monitor cache, perform the following optional task.

Prerequisites

The interface to which you applied the input flow monitor must be receiving traffic that meets the criteria defined by the original flow record before you can display the flow data in the flow monitor cache.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. show flow monitor name monitor-name cache format record

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 enable

The enable command enters privileged EXEC mode (enter the password if prompted).

Router> enable
Router#

Step 2 show flow monitor name monitor-name cache format record

The show flow monitor name monitor-name cache format record command string displays the status, statistics, and the flow data in the cache for a flow monitor.

Router# show flow monitor name FLOW-MONITOR-1 cache format record
Cache type:                            Normal
  Cache size:                              4096
  Current entries:                            8
  High Watermark:                             8

  Flows added:                               24
  Flows aged:                                16
    - Active timeout   (  1800 secs)          0
    - Inactive timeout (    15 secs)         16
    - Event aged                              0
    - Watermark aged                          0
    - Emergency aged                          0

IPV4 SOURCE ADDRESS:       10.251.10.1
IPV4 DESTINATION ADDRESS:  172.16.10.2
TRNS SOURCE PORT:          0
TRNS DESTINATION PORT:     2048
INTERFACE INPUT:           Et0/0
FLOW SAMPLER ID:           0
IP TOS:                    0x00
IP PROTOCOL:               1
ip source as:              0
ip destination as:         0
ipv4 next hop address:     172.16.7.2
ipv4 source mask:          /0
ipv4 destination mask:     /24
tcp flags:                 0x00
interface output:          Et1/0
counter bytes:             733500
counter packets:           489
timestamp first:           720892
timestamp last:            975032
.
.
.
IPV4 SOURCE ADDRESS:       172.16.6.1
IPV4 DESTINATION ADDRESS:  224.0.0.9
TRNS SOURCE PORT:          520
TRNS DESTINATION PORT:     520
INTERFACE INPUT:           Et0/0
FLOW SAMPLER ID:           0
IP TOS:                    0xC0
IP PROTOCOL:               17
ip source as:              0
ip destination as:         0
ipv4 next hop address:     0.0.0.0
ipv4 source mask:          /24
ipv4 destination mask:     /0
tcp flags:                 0x00
interface output:          Null
counter bytes:             52
counter packets:           1
timestamp first:           973804
timestamp last:            973804

Router# show flow monitor name FLOW-MONITOR-2 cache format record

Cache type:                            Normal
  Cache size:                              4096
  Current entries:                            6
  High Watermark:                             8

  Flows added:                             1048
  Flows aged:                              1042
    - Active timeout   (  1800 secs)         11
    - Inactive timeout (    15 secs)       1031
    - Event aged                              0
    - Watermark aged                          0
    - Emergency aged                          0

IPV6 FLOW LABEL:           0
IPV6 EXTENSION MAP:        0x00000040
IPV6 SOURCE ADDRESS:       2001:DB8:1:ABCD::1
IPV6 DESTINATION ADDRESS:  2001:DB8:4:ABCD::2
TRNS SOURCE PORT:          3000
TRNS DESTINATION PORT:     55
INTERFACE INPUT:           Et0/0
FLOW DIRECTION:            Input
FLOW SAMPLER ID:           0
IP PROTOCOL:               17
IP TOS:                    0x00
ip source as:              0
ip destination as:         0
ipv6 next hop address:     ::
ipv6 source mask:          /48
ipv6 destination mask:     /0
tcp flags:                 0x00
interface output:          Null
counter bytes:             521192
counter packets:           9307
timestamp first:           9899684
timestamp last:            11660744
.
.
.
IPV6 FLOW LABEL:           0
IPV6 EXTENSION MAP:        0x00000000
IPV6 SOURCE ADDRESS:       FE80::A8AA:BBFF:FEBB:CC03
IPV6 DESTINATION ADDRESS:  FF02::9
TRNS SOURCE PORT:          521
TRNS DESTINATION PORT:     521
INTERFACE INPUT:           Et0/0
FLOW DIRECTION:            Input
FLOW SAMPLER ID:           0
IP PROTOCOL:               17
IP TOS:                    0xE0
ip source as:              0
ip destination as:         0
ipv6 next hop address:     ::
ipv6 source mask:          /10
ipv6 destination mask:     /0
tcp flags:                 0x00
interface output:          Null
counter bytes:             92
counter packets:           1
timestamp first:           11653832
timestamp last:            11653832


Displaying the Current Status of a Flow Exporter

To display the current status of a flow exporter, perform the following optional task.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. show flow exporter [exporter-name]

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 enable

The enable command enters privileged EXEC mode (enter the password if prompted).

Router> enable
Router#

Step 2 show flow exporter [exporter-name]

The show flow exporter command shows the current status of the flow exporter that you specify.

Router# show flow exporter EXPORTER-1

Flow Exporter EXPORTER-1:
  Description:              Exports to Chicago datacenter
  Transport Configuration:
    Destination IP address: 172.16.10.2
    Source IP address:      172.16.7.1
    Transport Protocol:     UDP
    Destination Port:       65
    Source Port:            56041
    DSCP:                   0x0
    TTL:                    255

Verifying the Flow Exporter Configuration

To verify the configuration commands that you entered to configure the flow exporter, perform the following optional task.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. show running-config flow exporter exporter-name

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 enable

The enable command enters privileged EXEC mode (enter the password if prompted).

Router> enable
Router#

Step 2 show running-config flow exporter exporter-name

The show running-config flow exporter command shows the configuration commands of the flow exporter that you specify.

Router# show running-config flow exporter EXPORTER-1

Building configuration...

!
flow exporter EXPORTER-1
 description Exports to datacenter
 destination 172.16.10.2
 transport udp 65
!

Enabling Debugging

To enable debugging for Cisco Performance Monitor, perform the following optional task in privileged EXEC mode.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. debug performance monitor {database | dynamic | event | export | flow-monitor | metering | provision | sibling | snmp | tca | timer}

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 debug performance monitor {database | dynamic | event | export | flow-monitor | metering | provision | sibling | snmp | tca | timer}

The debug performance monitor command enables debugging for the following performance monitor components:

Flow database

Dynamic monitoring

Performance events

Exporting

Flow monitors

Metering layer

Provisioning

Sibling management

SNMP

TCA

Timers

The following example shows how to enable debugging for dynamic monitoring:

Router# debug performance monitor dynamic 

Configuration Example For Cisco Performacne Monitor

The following example show you how to configure a basic functionality for Cisco Performance Monitor:

Example: Monitor for Lost RTP Packets and RTP Jitter

Example: Monitor for Lost RTP Packets and RTP Jitter

This example show a configuration that monitors the number of lost RTP packets, the amount of RTP jitter, and other basic statistics for the gig1 interface. In this example, Cisco Performance Monitor is also configured to make an entry in the sylog when the any of the following events occur on the interface:

The percentage of lost RTP packets is between 5 percent and 9 percent.

The percentage of lost RTP packets is greater than 10 percent.

A media stop event has occurred.

! Set the filter spec for the flows to monitor.
access-list 101 ip permit host 10.10.2.20 any
! Use the flow record to define the flow keys and metric to collect.
flow record type performance-monitor video-monitor-record
 match ipv4 source
 match ipv4 destination
 match transport source-port
 match transport destination-port
 match rtp ssrc
 collect timestamp
 collect counter byte
 collect counter packet
 collect mse
 collect media-error
 collect counter rtp interval-jitter
 collect counter rtp packet lost
 collect counter rtp lost event

! Set the exporting server. The export message format is based on FNFv.9.
flow export video-nms-server
 export-protocol netflow-v9
 destination cisco-video-management
 transport udp 32001

! Set the flow filter in the class-map. 
class-map match-all video-class
 access-group  ipv4 101

! Set the policy map with the type performance-monitor for video monitor.
policy-map type performance-monitor video-monitor
 ! Set the video monitor actions. 
 class video-class  
  ! Specify where the metric data is being exported to.
  export  flow video-nms-server 
  flow monitor inline
   record video-monitor-record
! Set the monitoring modeling parameters.
monitor parameters 
 ! Set the measurement timeout to 10 secs.
 interval duration 10 
 ! Set the timeout to 10 minutes.
 timeout 10 
 ! Specify that 30 flow intervals can be kept in performance database.
 history 30 
 priority 7
 ! Set rtp flow verification criteria.
 monitor metric rtp 
 ! Configure a RTP flow criteria: at least 10 packets in sequence.
 min-sequential   10 
 ! Ignore packets that are more than 5 packet ahead in terms of seq  number. 
 max-dropout  5 
 ! Ignore packets that are more than 5 packets behind in terms of seq  number.
 max-reorder 5 
 ! Set the clock rate frequency for rtp packet timestamp clock.
 clock-rate 89000 
 ! Set the maximum number of ssrc sllowed within this class.
 ssrc maximum  100 

 ! Set TCA for alarm.
 react 100 transport-packets-lost-rate
  description critical  TCA
  ! Set the threshold to greater than 10%.
  threshold gt 10 
  ! Set the threshold to the average number based on the last five intervals.
  threshold type average 5 
  action  syslog
  alarm severity critical

 react 110 transport-packets-lost-rate
  description medium TCA  
  ! Set the threshold to between 5% and 9% of packet lost.
  threshold range gt 5 le 9 
  threshold type average 10
  action  syslog
  alarm type grouped percent 30

 react 3000 media-stop
  action syslog 
  alarm severity critical
  alarm type grouped percent 30
            
interface gig1
 service-policy type performance-monitor video-mon in

Where to Go Next

For more information about configuring the products in the Medianet product family, see the other chapter in this guide or see the Cisco Media Monitoring Configuration Guide.

Additional References

The following sections provide references related to Flexible NetFlow.

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

IP addressing commands: complete command syntax, command mode, command history, defaults, usage guidelines, and examples

Cisco Media Monitoring Command Reference

Cisco IOS commands

Cisco IOS Master Commands List, All Releases

Configuration commands for Flexible NetFlow

Cisco IOS Flexible NetFlow Command Reference

Overview of Flexible NetFlow

"Cisco IOS Flexible NetFlow Overview"

Flexible NetFlow Feature Roadmap

"Cisco IOS Flexible NetFlow Features Roadmap"

Configuring flow exporters to export Flexible NetFlow data.

"Configuring Data Export for Cisco IOS Flexible NetFlow with Flow Exporters"

Customizing Flexible NetFlow

"Customizing Cisco IOS Flexible NetFlow Flow Records and Flow Monitors"

Configuring flow sampling to reduce the overhead of monitoring traffic with Flexible NetFlow

"Using Cisco IOS Flexible NetFlow Flow Sampling to Reduce the CPU Overhead of Analyzing Traffic"

Configuring Flexible NetFlow using predefined records

"Configuring Cisco IOS Flexible NetFlow with Predefined Records"

Using Flexible NetFlow Top N Talkers to analyze network traffic

"Using Cisco IOS Flexible NetFlow Top N Talkers to Analyze Network Traffic"

Configuring IPv4 multicast statistics support for Flexible NetFlow

"Configuring IPv4 Multicast Statistics Support for Cisco IOS Flexible NetFlow"


Standards

Standard
Title

None.


MIBs

MIB
MIBs Link

CISCO-FLOW-MONITOR-TC-MIB
CISCO-FLOW-MONITOR-MIB
CISCO-RTP-METRICS-MIB
CISCO-IP-CBR-METRICS-MIB

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs


RFCs

RFC
Title

RFC 3954

Cisco Systems NetFlow Services Export Version 9

http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc3954.txt

RFC 3550

RTP: A Transport Protocol for Real-Time Applications

http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc3550.txt


Technical Assistance

Description
Link

The Cisco Support and Documentation website provides online resources to download documentation, software, and tools. Use these resources to install and configure the software and to troubleshoot and resolve technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. Access to most tools on the Cisco Support and Documentation website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

http://www.cisco.com/cisco/web/support/index.html


Feature Information for Cisco Performance Monitor

Table 3 lists the features in this module and provides links to specific configuration information.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and software image support. Cisco Feature Navigator enables you to determine which software images support a specific software release, feature set, or platform. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.


Note Table 3 lists only the Cisco IOS software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given Cisco IOS software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that Cisco IOS software release train also support that feature.


Table 3 Feature Information for Cisco Performance Monitor

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

Cisco Performance Monitor 1.0

15.1(4)M1
15.1(3)T
12.2(58)SE

This feature enables you to monitor the flow of packets in your network and become aware of any issues that might impact the flow before it starts to significantly impact your applications' performance.

The following commands were introduced or modified by this feature: action (policy react and policy inline react), alarm severity (policy react and policy inline react), alarm type (policy react and policy inline react), class-map, clock-rate (policy RTP), collect application media, collect counter, collect flow direction, collect interface, collect ipv4, collect ipv4 destination, collect ipv4 source, collect ipv4 ttl, collect monitor event, collect routing, collect timestamp interval, collect transport event packet-loss counter, collect transport packets, collect transport rtp jitter, description (Performance Monitor), destination, dscp (Flexible NetFlow), export-protocol, exporter, flow monitor type performance-monitor, flow record type performance-monitor, flows, history (monitor parameters), interval duration, match access-group, match any, match class-map, match cos, match destination-address mac, match discard-class, match dscp, match flow, match fr-de, match fr-dlci, match input-interface, match ip dscp, match ip precedence, match ip rtp, match ipv4, match ipv4 destination, match ipv4 source, match mpls experimental topmost, match not, match packet length (class-map), match precedence, match protocol, match qos-group , match source-address mac, match transport destination-port, match transport rtp ssrc, match transport source-port, match vlan, max-dropout (policy RTP), max-reorder (policy RTP), min-sequential (policy RTP), monitor metric ip-cbr, monitor metric rtp, monitor parameters, option (Flexible NetFlow), output-features, policy-map type performance-monitor, rate layer3, react (policy), record (Performance Monitor), rename (policy), service-policy type performance-monitor, show performance monitor status, show performance monitor history, show policy-map type performance-monitor, snmp-server host, snmp-server enable traps flowmon, snmp mib flowmon alarm history, source (Flexible NetFlow), ssrc maximum, template data timeout, threshold value (policy react and policy inline react), timeout (monitor parameters), transport (Flexible NetFlow), and ttl (Flexible NetFlow).