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Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

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Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

Table Of Contents

Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

Finding Feature Information

Contents

Prerequisites for Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

Restrictions for Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

Information About Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

Frame Relay Overview

Frame Relay Encapsulation on the IPv6 Interface

Frame Relay Encapsulation on Supported IPv6 Subinterfaces

Point-to-Point Protocol over Frame Relay

Fast Path Functionality in IPv6 over Frame Relay

Multilink Frame Relay

6PE Implementation of IPv6 over Frame Relay

QoS Services Models Used with Frame Relay

QoS nC/nD Model

QoS 1c/1D Model

QoS 1C/nD Model

How to Implement IPv6 over Frame Relay

Enabling Frame Relay Switching

Configuring Frame Relay Encapsulation on the Main IPv6 Interface

Configuring Frame Relay on an IPv6 Subinterface

Implementing Multilink Frame Relay for IPv6

Creating a Virtual Interface for an MFR Bundle

Adding Serial Interfaces to the MFR Bundle

Monitoring and Maintaining MFR for IPv6

Configuration Examples for Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

Example: Enabling Frame Relay Switching

Example: Configuring Frame Relay on the Main IPv6 Interface

Example: Configuring Frame Relay on an IPv6 Subinterface

Example: Implementing Multilink Frame Relay for IPv6

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance

Feature Information for Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay


Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay


First Published: April 16, 2008
Last Updated: November 10, 2008

This document describes IPv6 over Frame Relay encapsulation and multilink Frame Relay (MFR) encapsulation and provides information about QoS on Engine 3 and Engine 5 line cards on Cisco 12000 series Internet routers.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest feature information and caveats, see the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the "Feature Information for Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay" section.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Contents

Prerequisites for Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

Restrictions for Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

Information About Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

How to Implement IPv6 over Frame Relay

Configuration Examples for Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

Additional References

Feature Information for Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

Prerequisites for Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

This module assumes that you are familiar with IPv4. Refer to the publications in the "Additional References" section for IPv4 configuration and command reference information.

Before the IPv6 Provider Edge Router over MPLS (6PE) feature can be implemented, MPLS must be running over the core IPv4 network. If Cisco routers are used, Cisco Express Forwarding or distributed Cisco Express Forwarding must be enabled for both IPv4 and IPv6 protocols. This module assumes that you are familiar with MPLS.

QoS for IPv6 must be enabled. See the Implementing QoS for IPv6 document for further information.

6PE must be enabled. See the Implementing MPLS over IPv6 document for further information.

Restrictions for Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

If encapsulation configuration is changed on the main interface, all subinterfaces go to the down state, and the internal database is deleted. Configuration information is lost for all subinterfaces.

In Frame Relay, maximum transmission unit (MTU) changes are allowed only on the main interface, from which they are applied to all subinterfaces.

In MFR, MTU changes can be done only on the multilink interface, from which they are reflected on all links in that bundle.

Only T1 and E1 links are allowed in the multilink bundle. Fractional T1 links are not allowed.

Cisco IOS Release 12.0(33)S

The Engine 3 and Engine 5 line cards on Cisco 12000 series Internet routers support the IPv6 over Frame Relay and MFR features, as follows:

Frame Relay services are supported on channelized and nonchannelized shared port adapters (SPAs).

Engine 3:

Channelized OC-12—Frame Relay and MFR

4-port channelized OC-12/DS3—Frame Relay

4-port OC-3X Packet over SONET (PoS)—Frame Relay

8-port OC-3X PoS—Frame Relay

16-port OC-3X PoS—Frame Relay

4-port OC-12X PoS—Frame Relay

1-port OC- 48X PoS—Frame Relay

Engine 5:

8XT1/E1 SPA—Frame Relay and MFR

2/4xCT-3 SPA—Frame Relay and MFR

1-port channelized STM-1/OC-3 SPA—Frame Relay and MFR

2/4xT3 SPA—Frame Relay

OC-3/OC-12 PoS SPA—Frame Relay

OC-48 PoS SPA—Frame Relay

OC-192 PoS SPA—Frame Relay

For ingress 1c/1D and nC/nD policies, primary-level hierarchical policing is not supported for IPv6 traffic.

Information About Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

Frame Relay Overview

Multilink Frame Relay

6PE Implementation of IPv6 over Frame Relay

QoS Services Models Used with Frame Relay

Frame Relay Overview

Frame Relay is used as a way to offer multiple service levels for a customer link. The IPv6 over Frame Relay feature allows users to configure IPv6 addresses over Frame Relay physical interfaces and subinterfaces on Engine 3 and Engine 5 line cards in Cisco 12000 series Internet routers and to send IPv6 traffic over the Frame Relay interfaces. The supported Frame Relay encapsulations are Cisco Frame Relay and Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Frame Relay.

IPv6 is tunneled over dual-stack MPLS networks (that is, 6PE) on Frame Relay encapsulated links with QoS and access lists (ACLs) enabled. IPv6 ACLs are supported on Frame Relay encapsulated links in the same way they are supported in IPv4.

The IETF Frame Relay encapsulation with network layer protocol ID (NLPID) format uses fast path with the Engine 3 and Engine 5 line cards.

Frame Relay Encapsulation on the IPv6 Interface

IPv6 over Frame Relay encapsulation support on Cisco 12000 series Internet routers line cards is required for service providers (SPs) who offer 6PE service. Frame Relay encapsulation is configured on the main interface of the supported line cards. Users can configure either Cisco or IETF Frame Relay encapsulation on the main interface.

The Frame Relay encapsulation type set on an interface affects the NLPID in the 4-byte encapsulation that is added to any packets that egress out of the interface. However, in the ingress direction both NLPIDs corresponding to the two Frame Relay encapsulations are recognized. Only 10-bit data-link connection identifier (DLCI) address field packets are recognized.

Frame Relay Encapsulation on Supported IPv6 Subinterfaces

Frame Relay subinterfaces are supported on the line-card main interfaces configured with Frame Relay encapsulation. A user can configure a subinterface with a given DLCI.

Point-to-Point Protocol over Frame Relay

Point-to-point protocol (PPP) over Frame Relay interfaces and subinterfaces allows a router to establish end-to-end PPP sessions over Frame Relay over a permanent virtual circuit (PVC). The PPP session does not occur unless the associated Frame Relay PVC is in an "active" state. The Frame Relay PVC can coexist with other circuits using different Frame Relay encapsulation methods, such as IETF (RFC 2427) and the Cisco proprietary method, over the same Frame Relay link. There can be multiple PPP links over Frame Relay circuits on one Frame Relay link.

Fast Path Functionality in IPv6 over Frame Relay

The fast path feature in IPv6 over Frame Relay needs no configuration and is enabled automatically when Frame Relay for IPv6 is enabled.

Multilink Frame Relay

The MFR feature provides a cost-effective way to increase bandwidth for particular applications by enabling multiple serial links to be aggregated into a single bundle of bandwidth. MFR is supported on user-to-network interfaces (UNI) and network-to-network interfaces (NNI) in Frame Relay networks.

The MFR feature allows users to combine multiple physical and logical interfaces into a single bundle. Using this feature, a network operator can design a Frame Relay interface that supports more bandwidth than is available from any single physical interface and can also change the total bandwidth available on the interface by dynamically adding or removing physical interfaces. The MFR feature provides resilience when multiple physical interfaces are provisioned on a single bundle, so if some of the physical interfaces fail, the bundle continues to support Frame Relay service.

IPv6 MFR is tunneled over a dual-stack MPLS network, and QoS is supported on IPv6 MFR.

IPv6 MFR provides the following capabilities:

Supports up to 12 links per bundle

Allows users to add a link to the bundle from the same SPA or line card

Extended flow control

Fragmentation support

UNI termination on the provider edge (PE)

Support for L3/1C/nD, L3/nC/nD

MFR solves the following problems on user-to-network and network-to-network interfaces in a Frame Relay network:

Lack of required bandwidth availability due to facility constraints or due to a service with restrictions

The physical interface as an inflexible pool of bandwidth

The physical interface as a single point of failure on the Frame Relay interface

The MFR bundle contains and controls one or more bundle links supporting the transfer of MFR frames. Bundle procedures provide for the following activities:

Addition of bundle links to bundle operation

Graceful removal of bundle links from bundle operation

Interfacing with layer management functions

Accepting frames from the Q.922 data link layer for transmission on the bundle interface

Operating frame fragmentation procedures

Scheduling frames for transmission on individual bundle links

Reassembling received frame fragments for forwarding to the Q.922 data link layer

6PE Implementation of IPv6 over Frame Relay

6PE is a PE router running dual-stack IPv4 and IPv6. 6PE enables transport of IPv6 traffic over an MPLS IPv4 network. The Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is used as the label distribution protocol while MPLS is used as the forwarding mechanism inside the MPLS cloud.

In using Frame Relay over IPv6, only PE routers need to support IPv6. The IPv6 traffic received from the IPv6 network is transported to the destination IPv6 network using the MPLS infrastructure in the core (in the MPLS core, all control protocols, including label distribution and interior gateway protocols, remain IPv4).

Multiprotocol BGP is used between 6PEs to exchange IPv6 reachability information. An ingress 6PE knows the IPv6 address of the remote egress 6PE (that is, a BGP next-hop address) needed to reach a destination IPv6 subnet. This IPv6 address for the BGP next hop contains an embedded IPv4 address that is the IPv4 address of the BGP speaker.

BGP is used to bind a label to each advertised destination IPv6 prefix. Multiprotocol BGP uses two labels in the MPLS header, the IPv4 label (which is the top label) and aggregate IPv6 label (which is the lower label) for the destination IPv6 prefix. The aggregate IPv6 label is allocated by the egress 6PE to form a local pool of 16 labels (a pool of 16 labels used for all IPv6 prefixes).

QoS Services Models Used with Frame Relay

The term "QoS service model" is used in this document to define a specific combination of QoS features and functionality deployed by SPs. The QoS nC/nD and 1c/1D models are supported in the 12.0(33)S release.

QoS nC/nD Model

In the nC/nD model, there are a number (n) of DLCIs configured under a single physical interface. Each DLCI supports a single customer and is attached to a logical subinterface. The customer-specific modular quality of service (QoS) command-line interface (CLI) (MQC) configuration is also attached to the subinterface. Typically the customer buys an aggregate service, which is then divided into different classes. This model is generally applied to point-to-point rather point-to-multipoint subinterfaces.

QoS 1c/1D Model

In the 1c/1D model, a single customer is provisioned on the main interface with a single DLCI. The MQC configuration is attached on the main interface.

QoS 1C/nD Model

IPv6 Frame Relay supports the QoS 1C/nD model.

How to Implement IPv6 over Frame Relay

Enabling Frame Relay Switching (required)

Configuring Frame Relay Encapsulation on the Main IPv6 Interface (required)

Configuring Frame Relay on an IPv6 Subinterface (required)

Implementing Multilink Frame Relay for IPv6 (optional)

Enabling Frame Relay Switching

Frame Relay must be enabled before you can configure Frame Relay on an interface or a subinterface.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. frame-relay switching

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

frame-relay switching

Example:

Router(config)# frame-relay switching

Enables Frame Relay switching globally on a router.

Configuring Frame Relay Encapsulation on the Main IPv6 Interface

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface type number

4. ipv6 address {ipv6-address/prefix-length | prefix-name sub-bits/prefix-length}

5. encapsulation frame-relay [cisco | ietf]

6. frame-relay intf-type [dce | dte | nni]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface type number

Example:

Router(config)# interface pos 1/0/0

Specifies an interface type and number, and places the router in interface configuration mode. This example shows that the main interface on which Frame Relay is to be configured is POS 1/0/0.

Step 4 

ipv6 address {ipv6-address/prefix-length | prefix-name sub-bits/prefix-length}

Example:

Router(config-if)# ipv6 address my-prefix 2001:DB8:0:7272::72/64

Configures an IPv6 address based on an IPv6 general prefix and enables IPv6 processing on an interface.

Step 5 

encapsulation frame-relay [cisco | ietf]

Example:

Router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay

Enables Frame Relay encapsulation on a specified interface. Because no encapsulation is specified in the example, the cisco encapsulation (which is the default) will be used.

Step 6 

frame-relay intf-type [dce | dte | nni]

Example:

Router(config-if)# frame-relay intf-type dce

Configures a Frame Relay switch type.

Configuring Frame Relay on an IPv6 Subinterface

This task can be performed on as many subinterfaces as necessary to configure your system.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface type number

4. encapsulation frame-relay [cisco | ietf]

5. frame-relay intf-type [dce | dte | nni]

6. interface type number

7. ipv6 address {ipv6-address/prefix-length | prefix-name sub-bits/prefix-length}

8. frame-relay interface-dlci dlci [ietf | cisco] [voice-cir cir] [ppp virtual-template-name]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface type number

Example:

Router(config)# interface pos 1/0/0

Specifies an interface type and number.

Step 4 

encapsulation frame-relay [cisco | ietf]

Example:

Router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay

Enables Frame Relay encapsulation on a specified interface.

Step 5 

frame-relay intf-type [dce | dte | nni]

Example:

Router(config-if)# frame-relay intf-type dce

Configures a Frame Relay switch type.

Step 6 

interface type number

Example:

Router(config-if)# interface pos1/0/ 0.1

Specifies a subinterface type and number, and places the router in interface configuration mode.

Step 7 

ipv6 address {ipv6-address/prefix-length | prefix-name sub-bits/prefix-length}

Example:

Router(config-if)# ipv6 address my-prefix 2001:DB8:0:7273::72/64

Configures an IPv6 address based on an IPv6 general prefix and enables IPv6 processing on a subinterface.

Step 8 

frame-relay interface-dlci dlci [ietf | cisco] [voice-cir cir] [ppp virtual-template-name]

Example:

Router(config-if)# frame-relay interface-dlci 40

Assigns a DLCI to a specified Frame Relay subinterface on the router or access server.

Implementing Multilink Frame Relay for IPv6

Creating a Virtual Interface for an MFR Bundle (required)

Adding Serial Interfaces to the MFR Bundle (required)

Creating a Virtual Interface for an MFR Bundle

Perform this task to create a virtual interface for an MFR bundle and assign an IPv6 address and a DLCI number.

Prerequisites

The frame relay switching feature must be globally enabled for you to implement MFR for IPv6. For more information on how to enable frame relay switching, see the "Enabling Frame Relay Switching" section.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface mfr number

4. ipv6 address {ipv6-address/prefix-length | prefix-name sub-bits/prefix-length}

5. no ip directed-broadcast [access-list-number | extended access-list-number]

6. frame-relay interface-dlci dlci [ietf | cisco] [voice-cir cir] [ppp virtual-template-name]

7. frame-relay intf-type [dce | dte | nni]

8. frame-relay multilink bid name

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface mfr number

Example:

Router(config)# interface mfr 1

Configures an MFR bundle interface, and places the router in interface configuration mode.

Step 4 

ipv6 address {ipv6-address/prefix-length | prefix-name sub-bits/prefix-length}

Example:

Router(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:DB8:B00:1::1/64

Configures an IPv6 address based on an IPv6 general prefix and enables IPv6 processing on an interface.

Step 5 

no ip directed-broadcast [access-list-number | extended access-list-number]

Example:

Router(config-if)# no ip directed-broadcast

Disables the translation of a directed broadcast to physical broadcasts.

Step 6 

frame-relay interface-dlci dlci [ietf | cisco] [voice-cir cir] [ppp virtual-template-name]

Example:

Router(config-if)# frame-relay interface-dlci 10

Assigns a DLCI to a specified Frame Relay subinterface on the router or access server.

Step 7 

frame-relay intf-type [dce | dte | nni]

Example:

Router(config-if)# frame-relay intf-type dce

Configures a Frame Relay switch type.

Step 8 

frame-relay multilink bid name

Example:

Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink bid bundle1

Assigns a bundle identification (BID) name to an MFR bundle.

Adding Serial Interfaces to the MFR Bundle

The MFR bundle must be created before you can add serial interfaces. For information on how to create the MFR bundle, see the "Creating a Virtual Interface for an MFR Bundle" section.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface type number

4. no ipv6 address

5. no ip directed-broadcast

6. encapsulation frame-relay mfr number [name]

7. frame-relay multilink lid name

8. frame-relay multilink hello seconds

9. no ip mroute-cache

10. no arp {arpa | frame-relay | snap}

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface type number

Example:

Router(config)# interface Serial1/0/0/13:0

Configures an interface type and enters interface configuration mode.

Step 4 

no ipv6 address

Example:

Router(config-if)# no ipv6 address

Removes the IPv6 address from the interface.

Step 5 

no ip directed-broadcast

Example:

Router(config-if)# no ip directed-broadcast

Disables the translation of a directed broadcast to physical broadcasts.

Step 6 

encapsulation frame-relay mfr number [name]

Example:

Router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay mfr 1

Creates an MFR bundle link and to associate the link with a bundle.

Step 7 

frame-relay multilink lid name

Example:

Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink lid lid1

Assigns a bundle link identification (LID) name to an MFR bundle link.

Step 8 

frame-relay multilink hello seconds

Example:

Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink hello 15

Configures the interval at which a bundle link will send out hello messages.

Step 9 

frame-relay multilink ack seconds

Example:

Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink ack 6

Configures the number of seconds for which a bundle link will wait for a hello message acknowledgment before resending the hello message.

Step 10 

frame-relay multilink retry number

Example:

Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink retry 3

Configures the maximum number of times that a bundle link will resend a hello message while waiting for an acknowledgment.

Step 11 

no ip mroute-cache

Example:

Router(config-if)# no ip mroute-cache

Disables multicast fast switching.

Step 12 

no arp {arpa | frame-relay | snap}

Example:

Router(config-if)# no arp frame-relay

Supports a type of encapsulation for a specific network, such as Frame Relay, so that the 48-bit Media Access Control (MAC) address can be matched to a corresponding 32-bit IP address for address resolution.

Monitoring and Maintaining MFR for IPv6

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. show frame-relay multilink [mfr number | serial number] [detailed]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

show frame-relay multilink [mfr number | serial number] [detailed]

Example:

Router# show frame-relay multilink

Displays configuration information and statistics about MFR bundles and bundle links.

Configuration Examples for Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

Example: Enabling Frame Relay Switching

Example: Configuring Frame Relay on the Main IPv6 Interface

Example: Configuring Frame Relay on an IPv6 Subinterface

Example: Implementing Multilink Frame Relay for IPv6

Example: Implementing Multilink Frame Relay for IPv6

Example: Enabling Frame Relay Switching

The following example shows that Frame Relay has been enabled on the router.

Router# show running-config


Current configuration : 3910 bytes

!

.
.
.
frame-relay switching
.
.

.

Example: Configuring Frame Relay on the Main IPv6 Interface

The following example shows that Frame Relay encapsulation has been configured on the main interface, which is POS in this case. The encapsulation method used is cisco, which is the default, and the Frame Relay switch type used is DCE, which allows the router or access server to function as a switch connected to a router.

frame-relay switching


interface pos 1/0/0

ipv6 address 2001:DB8:B00:1::1/64

encapsulation frame-relay

frame-relay intf-type dce

Example: Configuring Frame Relay on an IPv6 Subinterface

The following example shows Frame Relay configured on an interface and two IPv6 subinterfaces.

frame-relay switching

interface pos 1/0/0
no ipv6 address
encapsulation frame-relay
frame-relay intf-type dce

interface pos 1/0/0.1 point-to-point
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:A00:1::1/64 
frame-relay interface-dlci 40

interface pos 1/0/0.2 point-to-point
ipv6 address 2001:DB8:C058:6301::/128 

frame-relay interface-dlci 50

Example: Implementing Multilink Frame Relay for IPv6

The following example shows how to configure MFR for IPv6. Remember that frame-relay switching must be enabled before MFR can be enabled.

   frame-relay switching


interface MFR1
 ipv6 address 2001:DB8:0:7272::72/64
 no ip directed-broadcast
 frame-relay interface-dlci 101
 frame-relay intf-type dce
 
interface Serial1/0/0/13:0
 no ip address
 no ip directed-broadcast
 encapsulation frame-relay MFR1
 no ip mroute-cache
 no arp frame-relay

Additional References

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Multilink Frame Relay

"Multilink Frame Relay (FRF.16.1)," Cisco IOS Wide-Area Networking Configuration Guide

Frame Relay configuration

"Configuring Frame Relay," Cisco IOS Wide-Area Networking Configuration Guide

QoS for IPv4 information

Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide

6PE and MPLS information and implementation

Implementing MPLS over IPv6

Multiprotocol BGP for IPv6 information and implementation

Implementing Multiprotocol BGP for IPv6

QoS for IPv6 information and implementation

Implementing QoS for IPv6

IPv6 commands

Cisco IOS IPv6 Command Reference

IPv4 commands

Cisco IOS Wide-Area Networking Command Reference


Standards

Standard
Title

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature.


MIBs

MIB
MIBs Link

None

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco software releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs


RFCs

RFC
Title

RFC 2427

Multiprotocol Interconnect over Frame Relay

RFC 2590

Transmission of IPv6 Packets over Frame Relay Networks Specification


Technical Assistance

Description
Link

The Cisco Support and Documentation website provides online resources to download documentation, software, and tools. Use these resources to install and configure the software and to troubleshoot and resolve technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. Access to most tools on the Cisco Support and Documentation website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

http://www.cisco.com/cisco/web/support/index.html


Feature Information for Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

Table 1 lists the features in this module and provides links to specific configuration information.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and software image support. Cisco Feature Navigator enables you to determine which software images support a specific software release, feature set, or platform. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.


Note Table 1 lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.


Table 1 Feature Information for Implementing IPv6 over Frame Relay

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

IPv6 over Frame Relay

12.0(33)S2

The IPv6 over Frame Relay feature allows users to configure IPv6 addresses over Frame Relay physical interfaces and subinterfaces on Engine 3 and Engine 5 line cards in Cisco 12000 series Internet routers and to send IPv6 traffic over the Frame Relay interfaces.

This feature was implemented on the Cisco 12000 series routers.