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MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

Table Of Contents

MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

Finding Feature Information

Contents

Prerequisites for Configuring MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

Restrictions for MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

Information About Configuring MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF Overview

Upstream and Downstream VRFs

Reverse Path Forwarding Check

How to Configure MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

Configuring the Upstream and Downstream VRFs on the Spoke PE Router

Associating a VRF with an Interface

Configuring the Downstream VRF for an AAA Server

Verifying MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF Configuration

Configuration Examples for MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

Example: Configuring the Upstream and Downstream VRFs on the Spoke PE Router

Example: Associating a VRF with an Interface

Example: Configuring MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF Using Static CE-PE Routing

Example: Configuring MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF Using RADIUS Server and Static CE-PE Routing

Example: Configuring MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF Using Dynamic CE-PE Routing

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance

Feature Information for MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF


MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF


First Published: May 2, 2005
Last Updated: December 7, 2009

The MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF feature provides scalable hub-and-spoke connectivity for subscribers of an Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Virtual Private Network (VPN) service. This feature addresses the limitations of hub-and-spoke topologies by removing the requirement of one virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instance per spoke. This feature also ensures that subscriber traffic always traverses the central link between the wholesale service provider and the Internet service provider (ISP), whether the subscriber traffic is being routed to a remote network by way of the upstream ISP or to another locally or remotely connected subscriber.

Finding Feature Information

For the latest feature information and caveats, see the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the "Feature Information for MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF" section.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco IOS XE software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Contents

Prerequisites for Configuring MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

Restrictions for MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

Information About Configuring MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

How to Configure MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

Configuration Examples for MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

Additional References

Feature Information for MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

Prerequisites for Configuring MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

You must have a working MPLS core network.

Restrictions for MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

The following features are not supported on interfaces configured with the MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF feature:

Multicast

MPLS VPN Carrier Supporting Carrier

MPLS VPN Interautonomous Systems

Information About Configuring MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF Overview

Upstream and Downstream VRFs

Reverse Path Forwarding Check

MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF Overview

The MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF feature provides:

The MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF feature prevents local connectivity between subscribers at the spoke provider edge (PE) router and ensures that a hub site provides subscriber connectivity. Any sites that connect to the same PE router must forward intersite traffic using the hub site. This ensures that the routing done at the spoke site moves from the access-side interface to the network-side interface or from the network-side interface to the access-side interface, but never from the access-side interface to the access-side interface.

The MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF feature prevents situations where the PE router locally switches the spokes without passing the traffic through the upstream ISP. This prevents subscribers from directly connecting to each other, which causes the wholesale service provider to lose revenue.

The MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF feature improves scalability by removing the requirement of one VRF per spoke. If the feature is not configured, when spokes are connected to the same PE router each spoke is configured in a separate VRF to ensure that the traffic between the spokes traverses the central link between the wholesale service provider and the ISP. However, this configuration is not scalable. When many spokes are connected to the same PE router, configuration of VRFs for each spoke becomes quite complex and greatly increases memory usage. This is especially true in large-scale wholesale service provider environments that support high-density remote access to Layer 3 VPNs.

Figure 1 shows a sample hub-and-spoke topology.

Figure 1 Hub-and-Spoke Topology

Upstream and Downstream VRFs

The MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF feature uses two unidirectional VRFs to forward IP traffic between the spokes and the hub PE router:

The upstream VRF forwards IP traffic from the spokes toward the hub PE router. This VRF typically contains only a default route but might also contain summary routes and several default routes. The default route points to the interface on the hub PE router that connects to the upstream ISP. The router dynamically learns about the default route from the routing updates that the hub PE router or home gateway sends.


Note Although the upstream VRF is typically populated from the hub, it is possible also to have a separate local upstream interface on the spoke PE for a different local service that would not be required to go through the hub: for example, a local Domain Name System (DNS) or game server service.


The downstream VRF forwards traffic from the hub PE router back to the spokes. This VRF can contain:

PPP peer routes for the spokes and per-user static routes received from the authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) server or from the Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP) server

Routes imported from the hub PE router

Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), Open Shortest Path First (OSPF), Routing Information Protocol (RIP), or Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) dynamic routes for the spokes

The spoke PE router redistributes routes from the downstream VRF into Multiprotocol Border Gateway Protocol (MP-BGP). That router typically advertises a summary route across the MPLS core for the connected spokes. The VRF configured on the hub PE router imports the advertised summary route.

Reverse Path Forwarding Check

The Reverse Path Forwarding (RPF) check ensures that an IP packet that enters a router uses the correct inbound interface. The MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF feature supports unicast RPF check on the spoke-side interfaces. Because different VRFs are used for downstream and upstream forwarding, the RPF mechanism ensures that source address checks occur in the downstream VRF.

Unicast RPF is not on by default. You need to enable it, as described in Configuring Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding.

How to Configure MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

Configuring the Upstream and Downstream VRFs on the Spoke PE Router (required)

Associating a VRF with an Interface (required)

Configuring the Downstream VRF for an AAA Server (optional)

Verifying MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF Configuration (optional)

Configuring the Upstream and Downstream VRFs on the Spoke PE Router

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. vrf definition vrf-name

4. rd route-distinguisher

5. address-family {ipv4 | ipv6}

6. route-target {import | export | both} route-target-ext-community

7. exit-address-family

8. end

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

vrf definition vrf-name

Example:

Router(config)# vrf definition vrf1

Configures a VRF routing table and enters VRF configuration mode.

The vrf-name argument is the name of the VRF.

Step 4 

rd route-distinguisher

Example:

Router(config-vrf)# rd 100:1

Creates routing and forwarding tables for a VRF.

The route-distinguisher argument specifies to add an 8-byte value to an IPv4 prefix to create a VPN IPv4 prefix. You can enter a route distinguisher in either of these formats:

16-bit autonomous system number (ASN): your 32-bit number
For example, 101:3.

32-bit IP address: your 16-bit number
For example, 192.168.122.15:1.

Step 5 

address-family {ipv4 | ipv6}

Example:

Router(config-vrf) address-family ipv4

Enters VRF address family configuration mode to specify an address family for a VRF.

The ipv4 keyword specifies an IPv4 address family for a VRF.

The ipv6 keyword specifies an IPv6 address family for a VRF.

Note The MPLS VPN Half Duplex VRF feature supports only the IPv4 address family.

Step 6 

route-target {import | export | both} route-target-ext-community

Example:

Router(config-vrf-af)# route-target both 100:2

Creates a route-target extended community for a VRF.

The import keyword specifies to import routing information from the target VPN extended community.

The export keyword specifies to export routing information to the target VPN extended community.

The both keyword specifies to import both import and export routing information to the target VPN extended community.

The route-target-ext-community argument adds the route-target extended community attributes to the VRF's list of import, export, or both (import and export) route-target extended communities.

Step 7 

exit-address-family

Example:

Router(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family

Exits VRF address family configuration mode.

Step 8 

end

Example:

Router(config-vrf)# end

Exits to privileged EXEC mode.

Associating a VRF with an Interface

Perform the following task to associate a VRF with an interface, which activates the VRF.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface type number

4. vrf forwarding vrf-name [downstream vrf-name2]

5. ip address ip-address mask [secondary]

6. end

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface type number

Example:

Router(config)# interface Ethernet 0/1

Configures an interface type and enters interface configuration mode.

The type argument identifies the type of interface to be configured.

The number argument identifies the port, connector, or interface card number.

Step 4 

vrf forwarding vrf-name [downstream vrf-name2]

Example:

Router(config-if)# vrf forwarding vrf1

Associates a VRF with an interface or subinterface.

The vrf-name argument is the name of the VRF.

The downstream vrf-name2 keyword and argument combination is the name of the downstream VRF into which peer and per-user routes are installed.

Step 5 

ip address ip-address mask [secondary]

Example:

Router(config-if)# ip address 10.24.24.24 255.255.255.255

Sets a primary or secondary IP address for an interface.

The ip-address argument is the IP address.

The mask argument is the mask of the associated IP subnet.

The secondary keyword specifies that the configured address is a secondary IP address. If this keyword is omitted, the configured address is the primary IP address.

Step 6 

end

Example:

Router(config-if) end

Exits to privileged EXEC mode.

Configuring the Downstream VRF for an AAA Server

To configure the downstream VRF for an AAA (RADIUS) server in broadband or remote access situations, enter the following Cisco attribute value:

lcp:interface-config=ip vrf forwarding U downstream D

In standard VPN situations, enter instead the following Cisco attribute value:

ip:vrf-id=U downstream D

Verifying MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF Configuration

SUMMARY STEPS

1. show vrf [ipv4 | ipv6] [brief | detail | id | interfaces | lock | select] [vrf-name]

2. show ip route vrf vrf-name

3. show running-config [interface type number]

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 show vrf [ipv4 | ipv6] [brief | detail | id | interfaces | lock | select ] [vrf-name]

Use this command to display information about all of the VRFs configured on the router, including the downstream VRF for each associated interface or virtual access interface (VAI):

Router# show vrf

Name     Default RD     Interfaces
Down     100:1          POS3/0/3 [D]
                        POS3/0/1 [D]
         100:3          Loopback2
                        Virtual-Access3 [D] 
                        Virtual-Access4 [D] 
Up       100:2          POS3/0/3
                        POS3/0/1
         100:4          Virtual-Access3

Use the show vrf detail vrf-name command to display detailed information about the VRF you specify, including all interfaces, subinterfaces, and VAIs associated with the VRF.

If you do not specify a value for the vrf-name argument, detailed information about all of the VRFs configured on the router appears.

The following example shows how to display detailed information for the VRF called vrf1, in a broadband or remote access case:

Router# show vrf detail vrf1 

VRF D; default RD 2:0; default VPNID <not set>
  Interfaces:
         Loopback2           Virtual-Access3 [D]  Virtual-Access4 [D]
  Connected addresses are not in global routing table
  Export VPN route-target communities
    RT:2:0                 
  Import VPN route-target communities
    RT:2:1                 
  No import route-map
  No export route-map
VRF U; default RD 2:1; default VPNID <not set>
  Interfaces:
    Virtual-Access3          Virtual-Access4         
  Connected addresses are not in global routing table
  No Export VPN route-target communities
  Import VPN route-target communities
    RT:2:1                 
  No import route-map
  No export route-map

The following example shows the VRF detail in a standard VPN situation:

Router# show vrf detail

VRF Down; default RD 100:1; default VPNID <not set> VRF Table ID = 1
  Description: import only from hub-pe
  Interfaces:
    Pos3/0/3 [D]        Pos3/0/1:0.1 [D]       
  Connected addresses are not in global routing table
  Export VPN route-target communities
    RT:100:0                
  Import VPN route-target communities
    RT:100:1                
  No import route-map
  No export route-map
  VRF label distribution protocol: not configured 
	VRF Up; default RD 100:2; default VPNID <not set> VRF Table ID = 2
  Interfaces:
    Pos3/0/1            Pos3/0/3           
  Connected addresses are not in global routing table
  No Export VPN route-target communities
  Import VPN route-target communities
    RT:100:1                
  No import route-map
  No export route-map
  VRF label distribution protocol: not configured

Step 2 show ip route vrf vrf-name

Use this command to display the IP routing table for the VRF you specify, and information about the per-user routes installed in the downstream VRF.

The following example shows how to display the routing table for the downstream VRF named D, in a broadband or remote access situation:

Router# show ip route vrf D 

Routing Table: D
Codes: C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
       D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area 
       N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
       E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
       i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS interarea
       * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR
       P - periodic downloaded static route

Gateway of last resort is not set

	10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 5 subnets, 2 masks
U 		10.0.0.2/32 [1/0] via 10.0.0.1
S 		10.0.0.0/8 is directly connected, Null0
U 		10.0.0.5/32 [1/0] via 10.0.0.2
C 		10.8.1.2/32 is directly connected, Virtual-Access4
C 		10.8.1.1/32 is directly connected, Virtual-Access3

The following example shows how to display the routing table for the downstream VRF named Down, in a standard VPN situation:

Router# show ip route vrf Down 

Routing Table: Down
Codes: C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
       D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area 
       N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
       E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
       i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
       ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
       o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route

Gateway of last resort is 10.13.13.13 to network 0.0.0.0

C 	10.2.0.0/8 is directly connected, Pos3/0/3            
     10.3.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
B       10.4.16.16 [200/0] via 10.13.13.13, 1w3d
B 	10.6.0.0/8 [200/0] via 10.13.13.13, 1w3d
C 	10.0.0.0/8 is directly connected, Pos3/0/1          
	10.7.0.0/16 is subnetted, 1 subnets
B 		10.7.0.0 [20/0] via 10.0.0.2, 1w3d
     10.0.6.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
B       10.0.6.14 [20/0] via 10.0.0.2, 1w3d
     10.8.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
B       10.8.15.15 [20/0] via 10.0.0.2, 1w3d
B*   0.0.0.0/0 [200/0] via 10.0.0.13, 1w3d

The following example shows how to display the routing table for the upstream VRF named U in a broadband or remote access situation:

Router# show ip route vrf U 

Routing Table: U
Codes: C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
       D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area 
       N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
       E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
       i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS interarea
       * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR
       P - periodic downloaded static route

Gateway of last resort is 192.168.0.20 to network 0.0.0.0

	10.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 		10.0.0.8 is directly connected, Loopback2
B*   0.0.0.0/0 [200/0] via 192.168.0.20, 1w5d

The following example shows how to display the routing table for the upstream VRF named Up in a standard VPN situation:

Router# show ip route vrf Up 

Routing Table: Up
Codes: C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
       D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area 
       N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
       E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
       i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
       ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
       o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route

Gateway of last resort is 10.13.13.13 to network 0.0.0.0

	10.2.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 		10.2.0.1 is directly connected, Pos3/0/3             
     10.3.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
B       10.3.16.16 [200/0] via 10.13.13.13, 1w3d
B 	10.6.0.0/8 [200/0] via 10.13.13.13, 1w3d
	10.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 		10.0.0.1 is directly connected, Pos3/0/1         
B*   0.0.0.0/0 [200/0] via 10.13.13.13, 1w3d

Step 3 show running-config [interface type number]

Use this command to display information about the interface you specify, including information about the associated upstream and downstream VRFs.

The following example shows how to display information about subinterface POS 3/0/1:

Router# show running-config interface POS 3/0/1

Building configuration...

Current configuration : 4261 bytes
!
interface POS3/0/1
ip vrf forwarding Up downstream Down
ip address 10.0.0.1 255.0.0.0
end


Configuration Examples for MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

Example: Configuring the Upstream and Downstream VRFs on the Spoke PE Router

Example: Associating a VRF with an Interface

Example: Configuring MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF Using Static CE-PE Routing

Configuring MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF: Example Using RADIUS Server and Static CE-PE Routing, page 13

Example: Configuring MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF Using Dynamic CE-PE Routing

Example: Configuring the Upstream and Downstream VRFs on the Spoke PE Router

The following example configures an upstream VRF named Up:

Router> enable 
Router# configure terminal 
Router(config)# vrf definition Up 
Router(config-vrf)# rd 1:0 
Router(config-vrf)# address-family ipv4
Router(config-vrf-af)# route-target import 1:0 
Router(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family

The following example configures a downstream VRF named Down:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal 
Router(config)# vrf definition Down 
Router(config-vrf)# rd 1:8 
Router(config-vrf)# address-family ipv4
Router(config-vrf-af)# route-target import 1:8 
Router(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family

Example: Associating a VRF with an Interface

The following example associates the VRF named Up with POS 3/0/1 subinterface and specifies the downstream VRF named Down:

Router> enable 
Router# configure terminal 
Router(config)# interface POS 3/0/1
Router(config-if)# vrf forwarding Up downstream Down
Router(config-if)# ip address 10.0.0.1 255.0.0.0

Example: Configuring MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF Using Static CE-PE Routing

This example uses the hub-and-spoke topology shown in Figure 2 with local authentication (that is, the RADIUS server is not used):

Figure 2 Sample Topology

vrf definition D 
 rd 1:8 
 address-family ipv4
 route-target export 1:100 
 exit-address-family
! 
vrf definition U 
 rd 1:0 
 address-family ipv4
 route-target import 1:0 
 exit-address-family
! 
ip cef 
vpdn enable 
! 
vpdn-group U 
 accept-dialin 
  protocol pppoe 
  virtual-template 1 
! 
interface Loopback 2 
 vrf forwarding U 
 ip address 10.0.0.8 255.255.255.255 
! 
interface ATM 2/0 
 description Mze ATM3/1/2 
 no ip address 
 no atm ilmi-keepalive 
 pvc 0/16 ilmi 
! 
 pvc 3/100 
  protocol pppoe 
!
pvc 3/101 
  protocol pppoe
!

Example: Configuring MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF Using RADIUS Server and Static CE-PE Routing

The following example shows how to connect two Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE) clients to a single VRF pair on the spoke PE router named Router C. Although both PPPoE clients are configured in the same VRF, all communication occurs using the hub PE router. Half-duplex VRFs are configured on the spoke PE. The client configuration is downloaded to the spoke PE from the RADIUS server.

This example uses the hub-and-spoke topology shown in Figure 2.


Note The wholesale provider can forward the user authentication request to the corresponding ISP. If the ISP authenticates the user, the wholesale provider appends the VRF information to the request that goes back to the PE router.


aaa new-model
!
aaa group server radius R
 server 10.0.20.26 auth-port 1812 acct-port 1813
!
aaa authentication ppp default group radius
aaa authorization network default group radius
!
vrf defintion D
 description Downstream VRF - to spokes
 rd 1:8   
 address-family ipv4
 route-target export 1:100
 exit-address-family
!
vrf definition U
 description Upstream VRF - to hub
 rd 1:0
 address-family ipv4
 route-target import 1:0
 exit-address-family
!
ip cef    
vpdn enable
!         
vpdn-group U
 accept-dialin
  protocol pppoe
  virtual-template 1
!
interface Loopback2
 vrf forwarding U
 ip address 10.0.0.8 255.255.255.255
!
interface ATM2/0
  pvc 3/100 
  protocol pppoe
 ! 
pvc 3/101 
  protocol pppoe
 !
interface virtual-template 1
 no ip address
 ppp authentication chap
!
router bgp 1
 no synchronization
 neighbor 172.16.0.34 remote-as 1
 neighbor 172.16.0.34 update-source Loopback0
 no auto-summary
 !
address-family vpnv4
  neighbor 172.16.0.34 activate
  neighbor 172.16.0.34 send-community extended
  auto-summary
  exit-address-family
 !
address-family ipv4 vrf U
  no auto-summary
  no synchronization
  exit-address-family
! 
address-family ipv4 vrf D
  redistribute static
  no auto-summary
  no synchronization
  exit-address-family 
!
ip local pool U-pool 10.8.1.1 2.8.1.100
ip route vrf D 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 Null0
!
radius-server host 10.0.20.26 auth-port 1812 acct-port 1813
radius-server key cisco

Example: Configuring MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF Using Dynamic CE-PE Routing

The following example shows how to use OSPF to dynamically advertise the routes on the spoke sites.

This example uses the hub-and-spoke topology shown in Figure 2.

Creating the VRFs

vrf definition Down
rd 100:1
address-family ipv4
route-target export 100:0
exit-address-family
!
vrf definition Up
rd 100:2
address-family ipv4
route-target import 100:1
exit-address-family

Enabling MPLS

mpls ldp graceful-restart
mpls ldp router-id Loopback0 force
mpls label protocol ldp

Configuring BGP Toward Core

router bgp 100
 no bgp default ipv4-unicast
 bgp log-neighbor-changes
 bgp graceful-restart restart-time 120
 bgp graceful-restart stalepath-time 360
 bgp graceful-restart
 neighbor 10.13.13.13 remote-as 100
 neighbor 10.13.13.13 update-source Loopback0
 !        
 address-family vpnv4
 neighbor 10.13.13.13 activate
 neighbor 10.13.13.13 send-community extended
 bgp scan-time import 5
 exit-address-family

Configuring BGP Toward Edge

address-family ipv4 vrf Up
no auto-summary
no synchronization
exit-address-family
!        
address-family ipv4 vrf Down
redistribute ospf 1000 vrf Down
no auto-summary
no synchronization
exit-address-family

Spoke PE's Core-Facing Interfaces and Processes

interface Loopback 0
 ip address 10.11.11.11 255.255.255.255
!
interface POS 3/0/2
 ip address 10.0.1.1 255.0.0.0
 mpls label protocol ldp
 mpls ip  
!
router ospf 100
 log-adjacency-changes
 auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
 nsf enforce global
 redistribute connected subnets
 network 10.11.11.11 0.0.0.0 area 100
 network 10.0.1.0 0.255.255.255 area 100

Spoke PE's Edge-Facing Interfaces and Processes

interface Loopback 100
vrf forwarding Down
 ip address 10.22.22.22 255.255.255.255
!         
interface POS 3/0/1
vrf forwarding Up downstream Down
 ip address 10.0.0.1 255.0.0.0
!         
interface POS 3/0/3
vrf forwarding Up downstream Down
 ip address 10.2.0.1 255.0.0.0
! 
router ospf 1000 vrf Down
 router-id 10.22.22.22
 log-adjacency-changes
 auto-cost reference-bandwidth 1000
 nsf enforce global
 redistribute connected subnets
 redistribute bgp 100 metric-type 1 subnets
 network 10.22.22.22 0.0.0.0 area 300
 network 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 300
 network 10.2.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 300
 default-information originate

Additional References

Related Documents


Standards

Standard
Title

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature.


MIBs

MIB
MIBs Link

No new or modified MIBs are supported by this feature, and support for existing MIBs has not been modified by this feature.

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco software releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs


RFCs

RFC
Title

RFC 2547

BGP/MPLS VPNs


Technical Assistance

Description
Link

The Cisco Support and Documentation website provides online resources to download documentation, software, and tools. Use these resources to install and configure the software and to troubleshoot and resolve technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. Access to most tools on the Cisco Support and Documentation website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

http://www.cisco.com/cisco/web/support/index.html


Feature Information for MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

Table 1 lists the release history for this feature.

Table 1 lists the release history for this feature.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and software image support. Cisco Feature Navigator enables you to determine which Cisco IOS XE software images support a specific software release, feature set, or platform. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.


Note Table 1 lists only the Cisco IOS XE software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given Cisco IOS XE software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that Cisco IOS XE software release train also support that feature.


Table 1 Feature Information for MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF 

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

MPLS VPN - Half Duplex VRF (HDVRF) Support with Static Routing

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.5

This feature ensures that VPN clients that connect to the same PE router at the edge of the MPLS VPN use the hub site to communicate.

In Cisco IOS XE Release 2.5, this feature was introduced on the Cisco ASR 1000 Series Aggregation Services Routers.

MPLS VPN Half-Duplex VRF

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.5

In Cisco IOS XE Release 2.5, this feature, with support for dynamic routing protocols, was integrated into the XE train.

The following commands were introduced or modified: ip vrf forwarding (interface configuration), show ip interface, show vrf.