Cisco CMTS Router Service Features Configuration Guide, Release 12.2SC
Cisco Network Registrar for the Cisco CMTS Routers
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Cisco Network Registrar for the Cisco CMTS Routers

Table Of Contents

Cisco Network Registrar for the Cisco CMTS Routers

Servers Required on the HFC Network

Cisco Network Registrar Description

Overview of DHCP Using CNR

How Cisco Universal Broadband Routers and Cable Modems Work

DHCP Fields and Options for Cable Modems

Cisco Network Registrar Sample Configuration

Cable Modem DHCP Response Fields

DOCSIS DHCP Fields

DHCP Relay Option (DOCSIS Option 82)

Overview of Scripts

Two-way Cable Modem Scripts

Telco Return Cable Modem Scripts

Placement of Scripts

Windows NT

Solaris

Activating Scripts in Cisco Network Registrar

Configuring the Cisco CMTS Routers to Use Scripts

Configuring the System Default Policy

Cable Modems

PCs

Creating Selection Tag Scopes

General

Telco Return for the Cisco uBR7200 Series Router

Creating Network Scopes

Creating Policies for Class of Service or for Upgrading Cable Modem Cisco IOS Images

CNR Steps to Support Subinterfaces

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance


Cisco Network Registrar for the Cisco CMTS Routers


First Published: February 14, 2008
Last Updated: February 9, 2009

This chapter supplements the Cisco Network Registrar (CNR) documentation by providing additional cable-specific instructions to provision a hybrid fiber-coaxial (HFC) network using Cisco universal broadband routers as CMTSs at the headend of the network.

This document contains the following sections:

Servers Required on the HFC Network

Cisco Network Registrar Description

Overview of DHCP Using CNR

How Cisco Universal Broadband Routers and Cable Modems Work

DHCP Fields and Options for Cable Modems

Cisco Network Registrar Sample Configuration

Overview of Scripts

Placement of Scripts

Activating Scripts in Cisco Network Registrar

Configuring the Cisco CMTS Routers to Use Scripts

Configuring the System Default Policy

Creating Selection Tag Scopes

Creating Network Scopes

Creating Policies for Class of Service or for Upgrading Cable Modem Cisco IOS Images

CNR Steps to Support Subinterfaces

Additional References

Servers Required on the HFC Network

A TFTP server, DHCP server, and time-of-day (TOD) server are required to support two-way data cable modems on an HFC network. A cable modem will not boot if these servers are not available. The log server and security servers are not required to configure and operate a cable modem. If the log server or security servers are not present, a cable modem will generate warning messages, but it will continue to boot and function properly.

Figure 1 Servers Required on a Two-Way HFC Network

In this provisioning model, TOD and TFTP servers are standard Internet implementations of the RFC 868 and RFC 1350 specifications. Most computers running a UNIX-based operating system supply TOD and TFTP servers as a standard software feature. Typically, the TOD server is embedded in the UNIX inetd and it requires no additional configuration. The TFTP server is usually disabled in the standard software but can be enabled by the user. Microsoft NT server software includes a TFTP server that can be enabled with the services control panel. Microsoft NT does not include a TOD server. A public domain version of the TOD server for Microsoft NT can be downloaded from several sites.

The DHCP and Domain Name System (DNS) server shown in Figure 1 must be the DHCP/DNS server available in Cisco Network Registrar version 2.0 or later. CNR is the only DHCP server that implements policy-based assignment of IP addresses. The headend must be a Cisco uBR7200 series universal broadband router or Cisco uBR10012 universal broadband router. The remote access server is only required on HFC networks that are limited to one-way (downstream only) communication. In a one-way HFC network, upstream data from a PC through the headend to the Internet is carried over a dialup connection. This dialup connection for upstream data is referred to as telco return. For simplification, the model will not include a log or security server. Cable modems can be set up to use the logging and security servers by including the appropriate DHCP options in the cable modem policy as described in the Cisco Network Registrar User Manual.

Cisco Network Registrar Description

CNR is a dynamic IP address management system, running on Windows or Solaris, that uses the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) to assign IP addresses to cable interfaces, PCs, and other devices on the broadband network. The CNR tool includes script extensions that allow a cable system administrator to define and view individual DHCP options, define the identity or type of device on the network, and assign the device to a predefined class or group.

Using the CNR tool, a cable system administrator can specify policies to provide:

Integrated DHCP and Domain Name Server (DNS) services

Time of Day (ToD) and Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server based on the size of the network

DHCP safe failover and dynamic DNS updates


Note This is available only in CNR 3.0 or higher.


Using the CNR tool and the extension scripts identified in the "Overview of Scripts" section, a cable system administrator can specify scopes, policies, and options for the network and each cable interface based on the services and configuration to support at each subscriber site.


Note Scopes refer to the administrative grouping of TCP/IP addresses; all IP addresses within a scope should be on the same subnet.


The cable system administrator defines system default policies for all standard options and uses scope-specific policies for options related to particular subnets, such as cable interfaces. This allows DHCP to send the information with the IP address.

Seven entry points exist for scripts:

post-packet-decode

pre-client-lookup

post-client-lookup—Examines and takes action on results of the client-class process, places data items in the environment dictionary to use at the pre-packet-encode extension point, includes DHCP relay option

check-lease-acceptable

pre-packet-encode

post-sent-packet

pre-dns-add-forward

Overview of DHCP Using CNR

Cisco Network Registrar (CNR) is a dynamic IP address management system that uses the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) and assigns IP addresses to PCs and other devices on a network based on a predefined set of policies, such as class of service. CNR assigns available IP addresses from address pools based on the identity or type of the requesting device and the policies in effect. For example, CNR can distinguish between registered devices, unregistered devices, and registered devices that have been assigned to a particular class of service.

CNR also provides extensions that can be customized (via programming or a script) so that you can view individual DHCP options, determine the identity or type of a device based on the content of the options, and assign a device to a predefined class or group. Using these extensions, you can determine the difference between PCs and cable modems and assign them IP addresses from different address pools.

In typical data-over-cable environments, service providers are interested in simplifying provisioning to limit the amount of information that must be collected about subscribers' customer premise equipment (CPEs). To support current provisioning models, a field technician must be sent to a subscriber's home or business to install and setup a cable modem. During this site visit, the technician might register the serial number and MAC address of the cable modem in the customer account database. Because a field technician must go to a subscriber's site to replace a cable modem, you can easily track modem information.

Manually registering and tracking information about a cable subscriber's PC is more difficult. A subscriber might purchase a new PC or exchange the network interface card (NIC) without notifying you of the change. Automatic provisioning with CNR reduces the amount of customer service involvement needed to track customer equipment. To use the provisioning model described in this document, you must still track serial numbers and MAC addresses for cable modems, but you do not need to track information about the PC or NIC cards installed at a subscriber site.

The remainder of this document describes how to configure CNR to support this model. The following sections describe the equipment and servers required for the cable headend, provide an overview of the interaction between DOCSIS-compatible cable modems and the Cisco universal broadband routers, and provide a guide on how to configure CNR to support this provisioning model.

How Cisco Universal Broadband Routers and Cable Modems Work

Cisco universal broadband routers and cable modems are based on the Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification (DOCSIS) standards. These standards were created by a consortium of cable service providers called Multimedia Cable Network Systems, Ltd. (MCNS) to that cable headend and cable modem equipment produced by different vendors will interoperate. The key DOCSIS standards provide the basis for a cable modem to communicate with any headend equipment and headend equipment to communicate with any cable modem.

Cable modems are assigned to operate on specific cable channels so activity can be balanced across several channels. Each Cisco uBR7200 series router installed at the headend serves a specific channel. Part of network planning is to decide which channel each cable modem can use.

A cable modem cannot connect to the network until the following events occur:

The cable modem initializes and ranges through available frequencies until it finds the first frequency that it can use to communicate to the headend. The cable modem might be another vendor's DOCSIS-compatible device and the headend might have a Cisco uBR7200 series router installed. At this point on the initial connection, the cable modem cannot determine if it is communicating on the correct channel.

The cable modem goes through the DHCP server process and receives a configuration file from the server.

One of the parameters in the configuration file tells the cable modem which channel it can use.

If the assigned channel is not available on the Cisco uBR7200 series router to which the cable modem is currently connected, it resets itself and comes up on the assigned channel.

During this second DHCP process, the modem will be connected to the correct CMTS. This time, the configuration file will be loaded. For a DOCSIS-compatible cable modem to access the network, it might go through the DHCP server two times on two different networks; therefore, one-lease-per-client IP addressing is critical.

DHCP Fields and Options for Cable Modems

DHCP options and packet fields are required to enable cable modems to boot and operate properly. Table 1 lists the required DHCP options and fields.

Table 1 Required DHCP Fields and Options

Required Field/Option
Field/Option In Cisco Network Registrar
Value/Description
Fields
   

giaddr

-

IP address. As a DHCP packet passes through the relay agent to the DHCP server, the relay agent supplies a unique IP address to the packet and stores it in this field. The relay agent is a uBR7200 series router with the iphelper attribute defined.

subnet-mask

-

Subnet mask for the IP address stored in the giaddr field. This value is also stored in the DHCP packet by the relay agent.

file

Packet-file-name

Name of the cable modem configuration file that will be read from a TFTP server.

siaddr

Packet-siaddr

IP address of the TFTP server where configuration files are stored.

Options
   

Time-servers

-

List of hosts running the time server specified in the RFC 868 standard.

Time-offset

-

Time offset of a cable modem internal clock from Universal Time Coordinated (UTC). This value is used by cable modems to calculate the local time that is stored in time-stamping error logs.

MCNS-security-server

-

IP address of the security server. This should be set if security is required. See RFC 1533 for details.


Cisco Network Registrar Sample Configuration

Yu can use the following information to set up Cisco Network Registrar in a trial configuration. The configuration describes DHCP-related setup only; it does not cover setting up DNS or configuring dynamic DNS (DDNS). You should be familiar with important CNR concepts including scopes, primary and secondary scopes, scope selection tags, client classes, and CNR policies. See the Using Network Registrar publication for detailed information on these concepts.

In the trial configuration, you can configure CNR to perform the following operations:

Receive DHCP requests from a cable modem and a PC on an HFC network via a port supporting multiple network numbers. The Cisco uBR7200 series router at the headend must be configured as a forwarder (iphelper is configured).

Serve IP addresses on two networks; a net-10 network (non-Internet routable) and a net-24 network (Internet routable).

Tell the difference between a cable modem and a PC based on the MAC address of the device and provide net-24 addresses to the PC and net-10 addresses to the cable modem.

Refuse to serve IP addresses to MAC addresses that it does not recognize.

To perform these options, you must implement the following CNR configuration items:

Create two scope selection tags; one for PCs, one for cable modems.

Create two client-classes; one for PCs , one for cable modems.

Create a lease policy appropriate for the cable modem devices.

Create a lease policy appropriate for the PC devices.

Create a scope containing Class A net-24 (routable) addresses.

Create a scope containing Class A net-10 (nonroutable) addresses.

Identify the scope containing the net-24 addresses as the primary scope and configure the other scope containing the net-10 addresses as secondary to the net-24 scope.


Note The Cisco uBR7200 series router upstream ports must be configured with the primary network address on the net-24 network; such as 24.1.1.1.


Assign the policies to the appropriate scope.

Add the MAC address of the cable modem and the PC to the client-entry list.

Associate the PC tag with the scope containing routable addresses.

Associate the cable modem tag with the scope containing nonroutable addresses.

Associate the cable modem tag with the cable modem client-class.

Associate the PC tag with the PC client-class.

Assign the PC MAC to the PC class.

Assign the cable modem MAC to the cable modem class.

Enable client-class processing.

Figure 2 shows the trial CNR configuration in an HFC network.

Figure 2 Trial Configuration in an HFC Network

These configuration items and their associations can be created using either the CNR management graphical user interface (GUI) or command-line interface (CLI). The following sample script configures DHCP for a sample server:

File: cabledemo.rc
Command line: nrcmd -C <cluster> -N <user name> -P <password> -b < cabledemo.rc
 
   
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
scope-selection-tag tag-CM create
scope-selection-tag tag-PC create
client-class create class-CM 
client-class class-CM set selection-criteria=tag-CM
client-class create class-PC 
client-class class-PC set selection-criteria=tag-PC
policy cmts-cisco create
policy cmts-cisco setleasetime 1800
policy cmts-cisco setoption domain-name-servers 192.168.10.2
policy cmts-cisco setoption routers 10.1.1.1
policy cmts-cisco setoption time-offset  604800
policy cmts-cisco setoption time-servers 192.168.10.20
policy cmts-cisco set packet-siaddr=192.168.10.2
policy cmts-cisco setoption log-servers 192.168.10.2
policy cmts-cisco setoption mcns-security-server 192.168.10.2
policy cmts-cisco set packet-file-name=golden.cfg
policy cmts-cisco set 
dhcp-reply-options=packet-file-name,packet-siaddr,mcns-security-server
policy pPC create
policy pPC set server-lease-time 1800
policy pPC setleasetime 1800
policy pPC setoption domain-name-servers 192.168.10.2
policy pPC setoption routers 24.1.1.1
scope S24.1.1.0 create 24.1.1.0 255.255.255.0
scope S24.1.1.0 addrange 24.1.1.5 24.1.1.254
scope S24.1.1.0 set policy=pPC
scope S24.1.1.0 set selection-tags=tag-PC
scope S10.1.1.0 create 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0
scope S10.1.1.0 addrange 10.1.1.5 10.1.1.254
scope S10.1.1.0 set policy=cmts-cisco
scope S10.1.1.0 set selection-tags=tag-CM
scope S10.1.1.0 set primary-scope=S24.1.1.0
client 01:02:03:04:05:06 create client-class-name=class-PC
client ab:cd:ef:01:02:03 create client-class-name=class-CM
client default create action=exclude
dhcp enable client-class
dhcp enable one-lease-per-client
save
dhcp reload
 
   

In addition to the DHCP server setup, you might want to enable packet-tracing. When packet-tracing is enabled, the server parses both requests and replies, and then adds them to the logs. If you do enable tracing, performance will be adversely affected, and the logs will roll over quickly.

Use the following nrcmd command to set packet tracing.

DHCP set log-settings=incoming-packet-detail,outgoing-packet-detail

Cable Modem DHCP Response Fields

Each cable interface on the broadband network requires the following fields in the DHCP response:

CM's IP address

CM's subnet mask


Note For cable operators with less experience in networking, you can fill in a guess based on the network number and indicate how your IP network is divided.


Name of the DOCSIS configuration file on the TFTP server intended for the cable interface

Time offset of the cable interface from the Universal Coordinated Time (UTC), which the cable interface uses to calculate the local time when time-stamping error logs

Time server address from which the cable interface obtains the current time

DOCSIS DHCP Fields

DOCSIS DHCP option requirements include:

IP address of the next server to use in the TFTP bootstrap process; this is returned in the siaddr field

DOCSIS configuration file that the cable interface downloads from the TFTP server


Note If the DHCP server is on a different network that uses a relay agent, then the relay agent must set the gateway address field of the DHCP response.


IP address of the security server should be set if security is required

DHCP Relay Option (DOCSIS Option 82)

DOCSIS Option82 modifies DHCPDISCOVER packets to distinguish cable interfaces from the CPE devices or "clients" behind them. The DOCSIS Option82 is comprised of the following two suboptions:

Suboption 1, Circuit ID:

Type 1 (1 byte)
Len 4 (1 byte)
Value (8 bytes)
<bit 31,30,....................0)
<xYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY> 

where the MSB indicates if the attached device is a cable interface.

x=1 Cable Modem REQ

x=0 CPE device
(Behind the cable interface with the cable interface MAC address shown in suboption 2.)

The rest of the bits make up the SNMP index to the CMTS interface.

Y=0xYYYYYYY is the SNMP index to the CMTS interface.

Suboption 2, MAC address of the cable interface:

Type 2 (1 byte)
Len 6 (1 byte)
Value xxxx.xxxx.xxxx (6 bytes)

Overview of Scripts

This section lists the scripts applicable to cable interface configuration.

Two-way Cable Modem Scripts

To support two-way configurations at a subscriber site, use these scripts:

Relay.tcl

SetRouter.tcl

Telco Return Cable Modem Scripts

To support telco return and two-way cable interface configurations on the same cable interface card or chassis, use these scripts:

PostClientLookup.tcl

PrePacketEncode.tcl

Placement of Scripts

Windows NT

For CNR running on Windows NT, place the appropriate scripts in the following directory:

\program files\network registrar\extensions\dhcp\scripts\tcl

Solaris

For CNR running on Solaris, place the appropriate scripts in the following directory:

/opt/nwreg2/extensions/dhcp/scripts/tcl

Activating Scripts in Cisco Network Registrar

To activate the scripts after you have placed them in the appropriate directory:


Step 1 Open up a text editor.

Step 2 Open one of the scripts at the nrcmd> command prompt.

Step 3 Create the extension points and attach them to the system.


Note The easiest way to do this is to simply cut and paste the command lines from the scripts to the nrcmd> command line.


Step 4 After you have created and attached the extension points, do a dhcp reload.

The scripts are active.


Configuring the Cisco CMTS Routers to Use Scripts

Each cable interface must be set up as a BOOTP forwarder and have the relay option enabled. The primary and secondary IP addresses for each cable interface must be in sync with the CNR tool.

To properly communicate with scripts in the system, use the following commands on the Cisco CMTS router:

To enable option 82, use the ip dhcp relay info option command.

To disable the validation of DHPC relay agent information in forwarded BOOTREPLY messages, use the no ip dhcp relay information option check command.


Note You can also use the cable dhcp-giaddr command in cable interface configuration mode to modify the GIADDR field of DHCPDISCOVER and DHCPREQUEST packets to provide a relay IP address before packets are forwarded to the DHCP server. Use this command to set a "policy" option such that primary addresses are used for CMs and secondary addresses are used for hosts behind the CMs.


Configuring the System Default Policy

Add these options to the system default policy for:

Cable modems to support on your network

PCs to support behind each cable interface on your network

Cable Modems

Define these settings following the CNR tool documentation:

TFTP server (IP address) for those cable interfaces using BOOTP

Time-server (IP address)

Time-offset (Hex value, 1440 for Eastern Standard Time)

Packet-siaddr (IP address of CNR)

Router (set to 0.0.0.0)

Boot-file (name of .cm file for those cable interfaces using BOOTP)

Packet-file-name (.cm file name)

PCs

Define these settings following the CNR tool documentation:

Domain name

Name servers (IP address of DNS servers)

Creating Selection Tag Scopes

General

When you create your scope selection tags:


Step 1 Cut and paste the scope selection tag create commands from the scripts into the nrcmd> command line.


Note These names have to be exactly as they appear in the scripts.


Step 2 Then attach the selection tags to the appropriate scripts:

Example:

CM_Scope tagCablemodem

PC_Scope tagComputer


Telco Return for the Cisco uBR7200 Series Router


Note If you are using the prepacketencode and postclientlookup .tcl scripts for telco return, the telco return scope does not have a selection tag associated to the scope.



Step 1 Put the tag Telcocablemodem on the primary cable interface scope to pull addresses from that pool instead.

Step 2 Follow the same procedure as above, but use a telco return policy which has a different .cm file with telco-specific commands in it.


Creating Network Scopes

Following is an example for creating scopes for your network. This example assumes two Cisco uBR7200 series universal broadband routers in two locations, with one cable interface card on one Cisco uBR7200 series configured for telco return.

cm-toledo1_2-0 10.2.0.0 255.255.0.0 assignable 10.2.0.10-10.2.254.254 tagCablemodem 
tagTelcomodem Default GW=10.2.0.1 (assigned by scripts)
 
   
cm-toledo1_3-0 10.3.0.0 255.255.0.0 assignable 10.3.0.10-10.3.254.254 tagCablemodem 
tagTelcomodem Default GW=10.3.0.1 (assigned by scripts)
 
   
pc-toledo1_2-0 208.16.182.0 255.255.255.248 assignable 208.16.182.2-208.16.182.6 
tagComputer Default GW=208.16.182.1 (assigned by scripts)
 
   
pc-toledo1_3-0 208.16.182.8 255.255.255.248 assignable 208.16.182.10-208.16.182.14 
tagComputer Default GW=208.16.182.9 (assigned by scripts)
 
   
telco_return_2-0 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 (No assignable addresses, tag was put on cable 
modem primary scope to force telco-return cable modem to pull address from primary scope)
 
   
cm-arlington1_2-0 10.4.0.0 255.255.0.0 assignable 10.4.0.10-10.4.254.254 tagCablemodem 
Default GW=10.4.0.1 (assigned by scripts)
 
   
cm-arlington1_3-0 10.5.0.0 255.255.0.0 assignable 10.5.0.10-10.5.254.254 tagCablemodem 
Default GW=10.5.0.1 (assigned by scripts)
 
   
pc-arlington1_2-0 208.16.182.16 255.255.255.248 assignable 208.16.182.17-208.16.182.22 
tagComputer Default GW=208.16.182.17 (assigned by scripts)
 
   
pc-toledo1_3-0 208.16.182.24 255.255.255.248 assignable 208.16.182.2-208.16.182.30 
tagComputer Default GW=208.16.182.25 (assigned by scripts)

Note Remember the last valid address in the .248 subnet range is the broadcast address; do not use this.


Creating Policies for Class of Service or for Upgrading Cable Modem Cisco IOS Images

To support Class of Service (CoS), define:

Scope selection tags—Identifiers that describe types of scope configurations


Note This is needed for Option82.


Client classes—Class with which a group of clients is associated


Note Scope selection tags are excluded from or included in client-classes.


Client—Specific DHCP clients and the defined class to which they belong

To assign the CoS or use Option82, make a client entry with a MAC address and point to the appropriate policy. To use client-based MAC provisioning, add a client entry "default - exclude," then put in MAC addresses for all devices (for example, cable interfaces and PCs) in the client tab and select the policy to use, including the appropriate tag.

CNR Steps to Support Subinterfaces

The CNR configuration is done differently if subinterfaces are configured. Here is an example. If you have configured two ISP subinterfaces and one management subinterface on a Cisco uBR7200 series, make sure that the management subinterface is the first subinterface that is configured. If cable interface three—c3/0—is being used, create c3/0.1, c3/0.2 and c3/0.3 as three subinterfaces and c3/0.1 as the first subinterface configured as the management subinterface.


Note The Cisco uBR7200 series requires management subinterfaces to route DHCP packets from CMs when they first initialize because the Cisco uBR7200 series does not know the subinterfaces they belong to until it has seen the IP addresses assigned to them by gleaning DHCP reply message from CNR.


In CNR, complete the following steps for such a configuration:


Step 1 Create two scope selection tags such as: isp1-cm-tag and isp2-cm-tag

Step 2 Configure three scopes; for example, mgmt-scope, isp1-cm-scope, and isp2-cm-scope such that isp1-cm-scope and isp2-cm-scope each define mgmt-scope to be the primary scope

Step 3 Also configure two scopes for PCs for each of the ISPs; isp1-pc-scope and isp2-pc-scope. For scope isp1-cm-scope, configure isp1-cm-tag to be the scope selection tag. For scope isp2-cm-scope, configure isp2-cm-tag to be the scope selection tag

Step 4 Configure two client classes; for example, isp1-client-class and isp2-client-class

Step 5 Create client entries with their MAC addresses for CMs that belong to ISP1 and assign them to isp1-client-class. Also assign the scope selection tag isp1-cm-tag

Step 6 Create client entries for CMs that belong to ISP2 and assign them to isp2-client-class. Also assign the scope selection tag isp2-cm-tag

Step 7 Enable client class processing from the scope-selection-tag window

Overlapping address ranges cannot be configured on these subinterfaces because software gleans the DHCP reply to figure out the subinterface it really belongs to. Although CNR can be configured with overlapping address range scopes, it cannot be used to allocate addresses from these scopes.

Additional References

The following sections provide references related to Cisco Network Registrar for use with the Cisco CMTS routers.

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Cisco Network Registrar documentation

Go to:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/netmgtsw/ps1982/tsd_products_support_series_home.html

Frequently Asked Questions

CNR and DHCP FAQs for Cable Environment

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/109/cable_faq_cnr_dhcp.html

CNR configuration recommendations for performance and troubleshooting tips.

Recommended CNR Settings and Management

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/477/CNR/cnr_best_settings.html

Cisco CMTS Commands

Cisco IOS CMTS Cable Command Reference Guide

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/cable/command/reference/cbl_book.html


Standards

Standards
Title

SP-CMCI-I02-980317

Cable Modem to Customer PremiseEquipment Interface Specification

(http://www.cablemodem.com)

SP-RFI-I04-980724

Radio Frequency Interface Specification

(http://www.cablemodem.com)

SP-CMTRI-I01-970804

Cable Modem Telephony Return Interface Specification (http://www.cablemodem.com)


MIBs

MIBs
MIBs Link

Cisco IOS MIBs Tools

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs


RFCs

RFCs
Title

RFC 2131

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol

RFC 2132

DHCP Options and BOOTP Vendor Extensions


Technical Assistance

Description
Link

Technical Assistance Center (TAC) home page, containing 30,000 pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content.

http://www.cisco.com/cisco/web/support/index.html