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QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

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QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

Table Of Contents

QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

Contents

Prerequisites for QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

Restrictions for QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

Information about QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

Configuration Guidelines and Restrictions

Configuring QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

Configuring and Applying QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps to Sessions

Example

Configuring and Applying QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps to Subinterfaces

Example

Displaying Policy Map Information

Configuration Examples for QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for E-DSLAMs

Configuring QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps on VLANs or QinQ Subinterfaces: Example

Configuring QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps on VLANs with Arbitrary QinQ: Example

Configuring QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps on Sessions: Example

Configuring QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps on Sessions with Aggregate Shaping: Example

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance

Command Reference

Feature Information for QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs


QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs


First Published: November, 2006

This feature module describes how to configure QoS hierarchical queuing policy maps on sessions and subinterfaces in Ethernet Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer (E-DSLAM) applications on a Cisco 10000 series router. The QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for E-DSLAM feature supports IEEE 802.1 QinQ VLAN Tag Termination to configure inner Virtual LAN (VLAN) identifiers on E-DSLAMs.

Finding Feature Information in This Module

Your Cisco IOS software release may not support all of the features documented in this module. To reach links to specific feature documentation in this module and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, use the "Feature Information for QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs" section.

Finding Support Information for Platforms and Cisco IOS Software Images

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco IOS software image support. Access Cisco Feature Navigator at http://www.cisco.com/go/fn. You must have an account on Cisco.com. If you do not have an account or have forgotten your username or password, click Cancel at the login dialog box and follow the instructions.

Contents

Prerequisites for QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

Restrictions for QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

Information about QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

Configuration Guidelines and Restrictions

Configuring QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

Configuration Examples for QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for E-DSLAMs

Additional References

Command Reference

Feature Information for QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

Prerequisites for QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

You must configure traffic classes using the class-map command.

This feature requires a Performance Routing Engine 3 (PRE3).

Restrictions for QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB2 does not include Modular QoS CLI (MQC) support for these session-based queuing policies:

IP sessions

Inner VLAN sessions

This feature is not supported in combination with load balancing when a session service policy is routed to an L2TP tunnel. Do not configure load balancing on an L2TP tunnel if per-session queuing is enabled.

Information about QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

Traffic downstream from a Broadband Router Access Server (BRAS) requires different levels of Quality of Service (QoS) provisioning depending on the network architecture between the BRAS and subscriber. Figure 1 shows multiple entities where QoS provisioning is required for different reasons.

The following examples are entities that may require different traffic shaping:

A VLAN shaped to a certain aggregate traffic rate to limit the traffic to a group of subscribers (different 802.1Q interfaces in Figure 1).

Individual sessions shaped with certain QoS services for different classes of traffic (individual PCs in Figure 1).

Different traffic shaping requirements result in QoS provisioning at multiple levels at the same time. The QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for E-DSLAM feature provides the ability to form one integrated queuing hierarchy that provides QoS provisioning at multiple levels with support for features such as bandwidth distribution at any of these levels.

The integrated queuing hierarchy is formed on the physical interface. When a service policy is instantiated on a session, the Subscriber Service Switch (SSS) infrastructure invokes the MQC and a common queuing control plane sets up and enables the queuing features.

Session-to-interface associations are resolved to determine the physical interface on which to form the integrated queuing hierarchy for all levels of QoS provisioning. As subinterface session-based policies are added, the respective queues are created and integrated into the queuing hierarchy.

When a subinterface is provisioned followed by session-based policy provisioning, the integrated queuing hierarchy is formed on top of the physical interface as a result of queuing policies provisioned at two different levels. When a session is provisioned before subinterface-based policy provisioning, the queuing hierarchy has a placeholder logical level between the physical queue and the session queue. The placeholder queue becomes the default queue at that level, and all other sessions are parented to that queue.

A PRE3 supports three hierarchical levels of scheduling: physical port, session, and class queues. When sessions are established within a subinterface configured with a shaping policy, the subinterface level is lowered to the physical layer.

Figure 1 Ethernet DSL Access Network

Configuration Guidelines and Restrictions

An individual subscriber is always identified by a PPP or IP session. A group of subscribers is identified by a particular VLAN via outer tag ISP, E-DSLAM, or user-facing provider edge (U-PE).

When a subinterface is used to aggregate a number of sessions with queuing policies, a queuing policy at a subinterface level must be a one-level policy map configured as class-default with only the shape feature.

Do not oversubscribe sessions to ensure distributed bandwidth for sessions with configured shape rates.

Configuring QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

This section includes the following procedures:

Configuring and Applying QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps to Sessions

Configuring and Applying QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps to Subinterfaces

Displaying Policy Map Information

Configuring and Applying QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps to Sessions

Perform this task to configure and apply a QoS hierarchical queuing policy map to PPP/IP sessions through a virtual template.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map policy-map-name

4. class class-map-name

5. (Optional) bandwidth {bandwidth-kbps| percent percentage | remaining percent percentage}

6. (Optional) precedence precedence min-threshold max-threshold mark-probability-denominator

7. (Optional) set cos cos-value

8. policy-map policy-map-name

9. class class-default

10. shape average cir [bc] [be]

11. bandwidth remaining ratio weight

12. service-policy policy-map-name

13. exit

14. exit

15. interface virtual-template number

16. service-policy output policy-map-name

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map session_a_child

Creates a child policy. Enters policy-map configuration mode.

policy-map-name—A maximum of 40 alphanumeric characters.

Step 4 

class class-map-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class voip

Configures the traffic class you specify. Enters policy-map class configuration mode.

class-map-name—Name of a previously configured class map.

Step 5 

bandwidth {bandwidth-kbps | percent percentage| remaining percent percentage}

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth 10000


(Optional) Enables class-based fair queuing.

bandwidth-kbps—Specifies the minimum bandwidth allocated for a class belonging to a policy map. Valid values are from 8 to 2,488,320, which represents from 1 to 99 percent of the link bandwidth.

percent percentage—Specifies the minimum percentage of the link bandwidth allocated for a class belonging to a policy map. Valid values are from 1 to 99.

remaining percent percentage—Specifies the minimum percentage of unused link bandwidth allocated for a class belonging to a policy map. Valid values are from 1 to 99.

Step 6 

precedence precedence min-threshold max-threshold mark-probability-denominator

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# precedence 0 32 256 100

(Optional) Configures a precedence level for the traffic class.

precedence—Specifies the IP precedence number. Valid values are from 0 to 7.

min-threshold—Specifies the minimum threshold in number of packets. Valid values are from 1 to 4096.

max-threshold—Specifies the maximum threshold in number of packets. Valid values are from the minimum threshold to 4096.

mark-probability-denominator—Specifies the denominator for the fraction of packets dropped when the average queue depth is equal to the maximum threshold. For example, if the denominator is 512, 1 out of every 512 packets is dropped when the average queue is at the maximum threshold. Valid values are from 1 to 65536. The default value is 10 (1 out of every 10 packets is dropped at the maximum threshold).

Step 7 

set cos cos-value

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# set cos 1

(Optional) Sets the Layer 2 class of service (CoS) value of an outgoing packet.

cos-value—Specifies an IEEE 802.1Q CoS value from 0 to 7.

Note Use the set cos command only in service policies that are attached in the output direction of an interface; packets entering an interface cannot be set with a CoS value. You can configure a CoS value on an Ethernet interface that is configured for 802.1Q or on a virtual access interface that is using an 802.1Q interface.

Step 8 

policy-map policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# policy-map session_a_parent

Creates a parent policy. Enters policy-map configuration mode.

policy-map-name—A maximum of 40 alphanumeric characters.

Step 9 

class class-default

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class-default

Configures the traffic class as class-default. Do not configure any other traffic class.

Step 10 

shape average cir [bc] [be]

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 10000000

Specifies average or peak rate traffic shaping for all traffic that does not match any other traffic class.

average—Average rate shaping.

cir—Committed information rate (CIR), in bits per second (bps).

bc—(Optional) Committed Burst size, in bits.

be—(Optional) Excess Burst size, in bits.

Step 11 

bandwidth remaining ratio weight

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining ratio 10

Specifies the weight for the subinterface.

weight—Specifies the relative weight of the subinterface with respect to other subinterfaces, during periods of congestion.

Step 12 

service-policy policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy session_a_child

Applies the child policy to the parent class-default class.

policy-map-name—Specifies the name of a previously configured child policy.

Step 13 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

Exits policy-map class configuration mode.

Step 14 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# exit

Exits policy-map configuration mode.

Step 15 

interface virtual-template number

Example:

Router(config)# interface virtual-template 1

Creates a virtual template. Enters interface configuration mode.

number—Identifies the virtual template. Valid range is from 1 to 200.

Step 16 

service-policy output policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config-if)# service-policy output session_a_parent

Applies the service policy to the virtual interface.

policy-map-name—Specifies the name of the previously configured parent policy.

Note You must specify the output keyword to apply the service policy to outbound traffic on the interface.

Example

Router> enable 
Router# configure terminal 
Router(config)# policy-map session_a_child 
Router(config-pmap)# class voip 
Router(config-pmap-c)# police 1000000 
Router(config-pmap-c)# priority level 1
Router(config-pmap-c)# class video 
Router(config-pmap-c)# police 100000 
Router(config-pmap-c)# priority level 2 
Router(config-pmap-c)# class precedence_0 
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining ratio 10 
Router(config-pmap-c)# class precedence_1 
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining ratio 20 
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map session_a_parent 
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default 
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 10000000 
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining ratio 10 
Router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy session_a_child 
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit 
Router(config-pmap)# exit 
Router(config)# interface virtual-template 20 
Router(config-if)# service-policy output session_a_parent 
Router(config-if)# end

Configuring and Applying QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps to Subinterfaces

Perform this task to configure and apply a QoS hierarchical queuing policy map to a subinterface. This provides aggregate shaping for a large number of subscribers.


Note When a subinterface is used to aggregate a number of sessions with queuing policies, a queuing policy at a subinterface level must be a one-level policy map configured as class-default with only the shape feature.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map policy-map-name

4. class class-default

5. shape average cir [bc] [be]

6. exit

7. exit

8. interface type slot/subslot/port.subinterface

9. encapsulation dot1q outer-vlan-id second-dot1q inner-vlan-id

10. service-policy output policy-map-name

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map subint_1

Creates the policy map. Enters policy-map configuration mode.

policy-map-name—A maximum of 40 alphanumeric characters.

Step 4 

class class-default

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class-default

Configures the traffic class as class-default. Do not configure any other traffic class.

Step 5 

shape average cir [bc] [be]

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 10000000

Specifies average or peak rate traffic shaping for all of the traffic that does not match any other traffic class.

average—Average rate shaping.

cir—Committed information rate (CIR), in bits per second (bps).

bc—(Optional) Committed Burst size, in bits.

be—(Optional) Excess Burst size, in bits.

Step 6 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

Exits policy-map class configuration mode.

Step 7 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# exit

Exits policy-map configuration mode.

Step 8 

interface type slot/subslot/port.subinterface

Example:

Router(config)# interface g3/1/1.1

Specifies the subinterface on which you are attaching the policy map. Enters subinterface configuration mode.

Step 9 

encapsulation dot1q outer-vlan-id [second-dot1q inner-vlan-id]

Example:

Router(config-subif)# encapsulation dot1q 100

Enables IEEE 802.1Q encapsulation of traffic on the subinterface.

The second-dot1q keyword supports the IEEE 802.1 QinQ VLAN Tag Termination feature to configure an inner VLAN ID.

outer-vlan-id—The outer VLAN identifier. The range is from 1 to 4095.

inner-vlan-id—The inner VLAN identifier. The range is from 1 to 4095.

Step 10 

service-policy output policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config-subif)# service-policy output subint_1

Attaches the service policy to the subinterface.

policy-map-name—Specifies the name of the previously configured policy map.

Note You must specify the output keyword to apply the service policy to outbound traffic on the subinterface.

Example

Router> enable 
Router# configure terminal
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map subint_1
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 10000000
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit 
Router(config-pmap)# exit 
Router(config)# interface g3/1/1.1
Router(config-subif)# encapsulation dot1q 1 second-dot1q 10
Router(config-subif)# service-policy output subint_1
Router(config-subif)# end 

Displaying Policy Map Information

Table 1 lists the show commands to display policy map information.

Table 1 show policy-map Commands

Field
Displays

show policy-map

Configuration of all classes for a specified service policy or all classes for all existing policy maps.

show policy-map session

Policy maps in effect for subscriber sessions.

show policy-map subinterface

Statistics for policy maps enabled on a subinterface.


Configuration Examples for QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for E-DSLAMs

This section provides the following configuration examples:

Configuring QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps on VLANs or QinQ Subinterfaces: Example

Configuring QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps on VLANs with Arbitrary QinQ: Example

Configuring QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps on Sessions: Example

Configuring QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps on Sessions with Aggregate Shaping: Example

Configuring QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps on VLANs or QinQ Subinterfaces: Example

The following example shows how to configure and apply QoS hierarchical queuing policy maps on VLANs or QinQ subinterfaces. A child queuing policy is applied to each parent subscriber line level policy. In this example, the policy maps are applied to create subscriber groups on subinterfaces.

Router> enable 
Router# configure terminal 
Router(config)# policy-map service_a_out
Router(config-pmap)# class voip
Router(config-pmap-c)# priority 
Router(config-pmap-c)# police percent 20 bc 300 ms pir 40
Router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 1
Router(config-pmap-c)# class video
Router(config-pmap-c)# police percent 20 bc 300 ms pir 40
Router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 2
Router(config-pmap-c)# class gaming
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining percent 80 
Router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 3
Router(config-pmap-c)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining percent 20 
Router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 4
!
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map service_z_out
Router(config-pmap)# policy-map rate_1_service_a_in
Router(config-pmap)# class voip
Router(config-pmap-c)# police percent 25 4 ms 1 ms
Router(config-pmap-c)# class gaming
Router(config-pmap-c)# police percent 50 2 ms 1 ms
Router(config-pmap-c)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# police percent 20 bc 300 ms pir 40
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map rate_x_service_z_in
Router(config-pmap)# policy-map rate_1_service_a_out
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining ratio 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 100000
Router(config-pmap-c)# service policy service_a_out
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map rate_x_serviice_z_out
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining ratio 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 100000
Router(config-pmap-c)# service policy service_z_out
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit 
Router(config-pmap)# exit 
!
Router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1
Router(config-subif)# encapsulation dot1q 5 second dot1q 20
Router(config-subif)# service-policy output rate_1_service_a_out
Router(config-subif)# service-policy input rate_1_service_a_in
Router(config-if)# exit
Router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0.2
Router(config-subif)# encapsulation dot1q 5 second dot1q 25
Router(config-subif)# service-policy output rate_x_service_z_out
Router(config-subif)# service-policy input rate_x_service_z_in
Router(config-if)# end 

Configuring QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps on VLANs with Arbitrary QinQ: Example

The following example shows how to configure and apply QoS hierarchical queuing policy maps on VLANs with subscriber lines grouped by arbitrary QinQ. A child queuing policy is applied to each parent subscriber line level policy. This example includes configuration of four class maps.

Router> enable 
Router# configure terminal 
Router(config)# class-map match-all user_1
Router(config-cmap)# match vlan 10
Router(config-cmap)# class-map match-all user_2
Router(config-cmap)# match vlan 11
Router(config-cmap)# class-map match-all user_3
Router(config-cmap)# match vlan 10
Router(config-cmap)# class-map match-any user_4
Router(config-cmap)# match vlan 11
Router(config-cmap)# class-map match-all user_n
Router(config-cmap)# class-map match-any isp_A
Router(config-cmap)# match class user_1
Router(config-cmap)# match class user_2
Router(config-cmap)# class-map match-any isp_Z
Router(config-cmap)# match class user_3
Router(config-cmap)# match class user_4
Router(config-cmap)# exit
!
Router(config)# policy-map service_a_out
Router(config-pmap)# class voip
Router(config-pmap-c)# priority 
Router(config-pmap-c)# police cir percent 20 bc 300 ms pir 40
Router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 1
Router(config-pmap-c)# class video
Router(config-pmap-c)# police cir percent 20 bc 300 ms pir 40
Router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 2
Router(config-pmap-c)# class gaming
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining percent 80 
Router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 3
Router(config-pmap-c)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining percent 20 
Router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 4
!
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map service_z_out
Router(config-pmap)# policy-map service_a_in
Router(config-pmap)# class voip
Router(config-pmap-c)# police percent 25 4 ms 1 ms
Router(config-pmap-c)# class gaming
Router(config-pmap-c)# police percent 50 2 ms 1 ms
Router(config-pmap-c)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# police cir percent 20 bc 300 ms pir 40
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map service_z_in
Router(config-pmap)# policy-map isp_A_out
Router(config-pmap)# class user_1
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining ratio 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 100000
Router(config-pmap-c)# service policy service_a_out
Router(config-pmap-c)# class user_n
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining ratio 20
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 100000
Router(config-pmap-c)# service policy service_z_out
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map isp_Z_out
Router(config-pmap)# policy-map isp_A_in
Router(config-pmap)# class user_1
Router(config-pmap-c)# service policy service_a_in
Router(config-pmap-c)# class user_n
Router(config-pmap-c)# service policy service_z_in
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map isp_Z_in
Router(config-pmap)# policy-map interface_policy_out
Router(config-pmap)# class isp_A
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 100000
Router(config-pmap-c)# service policy isp_A_out
Router(config-pmap-c)# class isp_Z
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 100000
Router(config-pmap-c)# service policy isp_Z_out
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map interface_policy_in
Router(config-pmap)# class isp_A
Router(config-pmap-c)# service policy isp_A_in
Router(config-pmap-c)# class isp_Z
Router(config-pmap-c)# service policy isp_Z_in
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit 
Router(config-pmap)# exit 
!
Router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1 
Router(config-subif)# encapsulation dot1q 5 second dot1q any 
Router(config-subif)# service-policy output interface_policy_out 
Router(config-subif)# service-policy input interface_policy_in 
Router(config-if)# end

Configuring QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps on Sessions: Example

The following example shows how to configure and apply QoS hierarchical queuing policy maps on sessions. A child queuing policy is applied to each parent subscriber line level policy.

Router> enable 
Router# configure terminal 
Router(config)# policy-map service_a_out
Router(config-pmap)# class voip
Router(config-pmap-c)# priority 
Router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 1
Router(config-pmap-c)# class video
Router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 2
Router(config-pmap-c)# class gaming
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining percent 80 
Router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 3
Router(config-pmap-c)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining percent 20 
Router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 4
!
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map service_z_out
Router(config-pmap)# policy-map rate_1_service_a_out
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining ratio 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 100000
Router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy service_a_out
!
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map rate_x_service_z_out
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining ratio 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 100000
Router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy service_z_out

Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map rate_1_service_a_in
Router(config-pmap)# class voip
Router(config-pmap-c)# police percent 25 4 ms 1 ms
Router(config-pmap-c)# class gaming
Router(config-pmap-c)# police percent 50 2 ms 1 ms
Router(config-pmap-c)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# police cir percent 20 bc 300 ms pir 40
!
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map rate_x_service_z_in
Router(config-pmap)# policy-map isp_A_out
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 100000
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map isp_Z_out
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 100000
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit 
Router(config-pmap)# exit 
!
Router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0.1
Router(config-if)# encapsulation dot1q 1
Router(config-if)# service-policy output isp_A_out
Router(config-if)# exit
Router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet2/0/0.2
Router(config-if)# encapsulation dot1q 2
Router(config-if)# service-policy output isp_Z_out

Configuring QoS - Hierarchical Queuing Policy Maps on Sessions with Aggregate Shaping: Example

The following example shows how to configure and apply QoS hierarchical queuing policy maps on sessions with multiple PPP/IP sessions per subscriber line. In this example, the same policies are applied to all sessions using the same virtual interface.

Router> enable 
Router# configure terminal 
Router(config)# policy-map service_a_out
Router(config-pmap)# class voip
Router(config-pmap-c) priority 
Router(config-pmap-c)# police percent 25 4 ms 1 ms
Router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 1 
Router(config-pmap-c)# class video
Router(config-pmap-c)# police percent 30 5 ms 1 ms
Router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 2
Router(config-pmap-c)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining percent 20
Router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 3
!
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map service_z_out
Router(config-pmap)# policy-map rate_1_service_a_in
Router(config-pmap)# class voip
Router(config-pmap-c)# police percent 25 4 ms 1 ms
Router(config-pmap-c)# class video
Router(config-pmap-c)# police percent 30 2 ms 1 ms
Router(config-pmap-c)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# police percent 40 2 ms 1 ms
!
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map rate_x_service_z_in
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map rate_1_service_a_out
Router(config-pmap-c)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining ratio 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 100000
Router(config-pmap-c)# service policy service_a_out
!
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map rate_x_service_z_out
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining ratio 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 100000
Router(config-pmap-c)# service policy service_z_out
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit 
Router(config-pmap)# exit 
!
Router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0 
Router(config-if)# encapsulation dot1q 1 
Router(config-if)# service-policy output isp_A_out 
Router(config-if)# exit 
Router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet2/0/0 
Router(config-if)# encapsulation dot1q 2 
Router(config-if)# service-policy output isp_Z_out 
Router(config-if)# end 

Additional References

The following sections provide references related to the QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for E-DSLAM feature.

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

QoS provisioning and traffic shaping

Cisco 10000 Series Router Quality of Service Configuration Guide


Standards

Standard
Title

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature.


MIBs

MIB
MIBs Link

No new or modified MIBs are supported by this feature, and support for existing MIBs has not been modified by this feature.

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs


RFCs

RFC
Title

No new or modified RFCs are supported by this feature, and support for existing RFCs has not been modified by this feature.


Technical Assistance

Description
Link

The Cisco Technical Support & Documentation website contains thousands of pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content.

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport


Command Reference

This feature uses no new or modified commands.

Feature Information for QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

Table 2 lists the release history for this feature.

Not all commands may be available in your Cisco IOS software release. For release information about a specific command, see the command reference documentation.

Cisco IOS software images are specific to a Cisco IOS software release, a feature set, and a platform. Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco IOS software image support. Access Cisco Feature Navigator at http://www.cisco.com/go/fn. You must have an account on Cisco.com. If you do not have an account or have forgotten your username or password, click Cancel at the login dialog box and follow the instructions that appear.


Note Table 2 lists only the Cisco IOS software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given Cisco IOS software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that Cisco IOS software release train also support that feature.


Table 2 Feature Information for Configuring

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

QoS - Hierarchical Queuing for Ethernet DSLAMs

12.2(31)SB2

This feature was introduced and implemented on the Cisco 10000 series router for the PRE3.