Cisco IOS Switching Services Configuration�Guide, Release�12.2
Configuring Multiprotocol Label Switching
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Configuring Multiprotocol Label Switching

Table Of Contents

Configuring Multiprotocol Label Switching

Configuring MPLS Levels of Control

Case 1—Enable MPLS Incrementally in a Network

Case 2—Route Labeled Packets to Network A Only

Case 3—Limit Label Distribution on an MPLS Network

Configuring a Router for MPLS Forwarding

Configuring MPLS Traffic Engineering

Configuring a Device to Support Tunnels

Configuring an Interface to Support RSVP-Based Tunnel Signalling and IGP Flooding

Configuring IS-IS for MPLS Traffic Engineering

Configuring OSPF for MPLS Traffic Engineering

Configuring an MPLS Traffic Engineering Tunnel

Configuring MPLS Traffic Engineering Paths

Configuring MPLS Virtual Private Networks

Defining VPNs

Configuring BGP Routing Sessions

Configuring PE to PE Routing Sessions

Configuring BGP PE to CE Routing Sessions

Configuring RIP PE to CE Routing Sessions

Configuring Static Route PE to CE Routing Sessions

Configuring MPLS VPNs with Cable Interfaces

Restrictions

Creating VRFs for Each VPN

Defining Subinterfaces on a Physical Cable Interface and Assigning VRFs

Configuring Cable Interface Bundles

Configuring Subinterfaces and MPLS VPNs on a Bundle Master

Configuring MPLS in the P Routers in the Provider Core

Verifying the MPLS VPN Configuration

Configuring Interautonomous Systems for MPLS VPNs

Configuring EBGP Routing for the Exchange of VPN Routes Between Autonomous Systems

Configuring EBGP Routing for the Exchange of VPN Routes Between Subautonomous Systems in a Confederation

Displaying VPN-IPv4 LFIB Entries

Verifying VPN Operation

Configuring MPLS QoS Backbone Support

LSRs

ATM-LSRs

ATM Switches

Configuring MPLS QoS

Configuring QoS

Setting the MPLS Experimental Field Value

Importance of Prioritizing a Packet Appropriately

Configuring the Ingress MPLS Router

Using the Modular QoS CLI to Configure the Ingress Label Switching Router

Configuring a Class Map to Classify IP Packets

Configuring a Policy Map to Set the MPLS Experimental Field

Configuring the Input Interface to Attach the Service Policy

Using CAR to Configure the Ingress Label Switching Router

Configuring a Rate Limit Access List for Classifying IP Packets

Configuring a Rate-Limit on an Input Interface to Set MPLS Packets

Configuring the Output IP QoS of the Packet

Configuring PVC Mode in a Non-MPLS-Enabled Core

Configuring Multi-VC Mode in a MPLS-Enabled Core

Configuring Multi-VCs Using the Cos-Map Function

Configuring DWFQ and Changing Queue Weights on an Outgoing Interface

Verifying QoS Operation

Configuring the MPLS Label Switch Controller

Configuring MPLS on the Cisco 7200 Series LSCs for BPX and IGX Switches

Configuring the Cisco 6400 UAC LSC

Configuring Cisco 6400 UAC NRP as an MPLS LSC

Configuring the Cisco 6400 UAC NSP for MPLS Connectivity to BPX

Verifying MPLS LSC Configuration

Configuring MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting

Enabling MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting

Configuring NetFlow Aggregation Cache

Troubleshooting MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting

Verifying MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting Configuration

Monitoring and Maintaining MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting

Verifying Configuration of MPLS Forwarding

MPLS Configuration Examples

Enabling MPLS Incrementally in a Network Example

Enabling MPLS for a Subset of Destination Prefixes Example

Selecting the Destination Prefixes and Paths Example

Displaying MPLS LDP Binding Information Example

Displaying MPLS Forwarding Table Information Example

Displaying MPLS Interface Information Example

Displaying MPLS LDP Neighbor Information Example

Enabling LSP Tunnel Signalling Example

Configuring an LSP Tunnel Example

Displaying the LSP Tunnel Information Example

Configuring MPLS Traffic Engineering Examples

Configuring MPLS Traffic Engineering Using IS-IS Example

Configuring MPLS Traffic Engineering Using OSPF Example

Configuring an MPLS Traffic Engineering Tunnel Example

Configuring Enhanced SPF Routing over a Tunnel Example

Configuring MPLS VPNs Examples

Configuring MPLS VPNs Example

Defining a Cable Subinterface Example

Cable Interface Bundling Example

Subinterface Definition on Bundle Master Example

Cable Interface Bundle Master Configuration Example

Configuring EBGP Routing to Exchange VPN Routes Between Autonomous Systems

Configuring EBGP Routing to Exchange VPN Routes Between Autonomous Systems in a Confederation

Implementing MPLS QoS Example

Configuring CEF Example

Running IP on Router 2 Example

Running IP on Router 1 Example

Running MPLS on Router 4 Example

Running MPLS on Router 3 Example

Running MPLS on Router 5 Example

Running MPLS on Router 6 Example

Configuring ATM Switch 2 Example

Configuring ATM Switch 1 Example

Configuring an MPLS LSC Examples

Configuring ATM-LSRs Example

Configuring Multi-VCs Example

Configuring ATM-LSRs with a Cisco 6400 NRP Operating as LSC Example

Configuring ATM LSRs Through ATM Network Using Cisco 7200 LSCs Implementing Virtual Trunking Example

Configuring ATM LSRs Through ATM Network Using Cisco 6400 NRP LSCs Implementing Virtual Trunking Example

Configuring LSC Hot Redundancy Example

Configuring LSC Warm Standby Redundancy Example

Configuring an Interface Using Two VSI Partitions Example

Using an Access List to Control the Creation of Headend VCs

MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting Example


Configuring Multiprotocol Label Switching


This chapter describes how to configure your network to perform Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS).

This chapter contains the following sections:

Configuring MPLS Levels of Control

Configuring a Router for MPLS Forwarding

Configuring MPLS Traffic Engineering

Configuring MPLS Traffic Engineering Paths

Configuring MPLS Virtual Private Networks

Configuring MPLS QoS Backbone Support

Configuring MPLS QoS

Configuring the MPLS Label Switch Controller

Configuring MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting

Verifying Configuration of MPLS Forwarding

For configuration examples on MPLS, see the "MPLS Configuration Examples" section.

For a complete description of the commands in this chapter, refer to the the Cisco IOS Switching Services Command Reference. To locate documentation of other commands that appear in this chapter, use the command reference master index or search online.

To identify the hardware platform or software image information associated with a feature, use the Feature Navigator on Cisco.com to search for information about the feature or refer to the software release notes for a specific release. For more information, see the section "Identifying Supported Platforms" in the chapter "Using Cisco IOS Software."

Configuring MPLS Levels of Control

This section describes three sample cases where MPLS is configured on Cisco 7500 and 7200 series routers. These cases show the levels of control possible in selecting how MPLS is deployed in a network.

Table 28 lists the cases, including the steps to perform MPLS and their corresponding Cisco IOS CLI commands.

Table 28 MPLS—Levels of Control 

Levels of Control Examples
Description

Case 1—Enable MPLS Incrementally in a Network

The steps necessary for incrementally deploying MPLS through a network, assuming that packets to all destination prefixes should be label switched.

Case 2—Route Labeled Packets to Network A Only

The mechanism by which MPLS can be restricted, such that packets are label switched to only a subset of destinations.

Case 3—Limit Label Distribution on an MPLS Network

The mechanisms for further controlling the distribution of labels within a network.


For more information about the Cisco IOS CLI commands, see the chapter "MPLS Commands" in the Cisco IOS Switching Services Command Reference.

Figure 51 shows a router-only MPLS network with Ethernet interfaces. The following sections outline the procedures for configuring MPLS and displaying MPLS information in a network based on the topology shown in Figure 51.


Note Ethernet interfaces are shown in Figure 51, but any of the interfaces that are supported could be used instead. ATM interfaces operating as TC-ATM interfaces are the exception to this statement.


Figure 51 A Router-Only MPLS Network with Ethernet Interfaces

Case 1—Enable MPLS Incrementally in a Network

In the first case, assume that you want to deploy MPLS incrementally throughout a network of routers, but that you do not want to restrict which destination prefixes are label switched. For a description of the commands listed in these cases, see the chapter "MPLS Commands" in the Cisco IOS Switching Services Command Reference.

To enable MPLS incrementally in a network, use the following commands beginning in router configuration mode (see Figure 51):

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

At R1:

Router# configuration terminal
Router(config)# ip cef distributed
Router(config)# tag-switching advertise-tags
Router(config)# interface e0/1
Router(config-if)# tag-switching ip
Router(config-if)# exit

At R3:

Router# configuration terminal
Router(config)# ip cef distributed
Router(config)# tag-switching advertise-tags
Router(config)# interface e0/1
Router(config-if)# tag-switching ip

Enables MPLS between R1 and R3.

In order to configure distributed VIP MPLS, you must configure dCEF switching. Enter the ip cef distributed global configuration command on all routers.

Step 2 

At R3:

Router(config)# interface e0/2
Router(config-if)# tag-switching ip
Router(config-if)# exit

At R4:

Router# configuration terminal
Router(config)# ip cef distributed
Router(config)# tag-switching advertise-tags
Router(config)# interface e0/2
Router(config-if)# tag-switching ip
Router(config-if)# exit

Enables MPLS between R3 and R4.

After you perform these steps, R1 applies labels to packets that are forwarded through Ethernet interface e0/1, with a next hop to R3.

You can enable MPLS throughout the rest of the network by repeating steps 1 and 2 as appropriate on other routers until all routers and interfaces are enabled for MPLS. See the example in the "Enabling MPLS Incrementally in a Network Example" section.

Case 2—Route Labeled Packets to Network A Only

In the second case, assume that you want to enable MPLS for a subset of destination prefixes. This option might be used to test MPLS across a large network. In this case, you would configure the system so that only a small number of destinations is label switched (for example, internal test networks) without the majority of traffic being affected.

To enable MPLS for a subset of destination prefixes, use the following commands at each router in the network in router configuration mode (see Figure 51):

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# access-list 1 permit A

Limits label distribution by using an access list.

(Enter the actual network address and netmask in place of permit A. For example,

access-list 1 permit 192.5.34. 0 0.0.0.255.)

Step 2 

Router(config)# tag-switching advertise-tags for 1

Instructs the router to advertise for network A only to all adjacent label switch routers.

Any labels for other destination networks that the router may have distributed before this step are withdrawn.

Case 3—Limit Label Distribution on an MPLS Network

The third case demonstrates the full control available to you in determining the destination prefixes and paths for which MPLS is enabled.

Configure the routers so that packets addressed to network A are labeled, all other packets are unlabeled, and only links R1-R3, R3-R4, R4-R6, and R6-R7 carry labeled packets addressed to network A. For example, suppose the normally routed path for packets arriving at R1 addressed to network A or network B is R1, R3, R5, R6, R7. A packet addressed to network A would flow labeled on links R1-R3 and R6-R7, and unlabeled on links R3-R5 and R5-R6. A packet addressed to network B would follow the same path, but would be unlabeled on all links.

Assume that at the outset the routers are configured so that packets addressed to network A are labeled and all other packets are unlabeled (as at the completion of Case 2).

Use the tag-switching advertise-tags command and access lists to limit label distribution. Specifically, you need to configure routers R2, R5, and R8 to distribute no labels to other routers. This ensures that no other routers send labeled packets to any of those three. You also need to configure routers R1, R3, R4, R6, and R7 to distribute labels only for network A and to distribute them only to the appropriate adjacent router; that is, R3 distributes its label for network A only to R1, R4 only to R3, and so on.

To limit label distribution on a MPLS network, use the following commands in router configuration mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# no tag-switching advertise-tags

Configures R2 to distribute no labels.

Step 2 

Router(config)# no tag-switching advertise-tags

Configures R5 to distribute no labels.

Step 3 

Router(config)# no tag-switching advertise-tags

Configures R8 to distribute no labels

Step 4 

Router(config)# access-list 2 permit R1
Router(config)# no tag-switching advertise-tags for 1
Router(config)# tag-switching advertise-tags for 1 to 2
Router(config)# exit

Configures R3 by defining an access list and by instructing the router to distribute labels for the networks permitted by access list 1 (created as part of case 2) to the routers permitted by access list 2.

The access list 2 permit R1 command permits R1 and denies all other routers.

(Enter the actual network address and netmask in place of permit R1. For example, access-list 1 permit 192.5.34.0 0.0.0.255.)

Step 5 

Router(config)# access-list 1 permit A
Router(config)# access-list 2 permit R1
Router(config)# tag-switching advertise-tags for 1 to 2
Router(config)# exit

Configures R3.

(Enter the actual network address and netmask in place of permit R1. For example, access-list 1 permit 192.5.34.0 0.0.0.255.)

Step 6 

Router(config)# access-list 1 permit A
Router(config)# access-list 2 permit R3
Router(config)# tag-switching advertise-tags for 1 to 2
Router(config)# exit

Configures R4.

(Enter the actual network address and netmask in place of permit R1. For example, access-list 1 permit 192.5.34.0 0.0.0.255.)

Step 7 

Router(config)# access-list 1 permit A
Router(config)# access-list 2 permit R4
Router(config)# tag-switching advertise-tags for 1 to 2
Router(config)# exit

Configures R6.

(Enter the actual network address and netmask in place of permit R1. For example, access-list 1 permit 192.5.34.0 0.0.0.255.)

Step 8 

Router(config)# access-list 1 permit A
Router(config)# access-list 2 permit R6
Router(config)# tag-switching advertise-tags for 1 to 2
Router(config)# exit

Configures R7.

(Enter the actual network address and netmask in place of permit R1. For example, access-list 1 permit 192.5.34.0 0.0.0.255.)

Configuring a Router for MPLS Forwarding

MPLS forwarding on routers requires that CEF be enabled. To enable CEF on a router, enter the following commands:

Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# ip cef [distributed]

Note For best MPLS forwarding performance, use the distributed option on routers that support this option.


For more information on the CEF commands, refer to the Cisco IOS Switching Services Command Reference.

Configuring MPLS Traffic Engineering

Perform the following tasks before you enable MPLS traffic engineering:

Turn on MPLS tunnels

Turn on CEF

Turn on IS-IS or OSPF

To configure MPLS traffic engineering, perform the tasks described in the following sections:

Configuring a Device to Support Tunnels

Configuring an Interface to Support RSVP-Based Tunnel Signalling and IGP Flooding

Configuring IS-IS for MPLS Traffic Engineering

Configuring OSPF for MPLS Traffic Engineering

Configuring an MPLS Traffic Engineering Tunnel

Configuring a Device to Support Tunnels

To configure a device to support tunnels, use the following commands in global configuration mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# ip cef

Enables standard CEF operation.

For information about CEF configuration and the command syntax, see the Cisco IOS Switching Services Command Reference.

Step 2 

Router(config)# mpls traffic-eng tunnels

Enables the MPLS traffic engineering tunnel feature on a device.

Configuring an Interface to Support RSVP-Based Tunnel Signalling and IGP Flooding

To configure an interface to support RSVP-based tunnel signalling and IGP flooding, use the following commands in interface configuration mode:


Note You must enable the tunnel feature on interfaces that you want to support MPLS traffic engineering.


 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config-if)# mpls traffic-eng tunnels

Enables MPLS traffic engineering tunnels on an interface.

Step 2 

Router(config-if)# ip rsvp bandwidth bandwidth

Enables RSVP for IP on an interface and specifies the amount of bandwidth that will be reserved.

For a description of the ip rsvp interface command syntax, see the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Command Reference.

Configuring IS-IS for MPLS Traffic Engineering

To configure IS-IS for MPLS traffic engineering, perform the steps described below. For a description of the IS-IS commands (excluding the IS-IS traffic engineering commands), see the Cisco IOS IP and IP Routing Command Reference.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# router isis

Enables IS-IS routing and specifies an IS-IS process for IP. This command places the router in router configuration mode.

Step 2 

Router(config-router)# mpls 
traffic-eng level-1

Turns on MPLS traffic engineering for IS-IS level 1.

Step 3 

Router(config-router)# mpls 
traffic-eng router-id loopback0

Specifies that the traffic engineering router identifier for the node is the IP address associated with interface loopback0.

Step 4 

Router(config-router)# metric-style 
wide

Configures a router to generate and accept only new-style TLVs.

Configuring OSPF for MPLS Traffic Engineering

To configure OSPF for MPLS traffic engineering, use the following commands beginning in global configuration mode. For a description of the OSPF commands (excluding the OSPF traffic engineering commands), see the Cisco IOS IP Command Reference, Volume 2 of 3: Routing Protocols.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# router ospf process-id

Configures an OSPF routing process for IP and places the router in configuration mode.

The process-id argument is an internally used identification parameter for an OSPF routing process. It is locally assigned and can be any positive integer. Assign a unique value for each OSPF routing process.

Step 2 

Router(config-router)# mpls 
traffic-eng 
area 0

Turns on MPLS traffic engineering for OSPF area 0.

Step 3 

Router(config-router)# mpls 
traffic-eng 
router-id loopback0

Specifies that the traffic engineering router identifier for the node is the IP address associated with interface loopback0.

Configuring an MPLS Traffic Engineering Tunnel

To configure an MPLS traffic engineering tunnel, use the following commands in interface configuration mode. This tunnel has two path setup options: a preferred explicit path and a backup dynamic path.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# interface tunnel 

Configures an interface type and enters interface configuration mode.

Step 2 

Router(config)# ip unnumbered loopback0

Gives the tunnel interface an IP address.

An MPLS traffic engineering tunnel interface should be unnumbered because it represents a unidirectional link.

Step 3 

Router(config-if)# tunnel destination 
A.B.C.D

Specifies the destination for a tunnel.

Step 4 

Router(config-if)# tunnel mode mpls 
traffic-eng

Sets the tunnel encapsulation mode to MPLS traffic engineering.

Step 5 

Router(config-if)# tunnel mpls 
traffic-eng bandwidth bandwidth

Configures the bandwidth for the MPLS traffic engineering tunnel.

Step 6 

Router(config-if)# tunnel mpls 
traffic-eng
path-option number {dynamic | 
explicit {name path-name | 
path-number}} [lockdown]

Configures the tunnel to use a named IP explicit path or a path dynamically calculated from the traffic engineering topology database. A dynamic path is used if an explicit path is unavailable.

Configuring MPLS Traffic Engineering Paths

To configure an MPLS traffic engineering tunnel that an IGP can use, use the following commands in interface configuration mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config-if)# interface tunnel1 

Configures an interface type and enters interface configuration mode.

Step 2 

Router(config-if)# tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute 
announce

Causes the IGP to use the tunnel in its enhanced SPF calculation.

Configuring MPLS Virtual Private Networks

To configure and verify VPNs, perform the tasks described in the following sections:

Defining VPNs

Configuring BGP Routing Sessions

Configuring PE to PE Routing Sessions

Configuring BGP PE to CE Routing Sessions

Configuring RIP PE to CE Routing Sessions

Configuring Static Route PE to CE Routing Sessions

Configuring MPLS VPNs with Cable Interfaces

Configuring Interautonomous Systems for MPLS VPNs

Verifying VPN Operation

Defining VPNs

To define VPN routing instances, use the following commands beginning in router configuration mode on the PE router:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# ip vrf vrf-name

Enters VRF configuration mode and defines the VPN routing instance by assigning a VRF name.

Step 2 

Router(config-vrf)# rd route-distinguisher

Creates routing and forwarding tables.

Step 3 

Router(config-vrf)# route-target {import | export | both} route-target-ext-community

Creates a list of import or export route target communities for the specified VRF.

Step 4 

Router(config-vrf)# import map route-map

(Optional) Associates the specified route map with the VRF.

Step 5 

Router(config-vrf)# export map route-map


(Optional) Associates the specified export route map with the VRF.

Step 6 

Router(config-if)# ip vrf forwarding vrf-name

Associates a VRF with an interface or subinterface.

Configuring BGP Routing Sessions

To configure BGP routing sessions in a provider network, use the following commands beginning in router configuration mode on the PE router:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# router bgp autonomous-system

Configures the BGP routing process with the autonomous system number passed along to other BGP routers.

Step 2 

Router(config-router)# neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} remote-as number

Specifies a neighbor's IP address or BGP peer group identifying it to the local autonomous system.

Step 3 

Router(config-router)# neighbor ip-address activate

Activates the advertisement of the IPv4 address family.

Configuring PE to PE Routing Sessions

To configure PE to PE routing sessions in a provider network, use the following commands beginning in router configuration mode on the PE router:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config-router)# address-family vpnv4 [unicast | multicast]

Defines IBGP parameters for VPNv4 NLRI exchange.

Step 2 

Router(config-router-af)# neighbor address remote-as as-number

Defines an IBGP session to exchange VPNv4 NLRIs.

Step 3 

Router(config-router-af)# neighbor address activate

Activates the advertisement of the IPv4 address family.

Configuring BGP PE to CE Routing Sessions

To configure BGP PE to CE routing sessions, use the following commands beginning in router configuration mode on the PE router:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config-router)# address-family ipv4 [unicast] vrf vrf-name

Defines EBGP parameters for PE to CE routing sessions.

Note The default is Off for autosummary and synchronization in the VRF address-family submode.

Step 2 

Router(config-router-af)# neighbor address remote-as as-number

Defines an EBGP session between PE and CE routers.

Step 3 

Router(config-router-af)# neighbor address activate

Activates the advertisement of the IPv4 address family.

Configuring RIP PE to CE Routing Sessions

To configure RIP PE to CE routing sessions, use the following commands beginning in router configuration mode on the PE router:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# router rip

Enables RIP.

Step 2 

Router(config-router-af)# address-family ipv4 [unicast] vrf vrf-name

Defines RIP parameters for PE to CE routing sessions.

Note The default is Off for auto-summary and synchronization in the VRF address-family submode.

Step 3 

Router(config-router-af)# network prefix

Enables RIP on the PE to CE link.

Configuring Static Route PE to CE Routing Sessions

To configure static route PE to CE routing sessions, use the following commands in router configuration mode on the PE router:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# ip route vrf vrf-name

Defines static route parameters for every PE to CE session.

Step 2 

Router(config-router)# address-family ipv4 [unicast] vrf vrf-name

Defines static route parameters for every BGP PE to CE routing session.

Note The default is Off for auto-summary and synchronization in the VRF address-family submode.

 

Step 3 

Router(config-router-af)# redistribute static

Redistributes VRF static routes into the VRF BGP table.

Step 4 

Router(config-router-af)# redistribute connected

Redistributes directly connected networks into the VRF BGP table.

Configuring MPLS VPNs with Cable Interfaces

Before configuring IP-based VPNs on Cisco uBR7200 series, perform the following tasks:

Ensure that your network supports reliable broadband data transmission. Your network area must be swept, balanced, and certified based on National Television Standards Committee (NTSC) or appropriate international cable plant recommendations. Ensure that your network area meets all DOCSIS or European Data-over-Cable Service Interface Specifications (EuroDOCSIS) downstream and upstream RF requirements.

Ensure that your Cisco uBR7200 series universal broadband router is installed following instructions in the Cisco uBR7200 Series Universal Broadband Router Hardware Installation Guide and the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco uBR7200 Series Universal Broadband Router.

Ensure that your Cisco uBR7200 series universal broadband router is configured for basic operations following instructions in the Cisco uBR7200 Series Universal Broadband Router Software Configuration Guide. The chassis must contain at least one port adapter to provide backbone connectivity and one Cisco cable modem card to serve as the RF cable TV interface.

To configure MPLS VPNs with cable interfaces, perform the tasks described in the following sections. The first two sections are required tasks; the remaining tasks are optional:

Creating VRFs for Each VPN (Required)

Defining Subinterfaces on a Physical Cable Interface and Assigning VRFs (Required)

Configuring Cable Interface Bundles (Optional)

Configuring Subinterfaces and MPLS VPNs on a Bundle Master (Optional)

Configuring MPLS in the P Routers in the Provider Core (Optional)

Verifying the MPLS VPN Configuration (Optional)

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply to configuring MPLS VPNs with cable interfaces:

Each subinterface on the CMTS requires an address range from the ISP and from the MSO. These two ranges must not overlap and must be extensible to support an increased number of subscribers for scalability. Cisco IOS Release 12.1(2)EC and 12.1(2)T do not support overlapping addresses for the MPLS VPN subinterface.


Note This document does not address allocation and management of MSO and ISP IP addresses. See Configuring Multiprotocol Label Switching for this information.


Cisco IOS Release 12.1(2) T supports the cable source-verify dhcp cable interface command, but Cisco IOS Release 12.1(2)EC does not support it. The cable source-verify dhcp cable interface command enables Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP) servers to verify IP addresses of upstream traffic, and prevent MSO users from using unauthorized, spoofed, or stolen IP addresses.

When using only MPLS VPNs, create subinterfaces on the bundle master, assign them an IP address, and provide VRF configuration for each ISP. When you create subinterfaces and configure only MPLS VPNs, the cable interface bundling feature is independent of the MPLS VPN.

When using cable interface bundling, perform the following tasks:

Define one of the interfaces in the bundle as the bundle master interface.

Specify all generic IP networking information (such as IP address, routing protocols, and switching modes) on the bundle master interface. Do not specify generic IP networking information on bundle slave interfaces. If you attempt to add an interface to a bundle as a nonmaster interface and an IP address is assigned to this interface, the command will fail. You must remove the IP address configuration before you can add the interface to a bundle.

An interface that has a subinterfaces defined over it is not allowed to be a part of the bundle.

Specify generic (not downstream or upstream related) cable interface configurations, such as source-verify or ARP handling, on the master interface. Do not specify generic configuration on nonmaster interfaces.

If you configure an interface as a part of a bundle and it is not the master interface, all generic cable configuration for this interface is removed. The master interface configuration will then apply to all interfaces in the bundle.

Cable interface bundling is only supported on cable interfaces. Cisco IOS software provides cable interfaces with Cisco uBR-MC11, Cisco uBR-MC12, Cisco uBR-MC14, and Cisco uBR-MC16 cable modem cards.

Interface bundles can only be configured using the command-line interface (including the CLI-based HTML configuration).

Creating VRFs for Each VPN

To create VRFs for each VPN, use the following commands beginning in router configuration mode:


Note Because only the CMTS has logical subinterfaces, assignments of VRFs on the other PE devices will be to specific physical interfaces.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# ip vrf mgmt-vpn

Enters VRF configuration mode and maps a VRF table to the VPN (specified by mgmt-vpn argument). The management VPN is the first VPN configured.

Step 2 

Router(config-vrf)# rd mgmt-rd

Creates a routing and forwarding table by assigning a RD to the management VPN.

Step 3 

Router(config-vrf)# route-target {export| import| both} mgmt-rd

Exports or imports all routes for the RD of the management VPN. This determines which routes will be shared within VRFs.

Step 4 

Router(config-vrf)# route-target import isp1-vpn-rd

Imports all routes for the VPNs (isp1-vpn argument) route distinguisher.

Step 5 

Router(config-vrf)# route-target import isp2-vpn-rd

Imports all routes for the VPNs (isp2-vpn argument) RD.

Step 6 

Router(config-vrf)# ip vrf isp1-vpn

Creates a routing and forwarding table by assigning a RD to isp1-vpn argument) .

Step 7 

Router(config-vrf)# rd mgmt-rd

Creates a routing and forwarding table by assigning a RD (mgmt-rd argument) to the management VPN (mgmt-vpn argument) .

Step 8 

Router(config-vrf)# route-target export isp1-vpn-rd

Exports all routes for the VPNs (isp1-vpn argument) RD.

Step 9 

Router(config-vrf)# route-target import isp1-vpn-rd

Imports all routes for the VPNs (isp1-vpn argument) RD.

Step 10 

Router(config-vrf)# route-target import mgmt-vpn-rd

Exports all routes for the VPNs (mgmt-vpn argument) RD.

Step 11 

Router(config-vrf)# ip vrf isp2-vpn

Creates a routing and forwarding table by assigning a RD to isp2-vpn argument) .

Step 12 

Router(config-vrf)# route-target export isp2-vpn-rd

Exports all routes for the VPNs (isp2-vpn argument) RD.

Step 13 

Router(config-vrf)# route-target import isp2-vpn-rd

Imports all routes for the VPNs (isp2-vpn argument) RD.

Step 14 

Router(config-vrf)# route-target import mgmt-vpn-rd

Imports all routes for the VPNs (mgmt-vpn argument) RD.


Defining Subinterfaces on a Physical Cable Interface and Assigning VRFs

To create a logical cable subinterface, use the following commands beginning in global configuration mode. Create one subinterface for each VPN (one per ISP). The first subinterface created must be configured as part of the management VPN (with the lowest subinterface number). Create VRFs using the procedure described in the "Creating VRFs for Each VPN" section and apply them to the subinterface.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# configure terminal

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

Router(config)# interface cable slot/port

Enters cable interface configuration mode.

slot = slot number in chassis (slot numbers begin with a 0).

port = port number on cable modem card slot (port numbers begin with a 0).

Step 3 

Router(config-if)# interface cable slot/port.n

Defines the first (management) subinterface with the lowest subinterface number. Valid range for n is from 1 to 255.

Step 4 

Router(config-subif)# description string

Identifies the subinterface as the management subinterface.

Step 5 

Router(config-subif)# ip vrf forwarding mgmt-vpn

Assigns the subinterface to the management VPN (the MPLS VPN used by the MSO to supply service to customers).

Step 6 

Router(config-subif)# ip address ipaddress mask

Assigns the subinterface an IP address and a subnet mask.

Step 7 

Router(config-subif)# cable helper-address ip-address cable-modem

Forwards DHCP requests from cable modems to the IP address listed.

Step 8 

Router(config-subif)# cable helper-address ip-address host

Forwards DHCP requests from hosts to the IP address listed.

Step 9 

Router(config-if)# interface cable slot/port.n

Defines an additional subinterface for the ISP (such as isp1). Valid range for n is 1 to 255.

Step 10 

Router(config-subif)# description string

Identifies the subinterface (such as subinterface for the isp1-vpn argument).

Step 11 

Router(config-subif)# ip vrf forwarding isp1-vpn

Assigns the subinterface to isp1-vpn VPN.

Step 12 

Router(config-subif)# ip address ipaddress mask

Assigns the subinterface an IP address and a subnet mask.

Step 13 

Router(config-subif)# cable helper-address ip-address cable-modem

Forwards DHCP requests from cable modems to the IP address listed.

Step 14 

Router(config-subif)# cable helper-address ip-address host

Forwards DHCP requests from hosts to the IP address listed.

Step 15 

Router(config-if)# interface cable slot/port.n

Defines an additional subinterface for the ISP (such as isp2). Valid range for n is 1 to 255.

Step 16 

Router(config-subif)# description string

Identifies the subinterface (such as subinterface for the isp2-vpn argument) .

Step 17 

Router(config-subif)# ip vrf forwarding isp2-vpn

Assigns the subinterface to isp2-vpn VPN.

Step 18 

Router(config-subif)# ip address ipaddress mask

Assigns the subinterface an IP address and a subnet mask.

Step 19 

Router(config-subif)# cable helper-address ip-address cable-modem

Forwards DHCP requests from cable modems to the IP address listed.

Step 20 

Router(config-subif)# cable helper-address ip-address host

Forwards DHCP requests from hosts to the IP address listed.

Step 21 

Router(config)# copy running-config startup-config

Returns to configuration mode, and stores the configuration or changes to your startup configuration in NVRAM.


Note Use this command to save the configuration settings that you created in the Cisco uBR7200 series universal broadband router using the configuration mode, the setup facility, and AutoInstall. If you fail to do this, your configuration will be lost the next time you reload the router.


Step 22 

Router(config)# exit

Returns to configuration mode.

Configuring Cable Interface Bundles

To assign a cable interface to a bundle, use the following commands beginning in global configuration mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# interface cable slot/port

Enters the cable interface configuration mode.

slot = slot number in chassis (slot numbers begin with 0).

port = port number on cable modem card slot (port numbers begin with 0).

IP addresses are not assigned to this interface. They are assigned to the logical subinterfaces created within this interface.

Step 2 

Router(config-if)# cable bundle bundle-number master

Defines the interface as the bundle's master interface. Valid range for bundle-number argument is from 1 to 255.

Step 3 

Router(config)# interface cable slot/port

Enters the cable interface configuration mode for another cable interface.

slot = slot number in chassis (slot numbers begin with 0).

port = port number on cable modem card slot (port numbers begin with 0).

IP addresses are not assigned to this interface. They are assigned to the logical subinterfaces created within this interface.

Step 4 

Router(config-if)# cable bundle bundle-number

Adds the interface to the bundle specified by bundle-number. Valid range for the bundle-number argument is from 1 to 255.

Configuring Subinterfaces and MPLS VPNs on a Bundle Master

To configure subinterfaces on a bundle master and assign each subinterface a Layer 3 configuration, configure cable interface bundles using the procedure described in the "Configuring Cable Interface Bundles" section.

Define subinterfaces on the bundle master interface and assign a Layer 3 configuration to each subinterface using the procedure described in the "Defining Subinterfaces on a Physical Cable Interface and Assigning VRFs" section. Create one subinterface for each customer VPN (one per ISP).

Configuring MPLS in the P Routers in the Provider Core

To configure MPLS in the P routers in the provider core, use the following commands beginning in router configuration mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# ip cef

Enables CEF operation.

Step 2 

Router(config)# interface FastEthernet slot/port

Enters FastEthernet interface configuration mode.

Step 3 

Router(config-if)# ip address ip-address mask

Defines the primary IP address range for the interface.

Step 4 

Router(config-if)# mpls ip

Enables the interface to be forwarded to an MPLS packet.

Step 5 

Router(config-if)# mpls label-protocol ldp

Enables Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) on the interface.

Step 6 

Router(config)# copy running-config startup-config

Stores the configuration or changes to your startup configuration in NVRAM.


Note Use this command to save the configuration settings that you created in the Cisco uBR7200 series universal broadband router using the configuration mode, the setup facility, and AutoInstall. If you fail to do this, your configuration will be lost the next time you reload the router.


Step 7 

Router(config)# exit

Returns to the configuration mode.

Verifying the MPLS VPN Configuration

To verify MPLS VPN operations on PE routers, use the following EXEC commands:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# show ip vrf

Displays the set of VRFs and interfaces.

Step 2 

Router# show ip route vrf

Displays the IP routing table for a VRF.

Step 3 

Router# show ip protocols vrf

Displays the routing protocol information for a VRF.

Step 4 

Router(config)# show cable bundle n forwarding-table

Displays the forwarding table for the specified interface.

Configuring Interautonomous Systems for MPLS VPNs

Before you configure EBGP routing between autonomous systems or subautonomous systems in an MPLS VPN, ensure that you have properly configured all MPLS VPN routing instances and sessions. The configuration tasks outlined in this section build from those configuration tasks.

Perform the following tasks before you enable configure EBGP routing between autonomous systems or subautonomous systems in an MPLS VPN:

Define VPN routing instances

Configure BGP routing sessions in the service provider (P) network

Configure PE to PE routing sessions in the service provider (P) network

Configure BGP PE to CE routing sessions

To configure the exchange of VPN-IPv4 addresses between two or more autonomous systems or subautonomous systems in a confederation, perform the tasks described in the following sections. The tasks in the following sections are described as required or optional:

Configuring EBGP Routing for the Exchange of VPN Routes Between Autonomous Systems (Required)

Configuring EBGP Routing for the Exchange of VPN Routes Between Subautonomous Systems in a Confederation (Required)

Displaying VPN-IPv4 LFIB Entries (Optional)

Configuring EBGP Routing for the Exchange of VPN Routes Between Autonomous Systems

To configure an EBGP border edge router in an autonomous system to exchange VPN routes with another autonomous system, use the following commands beginning in global configuration mode:


Note Enter the redistribute connected subnets command in the IGP configuration portion of the router to propagates host routes for VPN-IPv4 EBGP neighbors to other routers and provider edge routers. Alternatively, you can specify the next-hop-self address when you configure IBGP neighbors.


 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# router bgp autonomous-system

Creates an EBGP routing process and assigns it an AS number. The autonomous system number is passed along to identify the router to EBGP routers in another autonomous system.

Step 2 

Router(config)# no bgp default route-target filter

Disables BGP route-target filtering. All received BGP VPN-IPv4 routes are accepted by the router.

Step 3 

Router(config-router)# address-family vpnv4[unicast]

Configures a routing session to carry VPN-IPv4 addresses across the VPN backbone. Each address has been made globally unique by the addition of an 8-byte RD. Unicast is optional; use it if you need to specify a unicast prefix.

Step 4 

Router(config-router-af)# neighbor peer-group-name remote-as autonomous-system

Enters the address-family submode and specifies a neighboring EBGP peer group. This EBGP peer group is identified to the specified autonomous system.

Step 5 

Router(config-router-af)# neighbor peer-group-name activate

Activates the advertisement of the VPN-IPv4 address family to a neighboring EBGP router.

Step 6 

Router(config-router-af)# exit-address-family

Exits from the address-family submode of the global configuration mode.

Configuring EBGP Routing for the Exchange of VPN Routes Between Subautonomous Systems in a Confederation

In this confederation, subautonomous system IGP domains must know the addresses of CEBGP-1 and CEBGP-2. If you do not specify a next-hop-self address as part of the router configuration, ensure that the addresses of all PE routers in the subautonomous system are distributed throughout the network, not just the addresses of CEBGP-1 and CEBGP-2.


Note To ensure that the host routes for VPN-IPv4 EBGP neighbors are propagated (by means of the IGP) to the other routers and provider edge routers, specify the redistribute connected router configuration command in the IGP configuration portion of the CEBGP router. If you are using OSPF, make sure that the OSPF process is not enabled on the CEBGP interface where the "redistribute connected" subnet exists.


To configure EBGP border edge router in a confederation to exchange VPN routes with another subautonomous system, use the following commands beginning in global configuration mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# router bgp subautonomous-system

Creates an EBGP routing process and assigns it an autonomous system number. The subautonomous system number is passed along to identify the router to EBGP routers in other subautonomous systems.

Step 2 

Router(config)# bgp confederation identifier autonomous-system

Defines an EBGP confederation by specifying a confederation identifier associated with each subautonomous system. The subautonomous systems appear as a single autonomous system.

Step 3 

Router(config)# bgp confederation peers subautonomous-systems

Specifies the subautonomous systems that belong to the confederation (identifying neighbors from other subautonomous systems within the confederation as special EBGP peers).

Step 4 

Router(config)# no bgp default route-target filter

Disables BGP route-target community filtering. All received BGP VPN-IPv4 routes are accepted by the router.

Step 5 

Router(config-router)# address-family vpnv4[unicast]

Configures a routing session to carry VPN-IPv4 addresses across the VPN backbone. Each address has been made globally unique by the addition of an 8-byte RD. Unicast is optional; use it if you need to specify a unicast prefix.

Step 6 

Router(config-router-af)# neighbor peer-group-name remote-as autonomous-system

Enters the address-family submode and specifies a neighboring EBGP peer group. This EBGP peer group is identified to the specified subautonomous system.

Step 7 

Router(config-router-af)# neighbor peer-group-name next-hop-self

Advertises the router as the next hop for the specified neighbor. If you specify a next-hop-self address as part of the router configuration, you need not use the redistribute connected router configuration command

Step 8 

Router(config-router-af)# neighbor peer-group-name activate

Activates the advertisement of the VPN-IPv4 address family to a neighboring PE router in the specified subautonomous system.

Step 9 

Router(config-router-af)# exit-address-family

Exits from the address-family submode of the global configuration mode.

Displaying VPN-IPv4 LFIB Entries

To display the VPN-IPv4 Label Forwarding Information Base (LFIB) entries at the border edge routers in the autonomous systems, use the following EXEC commands:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# show ip bgp vpnv4 all [tags]

Displays information about all VPN-IPv4 labels.

Step 2 

Router# show tag-switching forwarding-table 

Displays the contents of the LFIB (such as VPN-IPv4 prefix or length and BGP next hop destination for the route).

The following is an example of how the VPN-IPv4 LFIB entries appear when you use the show tag-switching forwarding-table privileged EXEC command:

Router# show tag-switching forwarding-table

Local Outgoing      Prefix            Bytes tag Outgoing       Next Hop       
tag   tag or VC     or Tunnel Id      switched  interface                     
33    33            10.120.4.0/24     0         Hs0/0         point2point    
35    27            100:12:10.200.0.1/32 \         
                                      0         Hs0/0         point2point    

Note In this example, the Prefix field appears as a VPN-IPv4 RD, plus the prefix. If the value is longer than the Prefix column (as illustrated in the last line of the example), the output automatically wraps onto the next line in the forwarding table to preserve column alignment.


Verifying VPN Operation

To verify VPN operation by displaying routing information on the PE routers, use the following show commands, as needed:

Command
Purpose

Router# show ip vrf

Displays the set of defined VRFs and interfaces.

Router# show ip vrf [{brief | detail | interfaces}] vrf-name

Displays information about defined VRFs and associated interfaces.

Router# show ip route vrf vrf-name

Displays the IP routing table for a VRF.

Router# show ip protocols vrf vrf-name

Displays the routing protocol information for a VRF.

Router# show ip cef vrf vrf-name

Displays the CEF forwarding table associated with a VRF.

Router# show ip interface interface-number

Displays the VRF table associated with an interface.

Router# show ip bgp vpnv4 all [tags]

Displays information about all BGP VPN-IPv4 prefixes.

Router# show tag-switching forwarding vrf vrf-name [prefix mask/length][detail]

Displays label forwarding entries that correspond to VRF routes advertised by this router.


Configuring MPLS QoS Backbone Support

Several different methods exist for supporting QoS across an MPLS backbone, the choice depending on whether the core has label switch routers (LSRs) or ATM-LSRs. In each case, however, the QoS building blocks are the same: CAR, WRED, and WFQ.

Three configurations are described in this section:

LSRs used at the core of the network backbone

ATM-LSRs used at the core of the network backbone

ATM switches without the MPLS feature enabled

LSRs

LSRs at the core of the MPLS backbone are usually either Cisco 7200 and Cisco 7500 series routers running MPLS software. Packets are processed as follows:

1. IP packets enter into the edge of the MPLS network.

2. The edge LSRs invoke CAR to classify the IP packets and possibly set IP precedence. Alternatively, IP packets can be received with their IP precedence already set.

3. For each packet, the router performs a lookup on the IP address to determine the next hop LSR.

4. The appropriate label is placed on the packet with the IP Precedence bits copied into every label entry in the MPLS header.

5. The labeled packet is then forwarded to the appropriate output interface for processing.

6. The packets are differentiated by class. This is done according to drop probability (WRED) or according to bandwidth and delay (WFQ). In either case, LSRs enforce the defined differentiation by continuing to employ WRED or WFQ on each hop.

ATM-LSRs

ATM-LSRs at the core implement the multiple label virtual circuit model (LVC). In the multiple LVC model, one label is assigned for each service class for each destination. The operation of the edge LSR is the same as that described previously for the LSR case, except that the output is an ATM interface. WRED is used to define service classes and determine discard policy during congestion.

In the multiple LVC model, however, class-based WFQ (CBWFQ) is used to define the amount of bandwidth available to each service class. Packets are scheduled by class during congestion. The ATM-LSRs participate in the differentiation of classes with WFQ and intelligently drop packets when congestion occurs. The mechanism for this discard activity is weighted early packet discard (WEPD).

ATM Switches

When the core network uses ATM switches and the edge of the network uses MPLS-enabled edge LSRs, the edge LSRs are interconnected through a mesh of ATM Forum PVCs (CBR, VBR, or UBR) over the ATM core switches. The edge LSRs invoke WFQ on a per-VC basis to provide differentiation based on the delay of each MPLS QoS multiplexed onto the ATM Forum PVC. Optionally, WRED can also be used on a per-VC basis to manage drop priority between classes when congestion occurs on the edge LSR.

Table 29 lists the MPLS QoS features supported on packet interfaces.

Table 29 MPLS QoS Features Supported on Packet Interfaces

MPLS QoS Packet Feature
Cisco 7500 Series
Cisco 7200 Series
Cisco 4000 Series
Cisco 3600 Series
Cisco 2600 Series

Per-interface WRED

X

X

X

X

Untested

Per-interface, per-flow WFQ

X

X

X

X

Untested

Per-interface, per-class WFQ

X

X

X

X

Untested


Table 30 lists the MPLS QoS features supported on ATM interfaces.

Table 30 MPLS QoS Features Supported on ATM Interfaces

MPLS QoS ATM Forum PVCs Feature
Cisco 7500 Series
Cisco 7200 Series
Cisco 4000
Series
Cisco 3600 Series
Cisco 2600 Series

Per-VC WRED

X1

X1

Per-VC WRED and
per VC, per-class WFQ

X1

MPLS QoS Multi-VC or LBR Feature
         

Per-interface WRED

X2

X2

Per-interface, per-class WFQ

X2

X2

1 This feature is only available on the PA-A3.

2 This feature is only available on the PA-A1.


Table 31 lists the MPLS QoS features supported on ATM switches.

Table 31 MPLS QoS Features Supported on ATM Switches

MPLS QoS ATM Forum PVCs Feature
BPX 8650 Series
MGX 8800 Series
LightStream 1010 ATM Switch 1
Catalyst 8540 MSR 1

MPLS QoS ATM Forum PVCs

X

X

X

X

MPLS QoS Multi-VC or LBR—per-class WFQ

X

1 This switch can be used for the core only.


Configuring MPLS QoS

Perform the following tasks before you enable MPLS traffic engineering:

Turn on MPLS tunnels

Turn on CEF

To configure MPLS QoS, perform the tasks described in the following sections. The first five sections are described as required; the remaining tasks are optional:

Configuring QoS (Required)

Setting the MPLS Experimental Field Value (Required)

Using the Modular QoS CLI to Configure the Ingress Label Switching Router (Required)

Using CAR to Configure the Ingress Label Switching Router (Required)

Configuring the Output IP QoS of the Packet (Required)

Configuring PVC Mode in a Non-MPLS-Enabled Core (Optional)

Configuring Multi-VC Mode in a MPLS-Enabled Core (Optional)

Configuring Multi-VCs Using the Cos-Map Function (Optional)

Configuring DWFQ and Changing Queue Weights on an Outgoing Interface (Optional)

Verifying QoS Operation (Optional)

Configuring QoS

To configure QoS, you can configure one or more of the following features (in addition, of course, to other items not described in this document):

CAR

WRED

WFQ

Setting the MPLS Experimental Field Value

Setting the MPLS experimental field value satisfies the requirement of service providers that do not want the value of the IP Precedence field modified within IP packets transported through their networks.

By choosing different values for the MPLS experimental field, you can mark packets based on their characteristics, such as rate or type, so that packets have the priority that they require during periods of congestion.

Figure 52 shows a MPLS network of a service provider that connects two sites of a network belonging to a customer.

Figure 52 MPLS Network Connecting Two Sites of a Customer's IP Network

To use these features in a network, set the MPLS experimental field value at PE1 (the ingress label switching router) by using the modular QoS CLI or the rate-limit interface command that CAR provides to set the QoS value in the MPLS packet. For detailed instructions, see the "Setting the MPLS Experimental Field Value" section.

Importance of Prioritizing a Packet Appropriately

During Step 1 of the configuration process (described in the "Using the Modular QoS CLI to Configure the Ingress Label Switching Router" and "Using CAR to Configure the Ingress Label Switching Router" sections) you classify IP packets according to their source address, destination address, port, protocol identification, or quality of service field. For example, packets can be identified based on one or more of the specified fields, as Voice over IP (VoIP) or a File Transfer Protocol (FTP). Packet classification/marking is important because a priority of a packet is determined by how it is classified or marked.

A priority of a packet affects how the packet is treated during periods of congestion. For example, service providers have service level agreements (SLAs) with customers. The agreement specifies how much traffic the service provider has agreed to deliver. To comply with the agreement, the customer must not send more than the agreed-upon rate. Packets are considered to be in-rate or out-of-rate. If there is congestion in the network, out-of-rate packets might be dropped more aggressively.

Configuring the Ingress MPLS Router

To classify IP packets, you configure the ingress label switching router. Packets are received at the ingress router as IP packets and sent as MPLS packets. To perform the configuration, use either of the following features:

Modular QoS CLI, the newer and more flexible method—Use this method if you do not want to consider the rate of the packets that PE1 receives.

CAR—Use if you want to consider the rate of the incoming packets:

If a packet conforms to the SLA between the service provider and the customer (that is, the packet is in-rate), the service provider gives the packet preferential treatment when the network of a service provider is congested.

If a packet does not conform (that is, it is out-of-rate) and the network is congested, the service provider might discard the packet or give it less preferential treatment.

Using the Modular QoS CLI to Configure the Ingress Label Switching Router

To use the modular QoS CLI to configure PE1 (the ingress label switching router), perform the following steps:


Step 1 Configure a class map to classify IP packets according to their IP precedence.

Step 2 Configure a policy map to mark MPLS packets. (Write their classification into the MPLS experimental field.)

Step 3 Configure the input interface to attach the service policy.


Configuring a Class Map to Classify IP Packets

To configure a class map, use the following commands beginning in global configuration mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# class-map class-map name

Specifies the class map to which packets will be matched.

Step 2 

Router(config-c-map)# match criteria

Specifies the packet characteristics that will be matched to the class.

Step 3 

Router(config-c-map)# end

Exits class-map configuration mode.

In the following example, all packets that contain IP Precedence 4 are matched by the class-map name IP_prec4:

Router(config)# class-map IP_prec4 
Router(config-c-map)# match ip precedence 4 
Router(config-c-map)# end

Configuring a Policy Map to Set the MPLS Experimental Field

To configure a policy map, use the following commands beginning in global configuration mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# policy-map policy-map name

Creates a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy.

Step 2 

Router(config-p-map)# class class-map name

Specifies the name of the class map previously designated in the class-map command.

Step 3 

Router(config-p-map-c)# set mpls experimental value

Designates the value to which the MPLS bits are set if the packets match the specified policy map.

Step 4 

Router(config-p-map-c)# end 

Exits policy-map configuration mode.

In the following example, the value in the MPLS experimental field of each packet that is matched by the class-map IP_prec4 is set to 5:

Router(config)# policy-map set_experimental_5 
Router(config-p-map)# class IP_prec4 
Router(config-p-map-c)# set mpls experimental 5 
Router(config-p-map-c)# end

Configuring the Input Interface to Attach the Service Policy

To configure the input interface, use the following commands beginning in global configuration mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# interface name

Designates the input interface.

Step 2 

Router(config-int)# service-policy input policy-map 
name

Attaches the specified policy map to the input interface.

Step 3 

Router(config-int)# end

Exits interface configuration mode.

In the following example, the service policy set_experimental_5 is attached to an Ethernet input interface:

Router(config)# interface ethernet 1/0/0 
Router(config-int)# service-policy input set_experimental_5 
Router(config-int)# end

Using CAR to Configure the Ingress Label Switching Router

To use CAR to configure the ingress label switching router, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Configure an IP rate-limit access list for classifying IP packets according to their IP precedence. Perform this step at PE1 (the ingress LSR).

Step 2 Configure a rate limit on an input interface to set MPLS packets. (Write the classification of the packet into the MPLS experimental field.)


These steps are explained in the following sections.

Configuring a Rate Limit Access List for Classifying IP Packets

To configure a rate limit access list, use the following commands beginning in global configuration mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# access-list rate-limit acl-index 
precedence 

Specifies the criteria to be matched.

Step 2 

Router(config)# end

Exits configuration mode.

In the following example, all packets that contain IP Precedence 4 are matched by the rate-limit access list 24:

Router(config)# access-list rate-limit 24 4 
Router(config)# end

Configuring a Rate-Limit on an Input Interface to Set MPLS Packets

To configure a rate-limit on an input interface, use the following commands beginning in global configuration mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# interface name

Designates the input interface.

Step 2 

Router(config-int)# rate-limit input [access-group 
[rate-limit]acl-index] bps burst-normal burst-max 
conform-action set-mpls-exp-transmit exp exceed-action 
set-mpls-exp-transmit exp

Specifies the action to take on packets during label imposition.

In the following example, the experimental field for the output MPLS packet is set to 4 if the input IP packets match the access list and conform to the rate. The MPLS experimental field is set to 0 if packets match access list 24 and exceed the input rate.

Router(config)# interface ethernet 1/0/0 
Router(config-int)# rate-limit input access-group rate-limit 24 8000 8000 8000 
conform-action set-mpls-exp-transmit 4 exceed-action set-mpls-exp-transmit 0

Configuring the Output IP QoS of the Packet

The output QoS of the packet is determined by the IP header information. For configuration details, refer to the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

Configuring PVC Mode in a Non-MPLS-Enabled Core

To configure a PVC in a non-MPLS-enabled core, use the following commands beginning in router configuration mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# interface type number point-to-point

Configures a point-to-point ATM subinterface.

Step 2 

Router(config-subif)# ip unnumbered Loopback0

Assigns an IP address to the subinterface.

Step 3 

Router(config-subif)# pvc 4/40

Creates a PVC on the subinterface.

Step 4 

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# random-detect attach groupname

Activates WRED or dWRED on the interface.

Step 5 

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# encapsulation aal5snap

Sets encapsulation type for the PVC.

Step 6 

Router(config-subif)# exit

Exits from PVC mode and enters subinterface mode.

Step 7 

Router(config-subif)# tag-switching ip

Enables MPLS IP on the point-to-point interface.

Configuring Multi-VC Mode in a MPLS-Enabled Core

To configure multi-VC mode in an MPLS-enabled core, use the following commands beginning in router configuration mode:


Note The default for the multi-VC mode creates four VCs for each MPLS destination.


 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# interface type number tag-switching

Configures an ATM MPLS subinterface.

Step 2 

Router(config-subif)# ip unnumbered Loopback0

Assigns an IP address to the subinterface.

Step 3 

Router(config-subif)# tag-switching atm multi-vc

Enables ATM multi-VC mode on the subinterface.

Step 4 

Router(config-subif)# tag-switching ip

Enables MPLS on the ATM subinterface.

Configuring Multi-VCs Using the Cos-Map Function

If you do not choose to use the default for configuring label VCs, you can configure fewer label VCs by using the QoS map function. To use the QoS map function, use the following commands beginning in router configuration mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# tag-switching cos-map cos-map number

Creates a QoS map.

Step 2 

Router(config-tag-cos-map)# class 1 premium

Enters the cos-map submode and maps premium and standard classes to label VCs.

This QoS map assigns class 1 traffic to share the same label VC as class 2 traffic. The numbers you assign to the QoS map range from 0 to 3.

The defaults are:

class 0 is available

class 1 is standard

class 2 is premium

class 3 is control

Step 3 

Router(config-tag-cos-map)# exit

Exits the MPLS QoS map submode.

Step 4 

Router(config)# access-list access-list-number permit destination

Creates an access list.

The access list acts on traffic going to the specified destination address.

Step 5 

Router(config)# tag-switching prefix-map prefix-map access-list access-list cos-map cos-map

Configures the router to use a specified QoS map when an MPLS destination prefix matches the specified access list.

Configuring DWFQ and Changing Queue Weights on an Outgoing Interface

To configure distributed WFQ (dWFQ) and change queue weights on an interface, use the following commands in interface configuration mode after specifying the interface:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# interface type number

Specifies the interface type and number.

Step 2 

Router(config-if)# fair-queue tos

Configures an interface to use fair queueing.

Step 3 

Router(config)# fair-queue tos class weight

Changes the class weight on the specified interface.

Verifying QoS Operation

To verify the operation of MPLS QoS, use the following EXEC commands:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# show tag-switching interfaces interfaces

Displays detailed information about label switching interfaces.

Step 2 

Router# show tag-switching cos-map

Displays the QoS map used to assign VCs.

Step 3 

Router# show tag-switching prefix-map

Displays the prefix map used to assign a QoS map to network prefixes.

Configuring the MPLS Label Switch Controller

To enable MPLS LSC functionality, perform the tasks described in the following sections. The first two sections are required tasks; the remaining task is optional:

Configuring MPLS on the Cisco 7200 Series LSCs for BPX and IGX Switches (Required)

Configuring the Cisco 6400 UAC LSC (Required)

Verifying MPLS LSC Configuration (Optional)

Refer to the Cisco BPX 8600 or IGX 8400 series documentation for BPX or IGX service node configuration examples.

Configuring MPLS on the Cisco 7200 Series LSCs for BPX and IGX Switches

To configure MPLS on the Cisco 7200 Series LSCs for BPX and IGX switches, use the following commands on each LSC in the configuration beginning in router configuration mode.


Note If you are configuring for LSC redundancy, ensure that the controller ID matches the slave and is unique to the LSC system. Also, make sure that the VPI/VC value for the control VC matches its peer.


 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# interface loopback0
Router(config-if)# ip address 192.103.210.5 
255.255.255.255

Enables a loopback interface. A loopback interface provides stable router and LDP identifiers.

Step 2 

Router(config)# tag-switching atm disable-headend-vc

Forces the LSC not to assign headend VCs for each destination prefix. With downstream on demand, MPLS ATM networks LVCs are a limited resource that are easily depleted with the addition of each new node.

Step 3 

Router(config)# interface atm1/0
Router(config-if)# tag-control-protocol vsi id 1

Enables the VSI protocol on the control interface ATM1/0 with controller ID 1. (Use a unique ID for each LSC.)

For the IGX, use the tag-control-protocol vsi slaves 32 id 1 command.

Step 4 

Router(config-if)# interface XTagATM61
Router(config-if)# extended-port atm1/0 bpx 6.1

Configures MPLS on the extended label ATM interface by creating an extended label ATM (XTagATM) virtual interface and binding it to BPX port 6.1.

For the IGX, use the extended-port atm1/0 descriptor 0.6.1.0 command.

Step 5 

Router(config-if)# ip unnumbered loopback0
Router(config-if)# tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
Router(config-if)# tag-switching ip 
Router(config-if)# exit

Configures MPLS on the extended label ATM interface.

Limit the range so that the total number of VPIs does not exceed 4. For example:
tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
tag-switching atm vpi 10-13

Step 6 

Router(config-if)# interface XTagATM1222
Router(config-if)# extended-port atm1/0 bpx 12.2.2

Configures MPLS on another extended label ATM interface by creating an extended label ATM (XTagATM) virtual interface and binding it to BPX virtual trunk interface 12.2.2.

For the IGX, use the extended-port atm1/0 descriptor 0.12.2.2 command.

Step 7 

Router(config-if)# ip unnumbered loopback0
Router(config-if)# tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 2
Router(config-if)# tag-switching ip 
Router(config-if)# exit

Configures MPLS on the extended label ATM interface using a VP-tunnel interface.

This will limit the VPI to only vpi = 2. The command will also map tag atm control vc to 2,32.

Step 8 

Router(config)# ip cef 

Enables CEF switching.

Configuring the Cisco 6400 UAC LSC

To configure a Cisco 6400 UAC LSC, perform the tasks in the following sections. The first section contains a required task; the remaining task is optional:

Configuring Cisco 6400 UAC NRP as an MPLS LSC (Required)

Configuring the Cisco 6400 UAC NSP for MPLS Connectivity to BPX (Optional)

Configuring Cisco 6400 UAC NRP as an MPLS LSC

To configure a Cisco 6400 UAC NRP as an MPLS LSC, use the following commands beginning in global configuration mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# interface loopback0
Router(config-if)# ip address 192.103.210.5 
255.255.255.255

Enables a loopback interface. A loopback interface provides stable router and LDP identifiers.

Step 2 

Router(config)# interface atm0/0/0
Router(config-if)# tag-control-protocol vsi

Enables the VSI protocol on the control interface ATM0/0/0.

Step 3 

Router(config-if)# interface XTagATM61
Router(config-if)# extended-port atm1/0 bpx 6.1

Configures MPLS on the extended label ATM interface by creating an extended label ATM (XTagATM) virtual interface and binding it to BPX port 6.1.

Step 4 

Router(config-if)# ip unnumbered loopback0
Router(config-if)# tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
Router(config-if)# tag-switching ip 
Router(config-if)# exit

Configures MPLS on the extended label ATM interface.

Limit the range so that the total number of VPIs does not exceed 4. For example:
tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
tag-switching atm vpi 10-13

Step 5 

Router(config-if)# interface XTagATM122
Router(config-if)# extended-port atm1/0 bpx 12.2

Configures MPLS on the other extended label ATM interface by creating an extended label ATM (XTagATM) virtual interface and binding it to BPX port 12.2.

Step 6 

Router(config-if)# ip unnumbered loopback0
Router(config-if)# tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
Router(config-if)# tag-switching ip 
Router(config-if)# exit

Configures MPLS on the extended label ATM interface.

Limits the range so that the total number of VPIs does not exceed 4. For example:
tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
tag-switching atm vpi 10-13

Step 7 

Router(config)# ip cef 

Enables CEF switching.

Step 8 

Router(config)# tag-switching atm disable-headend-vc

Disables headend VC label advertisement.

Configuring the Cisco 6400 UAC NSP for MPLS Connectivity to BPX

To configure a Cisco 6400 UAC NSP for MPLS connectivity to BPX, use the following commands beginning in global configuration mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Switch# show hardware
3/0   NRP   00-0000-00 .......

Displays the hardware connected to the Cisco 6400 UAC, including the position (3/0) of the NRP in the Cisco 6400 chassis.

Step 2 

Switch(config)# interface atm3/0/0

Specifies the ATM interface for which you want to configure PVCs and PVPs.

Step 3 

Switch(config-if)# 
 atm pvc 0 40  interface  ATM1/0/0 0 40 
 atm pvc 0 41  interface  ATM1/0/0 0 41 
 atm pvc 0 42  interface  ATM1/0/0 0 42 
 atm pvc 0 43  interface  ATM1/0/0 0 43 
 atm pvc 0 44  interface  ATM1/0/0 0 44 
 atm pvc 0 45  interface  ATM1/0/0 0 45 
 atm pvc 0 46  interface  ATM1/0/0 0 46 
 atm pvc 0 47  interface  ATM1/0/0 0 47 
 atm pvc 0 48  interface  ATM1/0/0 0 48 
 atm pvc 0 49  interface  ATM1/0/0 0 49 
 atm pvc 0 50  interface  ATM1/0/0 0 50 
 atm pvc 0 51  interface  ATM1/0/0 0 51 
 atm pvc 0 52  interface  ATM1/0/0 0 52 
 atm pvc 0 53  interface  ATM1/0/0 0 53 

Configures the PVC for the VSI control channel, depending on which of the 14 slots in the Cisco BPX is occupied by a Cisco BXM. If you do not know the BPX slots containing a BXM, configure all 14 PVCs to ensure that the NSP functions properly.


Note Do not enable MPLS on this interface.


However, if you know that Cisco BPX slots 10 and 12, for example, contain a BXM, you only need to configure PVCs corresponding to those slots, as follows:

atm pvc 0 49 interface ATM1/0/0 0 49
atm pvc 0 51 interface ATM1/0/0 0 51

Instead of configuring multiple PVCs, you can configure PVP 0 by deleting all well-known VCs. For example, you can use the atm manual-well-known-vc delete command on both interfaces and then configure PVP 0, as follows:

atm pvp 0 interface ATM1/0/0 0

Step 4 

Switch(config-if)# 
 atm pvp 2  interface  ATM1/0/0 2 
 atm pvp 3  interface  ATM1/0/0 3 
 atm pvp 4  interface  ATM1/0/0 4 
 atm pvp 5  interface  ATM1/0/0 5 

Configures the PVPs for the LVCs. For XTagATM interfaces, use the VPI range 2 through 5 (by issuing a tag-switching atm vpi 2-5 command). If you want to use some other VPI range, configure the PVPs accordingly.

Verifying MPLS LSC Configuration

To verify your MPLS LSC configuration, use the following commands in EXEC mode:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# show controller vsi session

Displays the VSI session state.

Step 2 

Router# show tag-switching interfaces

Displays the MPLS-enabled interface states.

Step 3 

Router# show controllers vsi control-interface

Displays information about an ATM interface that controls an external ATM switch or VSI control interface.

Step 4 

Router# show interface XTagATM

Displays information about an extended MPLS ATM interface.

Step 5 

Router# show tag-switching tdp discovery

Displays information about the discovery of MPLS neighbors.

Step 6 

Router# show tag-switching tdp neighbor

Displays information about the MPLS neighbor relationship.

Step 7 

Router# show tag-switching atm capabilities

Displays information about negotiated of TDP or LDP control VPs.

Step 8 

Router# show tag-switching atm-tdp bindings

Displays the current headend, tailend, and transit dynamic tag bindings for the destinations.

Step 9 

Router# show tag-switching atm-tdp bindwait

Displays the tag VCs that are in bindwait state along with their destinations.

Step 10 

Router# show tag-switching atm summary

Displays summary information about the number of destination networks discovered via routing protocol and the LVCs created on each extended label ATM interface.

Configuring MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting

To configure MPLS egress NetFlow, perform the tasks described in the following sections. The first section contains a required task; the remaining tasks are optional:

Enabling MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting (Required)

Configuring NetFlow Aggregation Cache (Optional)

Troubleshooting MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting (Optional)

Verifying MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting Configuration (Optional)

Monitoring and Maintaining MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting (Optional)

Enabling MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting

To enable MPLS egress NetFlow accounting, use the following command in interface configuration mode:

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if)# mpls netflow egress

Enables MPLS egress NetFlow accounting on the egress router interface.

Configuring NetFlow Aggregation Cache

To configure NetFlow aggregation cache, use the following global configuration command:

Command
Purpose

Router(config)# ip flow-aggregation cache as | destination-prefix | prefix | protocol-port | source-prefix

Enters aggregation cache configuration mode and enables an aggregation cache scheme (as, destination-prefix, prefix, protocol-port, or source-prefix).

For more information on NetFlow aggregation, see the "Related Documents" section.

Troubleshooting MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting

To troubleshoot the MPLS egress NetFlow accounting feature, use the following commands in EXEC mode, as needed:

Command
Purpose

Router# show mpls forwarding-table detail

Displays detailed MPLS forwarding-table entries. The output has been modified to show if MPLS egress NetFlow accounting is applied to packets destined to an entry. This is for debugging purposes only.

Router# show mpls interfaces internal all

Displays detailed information about all of the MPLS interfaces in the router. The output has been modified to show if MPLS egress NetFlow accounting is enabled on the interface. This is for debugging purposes only.


Verifying MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting Configuration

To verify MPLS egress NetFlow accounting configuration, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Enter the show ip cache flow EXEC command to display a summary of NetFlow switching statistics.


Note This is an existing command that displays ingress and egress NetFlow statistics.


Router# show ip cache flow

IP packet size distribution (10 total packets):
   1-32   64   96  128  160  192  224  256  288  320  352  384  416  448  480
   .000 .000 .000 1.00 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000

    512  544  576 1024 1536 2048 2560 3072 3584 4096 4608
   .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000

IP Flow Switching Cache, 4456704 bytes
  1 active, 65535 inactive, 2 added
  26 ager polls, 0 flow alloc failures
  last clearing of statistics never
Protocol         Total    Flows   Packets Bytes  Packets Active(Sec) Idle(Sec)
--------         Flows     /Sec     /Flow  /Pkt     /Sec     /Flow     /Flow
ICMP                 1      0.0         5   100      0.0       0.0      15.7
Total :              1      0.0         5   100      0.0       0.0      15.7

SrcIf         SrcIPaddress    DstIf         DstIPaddress    Pr SrcP DstP  Pkts
Et1/1         34.0.0.2        Et1/4         180.1.1.2       01 0000 0800     5

Table 32 describes the fields in the flow switching cache lines of the output.

Table 32 show ip cache flow Field Descriptions—Flow Switching Cache 

Field
Description

IP packet size distribution

The two lines below this banner show the percentage distribution of packets by size range.

bytes

Number of bytes of memory the NetFlow cache uses.

active

Number of active flows in the NetFlow cache at the time this command is entered.

inactive

Number of flow buffers that are allocated in the NetFlow cache but are not assigned to a specific flow at the time this command is entered.

added

Number of flows created since the start of the summary period.

ager polls

Number of times the NetFlow code looked at the cache to remove expired entries (used by Cisco for diagnostics only).

flow alloc failures

Number of times the NetFlow code tried to allocate a flow but could not.

last clearing of statistics

Standard time output (hh:mm:ss) since the clear ip flow stats EXEC command was executed. This time output changes to hours and days after 24 hours is exceeded.


Table 33 describes the fields in the activity-by-protocol lines of the output.

Table 33 show ip cache flow Field Descriptions—Activity-by-Protocol 

Field
Description

Protocol

IP protocol and the "well known" port number as described in RFC 1340.

Total Flows

Number of flows for this protocol since the last time statistics were cleared.

Flows/Sec

Average number of flows for this protocol seen per second; equal to total flows/number of seconds for this summary period.

Packets/Flow

Average number of packets observed for the flows seen for this protocol. Equal to total packets for this protocol/number of flows for this protocol for this summary period.

Bytes/Pkt

Average number of bytes observed for the packets seen for this protocol (total bytes for this protocol and the total number of packet for this protocol for this summary period).

Packets/Sec

Average number of packets for this protocol per second (total packets for this protocol and the total number of seconds for this summary period).

Active(Sec)/Flow

Sum of all the seconds from the first packet to the last packet of an expired flow (for example, TCP FIN, time out, and so on) in seconds/total flows for this protocol for this summary period.

Idle(Sec)/Flow

Sum of all the seconds from the last packet seen in each nonexpired flow for this protocol until the time this command was entered, in seconds/total flows for this protocol for this summary period.


Table 34 describes the fields in the current flow lines of the output.

Table 34 show ip cache flow Field Descriptions—Current Flow 

Field
Description

SrcIf

Internal port name of the router for the source interface.

SrcIPaddress

Source IP address for this flow.

DstIf

Internal port name of the router for the destination interface.

DstIPaddress

Destination IP address for this flow.

Pr

IP protocol; for example, 6 = TCP, 17 = UDP, ... as defined in RFC 1340.

SrcP

Source port address, TCP/UDP "well known" port number, as defined in RFC 1340.

DstP

Destination port address, TCP/UDP "well known" port number, as defined in RFC 1340.

Pkts

Number of packets that the router observed for this flow.


Step 2 Enter the show ip cache flow aggregation EXEC command to display the contents of the aggregation cache. To display the prefix-based aggregation cache, use the following EXEC commands:

Router# show ip cache flow agg
Router# show ip cache flow aggregation pref
Router# show ip cache flow aggregation prefix

IP Flow Switching Cache, 278544 bytes
  1 active, 4095 inactive, 1 added
  4 ager polls, 0 flow alloc failures

Src If        Src Prefix     Msk  Dst If        Dst Prefix     Msk Flows  Pkts
Et1/1         34.0.0.0       /8   Et1/4         180.1.1.0      /24    1      5
Router#

Table 35 describes the fields in the flow switching cache lines of the output.

Table 35 show ip cache flow aggregation prefix Field Descriptions—Flow Switching Cache 

Field
Description

bytes

Number of bytes of memory the NetFlow cache uses.

active

Number of active flows in the NetFlow cache at the time this command is entered.

inactive

Number of flow buffers that are allocated in the NetFlow cache but are not assigned to a specific flow at the time this command is entered.

added

Number of flows created since the start of the summary period.

ager polls

Number of times the NetFlow code looked at the cache to remove expired entries (used by Cisco for diagnostics only).

flow alloc failures

Number of times the NetFlow code tried to allocate a flow but could not.


Table 36 describes the fields in the current flow lines of the output.

Table 36 show ip cache flow aggregation prefix Field Descriptions—Current Flow 

Field
Description

Src If

Router's internal port name for the source interface.

Src Prefix

Source IP address for this flow.

Msk

Mask source.

Dst If

Router's internal port name for the destination interface.

Dst Prefix

Destination prefix aggregation cache scheme.

Msk

Mask destination.

Flows

Number of flows.

Pkts

Number of packets that the router observed for this flow.


The ip flow-aggregation cache command has other options, including the following:

{as | destination-prefix | prefix | protocol-port | source-prefix}


Note For more information on these options, refer to the NetFlow Aggregation documentation.


Here is sample configuration output from the NetFlow aggregation cache:

Router(config)# ip flow-agg
Router(config)# ip flow-aggregation cache
Router(config)# ip flow-aggregation cache ?
  as                  AS aggregation
  destination-prefix  Destination Prefix aggregation
  prefix              Prefix aggregation
  protocol-port       Protocol and port aggregation
  source-prefix       Source Prefix aggregation

Router(config)# ip flow-aggregation cache prefix
Router(config-flow-cache)# enable

Here is sample output displaying the IP aggregation cache contents:

Router# show ip cache flow aggregation ?
  as                  AS aggregation cache
  destination-prefix  Destination Prefix aggregation cache
  prefix              Source/Destination Prefix aggregation cache
  protocol-port       Protocol and port aggregation cache
  source-prefix       Source Prefix aggregation cache
Router# show ip cache flow
IP packet size distribution (206 total packets):
   1-32   64   96  128  160  192  224  256  288  320  352  384  416 448  480
   .000 .854 .000 .145 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000

    512  544  576 1024 1536 2048 2560 3072 3584 4096 4608
   .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000

IP Flow Switching Cache, 4292920 bytes
  0 active, 62977 inactive, 182 added
  2912 ager polls, 0 flow alloc failures
  Active flows timeout in 30 minutes
  Inactive flows timeout in 15 seconds
  last clearing of statistics never
Protocol         Total    Flows   Packets Bytes  Packets Active(Sec) Idle(Sec)
--------         Flows     /Sec     /Flow  /Pkt     /Sec     /Flow /Flow
ICMP               182      0.0         1    62      0.0       0.0 15.5
Total :            182      0.0         1    62      0.0       0.0 15.5

SrcIf         SrcIPaddress    DstIf         DstIPaddress    Pr SrcP DstP  Pkts

Router# show ip cache flow aggregation prefix

IP Flow Switching Cache, 278544 bytes
  1 active, 4095 inactive, 3 added
  45 ager polls, 0 flow alloc failures
  Active flows timeout in 30 minutes
  Inactive flows timeout in 15 seconds

Src If        Src Prefix     Msk  Dst If        Dst Prefix     Msk Flows  Pkts
Et1/1         34.0.0.0       /8   PO6/0         12.12.12.12    /32 1      5
Router#

Monitoring and Maintaining MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting

To monitor and maintain MPLS egress NetFlow accounting, use the following command in EXEC mode:

Command
Purpose

Router# show ip cache flow

Displays summary NetFlow switching statistics, including the size of the packets, types of traffic, which interfaces the traffic enters and exits, and the source and destination addresses in the forwarded packet.


Verifying Configuration of MPLS Forwarding

To verify that CEF has been configured properly, enter the show ip cef summary command, which generates output similar to the following:

Router# show ip cef summary

IP CEF with switching (Table Version 49), flags=0x0
  43 routes, 0 resolve, 0 unresolved (0 old, 0 new)
  43 leaves, 49 nodes, 56756 bytes, 45 inserts, 2 invalidations
  2 load sharing elements, 672 bytes, 2 references
  1 CEF resets, 4 revisions of existing leaves
  4 in-place modifications
  refcounts:  7241 leaf, 7218 node

Adjacency Table has 18 adjacencies
Router#

MPLS Configuration Examples

This section provides the following MPLS configuration examples:

Enabling MPLS Incrementally in a Network Example

Enabling MPLS for a Subset of Destination Prefixes Example

Selecting the Destination Prefixes and Paths Example

Displaying MPLS LDP Binding Information Example

Displaying MPLS Forwarding Table Information Example

Displaying MPLS Interface Information Example

Displaying MPLS LDP Neighbor Information Example

Enabling LSP Tunnel Signalling Example

Configuring an LSP Tunnel Example

Displaying the LSP Tunnel Information Example

Configuring MPLS Traffic Engineering Examples

Configuring MPLS VPNs Example

Implementing MPLS QoS Example

Configuring an MPLS LSC Examples

MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting Example

Enabling MPLS Incrementally in a Network Example

The following example shows how to configure MPLS incrementally throughout a network of routers. You enable MPLS first between one pair of routers (in this case, R1 and R3 shown in Figure 51) and add routers step by step until every router in the network is label switch enabled.

router-1# configuration terminal 
router-1(config)# ip cef distributed 
router-1(config)# tag-switching ip 
router-1(config)# interface e0/1 
router-1(config-if)# tag-switching ip 
router-1(config-if)# exit 
router-1(config)# 
router-3# configuration terminal 
router-3(config)# ip cef distributed 
router-3(config)# tag-switching ip 
router-3(config)# interface e0/1 
router-3(config-if)# tag-switching ip 
router-3(config-if)# exit 
router-3(config)#

Enabling MPLS for a Subset of Destination Prefixes Example

The following example shows the commands you enter at each of the routers to enable MPLS for only a subset of destination prefixes (see Figure 51).

Router(config)# access-list-1 permit A 
Router(config)# tag-switching advertise-tags for 1

Selecting the Destination Prefixes and Paths Example

The following example shows the commands you enter to configure the routers to select the destination prefixes and paths for which MPLS is enabled. When you configure R2, R5, and R8 to distribute no labels to other routers, you ensure that no routers send them labeled packets. You also need to configure routers R1, R3, R4, R6, and R7 to distribute labels only for network A and only to the applicable adjacent router. This configuration ensures that R3 distributes its label for network A only to R1, R4 only to R3, R6 only to R4, and R7 only to R6 (see Figure 51).

router-2(config)# no tag-switching advertise-tags
router-5(config)# no tag-switching advertise-tags
router-8(config)# no tag-switching advertise-tags
router-1(config)# access-list permit R1
router-1(config)# no tag-switching advertise-tags for 1
router-1(config)# tag-switching advertise-tags for 1 to 2
router-1(config)# exit

router-3# access-list 1 permit A
router-3# access-list 2 permit R1
router-3# tag-switching advertise-tags for 1 to 2
router-3# exit

router-4# access-list 1 permit A
router-4# access-list 2 permit R3
router-4# tag-switching advertise-tags for 1 to 2
router-4# exit

router-6# access-list 1 permit A
router-6# access-list 2 permit R4
router-6# tag-switching advertise-tags for 1 to 2
router-6# exit
router-7# access-list 1 permit A
router-7# access-list 2 permit R6
router-7# tag-switching advertise-tags for 1 to 2
router-7# exit

Displaying MPLS LDP Binding Information Example

The following example shows how to use the show tag-switching tdp bindings EXEC command to display the contents of the Label Information Base (LIB). The display can show the entire database or can be limited to a subset of entries, based on prefix, input or output label values or ranges, or the neighbor advertising the label.


Note This command displays downstream mode bindings. For label VC bindings, see the show tag-switching atm-tdp bindings EXEC command.


Router# show tag-switching tdp bindings

Matching entries:
  tib entry: 10.92.0.0/16, rev 28
        local binding:  tag: imp-null(1)
        remote binding: tsr: 172.27.32.29:0, tag: imp-null(1)
  tib entry: 10.102.0.0/16, rev 29
        local binding:  tag: 26
        remote binding: tsr: 172.27.32.29:0, tag: 26
  tib entry: 10.105.0.0/16, rev 30
        local binding:  tag: imp-null(1)
        remote binding: tsr: 172.27.32.29:0, tag: imp-null(1)
  tib entry: 10.205.0.0/16, rev 31
        local binding:  tag: imp-null(1)
        remote binding: tsr: 172.27.32.29:0, tag: imp-null(1)
  tib entry: 10.211.0.7/32, rev 32
        local binding:  tag: 27
        remote binding: tsr: 172.27.32.29:0, tag: 28
  tib entry: 10.220.0.7/32, rev 33
        local binding:  tag: 28
        remote binding: tsr: 172.27.32.29:0, tag: 29
  tib entry: 99.101.0.0/16, rev 35
        local binding:  tag: imp-null(1)
        remote binding: tsr: 172.27.32.29:0, tag: imp-null(1)
  tib entry: 100.101.0.0/16, rev 36
        local binding:  tag: 29
        remote binding: tsr: 172.27.32.29:0, tag: imp-null(1)
  tib entry: 171.69.204.0/24, rev 37
        local binding:  tag: imp-null(1)
        remote binding: tsr: 172.27.32.29:0, tag: imp-null(1)
  tib entry: 172.27.32.0/22, rev 38
        local binding:  tag: imp-null(1)
        remote binding: tsr: 172.27.32.29:0, tag: imp-null(1)
  tib entry: 210.10.0.0/16, rev 39
        local binding:  tag: imp-null(1)
  tib entry: 210.10.0.8/32, rev 40
        remote binding: tsr: 172.27.32.29:0, tag: 27

Displaying MPLS Forwarding Table Information Example

The following example shows how to use the show tag-switching forwarding-table command to display the contents of the LFIB. The LFIB lists the labels, output interface information, prefix or tunnel associated with the entry, and number of bytes received with each incoming label. A request can show the entire LFIB or can be limited to a subset of entries. A request can also be restricted to selected entries in any of the following ways:

Single entry associated with a given incoming label

Entries associated with a given output interface

Entries associated with a given next hop

Single entry associated with a given destination

Single entry associated with a given tunnel having the current node as an intermediate hop

Router# show tag-switching forwarding-table

Local Outgoing      Prefix            Bytes tag Outgoing       Next Hop       
tag   tag or VC     or Tunnel Id      switched  interface                     
26    Untagged      10.253.0.0/16     0         Et4/0/0       172.27.32.4    
28    1/33          10.15.0.0/16      0         AT0/0.1       point2point    
29    Pop tag       10.91.0.0/16      0         Hs5/0         point2point    
      1/36          10.91.0.0/16      0         AT0/0.1       point2point    
30    32            10.250.0.97/32    0         Et4/0/2       10.92.0.7      
      32            10.250.0.97/32    0         Hs5/0         point2point    
34    26            10.77.0.0/24      0         Et4/0/2       10.92.0.7      
      26            10.77.0.0/24      0         Hs5/0         point2point    
35    Untagged  [T] 10.100.100.101/32 0         Tu301         point2point    
36    Pop tag       168.1.0.0/16      0         Hs5/0         point2point    
      1/37          168.1.0.0/16      0         AT0/0.1       point2point 

[T]     Forwarding through a TSP tunnel.
        View additional tagging info with the 'detail' option

Displaying MPLS Interface Information Example

The following example shows how to use the show tag-switching interfaces command to show information about the requested interface or about all interfaces on which MPLS is enabled. The per-interface information includes the interface name and indications as to whether IP MPLS is enabled and operational.

Router# show tag-switching interfaces

Interface              IP    Tunnel   Operational
Hssi3/0                Yes   Yes      No          
ATM4/0.1               Yes   Yes      Yes         (ATM tagging)
Ethernet5/0/0          No    Yes      Yes         
Ethernet5/0/1          Yes   No       Yes         
Ethernet5/0/2          Yes   No       No          
Ethernet5/0/3          Yes   No       Yes         
Ethernet5/1/1          Yes   No       No 

The following shows sample output from the show tag-switching interfaces command when you specify the detail keyword:

Router# show tag-switching interfaces detail

Interface Hssi3/0:
        IP tagging enabled
        TSP Tunnel tagging enabled
        Tagging not operational
        MTU = 4470
Interface ATM4/0.1:
        IP tagging enabled
        TSP Tunnel tagging enabled
        Tagging operational
        MTU = 4470
        ATM tagging: Tag VPI = 1, Control VC = 0/32
Interface Ethernet5/0/0:
        IP tagging not enabled
        TSP Tunnel tagging enabled
        Tagging operational
        MTU = 1500
Interface Ethernet5/0/1:
        IP tagging enabled
        TSP Tunnel tagging not enabled
        Tagging operational
        MTU = 1500
Interface Ethernet5/0/2:
        IP tagging enabled
        TSP Tunnel tagging not enabled
        Tagging not operational
        MTU = 1500
Interface Ethernet5/0/3:
        IP tagging enabled
        TSP Tunnel tagging not enabled
        Tagging operational
        MTU = 1500

Displaying MPLS LDP Neighbor Information Example

The following example shows how to use the show tag-switching tdp neighbors EXEC command to display the status of LDP sessions. The neighbor information branch can have information about all LDP neighbors or can be limited to the neighbor with a specific IP address or LDP identifier, or to LDP neighbors known to be accessible over a specific interface.

Router# show tag-switching tdp neighbors

Peer TDP Ident: 10.220.0.7:1; Local TDP Ident 172.27.32.29:1
        TCP connection: 10.220.0.7.711 - 172.27.32.29.11029
        State: Oper; PIEs sent/rcvd: 17477/17487; Downstream on demand
Up time: 01:03:00
TDP discovery sources:
          ATM0/0.1
Peer TDP Ident: 210.10.0.8:0; Local TDP Ident 172.27.32.29:0
        TCP connection: 210.10.0.8.11004 - 172.27.32.29.711
        State: Oper; PIEs sent/rcvd: 14656/14675; Downstream;
Up time: 2d5h
        TDP discovery sources:
          Ethernet4/0/1
          Ethernet4/0/2
          POS6/0/0
        Addresses bound to peer TDP Ident:
          99.101.0.8      172.27.32.28    10.105.0.8      10.92.0.8       
          10.205.0.8      210.10.0.8      

Enabling LSP Tunnel Signalling Example

The following example shows how to configure support for LSP tunnel signalling along a path and on each interface crossed by one or more tunnels:

Router(config)# ip cef distributed
Router(config)# tag-switching tsp-tunnels 
Router(config)# interface e0/1
Router(config-if)# tag-switching tsp-tunnels
Router(config-if)# interface e0/2
Router(config-if)# tag-switching tsp-tunnels
Router(config-if)# exit

Configuring an LSP Tunnel Example

The following example shows how to set the encapsulation of the tunnel to MPLS and how to define hops in the path for the LSP.

Follow these steps to configure a two-hop tunnel, hop 0 being the headend router. For hops 1 and 2, you specify the IP addresses of the incoming interfaces for the tunnel. The tunnel interface number is arbitrary, but must be less than 65,535.

Router(config)# interface tunnel 2003
Router(config-if)# tunnel mode tag-switching
Router(config-if)# tunnel tsp-hop 1 10.10.0.12
Router(config-if)# tunnel tsp-hop 2 10.50.0.24 lasthop
Router(config-if)# exit

To shorten the previous path, delete the hop by entering the following commands:

Router(config)# interface tunnel 2003
Router(config-if)# no tunnel tsp-hop 2
Router(config-if)# tunnel tsp-hop 1 10.10.0.12 lasthop
Router(config-if)# exit

Displaying the LSP Tunnel Information Example

The following example shows how to use the show tag-switching tsp-tunnels command to display information about the configuration and status of selected tunnels:

Router# show tag-switching tsp-tunnels

Signalling Summary:
            TSP Tunnels Process:            running
            RSVP Process:                   running
            Forwarding:                     enabled

TUNNEL ID 	DESTINATION      STATUS           CONNECTION 
10.106.0.6.2003	10.2.0.12	up 	 up						

Configuring MPLS Traffic Engineering Examples

This section provides the following MPLS traffic engineering configuration examples:

Configuring MPLS Traffic Engineering Using IS-IS Example

Configuring MPLS Traffic Engineering Using OSPF Example

Configuring an MPLS Traffic Engineering Tunnel Example

Configuring Enhanced SPF Routing over a Tunnel Example

Figure 53 illustrates a sample MPLS topology. This example specifies point-to-point outgoing interfaces. The next sections contain sample configuration commands you enter to implement MPLS traffic engineering and the basic tunnel configuration shown in Figure 53.

Figure 53 Sample MPLS Traffic Engineering Tunnel Configuration

Configuring MPLS Traffic Engineering Using IS-IS Example

This example lists the commands you enter to configure MPLS traffic engineering with IS-IS routing enabled (see Figure 53).


Note You must enter the following commands on every router in the traffic-engineered portion of your network.


Router 1—MPLS Traffic Engineering Configuration

To configure MPLS traffic engineering, enter the following commands:

ip cef
mpls traffic-eng tunnels
interface loopback 0
ip address 11.11.11.11 255.255.255.255
ip router isis

interface s1/0
ip address 131.0.0.1 255.255.0.0
ip router isis
mpls traffic-eng tunnels
ip rsvp bandwidth 1000

Router 1—IS-IS Configuration

To enable IS-IS routing, enter the following commands:

router isis
network 47.0000.0011.0011.00
is-type level-1
metric-style wide
mpls traffic-eng router-id loopback0
mpls traffic-eng level-1

Configuring MPLS Traffic Engineering Using OSPF Example

This example lists the commands you enter to configure MPLS traffic engineering with OSPF routing enabled (see Figure 53).


Note You must enter the following commands on every router in the traffic-engineered portion of your network.


Router 1—MPLS Traffic Engineering Configuration

To configure MPLS traffic engineering, enter the following commands:

ip cef
mpls traffic-eng tunnels
interface loopback 0
ip address 11.11.11.11 255.255.255.255

interface s1/0
ip address 131.0.0.1 255.255.0.0
mpls traffic-eng tunnels
  ip rsvp bandwidth 1000

Router 1—OSPF Configuration

To enable OSPF, enter the following commands:

router ospf 0
network 131.0.0.0.0.0.255.255 area 0
mpls traffic-eng router-id Loopback0
mpls traffic-eng area 0

Configuring an MPLS Traffic Engineering Tunnel Example

This example shows you how to configure a dynamic path tunnel and an explicit path in the tunnel. Before you configure MPLS traffic engineering tunnels, you must enter the appropriate global and interface commands on the specified router (in this case, Router 1).

Router 1—Dynamic Path Tunnel Configuration

In this section, a tunnel is configured to use a dynamic path:

interface tunnel1
  ip unnumbered loopback 0
  tunnel destination 17.17.17.17
  tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng
tunnel mpls traffic-eng bandwidth 100
  tunnel mpls traffic-eng priority 1 1
  tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-option 1 dynamic

Router 1—Dynamic Path Tunnel Verification

This section includes the commands you use to verify that the tunnel is up:

show mpls traffic-eng tunnels 
show ip interface tunnel1

Router 1—Explicit Path Configuration

In this section, an explicit path is configured:

ip explicit-path identifier 1
 next-address 131.0.0.1 
 next-address 135.0.0.1 
 next-address 136.0.0.1 
 next-address 133.0.0.1 

Router 1—Explicit Path Tunnel Configuration

In this section, a tunnel is configured to use an explicit path:

interface tunnel2
  ip unnumbered loopback 0
  tunnel destination 17.17.17.17
  tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng
tunnel mpls traffic-eng bandwidth 100
  tunnel mpls traffic-eng priority 1 1
  tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-option 1 explicit identifier 1

Router 1—Explicit Path Tunnel Verification

This section includes the commands you use to verify that the tunnel is up:

show mpls traffic-eng tunnels 
show ip interface tunnel2

Configuring Enhanced SPF Routing over a Tunnel Example

This section includes the commands that cause the tunnel to be considered by the enhanced SPF calculation of the IGP, which installs routes over the tunnel for appropriate network prefixes.

Router 1—IGP Enhanced SPF Consideration Configuration

In this section, you specify that the IGP should use the tunnel (if the tunnel is up) in its enhanced SPF calculation:

interface tunnel1
tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute announce

Router 1—Route and Traffic Verification

This section includes the commands you use to verify that the tunnel is up and that the traffic is routed through the tunnel:

show traffic-eng tunnels tunnel1 brief
show ip route 17.17.17.17
show mpls traffic-eng autoroute
ping 17.17.17.17
show interface tunnel1 accounting
show interface s1/0 accounting

Configuring MPLS VPNs Examples

This section provides the following configuration examples:

Configuring MPLS VPNs Example

Defining a Cable Subinterface Example

Cable Interface Bundling Example

Subinterface Definition on Bundle Master Example

Cable Interface Bundle Master Configuration Example

Configuring EBGP Routing to Exchange VPN Routes Between Autonomous Systems

Configuring EBGP Routing to Exchange VPN Routes Between Autonomous Systems in a Confederation

Configuring MPLS VPNs Example

The following example provides a sample configuration file from a PE router:

ip cef distributed           ! CEF switching is pre-requisite for label Switching
frame-relay switching
!
ip vrf vrf1                  ! Define VPN Routing instance vrf1
 rd 100:1
 route-target both 100:1     ! Configure import and export route-targets for vrf1
!
ip vrf vrf2                  ! Define VPN Routing instance vrf2
 rd 100:2
 route-target both 100:2     ! Configure import and export route-targets for vrf2
 route-target import 100:1   ! Configure an additional import route-target for vrf2
 import map vrf2_import      ! Configure import route-map for vrf2
!
interface lo0
 ip address 10.13.0.13 255.255.255.255
!
interface atm9/0/0           ! Backbone link to another Provider router
!
interface atm9/0/0.1 tag-switching
 ip unnumbered loopback0 
	no ip directed-broadcast 
	tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
 tag-switching ip

interface atm5/0 
	no ip address 
	no ip directed-broadcast  
	atm clock INTERNAL 
	no atm ilmi-keepalive

interface Ethernet1/0 
	ip address 3.3.3.5 255.255.0.0 
	no ip directed-broadcast
	no ip mroute-cache
	no keepalive

interface Ethernet5/0/1      ! Set up Ethernet interface as VRF link to a CE router
 ip vrf forwarding vrf1
 ip address 10.20.0.13 255.255.255.0
 !
interface hssi 10/1/0	
	
 hssi internal-clock
 encaps fr
 frame-relay intf-type dce
 frame-relay lmi-type ansi
!
interface hssi 10/1/0.16 point-to-point
 ip vrf forwarding vrf2
 ip address 10.20.1.13 255.255.255.0
 frame-relay interface-dlci 16 ! Set up Frame Relay PVC subinterface as link to another
!                            ! CE router

router bgp 1                 ! Configure BGP sessions
 no synchronization	
 no bgp default ipv4-activate         ! Deactivate default IPv4 advertisements
 neighbor 10.15.0.15 remote-as 1      ! Define IBGP session with another PE
 neighbor 10.15.0.15 update-source lo0
!
 address-family vpnv4 unicast         ! Activate PE exchange of VPNv4 NLRI
  neighbor 10.15.0.15 activate
  exit-address-family
!
 address-family ipv4 unicast vrf vrf1    ! Define BGP PE-CE session for vrf1
  redistribute static 
	 redistribute connected
  neighbor 10.20.0.60 remote-as 65535
  neighbor 10.20.0.60 activate
  no auto-summary
  exit-address-family
!
 address-family ipv4 unicast vrf vrf2    ! Define BGP PE-CE session for vrf2
  redistribute static 
	 redistribute connected 
  neighbor 10.20.1.11 remote-as 65535
  neighbor 10.20.1.11 update-source h10/1/0.16
  neighbor 10.20.1.11 activate
  no auto-summary
  exit-address-family
!
! Define a VRF static route
ip route vrf vrf1 12.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 e5/0/1 10.20.0.60
!
route-map vrf2_import permit 10          ! Define import route-map for vrf2.
 ...

Defining a Cable Subinterface Example

The following example shows how to define a subinterface on cable3/0:

interface cable3/0
! No IP address
! MAC level configuration only

! first subinterface
interface cable3/0.1
description Management Subinterface
ip address 10.255.1.1 255.255.255.0
cable helper-address 10.151.129.2

! second subinterface
interface cable3/0.2
ip address 10.279.4.2 255.255.255.0
cable helper-address 10.151.129.2

! third subinterface
interface cable3/0.3
ip address 10.254.5.2 255.255.255.0
cable helper-address 10.151.129.2

Cable Interface Bundling Example

The following example shows how to bundle a group of physical interfaces:

interface c3/0 and interface c4/0 are bundled.

interface c3/0
ip address 209.165.200.225 255.255.255.0
ip address 209.165.201.1 255.255.255.0 secondary
cable helper-address 10.5.1.5
! MAC level configuration
cable bundle 1 master
int c4/0
! No IP address
! MAC layer configuration only
cable bundle 1

Subinterface Definition on Bundle Master Example

The following example shows how to define subinterfaces on a bundle master and define Layer 3 configurations for each subinterface:

interface c3/0 and interface c4/0 are bundled.

interface c3/0
! No IP address
! MAC level configuration only
cable bundle 1 master

interface c4/0
! No IP address
! MAC layer configuration
cable bundle 1

! first subinterface
interface c3/0.1
ip address 10.22.64.0 255.255.255.0
cable helper-address 10.4.1.2

! second subinterface
interface c3/0.2
ip address 10.12.39.0 255.255.255.0
cable helper-address 10.4.1.2

! third subinterface
interface c3/0.3
ip address 10.96.3.0 255.255.255.0
cable helper-address 10.4.1.2

Cable Interface Bundle Master Configuration Example

The following examples show how to configure cable interface bundles:

Displaying the contents of the bundle
Router(config-if)# cable bundle ?
  <1-255>  Bundle number
Router(config-if)# cable bundle 25 ?
  master  Bundle master
  <cr>
Router(config-if)# cable bundle 25 master ?
  <cr>
Router(config-if)# cable bundle 25 master
Router(config-if)#
07:28:17: %UBR7200-5-UPDOWN: Interface Cable3/0 Port U0, changed state to down
07:28:18: %UBR7200-5-UPDOWN: Interface Cable3/0 Port U0, changed state to up

PE Router Configuration Example

!
! Identifies the version of Cisco IOS software installed.
version 12.0

! Defines the hostname of the Cisco uBR7246
hostname region-1-ubr
!
! Describes where the system is getting the software image it is running. In
! this configuration example, the system is loading a Cisco uBR7246 image named
! AdamSpecial from slot 0.
boot system flash slot0:ubr7200-p-mz.AdamSpecial
!
! Creates the enable secret password.
enable secret xxxx
enable password xxxx
!
! Sets QoS per modem for the cable plant.
no cable qos permission create
no cable qos permission update
cable qos permission modems
!
! Allows the system to use a full range of IP addresses, including subnet zero, for
! interface addresses and routing updates.
ip subnet-zero
!
! Enables Cisco Express Forwarding.
ip cef
!
! Configures a Cisco IOS Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server to insert the
! DHCP relay agent information option in forwarded BOOTREQUEST messages.
ip dhcp relay information option
!
! Enters the virtual routing forwarding (VRF) configuration mode and maps a VRF table to
! the virtual private network (VPN) called MGMT-VPN. The VRF table contains the set of
! routes that points to or gives routes to the CNR device, which provisions the cable
! modem devices. Each VRF table defines a path through the MPLS cloud.
ip vrf MGMT-VPN
!
! Creates the route distinguisher and creates the routing and forwarding table of the
! router itself.
 rd 100:1
!
! Creates a list of import and/or export route target communities for the VPN.
 route-target export 100:2
 route-target export 100:3
!
! Maps a VRF table to the VPN called ISP1-VPN.
ip vrf ISP1-VPN
!
! Creates the route distinguisher and creates the routing and forwarding table of the
! router itself.
 rd 100:2
!
! Creates a list of import and/or export route target communities for the VPN.
 route-target import 100:1
!
! Maps a VRF table to the VPN called ISP2-VPN.
ip vrf ISP2-VPN
!
! Creates the route distinguisher and creates the routing and forwarding table of the
! router itself.
 rd 100:3
!
! Creates a list of import and/or export route target communities for the VPN.
 route-target import 100:1
!
! Maps a VRF table to the VPN called MSO-isp. Note: MSO-isp could be considered ISP-3; in
! this case, the MSO is competing with other ISPs for other ISP services.
ip vrf MSO-isp
!
! Creates the route distinguisher and creates the routing and forwarding table of the
! router itself.
 rd 100:4
!
! Creates a list of import and/or export route target communities for the VPN.
  route-target import 100:1
!
! Builds a loopback interface to be used with MPLS and BGP; creating a loopback interface 
! eliminates unnecessary updates (caused by physical interfaces going up and down) from
! flooding the network.
interface Loopback0
 ip address 10.0.0.0 255.255.255.0
 no ip directed-broadcast
!
! Assigns an IP address to this Fast Ethernet interface. MPLS tag-switching must be
! enabled on this interface.
interface FastEthernet0/0
 description Connection to MSO core.
 ip address 10.0.0.0 255.255.255.0
 no ip directed-broadcast
 full-duplex
 tag-switching ip
!
! Enters cable interface configuration mode and configures the physical aspects of the
! 3/0 cable interface. Please note that no IP addresses are assigned to this interface;
! they will be assigned instead to the logical subinterfaces. All other commands for
! this cable interface should be configured to meet the specific needs of your cable RF
! plant and cable network.
interface Cable3/0
 no ip address
 ip directed-broadcast
 no ip mroute-cache
 load-interval 30
 no keepalive
 cable downstream annex B
 cable downstream modulation 64qam
 cable downstream interleave-depth 32
 cable downstream frequency 855000000
 cable upstream 0 frequency 30000000
 cable upstream 0 power-level 0
 no cable upstream 0 shutdown
 cable upstream 1 shutdown
 cable upstream 2 shutdown
 cable upstream 3 shutdown
 cable upstream 4 shutdown
 cable upstream 5 shutdown
!
! Configures the physical aspects of the 3/0.1 cable subinterface. If cable modems have
! not been assigned IP addresses, they will automatically come on-line using the settings
! for subinterface X.1. 
interface Cable3/0.1
 description Cable Administration Network
!
! Associates this interface with the VRF and MPLS VPNs that connect to the MSO cable
! network registrar (CNR). The CNR provides cable modems with IP addresses and other
! initialization parameters. 
 ip vrf forwarding MSO
!
! Defines a range of IP addresses and masks to be assigned to cable modems not yet 
associated with an ISP.
 ip address 10.0.0.0 255.255.255.0
!
! Disables the translation of directed broadcasts to physical broadcasts.
 no ip directed-broadcast
!
! Defines the DHCP server for cable modems whether they are associated with an ISP or
! with the MSO acting as ISP.
 cable helper-address 10.4.1.2 cable-modem
!
! Defines the DHCP server for PCs that are not yet associated with an ISP.
 cable helper-address 10.4.1.2 host
!
! Disables cable proxy Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) and IP multicast echo on this
! cable interface.
 no cable proxy-arp
 no cable ip-multicast-echo
!
! Configures the physical aspects of the 3/0.2 cable subinterface.
interface Cable3/0.2
 description MSO as ISP Network
!
! Assigns this subinterface to the MPLS VPN used by the MSO to supply service to
! customers—in this case, MSO-isp. 
 ip vrf forwarding MSO-isp
!
! Defines a range of IP addresses and masks to be assigned to cable modems associated
! with the MSO as ISP network.
 ip address 10.1.0.0 255.255.255.0 secondary
! 
! Defines a range of IP addresses and masks to be assigned to host devices associated
! with the MSO as ISP network.
 ip address 10.1.0.0 255.255.255.0
!
! Disables the translation of directed broadcasts to physical broadcasts.
 no ip directed-broadcast
!
! Defines the DHCP server for cable modems whether they are associated with an ISP or
! with the MSO acting as ISP.
 cable helper-address 10.4.1.2 cable-modem
!
! Defines the DHCP server for PC host devices.
 cable helper-address 10.4.1.2 host
!
! Disables cable proxy Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) and IP multicast echo on this
! cable interface.
 no cable proxy-arp
 no cable ip-multicast-echo
!
! Configures the physical aspects of the 3/0.3 cable subinterface
interface Cable3/0.3
 description ISP1's Network
! 
! Makes this subinterface a member of the MPLS VPN.
 ip vrf forwarding isp1
!
! Defines a range of IP addresses and masks to be assigned to cable modems associated
! with the MSO as ISP network.
 ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0 secondary
!
! Defines a range of IP addresses and masks to be assigned to host devices associated
! with the MSO as ISP network.
 ip address 10.0.1.1 255.255.255.0
!
! Disables the translation of directed broadcasts to physical broadcasts.
 no ip directed-broadcast
!
! Disables cable proxy Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) and IP multicast echo on this
! cable interface.
 no cable proxy-arp
 no cable ip-multicast-echo
!
! Defines the DHCP server for cable modems whether they are associated with an ISP or
! with the MSO acting as ISP.
 cable helper-address 10.4.1.2 cable-modem
!
! Defines the DHCP server for PC host devices.
 cable helper-address 10.4.1.2 host
!
! Configures the physical aspects of the 3/0.4 cable subinterface
interface Cable3/0.4
 description ISP2's Network
!
! Makes this subinterface a member of the MPLS VPN.
 ip vrf forwarding isp2
!
! Defines a range of IP addresses and masks to be assigned to cable modems associated
! with the MSO as ISP network.
 ip address 10.1.2.1 255.255.255.0 secondary
!
! Defines a range of IP addresses and masks to be assigned to host devices associated
! with the MSO as ISP network.
 ip address 10.0.1.1 255.255.255.0
!
! Disables the translation of directed broadcasts to physical broadcasts.
 no ip directed-broadcast
!
! Disables cable proxy Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) and IP multicast echo on this
! cable interface.
 no cable proxy-arp
 no cable ip-multicast-echo
!
!
 cable dhcp-giaddr policy
!
!! Defines the DHCP server for cable modems whether they are associated with an ISP or
! with the MSO acting as ISP.
 cable helper-address 10.4.1.2 cable-modem
!
! Defines the DHCP server for PC host devices.
 cable helper-address 10.4.1.2 host
!
!
end

P Router Configuration Example

Building configuration...

Current configuration:
!
version 12.0
service timestamps debug uptime
service timestamps log uptime
no service password-encryption
!
hostname R7460-7206-02
!
enable password xxxx
!
ip subnet-zero
ip cef
ip host brios 223.255.254.253
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 10.2.1.3 255.255.255.0
 no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface Loopback1
 no ip address
 no ip directed-broadcast
 no ip mroute-cache
!
interface FastEthernet0/0
 ip address 1.7.108.2 255.255.255.0
 no ip directed-broadcast
 no ip mroute-cache
 shutdown
 full-duplex
 no cdp enable
!
interface Ethernet1/0
 ip address 10.0.1.2 255.255.255.0
 no ip directed-broadcast
 no ip route-cache cef
 no ip mroute-cache
 tag-switching ip
 no cdp enable
!
interface Ethernet1/1
 ip address 10.0.1.17 255.255.255.0
 no ip directed-broadcast
 no ip route-cache cef
 no ip mroute-cache
 tag-switching ip
 no cdp enable
!
interface Ethernet1/2
 ip address 10.0.2.2 255.255.255.0
 no ip directed-broadcast
 no ip route-cache cef
 no ip mroute-cache
 tag-switching ip
 no cdp enable
!
interface Ethernet1/3
 ip address 10.0.3.2 255.255.255.0
 no ip directed-broadcast
 no ip route-cache cef
 no ip mroute-cache
 tag-switching ip
 no cdp enable
!
interface Ethernet1/4
 ip address 10.0.4.2 255.255.255.0
 no ip directed-broadcast
 no ip route-cache cef
 no ip mroute-cache
 tag-switching ip
 no cdp enable
!
interface Ethernet1/5
 no ip address
 no ip directed-broadcast
 no ip route-cache cef
 shutdown
 no cdp enable
!
interface Ethernet1/6
 no ip address
 no ip directed-broadcast
 no ip route-cache cef
 shutdown
 no cdp enable
!
interface Ethernet1/7
 no ip address
 no ip directed-broadcast
 no ip route-cache cef
 shutdown
 no cdp enable
!
router ospf 222
 network 10.0.1.0 255.255.255.0 area 0
 network 10.0.2.0 255.255.255.0 area 0
 network 10.0.3.0 255.255.255.0 area 0
 network 10.0.4.0 255.255.255.0 area 0
 network 20.2.1.3 255.255.255.0 area 0
!
ip classless
no ip http server
!
!
map-list test-b
no cdp run
!
tftp-server slot0:master/120/c7200-p-mz.120-1.4
!
line con 0
 exec-timeout 0 0
 password xxxx
 login
 transport input none
line aux 0
line vty 0 4
 password xxxx
 login
!
no scheduler max-task-time
end

Configuring EBGP Routing to Exchange VPN Routes Between Autonomous Systems

The network topology in Figure 54 shows two autonomous systems, which are configured as follows:

Autonomous system 1 (AS1) includes PE1, P1, EBGP1. The IGP is OSPF.

Autonomous system 2 (AS2) includes PE2, P2, EBGP2. The IGP is ISIS.

CE1 and CE2 belongs to the same VPN, which is called VPN1.

The P routers are route reflectors.

EBGP1 is configured with the redistribute connected subnets router configuration command.

EBGP2 is configured with the neighbor next-hop-self router configuration command.

Figure 54 Configuring Two Autonomous Systems

Autonomous System 1, CE1 Configuration

CE1: Company 
! 
interface Loopback1 
 ip address 1.0.0.6 255.255.255.255 
! 
interface Serial1/3 
 description Veritas 
 no ip address 
 encapsulation frame-relay 
 frame-relay intf-type dce 
! 
interface Serial1/3.1 point-to-point 
 description Veritas 
 ip address 1.6.2.1 255.255.255.252 
 frame-relay interface-dlci 22 
! 
router ospf 1 
 network 1.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0 

Autonomous System 1, PE1 Configuration

PE1: Company 
! 
ip cef 
! 
ip vrf V1 
 rd 1:105 
 route-target export 1:100 
 route-target import 1:100 
! 
interface Serial0/0 
 description Burlington 
 no ip address 
 encapsulation frame-relay 
 no fair-queue 
 clockrate 2000000 
! 
interface Serial0/0.3 point-to-point 
 description Burlington 
 ip vrf forwarding V1 
 ip address 1.6.2.2 255.255.255.252 
 frame-relay interface-dlci 22 
! 
interface Ethernet0/1 
 description Vermont 
 ip address 100.2.2.5 255.255.255.0 
 tag-switching ip 
! 
router ospf 1 
 log-adjacency-changes 
 network 100.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0 
! 
router ospf 10 vrf V1 
 log-adjacency-changes 
 redistribute bgp 1 metric 100 subnets 
 network 1.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0 
! 
router bgp 1 
 no synchronization 
 neighbor R peer-group 
 neighbor R remote-as 1 
 neighbor R update-source Loopback0 
 neighbor 100.0.0.2 peer-group R 
 no auto-summary 
 ! 
 address-family ipv4 vrf V1 
 redistribute ospf 10 
 no auto-summary 
 no synchronization 
 exit-address-family 
 ! 
 address-family vpnv4 
 neighbor R activate 
 neighbor R send-community extended 
 neighbor 100.0.0.2 peer-group R 
 no auto-summary 
 exit-address-family 

Autonomous System 1, P1 Configuration

P1: Company 
! 
ip cef 
! 
interface Loopback0 
 ip address 100.0.0.2 255.255.255.255 
! 
interface Ethernet0/1 
 description Ogunquit 
 ip address 100.2.1.1 255.255.255.0 
 tag-switching ip 
! 
interface FastEthernet2/0 
 description Veritas 
 ip address 100.2.2.1 255.255.255.0 
 duplex auto 
 speed auto 
 tag-switching ip 
! 
router ospf 1 
 log-adjacency-changes 
 network 100.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0 
! 
router bgp 1 
 no synchronization 
 bgp log-neighbor-changes 
 neighbor R peer-group 
 neighbor R remote-as 1 
 neighbor R update-source Loopback0 
 neighbor R route-reflector-client 
 neighbor 100.0.0.4 peer-group R 
 neighbor 100.0.0.5 peer-group R 
 ! 
 address-family vpnv4 
 neighbor R activate 
 neighbor R route-reflector-client 
 neighbor R send-community extended 
 neighbor 100.0.0.4 peer-group R 
 neighbor 100.0.0.5 peer-group R 
 exit-address-family 

Autonomous System 1, EBGP1 Configuration

EBGP1: Company 
! 
ip cef 
! 
interface Loopback0 
 ip address 100.0.0.4 255.255.255.255 
! 
interface Ethernet0/1 
 description Vermont 
 ip address 100.2.1.40 255.255.255.0 
 tag-switching ip 
! 
interface ATM1/0 
 description Lowell 
 no ip address 
 no atm scrambling cell-payload 
 no atm ilmi-keepalive 
! 
interface ATM1/0.1 point-to-point 
 description Lowell 
 ip address 12.0.0.1 255.255.255.252 
 pvc 1/100 
! 
router ospf 1 
 log-adjacency-changes 
 redistribute connected subnets 
 network 100.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0 
! 
router bgp 1 
 no synchronization 
 no bgp default route-target filter 
 bgp log-neighbor-changes 
 neighbor R peer-group 
 neighbor R remote-as 1 
 neighbor R update-source Loopback0 
 neighbor 12.0.0.2 remote-as 2 
 neighbor 100.0.0.2 peer-group R 
 no auto-summary 
 ! 
 address-family vpnv4 
 neighbor R activate 
 neighbor R send-community extended 
 neighbor 12.0.0.2 activate 
 neighbor 12.0.0.2 send-community extended 
 neighbor 100.0.0.2 peer-group R 
 no auto-summary 
 exit-address-family 

Autonomous System 2, EBGP2 Configuration

EBGP2: Company 
! 
ip cef 
! 
ip vrf V1 
 rd 2:103 
 route-target export 1:100 
 route-target import 1:100 
! 
interface Loopback0 
 ip address 200.0.0.3 255.255.255.255 
 ip router isis 
! 
interface Loopback1 
 ip vrf forwarding V1 
 ip address 1.0.0.3 255.255.255.255 
! 
interface Serial0/0 
 description Littleton 
 no ip address 
 encapsulation frame-relay 
 load-interval 30 
 no fair-queue 
 clockrate 2000000 
! 
interface Serial0/0.2 point-to-point 
 description Littleton 
 ip unnumbered Loopback0 
 ip router isis 
 tag-switching ip 
 frame-relay interface-dlci 23 
! 
interface ATM1/0 
 description Ogunquit 
 no ip address 
 atm clock INTERNAL 
 no atm scrambling cell-payload 
 no atm ilmi-keepalive 
! 
interface ATM1/0.1 point-to-point 
 description Ogunquit 
 ip address 12.0.0.2 255.255.255.252 
 pvc 1/100 
! 
router isis 
 net 49.0002.0000.0000.0003.00 
! 
router bgp 2 
 no synchronization 
 no bgp default route-target filter 
 bgp log-neighbor-changes 
 neighbor 12.0.0.1 remote-as 1 
 neighbor 200.0.0.8 remote-as 2 
 neighbor 200.0.0.8 update-source Loopback0 
 neighbor 200.0.0.8 next-hop-self 
 ! 
address-family ipv4 vrf V1 
 redistribute connected 
 no auto-summary 
 no synchronization 
 exit-address-family 
 ! 
address-family vpnv4 
 neighbor 12.0.0.1 activate 
 neighbor 12.0.0.1 send-community extended 
 neighbor 200.0.0.8 activate 
 neighbor 200.0.0.8 next-hop-self 
 neighbor 200.0.0.8 send-community extended 
 exit-address-family 

Autonomous System 2, P2 Configuration

P2: Company 
! 
ip cef 
! 
ip vrf V1 
 rd 2:108 
 route-target export 1:100 
 route-target import 1:100 
! 
interface Loopback0 
 ip address 200.0.0.8 255.255.255.255 
 ip router isis 
! 
interface Loopback1 
 ip vrf forwarding V1 
 ip address 1.0.0.8 255.255.255.255 
! 
interface FastEthernet0/0 
 description Pax 
 ip address 200.9.1.2 255.255.255.0 
 ip router isis 
 tag-switching ip 
! 
interface Serial5/0 
 description Lowell 
 no ip address 
 encapsulation frame-relay 
 frame-relay intf-type dce 
! 
interface Serial5/0.1 point-to-point 
 description Lowell 
 ip unnumbered Loopback0 
 ip router isis 
 tag-switching ip 
 frame-relay interface-dlci 23 
! 
router isis 
 net 49.0002.0000.0000.0008.00 
! 
router bgp 2 
 no synchronization 
 bgp log-neighbor-changes 
 neighbor R peer-group 
 neighbor R remote-as 2 
 neighbor R update-source Loopback0 
 neighbor R route-reflector-client 
 neighbor 200.0.0.3 peer-group R 
 neighbor 200.0.0.9 peer-group R 
 ! 
 address-family ipv4 vrf V1 
 redistribute connected 
 no auto-summary 
 no synchronization 
 exit-address-family 
 ! 
 address-family vpnv4 
 neighbor R activate 
 neighbor R route-reflector-client 
 neighbor R send-community extended 
 neighbor 200.0.0.3 peer-group R 
 neighbor 200.0.0.9 peer-group R 
 exit-address-family 

Autonomous System 2, PE2 Configuration

PE2: Company 
! 
ip cef 
! 
ip vrf V1 
 rd 2:109 
 route-target export 1:100 
 route-target import 1:100 
! 
interface Loopback0 
 ip address 200.0.0.9 255.255.255.255 
 ip router isis 
! 
interface Loopback1 
 ip vrf forwarding V1 
 ip address 1.0.0.9 255.255.255.255 
! 
interface Serial0/0 
 description Bethel 
 no ip address 
 encapsulation frame-relay 
 frame-relay intf-type dce 
 no fair-queue 
 clockrate 2000000 
! 
interface Serial0/0.1 point-to-point 
 description Bethel 
 ip vrf forwarding V1 
 ip unnumbered Loopback1 
 frame-relay interface-dlci 24 
! 
interface FastEthernet0/1 
 description Littleton 
 ip address 200.9.1.1 255.255.255.0 
 ip router isis 
 tag-switching ip 
! 
router ospf 10 vrf V1 
 log-adjacency-changes 
 redistribute bgp 2 subnets 
 network 1.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0 
! 
router isis 
 net 49.0002.0000.0000.0009.00 
! 
router bgp 2 
 no synchronization 
 bgp log-neighbor-changes 
 neighbor 200.0.0.8 remote-as 2 
 neighbor 200.0.0.8 update-source Loopback0 
 ! 
address-family ipv4 vrf V1 
 redistribute connected 
 redistribute ospf 10 
 no auto-summary 
 no synchronization 
 exit-address-family 
 address-family vpnv4 
 neighbor 200.0.0.8 activate 
 neighbor 200.0.0.8 send-community extended 
 exit-address-family 

Autonomous System 2, CE2 Configuration

CE2: Company 
! 
interface Loopback0 
 ip address 1.0.0.11 255.255.255.255 
! 
interface Serial0 
 description Pax 
 no ip address 
 encapsulation frame-relay 
 no fair-queue 
 clockrate 2000000 
! 
interface Serial0.1 point-to-point 
 description Pax 
 ip unnumbered Loopback0 
 frame-relay interface-dlci 24 
! 
router ospf 1 
 network 1.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0 

Configuring EBGP Routing to Exchange VPN Routes Between Autonomous Systems in a Confederation

The network topology in Figure 55 shows a single ISP that is partitioning the backbone with confederations. The AS number of the provider is 100. The two autonomous systems run their own IGPs and are configured as follows:

Autonomous system 1 (AS1) includes PE1, P1, EBGP1. The IGP is OSPF.

Autonomous system 2 (AS2) includes PE2, P2, EBGP2. The IGP is ISIS.

CE1 and CE2 belongs to the same VPN, which is called VPN1.

The P routers are route reflectors.

EBGP1 is configured with the redistribute connected subnets router configuration command.

EBGP2 is configured with the neighbor next-hop-self router configuration command.

Figure 55 Configuring Two Autonomous Systems in a Confederation

Autonomous System 1, CE1 Configuration

CE1: Company 
! 
interface Loopback1 
 ip address 1.0.0.6 255.255.255.255 
! 
interface Serial1/3 
 description Veritas 
 no ip address 
 encapsulation frame-relay 
 frame-relay intf-type dce 
! 
interface Serial1/3.1 point-to-point 
 description Veritas 
 ip address 1.6.2.1 255.255.255.252 
 frame-relay interface-dlci 22 
! 
router ospf 1 
 network 1.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0 

Autonomous System 1, PE1 Configuration

PE1: Company 
! 
ip cef 
! 
ip vrf V1 
 rd 1:105 
 route-target export 1:100 
 route-target import 1:100 
! 
interface Serial0/0 
 description Burlington 
 no ip address 
 encapsulation frame-relay 
 no fair-queue 
 clockrate 2000000 
! 
interface Serial0/0.3 point-to-point 
 description Burlington 
 ip vrf forwarding V1 
 ip address 1.6.2.2 255.255.255.252 
 frame-relay interface-dlci 22 
! 
interface Ethernet0/1 
 description Vermont 
 ip address 100.2.2.5 255.255.255.0 
 tag-switching ip 
! 
router ospf 1 
 log-adjacency-changes 
 network 100.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0 
! 
router ospf 10 vrf V1 
 log-adjacency-changes 
 redistribute bgp 1 metric 100 subnets 
 network 1.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0 
! 
router bgp 1 
no synchronization 
bgp confederation identifier 100 
bgp confederation identifier 100 
neighbor R peer-group 
neighbor R remote-as 1 
neighbor R update-source Loopback0 
neighbor 100.0.0.2 peer-group R 
no auto-summary 
 ! 
 address-family ipv4 vrf V1 
 redistribute ospf 10 
 no auto-summary 
 no synchronization 
 exit-address-family 
 ! 
 address-family vpnv4 
 neighbor R activate 
 neighbor R send-community extended 
 neighbor 100.0.0.2 peer-group R 
 no auto-summary 
 exit-address-family 

Autonomous System 1, P1 Configuration

P1: Company 
! 
ip cef 
! 
interface Loopback0 
 ip address 100.0.0.2 255.255.255.255 
! 
interface Ethernet0/1 
 description Ogunquit 
 ip address 100.2.1.1 255.255.255.0 
 tag-switching ip 
! 
interface FastEthernet2/0 
 description Veritas 
 ip address 100.2.2.1 255.255.255.0 
 duplex auto 
 speed auto 
 tag-switching ip 
! 
router ospf 1 
 log-adjacency-changes 
 network 100.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0 
! 
router bgp 1 
no synchronization 
bgp log-neighbor-changes 
bgp confederation identifier 100 
neighbor R peer-group 
neighbor R remote-as 1 
neighbor R update-source Loopback0 
neighbor R route-reflector-client 
neighbor 100.0.0.4 peer-group R 
neighbor 100.0.0.5 peer-group R 
 ! 
 address-family vpnv4 
 neighbor R activate 
 neighbor R route-reflector-client 
 neighbor R send-community extended 
 neighbor 100.0.0.4 peer-group R 
 neighbor 100.0.0.5 peer-group R 
 exit-address-family 

Autonomous System 1, EBGP1 Configuration

EBGP1: Company 
! 
ip cef 
! 
interface Loopback0 
 ip address 100.0.0.4 255.255.255.255 
! 
interface Ethernet0/1 
 description Vermont 
 ip address 100.2.1.40 255.255.255.0 
 tag-switching ip 
! 
interface ATM1/0 
 description Lowell 
 no ip address 
 no atm scrambling cell-payload 
 no atm ilmi-keepalive 
! 
interface ATM1/0.1 point-to-point 
 description Lowell 
 ip address 12.0.0.1 255.255.255.252 
 pvc 1/100 
! 
router ospf 1 
 log-adjacency-changes 
 redistribute connected subnets 
 network 100.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0 
! 
router bgp 1 
no synchronization 
no bgp default route-target filter 
bgp log-neighbor-changes 
bgp confederation identifier 100 
bgp confederation peers 1 
neighbor R peer-group 
neighbor R remote-as 1 
neighbor R update-source Loopback0 
neighbor 12.0.0.2 remote-as 2 
neighbor 12.0.0.2 next-hop-self 
neighbor 100.0.0.2 peer-group R 
no auto-summary 
 ! 
 address-family vpnv4 
neighbor R activate 
neighbor R send-community extended 
neighbor 12.0.0.2 activate 
neighbor 12.0.0.2 next-hop-self 
neighbor 12.0.0.2 send-community extended 
neighbor 100.0.0.2 peer-group R 
no auto-summary 
exit-address-family 

Autonomous System 2, EBGP2 Configuration

EBGP2: Company 
! 
ip cef 
! 
ip vrf V1 
 rd 2:103 
 route-target export 1:100 
 route-target import 1:100 
! 
interface Loopback0 
 ip address 200.0.0.3 255.255.255.255 
 ip router isis 
! 
interface Loopback1 
 ip vrf forwarding V1 
 ip address 1.0.0.3 255.255.255.255 
! 
interface Serial0/0 
 description Littleton 
 no ip address 
 encapsulation frame-relay 
 load-interval 30 
 no fair-queue 
 clockrate 2000000 
! 
interface Serial0/0.2 point-to-point 
 description Littleton 
 ip unnumbered Loopback0 
 ip router isis 
 tag-switching ip 
 frame-relay interface-dlci 23 
! 
interface ATM1/0 
 description Ogunquit 
 no ip address 
 atm clock INTERNAL 
 no atm scrambling cell-payload 
 no atm ilmi-keepalive 
! 
interface ATM1/0.1 point-to-point 
 description Ogunquit 
 ip address 12.0.0.2 255.255.255.252 
 pvc 1/100 
! 
router isis 
 net 49.0002.0000.0000.0003.00 
! 
router bgp 2 
no synchronization 
no bgp default route-target filter 
bgp log-neighbor-changes 
bgp confederation identifier 100 
bgp confederation peers 1 
neighbor 12.0.0.1 remote-as 1 
neighbor 12.0.0.1 next-hop-self 
neighbor 200.0.0.8 remote-as 2 
neighbor 200.0.0.8 update-source Loopback0 
neighbor 200.0.0.8 next-hop-self 
 ! 
address-family ipv4 vrf V1 
 redistribute connected 
 no auto-summary 
 no synchronization 
 exit-address-family 
 ! 
address-family vpnv4 
neighbor 12.0.0.1 activate 
neighbor 12.0.0.1 next-hop-self 
neighbor 12.0.0.1 send-community extended 
neighbor 200.0.0.8 activate 
neighbor 200.0.0.8 next-hop-self 
neighbor 200.0.0.8 send-community extended 
exit-address-family 

Autonomous System 2, P2 Configuration

P2: Company 
! 
ip cef 
! 
ip vrf V1 
 rd 2:108 
 route-target export 1:100 
 route-target import 1:100 
! 
interface Loopback0 
 ip address 200.0.0.8 255.255.255.255 
 ip router isis 
! 
interface Loopback1 
 ip vrf forwarding V1 
 ip address 1.0.0.8 255.255.255.255 
! 
interface FastEthernet0/0 
 description Pax 
 ip address 200.9.1.2 255.255.255.0 
 ip router isis 
 tag-switching ip 
! 
interface Serial5/0 
 description Lowell 
 no ip address 
 encapsulation frame-relay 
 frame-relay intf-type dce 
! 
interface Serial5/0.1 point-to-point 
 description Lowell 
 ip unnumbered Loopback0 
 ip router isis 
 tag-switching ip 
 frame-relay interface-dlci 23 
! 
router isis 
 net 49.0002.0000.0000.0008.00 
! 
router bgp 2 
no synchronization 
bgp log-neighbor-changes 
bgp confederation identifier 100 
neighbor R peer-group 
neighbor R remote-as 2 
neighbor R update-source Loopback0 
neighbor R route-reflector-client 
neighbor 200.0.0.3 peer-group R 
neighbor 200.0.0.9 peer-group R 
 ! 
address-family ipv4 vrf V1 
 redistribute connected 
 no auto-summary 
 no synchronization 
 exit-address-family 
 ! 
address-family vpnv4 
 neighbor R activate 
 neighbor R route-reflector-client 
 neighbor R send-community extended 
 neighbor 200.0.0.3 peer-group R 
 neighbor 200.0.0.9 peer-group R 
 exit-address-family 

Autonomous System 2, PE2 Configuration

PE2: Company 
! 
ip cef 
! 
ip vrf V1 
 rd 2:109 
 route-target export 1:100 
 route-target import 1:100 
! 
interface Loopback0 
 ip address 200.0.0.9 255.255.255.255 
 ip router isis 
! 
interface Loopback1 
 ip vrf forwarding V1 
 ip address 1.0.0.9 255.255.255.255 
! 
interface Serial0/0 
 description Bethel 
 no ip address 
 encapsulation frame-relay 
 frame-relay intf-type dce 
 no fair-queue 
 clockrate 2000000 
! 
interface Serial0/0.1 point-to-point 
 description Bethel 
 ip vrf forwarding V1 
 ip unnumbered Loopback1 
 frame-relay interface-dlci 24 
! 
interface FastEthernet0/1 
 description Littleton 
 ip address 200.9.1.1 255.255.255.0 
 ip router isis 
 tag-switching ip 
! 
router ospf 10 vrf V1 
 log-adjacency-changes 
 redistribute bgp 2 subnets 
 network 1.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0 
! 
router isis 
 net 49.0002.0000.0000.0009.00 
! 
router bgp 2 
no synchronization 
bgp log-neighbor-changes 
bgp confederation identifier 100 
neighbor 200.0.0.8 remote-as 2 
neighbor 200.0.0.8 update-source Loopback0 
 ! 
 address-family ipv4 vrf V1 
 redistribute connected 
 redistribute ospf 10 
 no auto-summary 
 no synchronization 
 exit-address-family 
 address-family vpnv4 
 neighbor 200.0.0.8 activate 
 neighbor 200.0.0.8 send-community extended 
 exit-address-family 

Autonomous System 2, CE2 Configuration

CE2: Company 
! 
interface Loopback0 
 ip address 1.0.0.11 255.255.255.255 
! 
interface Serial0 
 description Pax 
 no ip address 
 encapsulation frame-relay 
 no fair-queue 
 clockrate 2000000 
! 
interface Serial0.1 point-to-point 
 description Pax 
 ip unnumbered Loopback0 
 frame-relay interface-dlci 24 
! 
router ospf 1 
 network 1.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0 

Implementing MPLS QoS Example

Figure 56 illustrates a sample MPLS topology that implements the MPLS QoS feature. The following sections contain the configuration commands entered on Routers R1 to R6 and on Switches 1 and 2 included in this figure.

Figure 56 Sample MPLS Topology Implementing QoS

Configuring CEF Example

The following configuration commands enable CEF. CEF switching is a prerequisite for the MPLS feature and must be running on all routers in the network:

ip cef distributed
tag-switching ip
!

Running IP on Router 2 Example

The following commands enable IP routing on Router 2. All routers must have IP enabled:


Note Router 2 is not part of the MPLS network.


!
ip routing
!
hostname R2
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 10.10.10.10 255.255.255.255
!
interface POS0/3
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
crc 16
 clock source internal
!
router ospf 100
 network 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 100
!

Running IP on Router 1 Example

The following commands enable IP routing on Router 1:


Note Router 1 is not part of the MPLS network.


ip routing 
!
hostname R1
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 15.15.15.15 255.255.255.255
!
interface POS0/3
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
crc 16
 clock source internal
!
router ospf 100
 network 15.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 100

Running MPLS on Router 4 Example

Router 4 is a label edge router. CEF and the MPLS feature must be enabled on this router. CAR is also configured on Router 4 on interface POS3/0/0 (see the following section on configuring CAR).

!
hostname R4
!
ip routing
tag-switching ip
tag-switching advertise-tags
!
ip cef distributed
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 11.11.11.11 255.255.255.255
!
interface Ethernet0/1
 ip address 90.0.0.1 255.0.0.0
tag-switching ip
!

Configuring CAR Example

Lines 3 and 4 of the following sample configuration contain the CAR rate policies. Line 3 sets the committed information rate (CIR) at 155,000,000 bits and the normal burst/maximum burst size at 200,000/800,000 bytes. The conform action (action to take on packets) sets the IP precedence and sends the packets that conform to the rate limit. The exceed action sets the IP precedence and sends the packets when the packets exceed the rate limit.

!
interface POS3/0/0
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
rate-limit input 155000000 2000000 8000000 conform-action set-prec-transmit 5
exceed-action set-prec-transmit 1
 ip route-cache distributed
!
router ospf 100
 network 11.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 100
 network 90.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 100

Running MPLS on Router 3 Example

Router 3 is running MPLS. CEF and the MPLS feature must be enabled on this router. Router 3 contains interfaces that are configured for WRED, multi-VC, per-VC WRED, WFQ, and CAR. The following sections contain these sample configurations:

!
hostname R3
!
ip cef distributed
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 12.12.12.12 255.255.255.255
!
interface Ethernet0/1
 ip address 90.0.0.2 255.0.0.0
tag-switching ip

Configuring Point-to-Point WRED Example

The following commands configure WRED on an ATM interface. In this example, the commands refer to a PA-A1 port adapter.

!
interface ATM1/1/0
ip route-cache distributed
 atm clock INTERNAL
 random-detect
!

Configuring an Interface for Multi-VC Mode Example

The following commands configure interface ATM1/1/0 for multi-VC mode. In this example, the commands refer to a PA-A1 port adapter.

!
interface ATM1/1/0.1 tag-switching
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
tag-switching atm multi-vc
 tag-switching ip
!

Configuring WRED and Multi-VC Mode on a PA-A3 Port-Adapter Interface Example

The commands to configure a PA-A3 port adapter differ slightly from the commands to configure a PA-A1 port adapter as shown previously.

On an PA-A3 port-adapter interface, distributed WRED (DWRED) is supported only per-VC, not per-interface.

To configure a PA-A3 port adapter, enter the following commands:

!
interface ATM1/1/0
ip route-cache distributed
atm clock INTERNAL
!
interface ATM 1/1/0.1 tag-switching
ip unnumbered Loopback0
tag-switching multi-vc 
tag-switching random detect attach groupname
!

Configuring Per-VC WRED Example

The following commands configure per-VC WRED on a PA-A3 port adapter only:


Note The PA-A1 port adapter does not support the per-VC WRED drop mechanism.


!interface ATM2/0/0
 no ip address
ip route-cache distributed

interface ATM2/0/0.1 point-to-point
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 no ip directed-broadcast
 pvc 10/100 
  random-detect
  encapsulation aal5snap
  exit
 !
 tag-switching ip

Configuring WRED and WFQ Example

Lines 5 and 6 of the following sample configuration contain the commands for configuring WRED and WFQ on interface Hssi2/1/0:

!
interface Hssi2/1/0
 ip address 91.0.0.1 255.0.0.0
ip route-cache distributed
tag-switching ip
 random-detect
fair queue tos
hssi internal-clock
!

Configuring CAR Example

Lines 3 and 4 of the following sample configuration contain the CAR rate policies. Line 3 sets the CIR at 155,000,000 bits and the normal burst/maximum burst size at 200,000/800,000 bytes. The conform action (action to take on packets) sets the IP precedence and sends the packets that conform to the rate limit. The exceed action sets the IP precedence and sends the packets when the packets exceed the rate limit.

!
interface POS3/0/0
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
rate-limit input 155000000 2000000 8000000 conform-action set-prec-transmit 2
exceed-action set-prec-transmit 2
 ip route-cache distributed
!
router ospf 100
 network 12.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 100
 network 90.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 100
 network 91.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 100
!
ip route 93.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 Hssi2/1/0 91.0.0.2
!

Running MPLS on Router 5 Example

Router 5 is running the MPLS feature. CEF and MPLS must be enabled on this router. Router 5 has also been configured to create an ATM subinterface in multi-VC mode and to create a PVC on a point-to-point subinterface. The sections that follow contain these sample configurations.

!
hostname R5
!
ip cef distributed
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 13.13.13.13 255.255.255.255
!
interface Ethernet0/2
 ip address 92.0.0.1 255.0.0.0
tag-switching ip

Configuring an ATM Interface Example

The following commands create an ATM interface:

!
interface ATM1/0/0
 no ip address
ip route-cache distributed
 atm clock INTERNAL
!

Configuring an ATM MPLS Subinterface in Multi-VC Mode Example

The following commands create an MPLS subinterface in multi-VC mode:

!
interface ATM1/0/0.1 tag-switching
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
tag-switching atm multi-vc
 tag-switching ip
!

Configuring a PVC on Point-to-Point Subinterface Example

The following commands create a PVC on a point-to-point subinterface (interface ATM1/0/0.2).

!
interface ATM1/0/0.2 point-to-point
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
pvc 10/100 
  random-detect
  encapsulation aal5snap
  exit
 !
 tag-switching ip
!
interface Hssi3/0
 ip address 91.0.0.2 255.0.0.0
tag-switching ip
 hssi internal-clock
!
router ospf 100
 network 13.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 100
 network 91.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 100
 network 92.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 100
!

Running MPLS on Router 6 Example

Router 6 is running the MPLS feature. CEF and MPLS must be enabled on this router. The following commands configure MPLS on an ethernet interface:

!
hostname R6
!
ip cef distributed
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 14.14.14.14 255.255.255.255
!
interface Ethernet0/1
 ip address 93.0.0.1 255.0.0.0
tag-switching ip
!
interface Ethernet0/2
 ip address 92.0.0.2 255.0.0.0
 tag-switching ip
!
interface Ethernet0/3
 ip address 94.0.0.1 255.0.0.0
 tag-switching ip
!
router ospf 100
 network 14.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 100
 network 92.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 100
 network 93.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 100
 network 94.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 100
!

Configuring ATM Switch 2 Example

Switch 2 is configured for MPLS and creates an ATM Forum PVC. The following commands configure MPLS on ATM switch2:

!
hostname S2
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 16.16.16.16 255.255.255.255
!
interface ATM0/0/0
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
tag-switching ip
!
interface ATM0/0/1
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 tag-switching ip
atm pvc 10 100 interface ATM0/0/0 10 100

interface ATM0/0/2
 no ip address
 no ip directed-broadcast
!
interface ATM0/0/3
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
tag-switching ip
!
interface ATM1/1/0
ip unnumbered Loopback0
tag-switching ip
!
router ospf 100
 network 16.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 100
!

Configuring ATM Switch 1 Example

Switch 1 is configured to create an ATM Forum PVC. The following commands configure MPLS on ATM switch1:

!
hostname S1
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 17.17.17.17 255.255.255.255
!
interface ATM0/0/0
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
tag-switching ip
!

Configuring Label VCs and an ATM Forum PVC Example

Line 3 of the following sample configuration contains the configuration command for an ATM Forum PVC:

!
interface ATM0/1/1
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
atm pvc 10 100  interface  ATM0/0/0 10 100 
 tag-switching ip
!
interface ATM1/1/0
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
tag-switching ip
!
router ospf 100
 network 17.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 100
!

Configuring an MPLS LSC Examples

The following sections present the following MPLS LSC configuration examples:

Configuring ATM-LSRs Example

Configuring Multi-VCs Example

Configuring ATM-LSRs with a Cisco 6400 NRP Operating as LSC Example

Configuring ATM LSRs Through ATM Network Using Cisco 7200 LSCs Implementing Virtual Trunking Example

Configuring ATM LSRs Through ATM Network Using Cisco 6400 NRP LSCs Implementing Virtual Trunking Example

Configuring LSC Hot Redundancy Example

Configuring LSC Warm Standby Redundancy Example

Configuring an Interface Using Two VSI Partitions Example

Using an Access List to Control the Creation of Headend VCs

Configuring ATM-LSRs Example

The network topology shown in Figure 57 incorporates two ATM-LSRs in an MPLS network. This topology includes two LSCs (Cisco 7200 routers), two BPX service nodes, and two edge LSRs (Cisco 7500 routers).

For the IGX, use the following commands:

extended-port atm1/0 descriptor 0.x.x.0  
tag-control-protocol vsi slaves 32 id x

Figure 57 ATM-LSR Network Configuration Example

Based on Figure 57, the following configuration examples are provided:

LSC1 Configuration

BPX1 and BPX2 Configuration

LSC2 Configuration

Edge LSR1 Configuration

Edge LSR2 Configuration

LSC1 Configuration

7200 LSC1:
ip cef 
	!
	interface loopback0
ip address 192.103.210.5 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM3/0
	no ip address
	tag-control-protocol vsi
!
interface XTagATM13
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 1.3
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-15
		tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM22
	extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.2
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip

BPX1 and BPX2 Configuration

BPX1 and BPX2:
	uptrk 1.1
	addshelf 1.1 v 1 1
	cnfrsrc 1.1 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 2 15 26000 100000
	uptrk 1.3
	cnfrsrc 1.3 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 2 15 26000 100000
	uptrk 2.2
	cnfrsrc 2.2 256 252207 y 1 e 512 4096 2 5 26000 100000

Note For the shelf controller, you must configure a VSI partition for the slave control port interface (addshelf 1.1, cnfrsrc 1.1...). However, do not configure an XTagATM port for the VSI partition (for example, XTagATM11).


LSC2 Configuration

7200 LSC2:
ip cef 
!
interface loopback0
ip address 142.2.143.22 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM3/0 
	no ip address
	tag-control-protocol vsi 
	!
	interface XTagATM13
	extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 1.3
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-15
		tag-switching ip
	!
	interface XTagATM22
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.2
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip
!

Edge LSR1 Configuration

7500 LSR1:
	ip cef distributed 
	!
interface loopback 0
ip address 142.6.132.2 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0.5 tag-switching
		ip unnumbered loopback 0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip

Edge LSR2 Configuration

7200 LSR2:
	ip cef 
interface loopback 0
ip address 142.6.142.2 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM2/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM2/0.9 tag-switching
		ip unnumbered loopback 0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip

Configuring Multi-VCs Example

When you configure multi-VC support, four label VCs for each destination are created by default, as follows:

Standard (for class 0 and class 4 traffic)

Available (for class 1 and class 5 traffic)

Premium (for class 2 and class 6 traffic)

Control (for class 3 and class 7 traffic)

This section provides examples for the following configurations, based on the sample network configuration shown earlier in Figure 57:

LSC1 Configuration

BPX1 and BPX2 Configuration

LSC2 Configuration

Edge LSR1 Configuration

Edge LSR2 Configuration


Note The IGX series ATM switches do not support QoS.


LSC1 Configuration

7200 LSC1:
ip cef
	!
	interface loopback0
		ip address 192.103.210.5 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM3/0
no ip address
	tag-control-protocol vsi
!
interface XTagATM13
		ip unnumbered loopback 0
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 1.3
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-15
		tag-switching atm cos available 25
		tag-switching atm cos standard 25
		tag-switching atm cos premium 25
		tag-switching atm cos control 25
	tag-switching ip
	!
interface XTagATM23
		ip unnumbered loopback 0
	extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.2
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching atm cos available 20
		tag-switching atm cos standard 30
		tag-switching atm cos premium 25
		tag-switching atm cos control 25
tag-switching ip

BPX1 and BPX2 Configuration

BPX1 and BPX2:
	uptrk 1.1
	addshelf 1.1 v 1 1
	cnfrsrc 1.1 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 2 15 26000 100000
	uptrk 1.3
	cnfrsrc 1.3 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 2 15 26000 100000
	uptrk 2.2
	cnfrsrc 2.2 256 252207 y 1 e 512 4096 2 5 26000 100000

LSC2 Configuration

7200 LSC2:
	ip cef 
	!
	interface loopback0
		ip address 142.2.143.22 255.255.255.255
	!
		interface ATM3/0 
		no ip address
		tag-control-protocol vsi
	!
	interface XTagATM13
		ip unnumbered loopback 0
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 1.3
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-15
		tag-switching atm cos available 25
		tag-switching atm cos standard 25
		tag-switching atm cos premium 25
		tag-switching atm cos control 25
	tag-switching ip
	!
interface XTagATM23
		ip unnumbered loopback 0
	extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.2
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching atm cos available 20
		tag-switching atm cos standard 30
		tag-switching atm cos premium 25
		tag-switching atm cos control 25
tag-switching ip

Edge LSR1 Configuration

7500 LSR1:
	ip cef distributed
interface loopback 0
ip address 142.6.132.2 255.255.255.255 
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0.5 tag-switching
		ip unnumbered loopback 0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching atm multi-vc
		tag-switching ip

Edge LSR2 Configuration

7200 LSR2:
	ip cef 
interface loopback 0
ip address 142.2.142.2 255.255.255.255 
	!
	interface ATM2/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM2/0.9 tag-switching
ip unnumbered loopback 0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching atm multi-vc
		tag-switching ip

QoS Support

If LSC1 supports QoS, but LSC2 does not, LSC1 makes VC requests for the following default classes:

Control=QoS3

Standard=QoS1

LSC2 ignores the call field in the request and allocates two UBR label VCs.

If LSR1 supports QoS, but LSR2 does not, LSR2 receives the request to create multiple label VCs, but by default, creates class 0 only (UBR).

Configuring ATM-LSRs with a Cisco 6400 NRP Operating as LSC Example

When you use the NRP as an MPLS LSC in the Cisco 6400 UAC, you must configure the NSP to provide connectivity between the NRP and the Cisco BPX switch. When configured in this way (as shown in Figure 58), the NRP is connected to the NSP by means of the internal interface ATM3/0/0, while external connectivity from the Cisco 6400 UAC to the Cisco BPX switch is provided by means of the external interface ATM1/0/0 from the NSP.

Figure 58 Cisco 6400 UAC NRP Operating As an LSC

Based on Figure 58, the following configuration examples are provided:

6400 UAC NSP Configuration

6400 UAC NRP LSC1 Configuration

BPX1 and BPX2 Configuration

6400 UAC NRP LSC2 Configuration

Edge LSR1 Configuration

Edge LSR2 Configuration

6400 UAC NSP Configuration

6400 NSP:
	!
interface ATM3/0/0
atm pvp 0 interface  ATM1/0/0 0
atm pvp 2 interface  ATM1/0/0 2 
atm pvp 3 interface  ATM1/0/0 3 
atm pvp 4 interface  ATM1/0/0 4 
atm pvp 5 interface  ATM1/0/0 5
atm pvp 6 interface  ATM1/0/0 6 
atm pvp 7 interface  ATM1/0/0 7 
atm pvp 8 interface  ATM1/0/0 8 
atm pvp 9 interface  ATM1/0/0 9
atm pvp 10 interface  ATM1/0/0 10 
atm pvp 11 interface  ATM1/0/0 11
atm pvp 12 interface  ATM1/0/0 12
atm pvp 13 interface  ATM1/0/0 13
atm pvp 14 interface  ATM1/0/0 14 
atm pvp 15 interface  ATM1/0/0 15

Note Instead of configuring multiple PVCs, you can also configure PVP 0 by deleting all well-known VCs. For example, you can use the atm manual-well-known-vc delete interface command on both interfaces and then configure PVP 0, as follows:
atm pvp 0 interface ATM1/0/0 0


6400 UAC NRP LSC1 Configuration

ip cef
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 142.2.143.22 255.255.255.255
!
interface ATM0/0/0
			no ip address
tag-control-protocol vsi
!
interface XTagATM13
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 extended-port ATM0/0/0 bpx 1.3
 tag-switching atm vpi 2-15
 tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM22
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 extended-port ATM0/0/0 bpx 2.2
 tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
 tag-switching ip
!
tag-switching atm disable-headend-vc

BPX1 and BPX2 Configuration

BPX1 and BPX2:
	uptrk 1.1
	addshelf 1.1 v 1 1
	cnfrsrc 1.1 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 2 15 26000 100000
	uptrk 1.3
	cnfrsrc 1.3 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 2 15 26000 100000
	uptrk 2.2
	cnfrsrc 2.2 256 252207 y 1 e 512 4096 2 5 26000 100000

Note For the shelf controller, you must configure a VSI partition for the slave control port interface (addshelf 1.1, cnfrsrc 1.1...). However, do not configure an XTagATM port for the VSI partition (for example, XTagATM11).


6400 UAC NRP LSC2 Configuration

ip cef
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 192.103.210.5 255.255.255.255
!
interface ATM0/0/0
no ip address
tag-control-protocol vsi
!
interface XTagATM13
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 extended-port ATM0/0/0 bpx 1.3
 tag-switching atm vpi 2-15
 tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM22
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 extended-port ATM0/0/0 bpx 2.2
 tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
 tag-switching ip
!
tag-switching atm disable-headend-vc

Edge LSR1 Configuration

7500 LSR1:
	ip cef distributed 
	!
interface loopback 0
ip address 142.6.132.2 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0.22 tag-switching
		ip unnumbered loopback 0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip

Edge LSR2 Configuration

7500 LSR2:
	ip cef distributed 
	!
interface loopback 0
ip address 142.6.142.2 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0.22 tag-switching
		unnumbered loopback 0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip

Configuring ATM LSRs Through ATM Network Using Cisco 7200 LSCs Implementing Virtual Trunking Example

The network topology shown in Figure 59 incorporates two ATM-LSRs using virtual trunking to create an MPLS network through a private ATM Network. This topology includes the following:

Two LSCs (Cisco 7200 routers)

Two BPX service nodes

Two edge LSRs (Cisco 7500 and 7200 routers)

For the IGX, use the following commands:

extended-port atm1/0 descriptor 0.x.x.0  
tag-control-protocol vsi slaves 32 id x

Figure 59 ATM-LSR Virtual Trunking Through an ATM Network

Based on Figure 59, the following configuration examples are provided:

LSC1 Implementing Virtual Trunking Configuration

BPX1 and BPX2 Configuration

LSC2 Implementing Virtual Trunking Configuration

Edge LSR1 Configuration

Edge LSR2 Configuration

LSC1 Implementing Virtual Trunking Configuration

7200 LSC1:
ip cef 
	!
	interface loopback0
ip address 192.103.210.5 255.255.255.255
	!
interface ATM3/0
	no ip address
	tag-control-protocol vsi
!
interface XTagATM132
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 1.3.2
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 2
		tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM22
	extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.2
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
tag-switching ip

BPX1 and BPX2 Configuration

BPX1 and BPX2:
	uptrk 1.1
	addshelf 1.1 v 1 1
	cnfrsrc 1.1 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 2 15 26000 100000
	uptrk 1.3.2
cnftrk 1.3.2 100000 N 1000 7F V,TS,NTS,FR,FST,CBR,NRT-VBR,ABR,RT-VBR N TERRESTRIAL 10      	
	0 N N Y Y Y CBR 2
cnfrsrc 1.3.2 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 2 2 26000 100000
	uptrk 2.2
	cnfrsrc 2.2 256 252207 y 1 e 512 4096 2 5 26000 100000

Note For the shelf controller, you must configure a VSI partition for the slave control port interface (addshelf 1.1, cnfrsrc 1.1...). However, do not configure an XtagATM port for the VSI partition (for example, XtagATM11).


LSC2 Implementing Virtual Trunking Configuration

7200 LSC2:
ip cef 
!
interface loopback0
ip address 142.2.143.22 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM3/0 
	no ip address
	tag-control-protocol vsi 
	!
	interface XTagATM132
	extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 1.3.2
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 2
		tag-switching ip
	!
	interface XTagATM22
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.2
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip

Edge LSR1 Configuration

7500 LSR1:
	ip cef distributed 
interface loopback 0
ip address 142.6.132.2 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0.22 tag-switching
		ip unnumbered loopback 0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip

Edge LSR2 Configuration

7200 LSR2:
	ip cef 
interface loopback 0
ip address 142.6.142.2 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM2/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM2/0.22 tag-switching
		ip unnumbered loopback 0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip

Configuring ATM LSRs Through ATM Network Using Cisco 6400 NRP LSCs Implementing Virtual Trunking Example

The network topology shown in Figure 60 incorporates two ATM-LSRs using virtual trunking to create an MPLS network through a private ATM network. This topology includes two LSCs (Cisco 6400 UAC NRP routers), two BPX service nodes, and two edge LSRs (Cisco 7500 and 7200 routers).

Figure 60 Cisco 6400 NRP Operating as LSC Implementing Virtual Trunking

Based on Figure 60, the following configuration examples are provided:

6400 UAC NSP Configuration

6400 UAC NRP LSC1 Implementing Virtual Trunking Configuration

BPX1 and BPX2 Configuration

6400 UAC NRP LSC2 Implementing Virtual Trunking Configuration

Edge LSR1 Configuration

Edge LSR2 Configuration

6400 UAC NSP Configuration

6400 NSP:
	!
interface ATM3/0/0
atm pvp 0 interface  ATM1/0/0 0
atm pvp 2  interface  ATM1/0/0 2 
atm pvp 3  interface  ATM1/0/0 3 
atm pvp 4  interface  ATM1/0/0 4 
atm pvp 5  interface  ATM1/0/0 5
atm pvp 6  interface  ATM1/0/0 6 
atm pvp 7  interface  ATM1/0/0 7 
atm pvp 8  interface  ATM1/0/0 8 
atm pvp 9  interface  ATM1/0/0 9
atm pvp 10 interface  ATM1/0/0 10 
atm pvp 11 interface  ATM1/0/0 11
atm pvp 12 interface  ATM1/0/0 12
atm pvp 13 interface  ATM1/0/0 13
atm pvp 14 interface  ATM1/0/0 14 
atm pvp 15 interface  ATM1/0/0 15

Note Instead of configuring multiple PVCs, you can also configure PVP 0 by deleting all well-known VCs. For example, you can use the atm manual-well-known-vc delete interface command on both interfaces and then configure PVP 0, as follows:
atm pvp 0 interface ATM1/0/0 0


6400 UAC NRP LSC1 Implementing Virtual Trunking Configuration

ip cef
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 142.2.143.22 255.255.255.255
!
interface ATM0/0/0
			no ip address
tag-control-protocol vsi
!
interface XTagATM132
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 extended-port ATM0/0/0 bpx 1.3.2
 tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 2
 tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM22
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 extended-port ATM0/0/0 bpx 2.2
 tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
 tag-switching ip
!
tag-switching atm disable-headend-vc
BPX1 and BPX2 Configuration
BPX1 and BPX2:
	uptrk 1.1
	addshelf 1.1 v 1 1
	cnfrsrc 1.1 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 2 15 26000 100000
	uptrk 1.3.2
cnftrk 1.3.2 100000 N 1000 7F V,TS,NTS,FR,FST,CBR,NRT-VBR,ABR,RT-VBR N TERRESTRIAL 10      	
	0 N N Y Y Y CBR 2
cnfrsrc 1.3.2 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 2 2 26000 100000
	uptrk 2.2
	cnfrsrc 2.2 256 252207 y 1 e 512 4096 2 5 26000 100000

Note For the shelf controller, you must configure a VSI partition for the slave control port interface (addshelf 1.1, cnfrsrc 1.1...). However, do not configure an XtagATM port for the VSI partition (for example, XtagATM11).


6400 UAC NRP LSC2 Implementing Virtual Trunking Configuration

ip cef
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 192.103.210.5 255.255.255.255
!
interface ATM0/0/0
no ip address
tag-control-protocol vsi
!
interface XTagATM132
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 extended-port ATM0/0/0 bpx 1.3.2
 tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 2
 tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM22
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 extended-port ATM0/0/0 bpx 2.2
 tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
 tag-switching ip
!
tag-switching atm disable-headend-vc

Edge LSR1 Configuration

7500 LSR1:
	ip cef distributed 
	!
interface loopback 0
ip address 142.6.132.2 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0.22 tag-switching
		ip unnumbered loopback 0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip

Edge LSR2 Configuration

7500 LSR2:
	ip cef distributed 
	!
interface loopback 0
ip address 142.6.142.2 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0.22 tag-switching
		unnumbered loopback 0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip

Configuring LSC Hot Redundancy Example

The network topology shown in Figure 61 incorporates two ATM-LSRs in an MPLS network. This topology includes two LSCs on each BPX node and four edge LSRs.

The following configuration examples show the label-switching configuration for both standard downstream-on-demand interfaces and downstream on demand over a VP-tunnel. The difference between these two types of configurations is as follows:

Standard interface configuration configures a VPI range of one or more VPIs while LDP control information flows in PVC 0,32.

VP-tunnel configures a single VPI (such as vpi 12) and uses a tag-switching atm control-vc of vpi,32 global configuration command (for example, 12,32). You can use a VP-tunnel to establish label-switching neighbor relationships through a private ATM cloud.

The following configuration examples are provided in this section:

LSC 1A Configuration

LSC 1B Configuration

LSC 2A Configuration

LSC 2B Configuration

BPX1 and BPX2 Configuration

Edge LSR 7200-1 Configuration

Edge LSR 7500-1 Configuration

Edge LSR 7500-2 Configuration

Edge LSR 7200-2 Configuration

For the IGX, use the following commands:

extended-port atm1/0 descriptor 0.x.x.0  
tag-control-protocol vsi slaves 32 id x

Figure 61 ATM-LSR Network Configuration Example


Note In the following configuration examples for the LSCs, you can use the tag-switching request-tags for global configuration command instead of the tag-switching atm disable headend-vc global configuration command.


LSC 1A Configuration

7200 LSC 1A:
ip cef 
!
tag-switching atm disable-headend vc	
!
	interface loopback0
ip address 192.103.210.5 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM3/0
	no ip address
	tag-control-protocol vsi id 1
!
interface XTagATM12
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 1.2
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM15
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 1.5
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-15
		tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM1612
		ip unnumbered loopback0
	extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 1.6.12
		tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 12
		tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM2612
		ip unnumbered loopback0
	extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.6.12
		tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 12
		tag-switching ip

LSC 1B Configuration

7200 LSC 1B:
ip cef 
!
tag-switching atm disable-headend vc	
!
	!
	interface loopback0
ip address 192.103.210.6 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM3/0 
	no ip address
	tag-control-protocol vsi id 2
!
interface XTagATM22
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.2
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM25
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.5
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-15
		tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM1622
		ip unnumbered loopback0
	extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 1.6.22
		tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 22
		tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM2622
		ip unnumbered loopback0
	extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.6.22
		tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 22
		tag-switching ip

LSC 2A Configuration

7200 LSC 2A:
ip cef  
!
tag-switching atm disable-headend vc	
!
	interface loopback0
ip address 192.103.210.7 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM3/0 
	no ip address
	tag-control-protocol vsi id 1
!
interface XTagATM12
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 1.2
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM15
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 1.5
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-15
		tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM1612
		ip unnumbered loopback0
	extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 1.6.12
		tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 12
		tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM2612
		ip unnumbered loopback0
	extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.6.12
		tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 12
		tag-switching ip

LSC 2B Configuration

7200 LSC 2B:
ip cef 
!
tag-switching atm disable-headend vc	
!
	interface loopback0
ip address 192.103.210.8 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM3/0
	no ip address
	tag-control-protocol vsi id 2
!
interface XTagATM22
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.2
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM25
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.5
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-15
		tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM1622
		ip unnumbered loopback0
	extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 1.6.22
		tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 22
		tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM2622
		ip unnumbered loopback0
	extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.6.22
		tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 22
		tag-switching ip

BPX1 and BPX2 Configuration

BPX1 and BPX2:
	uptrk 1.1
	addshelf 1.1 vsi 1 1
cnfrsrc 1.1 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 2 15 26000 100000
	upln 1.2
upport 1.2
	cnfrsrc 1.2 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 2 5 26000 100000
	uptrk 1.5
	cnfrsrc 1.5 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 2 15 26000 100000
	uptrk 1.6.12
cnftrk 1.6.12 110000 N 1000 7F V,TS,NTS,FR,FST,CBR,NRT-VBR,ABR,
       RT-VBR N TERRESTRIAL 10 0 N N Y Y Y CBR 12
	cnfrsrc 1.6.12 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 12 12 26000 100000
	uptrk 1.6.22
cnftrk 1.6.22 110000 N 1000 7F V,TS,NTS,FR,FST,CBR,NRT-VBR,ABR,
       RT-VBR N TERRESTRIAL 10 0 N N Y Y Y CBR 22
	cnfrsrc 1.6.22 256 252207 y 2 e 512 6144 22 22 26000 100000
		uptrk 2.1
	addshelf 2.1 vsi 2 2
cnfrsrc 2.1 256 252207 y 2 e 512 6144 2 15 26000 100000
	upln 2.2
upport 2.2
	cnfrsrc 2.2 256 252207 y 2 e 512 4096 2 5 26000 100000
uptrk 2.5
	cnfrsrc 2.5 256 252207 y 2 e 512 6144 2 15 26000 100000
	uptrk 2.6.12
cnftrk 2.6.12 110000 N 1000 7F V,TS,NTS,FR,FST,CBR,NRT-VBR,ABR,
       RT-VBR N TERRESTRIAL 10 0 N N Y Y Y CBR 12
	cnfrsrc 2.6.12 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 12 12 26000 100000
	uptrk 2.6.22
cnftrk 2.6.22 110000 N 1000 7F V,TS,NTS,FR,FST,CBR,NRT-VBR,ABR,
       RT-VBR N TERRESTRIAL 10 0 N N Y Y Y CBR 22
	cnfrsrc 2.6.22 256 252207 y 2 e 512 6144 22 22 26000 100000

Note For the shelf controller, you must configure a VSI partition for the slave control port interface (addshelf 1.1, cnfrsrc 1.1...). However, do not configure an XtagATM port for the VSI partition (for example, XtagATM11).


Edge LSR 7200-1 Configuration

7200-1 edge LSR:
	ip cef 
	!
	interface loopback0
ip address 192.103.210.1 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM2/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM2/0.12 tag-switching
		ip unnumbered loopback 0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip
!
	interface ATM3/0
		no ip address

	interface ATM3/0.22 tag-switching
		ip unnumbered loopback 0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip

Edge LSR 7500-1 Configuration

7500-1 edge LSR:
	ip cef distributed 
	!
	interface loopback0
ip address 192.103.210.2 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0.1612 tag-switching
ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 12
		tag-switching ip
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0.1622 tag-switching
ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 22
		tag-switching ip

Edge LSR 7500-2 Configuration

7500-2 edge LSR:
	ip cef distributed 
	!
	interface loopback0
ip address 192.103.210.3 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0.12 tag-switching
ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip
	!	!
	interface ATM3/0/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM3/0/0.22 tag-switching
ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip

Edge LSR 7200-2 Configuration

7200-2 edge LSR:
	ip cef 
	!
	interface loopback0
ip address 192.103.210.4 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM2/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM2/0.1612 tag-switching
ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 12
		tag-switching ip
	!
	interface ATM2/0.1622 tag-switching
ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 22
		tag-switching ip

Configuring LSC Warm Standby Redundancy Example

The configuration of LSC Warm Standby redundancy can be implemented by configuring the redundant link for either a higher routing cost than the primary link or configuring a bandwidth allocation that is less desirable. This needs to be performed only at the edge LSR nodes, because the LSCs have been configured to disable the creation of headend VCs, which reduces the LVC overhead.

Configuring an Interface Using Two VSI Partitions Example

A special case may arise where a network topology can only support a neighbor relationship between peers using a single trunk or line interface. To configure the network, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Configure the interface to use both VSI partitions. The VSI partition configuration for the interface must be made with no overlapping VP space. For example, for interface 2.8 on the ATM-LSR, the following configuration is required:

uptrk 2.8
	cnfrsrc 2.8 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 2 15 26000 100000
	cnfrsrc 2.8 256 252207 y 2 e 512 6144 16 29 26000 100000

Thus partition 1 will create LVCs using VPIs 2-15 and partition 2 will create LVCs using VPIs 16-29.

Step 2 Configure the control-vc. Each LSC requires a control VC (default 0,32); however, only one LSC can use this defeat control-vc for any one trunk interface. The following command forces the control VC assignment.

	tag-switching atm control-vc <vpi>,<vci>

Therefore, LSC 1 XTagATM28 can use the default control-vc 0,32 (but it is suggested that you use 2,32 to reduce configuration confusion) and the LSC 2 XTagATM28 should use control-vc 16,32.


For the IGX, use the following commands:

extended-port atm1/0 descriptor 0.x.x.0  
tag-control-protocol vsi slaves 32 id x

The following example shows the configuration steps:

LSC1 Configuration

interface XTagATM2801
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.8
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-15
				tag-switching atm control-vc 2 32
tag-switching ip

LSC2 Configuration

interface XTagATM2802
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.8
		tag-switching atm vpi 16-29
				tag-switching atm control-vc 16 32
tag-switching ip

Using an Access List to Control the Creation of Headend VCs

The following example shows how to use an access list to control the creation of headend VCs in an MPLS network, which allows the network to support more destinations.

Figure 62 shows two edge LSRs and two ATM-LSRs. In the configuration, only LSPs between edge LSRs are required to provide label switched paths. Other LSPs are not essential. The LSPs between LSCs and between the LSCs and the edge LSRs are often unused and required only for monitoring and maintaining the network. In such cases the IP forwarding path is sufficient.

Figure 62 Sample MPLS Network

In networks that require connections only between edge LSRs, you can use the access list to eliminate the creation of unnecessary LSPs. This allows LVC resources to be conserved so that more edge LSR connections can be supported.

To prevent creation of LSPs between LSCs, create an access list that denies all 192.0.0.0/24 addresses. Then, to prevent creation of LVCs from the LSCs to the edge LSRs, create an access list that denies all 198.0.0.0/24 addresses. The configuration examples for LSC 1 and 2 show the commands for performing these tasks.

To prevent creation of LVCs from the edge LSRs to LSCs, create an access list at the edge LSRs that denies all 192.0.0.0/24 addresses. The configuration examples for edge LSR 1 and 2 show the commands for performing this task.

LSC 1 Configuration

7200 LSC1:
ip cef 
!
tag-switching request-tags for acl_lsc
ip access-list standard acl_lsc
deny   192.0.0.0 0.255.255.255
deny   198.0.0.0 0.255.255.255
permit any
!
	interface loopback0
ip address 192.0.0.1 255.255.255.255
!
	interface ATM3/0
	no ip address
	tag-control-protocol vsi
!
interface XTagATM13
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 1.3
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-15
		tag-switching ip
!
interface XTagATM22
	extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.2
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip

BPX1 and BPX2 Configuration

BPX1 and BPX2:
	uptrk 1.1
	addshelf 1.1 v 1 1
	cnfrsrc 1.1 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 2 15 26000 100000
	uptrk 1.3
	cnfrsrc 1.3 256 252207 y 1 e 512 6144 2 15 26000 100000
	uptrk 2.2
	cnfrsrc 2.2 256 252207 y 1 e 512 4096 2 5 26000 100000

Note For the shelf controller, you must configure a VSI partition for the slave control port interface (addshelf 1.1, cnfrsrc 1.1...). However, do not configure an XtagATM port for the VSI partition (for example, XtagATM11).


LSC 2 Configuration

7200 LSC2:
ip cef 
!
tag-switching request-tags for acl_lsc
ip access-list standard acl_lsc
deny   192.0.0.0 0.255.255.255
deny   198.0.0.0 0.255.255.255
permit any
!
interface loopback0
ip address 192.0.0.2 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM3/0 
	no ip address
	tag-control-protocol vsi 
	!
	interface XTagATM13
	extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 1.3
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-15
		tag-switching ip
	!
	interface XTagATM22
		extended-port ATM3/0 bpx 2.2
		ip unnumbered loopback0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip
!

Edge LSR 1 Configuration

7500 LSR1:
	ip cef distributed 
	!
tag-switching request-tags for acl_ler
ip access-list standard acl_ler
deny   192.0.0.0 0.255.255.255
permit any
!
interface loopback 0
ip address 198.0.0.1 255.255.255.255
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM2/0/0.22 tag-switching
		ip unnumbered loopback 0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip

Edge LSR 2 Configuration

7200 LSR2:
	ip cef 
	!
tag-switching request-tags for acl_ler
ip access-list standard acl_ler
deny   192.0.0.0 0.255.255.255
permit any
!
interface loopback 0
ip address 198.0.0.2 255.255.255.255
!
	interface ATM2/0
		no ip address
	!
	interface ATM2/0.22 tag-switching
		ip unnumbered loopback 0
		tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
		tag-switching ip

MPLS Egress NetFlow Accounting Example

In the following example, the VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) instances currently configured in the router is displayed:

Router# show ip vrf

  Name                             Default RD          Interfaces
  vpn1                             100:1               Ethernet1/4
                                                       Loopback1
  vpn3                             300:1               Ethernet1/2
                                                       Loopback2
Router# configure terminal

Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# interface eth1/4
Router(config-if)# mpls ?
  ip              Configure dynamic MPLS forwarding for IP
  label-protocol  Configure label/tag distribution protocol (LDP/TDP)
  mtu             Set tag switching Maximum Transmission Unit
  netflow         Configure Egress Netflow Accounting
  traffic-eng     Configure Traffic Engineering parameters

Router(config-if)# mpls net
Router(config-if)# mpls netflow ?
  egress  Enable Egress Netflow Accounting

MPLS egress NetFlow accounting is enabled on interface eth1/4 and debugging is turned on, as follows:

Router(config-if)# mpls netflow egress
Router(config-if)# 
Router(config-if)# 
Router# debug mpls netflow
MPLS Egress NetFlow debugging is on
Router#

The following example shows the current configuration in the router:

Router# show run
Building configuration...

Current configuration:
!
version 12.0
service timestamps debug uptime
service timestamps log uptime
no service password-encryption

ip cef
no ip domain-lookup
!

The VRF is defined, as follows:

ip vrf vpn1
 rd 100:1
 route-target export 100:1
 route-target import 100:1
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 41.41.41.41 255.255.255.255
 no ip directed-broadcast
 no ip mroute-cache
!
interface Ethernet1/4
 ip vrf forwarding vpn1
 ip address 180.1.1.1 255.255.255.0
 no ip directed-broadcast
mpls netflow egress
!