Cisco IOS Switching Services Command Reference, Release 12.2
Commands: show tag-switching tdp discovery through tunnel tsp-hop
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show tag-switching tdp discovery

Table Of Contents

show tag-switching tdp discovery

show tag-switching tdp neighbors

show tag-switching tdp parameters

show tag-switching tsp-tunnels

show vlans

show xtagatm cos-bandwidth-allocation xtagatm

show xtagatm cross-connect

show xtagatm vc

tag-control-protocol vsi

tag-switching advertise-tags

tag-switching atm allocation-mode

tag-switching atm control-vc

tag-switching atm cos

tag-switching atm disable-headend-vc

tag-switching atm maxhops

tag-switching atm multi-vc

tag-switching atm vc-merge

tag-switching atm vpi

tag-switching atm vp-tunnel

tag-switching cos-map

tag-switching ip (global configuration)

tag-switching ip (interface configuration)

tag-switching ip default-route

tag-switching mtu

tag-switching prefix-map

tag-switching request-tags for

tag-switching tag-range downstream

tag-switching tdp discovery

tag-switching tdp holdtime

tag-switching tsp-tunnels (global configuration)

tag-switching tsp-tunnels (interface configuration)

tunnel flow egress-records

tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng

tunnel mode tag-switching

tunnel mpls traffic-eng affinity

tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute announce

tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute metric

tunnel mpls traffic-eng bandwidth

tunnel mpls traffic-eng load-share

tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-option

tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-selection metric

tunnel mpls traffic-eng priority

tunnel tsp-hop


show tag-switching tdp discovery

To display the status of the LDP discovery process, use the show tag-switching tdp discovery command in privileged EXEC mode.

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

11.1 CT

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Status of the LDP discovery process means a list of interfaces over which LDP discovery is running.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show tag-switching tdp discovery command.

Router# show tag-switching tdp discovery

Local TDP Identifier:
    172.27.32.29:0
TDP Discovery Sources:
    Interfaces:
ATM0/0.1:       xmit/recv
ATM0/0.1:       xmit/rec
Ethernet4/0/1:  xmit/recv
Ethernet4/0/2:  xmit/recv
POS6/0/0:       xmit/recv

Table 94 describes the significant fields shown in the output.

Table 94 show tag-switching tdp discovery Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Local TDP Identifier

The LDP identifier for the local router. An LDP identifier is a 6-byte quantity displayed as an IP address:number.

The Cisco convention is to use a router ID for the first 4 bytes of the LDP identifier, and integers starting with 0 for the final 2 bytes of the IP address:number.

Interfaces

Lists the interfaces engaging in LDP discovery activity. "xmit" indicates that the interface is sending LDP discovery hello packets; "recv" indicates that the interface is receiving LDP discovery hello packets.


Related Commands

Command
Description

show tag-switching tdp neighbors

Displays the status of LDP sessions.


show tag-switching tdp neighbors

To display the status of Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) sessions, use the show tag-switching tdp neighbors command in privileged EXEC mode.

show tag-switching tdp neighbors [address | interface] [detail]

Syntax Description

address

(Optional) The neighbor that has this IP address.

interface

(Optional) LDP neighbors accessible over this interface.

detail

(Optional) Displays information in long form.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

11.1 CT

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The neighbor information branch can give information about all LDP neighbors, or it can be limited to

The neighbor with a specific IP address

LDP neighbors known to be accessible over a specific interface

Examples

The following is sample output from the show tag-switching tdp neighbors command:

Router# show tag-switching tdp neighbors

Peer TDP Ident: 10.220.0.7:1; Local TDP Ident 172.27.32.29:1
        TCP connection: 10.220.0.7.711 - 172.27.32.29.11029
        State: Oper; PIEs sent/rcvd: 17477/17487; Downstream on demand
Up time: 01:03:00
TDP discovery sources:
          ATM0/0.1
Peer TDP Ident: 210.10.0.8:0; Local TDP Ident 172.27.32.29:0
        TCP connection: 210.10.0.8.11004 - 172.27.32.29.711
        State: Oper; PIEs sent/rcvd: 14656/14675; Downstream
Up time: 2d5h
        TDP discovery sources:
          Ethernet4/0/1
          Ethernet4/0/2
          POS6/0/0
        Addresses bound to peer TDP Ident:
          99.101.0.8      172.27.32.28    10.105.0.8      10.92.0.8       
          10.205.0.8      210.10.0.8     

Table 95 describes the significant fields shown in the output.

Table 95 show tag-switching tdp neighbors Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Peer TDP Ident

The LDP identifier of the neighbor (peer device) for this session.

Local TDP Ident

The LDP identifier for the local LSR (TSR) for this session.

TCP connection

The TCP connection used to support the LDP session. The format for displaying the TCP connection is as follows:

peer IP address.peer port
local IP address
.local port

State

The state of the LDP session. Generally this is Oper (operational), but Transient is another possible state.

PIEs sent/rcvd

The number of LDP protocol information elements (PIEs) sent to and received from the session peer device. The count includes the transmission and receipt of periodic keepalive PIEs, which are required for maintenance of the LDP session.

Downstream

Indicates that the downstream method of label distribution is being used for this LDP session. When the downstream method is used, an LSR advertises all of its locally assigned (incoming) labels to its LDP peer device (subject to any configured access list restrictions).

Downstream on demand

Indicates that the downstream-on-demand method of label distribution is being used for this LDP session. When the downstream-on-demand method is used, an LSR advertises its locally assigned (incoming) labels to its LDP peer device only when the peer device asks for them.

Up time

The length of time the LDP session has existed.

TDP discovery sources

The sources of LDP discovery activity that led to the establishment of this LDP session.

Addresses bound to peer TDP Ident

The known interface addresses of the LDP session peer device. These are addresses that may appear as next hop addresses in the local routing table. They are used to maintain the label forwarding information base (LFIB).


Related Commands

Command
Description

show tag-switching tdp discovery

Displays the status of the LDP discovery process.


show tag-switching tdp parameters

To display available LDP (TDP) parameters, use the show tag-switching tdp parameters command in privileged EXEC mode.

show tag-switching tdp parameters

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

11.1 CT

This command was introduced.


Examples

The following is sample output from the show tag-switching tdp parameters command:

Router# show tag-switching tdp parameters

Protocol version: 1
 Downstream tag pool: min tag: 10; max_tag: 10000; reserved tags: 16
 Session hold time: 15 sec; keep alive interval: 5 sec
 Discovery hello: holdtime: 15 sec; interval: 5 sec
 Discovery directed hello: holdtime: 15 sec; interval: 5 sec
 Accepting directed hellos

Table 96 describes the significant fields shown in the output.

Table 96 show tag-switching tdp parameters Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Protocol version

Indicates the version of the LDP running on the platform.

Downstream tag pool

Describes the range of labels available for the platform to assign for label switching. The labels available run from the smallest label value (min label) to the largest label value (max label), with a modest number of labels at the low end of the range (reserved labels) reserved for diagnostic purposes.

Session hold time

Indicates the time to maintain an LDP session with an LDP peer device without receiving LDP traffic or an LDP keepalive from the peer device.

keep alive interval

Indicates the interval of time between consecutive transmission LDP keepalive messages to an LDP peer device.

Discovery hello

Indicates the amount of time to remember that a neighbor platform wants an LDP session without receiving an LDP hello message from the neighbor (hold time), and the time interval between sending LDP hello messages to neighbors (interval).

Discovery directed hello

Indicates the amount of time to remember that a neighbor platform wants an LDP session when the neighbor platform is not directly connected to the router and the neighbor platform has not sent an LDP hello message. The interval is known as hold time.

Also indicates the time interval between the transmission of hello messages to a neighbor not directly connected to the router.

Accepting directed hellos

Indicates that the platform will accept and act on directed LDP hello messages. This field may not be present.


Related Commands

Command
Description

tag-switching tdp discovery

Configures the interval between transmission of LDP discovery hello messages.

tag-switching tdp holdtime

Enables LSP tunnel functionality on a device.


show tag-switching tsp-tunnels

The show tag-switching tsp-tunnels command is replaced by the show mpls traffic-eng tunnels command. See the show mpls traffic-eng tunnels command for more information.

show vlans

To view virtual LAN (VLAN) subinterfaces, use the show vlans privileged EXEC command.

show vlans

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

11.0

This command was introduced.

12.1(3)T

This command was modified to display traffic count on FastEthernet subinterfaces.


Examples

The following is sample output from the show vlans command:

RouterC7xxx# show vlans

Virtual LAN ID:  2 (IEEE 802.1Q Encapsulation)

    vLAN Trunk Interface:   FastEthernet5/0.1
 
    Protocols Configured:   Address:              Received:        Transmitted:
            IP              56.0.0.3                    16               92129
 
Virtual LAN ID:  3 (IEEE 802.1Q Encapsulation)
 
    vLAN Trunk Interface:   Ethernet6/0/1.1
 
    Protocols Configured:   Address:              Received:        Transmitted:
            IP              36.0.0.3                  1558                1521
 
Virtual LAN ID:  4 (Inter Switch Link Encapsulation)
 
    vLAN Trunk Interface:   FastEthernet5/0.2     
 
    Protocols Configured:   Address:              Received:        Transmitted:
            IP              76.0.0.3                     0                   7

The following is sample output from the show vlans command indicating a native VLAN and a bridged group:

Virtual LAN ID:  1 (IEEE 802.1Q Encapsulation)

   vLAN Trunk Interface:   FastEthernet1/0/2

 This is configured as native Vlan for the following interface(s) :

FastEthernet1/0/2

   Protocols Configured:   Address: Received:        Transmitted:

Virtual LAN ID:  100 (IEEE 802.1Q Encapsulation)

   vLAN Trunk Interface:   FastEthernet1/0/2.1

   Protocols Configured:   Address: Received:        Transmitted:

        Bridging        Bridge Group 1 0                   0

Table 97 describes the significant fields shown in the output.

Table 97 show vlans Field Descriptions  

Field
Description

Virtual LAN ID

Domain number of the VLAN.

vLAN Trunk Interface

Subinterface that carries the VLAN traffic.

Protocols Configured

Protocols configured on the VLAN.

Address

Network address.

Received

Packets received.

Transmitted

Packets sent.


show xtagatm cos-bandwidth-allocation xtagatm

To display information about QoS bandwidth allocation on extended MPLS ATM interfaces, use the show xtagatm cos-bandwidth-allocation xtagatm EXEC command.

show xtagatm cos-bandwidth-allocation xtagatm [xtagatm interface number]

Syntax Description

xtagatm interface number

(Optional) Specifies the XTagATM interface number.


Defaults

Available 50 percent, control 50 percent.

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Use this command to display CoS bandwidth allocation information for the following CoS traffic categories:

Available

Standard

Premium

Control

Examples

The following example shows output from this command:

Router# show xtagatm cos-bandwidth-allocation xtagatm 123

CoS		Bandwidth allocation
available		25%
standard		25%
premium		25%
control		25%

show xtagatm cross-connect

To display information about the LSC view of the cross-connect table on the remotely controlled ATM switch, use the show xtagatm cross-connect EXEC command.

show xtagatm cross-connect [traffic] [{interface interface [vpi vci] | descriptor descriptor [vpi vci]]

Syntax Description

traffic

(Optional) Displays receive and transmit cell counts for each connection.

interface interface

(Optional) Displays only connections with an endpoint of the specified interface.

vpi vci

(Optional) Displays only detailed information on the endpoint with the specified VPI/VCI on the specified interface.

descriptor descriptor

(Optional) Displays only connections with an endpoint on the interface with the specified physical descriptor.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Related Commands

EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)T

This command was introduced.


Examples

Each connection is listed twice in the sample output from the show xtagatm cross-connect command under each interface that is linked by the connection. Connections are marked as -> (unidirectional traffic flow, into the first interface), <- (unidirectional traffic flow, away from the interface), or <-> (bidirectional).

The following is sample output from the show xtagatm cross-connect command:

Router# show xtagatm cross-connect

Phys Desc    VPI/VCI     Type   X-Phys Desc  X-VPI/VCI   State 

10.1.0       1/37        ->     10.3.0       1/35        UP  
10.1.0       1/34        ->     10.3.0       1/33        UP  
10.1.0       1/33        <->    10.2.0       0/32        UP  
10.1.0       1/32        <->    10.3.0       0/32        UP  
10.1.0       1/35        <-     10.3.0       1/34        UP  
10.2.0       1/57        ->     10.3.0       1/49        UP  
10.2.0       1/53        ->     10.3.0       1/47        UP  
10.2.0       1/48        <-     10.1.0       1/50        UP  
10.2.0       0/32        <->    10.1.0       1/33        UP  
10.3.0       1/34        ->     10.1.0       1/35        UP  
10.3.0       1/49        <-     10.2.0       1/57        UP  
10.3.0       1/47        <-     10.2.0       1/53        UP  
10.3.0       1/37        <-     10.1.0       1/38        UP  
10.3.0       1/35        <-     10.1.0       1/37        UP  
10.3.0       1/33        <-     10.1.0       1/34        UP 
10.3.0       0/32        <->    10.1.0       1/32        UP 

Table 98 describes the significant fields in the sample command output shown above.

Table 98 show xtagatm cross-connect Field Descriptions

Field
Description

Phys desc

Physical descriptor. A switch-supplied string identifying the interface on which the endpoint exists.

VPI/VCI

Virtual path identifier and virtual channel identifier for this endpoint.

Type

The notation -> indicates an ingress endpoint, where traffic is only expected to be received into the switch; <- indicates an egress endpoint, where traffic is only expected to be sent from the interface; <-> indicates that traffic is expected to be both sent and received at this endpoint.

X-Phys Desc

Physical descriptor for the interface of the other endpoint belonging to the cross-connect.

X-VPI/VCI

Virtual path identifier and virtual channel identifier of the other endpoint belonging to the cross-connect.

State

Indicates the status of the cross-connect to which this endpoint belongs. The state is typically UP; other values, all of which are transient, include the following:

DOWN

ABOUT_TO_DOWN

ABOUT_TO_CONNECT

CONNECTING

ABOUT_TO_RECONNECT

RECONNECTING

ABOUT_TO_RESYNC

RESYNCING

NEED_RESYNC_RETRY

ABOUT_TO_RESYNC_RETRY RETRYING_RESYNC

ABOUT_TO_DISCONNECT

DISCONNECTING


A sample of the detailed command output provided for a single endpoint is as follows.

Router# show xtagatm cross-connect descriptor 12.1.0 1 42 

Phys desc:   12.1.0
Interface:   n/a
Intf type:   switch control port
VPI/VCI:     1/42
X-Phys desc: 12.2.0
X-Interface: XTagATM0
X-Intf type: extended tag ATM
X-VPI/VCI:   2/38
Conn-state:  UP
Conn-type:   input/output
Cast-type:   point-to-point
Rx service type:   Tag COS 0
Rx cell rate:      n/a
Rx peak cell rate: 10000
Tx service type:   Tag COS 0
Tx cell rate:      n/a
Tx peak cell rate: 10000

Table 99 describes the significant fields in the sample command output shown above.

Table 99 show xtagatm cross-connect descriptor Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Phys desc

Physical descriptor. A switch-supplied string identifying the interface on which the endpoint exists.

Interface

The (Cisco IOS) interface name.

Intf type

Interface type. Can be either extended MPLS ATM or a switch control port.

VPI/VCI

Virtual path identifier and virtual channel identifier for this endpoint.

X-Phys desc

Physical descriptor for the interface of the other endpoint belonging to the cross-connect.

X-Interface

The (Cisco IOS) name for the interface of the other endpoint belonging to the cross-connect.

X-Intf type

Interface type for the interface of the other endpoint belonging to the cross-connect.

X-VPI/VCI

Virtual path identifier and virtual channel identifier of the other endpoint belonging to the cross-connect.

Conn-state

Indicates the status of the cross-connect to which this endpoint belongs. The cross-connect state is typically UP; other values, all of which are transient, include the following:

DOWN ABOUT_TO_DOWN ABOUT_TO_CONNECT

CONNECTING

ABOUT_TO_RECONNECT

RECONNECTING

ABOUT_TO_RESYNC

RESYNCING

NEED_RESYNC_RETRY

ABOUT_TO_RESYNC_RETRY

RETRYING_RESYNC

ABOUT_TO_DISCONNECT

DISCONNECTING

Conn-type

Input—Indicates an ingress endpoint where traffic is only expected to be received into the switch.

Output—Indicates an egress endpoint, where traffic is only expected to be sent from the interface.

Input/output—Indicates that traffic is expected to be both send and received at this endpoint.

Cast-type

Indicates whether the cross-connect is multicast.

Rx service type

Quality of service type for the receive, or ingress, direction. This is MPLS QoS <n>, (MPLS Quality of Service <n>), where n is in the range from 0 to 7 for input and input/output endpoints; this will be N/A for output endpoints. (In the first release, this is either 0 or 7.)

Rx cell rate

(Guaranteed) cell rate in the receive, or ingress, direction.

Rx peak cell rate

Peak cell rate in the receive, or ingress, direction, in cells per second. This is n/a for an output endpoint.

Tx service type

Quality of service type for the transmit, or egress, direction. This is MPLS QoS <n>, (MPLS Class of Service <n>), where n is in the range from 0 to 7 for output and input/output endpoints; this will be N/A for input endpoints.

Tx cell rate

(Guaranteed) cell rate in the transmit, or egress, direction.

Tx peak cell rate

Peak cell rate in the transmit, or egress, direction, in cells per second. This is N/A for an input endpoint.


show xtagatm vc

To display information about terminating VCs on extended MPLS ATM (XTagATM) interfaces, use the show xtagatm vc EXEC command.

show xtagatm vc [vcd [interface]]

Syntax Description

vcd

(Optional) Virtual circuit descriptor (virtual circuit number). If you specify the vcd argument, then detailed information about all VCs with that vcd appears. If you do not specify the vcd argument, a summary description of all VCs on all XTagATM interfaces appears.

interface

(Optional) Interface number. If you specify the interface and the vcd arguments, the single VC with the specified vcd on the specified interface is selected.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release
Modifications

12.0(5)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The columns in the output marked VCD, VPI, and VCI display information for the corresponding private VC on the control interface. The private VC connects the XTagATM VC to the external switch. It is termed private because its VPI and VCI are only used for communication between the MPLS LSC and the switch, and it is different from the VPI and VCI seen on the XTagATM interface and the corresponding switch port.

Examples

Each connection is listed twice in the sample output from the show xtagatm vc cross-connect command under each interface that is linked by the connection. Connections are marked as input (unidirectional traffic flow, into the interface), output (unidirectional traffic flow, away from the interface), or in/out (bidirectional).

The following is sample output from the show xtagatm vc command:

Router# show xtagatm vc

AAL / Control Interface 
Interface     VCD   VPI   VCI Type  Encapsulation  VCD   VPI   VCI Status
XTagATM0        1     0    32  PVC  AAL5-SNAP        2     0    33 ACTIVE
XTagATM0        2     1    33  TVC  AAL5-MUX         4     0    37 ACTIVE
XTagATM0        3     1    34  TVC  AAL5-MUX         6     0    39 ACTIVE

Table 100 describes the significant fields shown in the output.

Table 100 show xtagatm vc Field Descriptions

Field
Description

VCD

Virtual circuit descriptor (virtual circuit number).

VPI

Virtual path identifier.

VCI

Virtual circuit identifier.

Control Interf. VCD

VCD for the corresponding private VC on the control interface.

Control Interf. VPI

VPI for the corresponding private VC on the control interface.

Control Interf. VCI

VCI for the corresponding private VC on the control interface.

Encapsulation

Displays the type of connection on the interface.

Status

Displays the current state of the specified ATM interface.


Related Commands

Command
Description

show atm vc

Displays information about private ATM VCs.

show xtagatm cross-connect

Displays information about remotely connected ATM switches.


tag-control-protocol vsi

To configure the use of VSI on a particular master control port, use the tag-control-protocol vsi interface configuration command. To disable VSI, use the no form of this command.

tag-control-protocol vsi [id controller-id] [base-vc vpi vci] [slaves slave-count]
[keepalive timeout] [retry timeout-count]

no tag-control-protocol vsi [id controller-id] [base-vc vpi vci] [slaves slave-count]
[keepalive timeout] [retry timeout-count]

Syntax Description

id controller-id

(Optional) Determines the value of the controller-id field present in the header of each VSI message. The default is 1.

base-vc vpi vci

(Optional) Determines the VPI/VCI value for the channel to the first slave. The default is 0/40.

Together with the slave value, this value determines the VPI/VCI values for the channels to all of the slaves, which are as follows:

vpi/vci

vpi/vci+1, and so on

vpi/vci+slave_count-1

slaves slave-count

(Optional) Determines the number of slaves reachable through this master control port. The default is 14 (suitable for the Cisco BPX switch).

keepalive timeout

(Optional) Determines the value of the keepalive timer (in seconds). Make sure that the keepalive timer value is greater than the value of the retry_timer times the retry_count+1. The default is 15 seconds.

retry timeout-count

(Optional) Determines the value of the message retry timer (in seconds) and the maximum number of retries. The default is 8 seconds and 10 retries.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The command is only available on interfaces that can serve as a VSI master control port. We recommend that all options to the tag-control-protocol vsi command be entered at the same time.

After VSI is active on the control interface (through the earlier issuance of a tag-control-protocol vsi command), reentering the command may cause all associated XTagATM interfaces to shut down and restart. In particular, if you reenter the tag-control-protocol vsi command with any of the following options, the VSI shuts down and reactivates on the control interface:

id

base-vc

slaves

VSI remains continuously active (that is, the VSI does not shut down and then reactivate) if you reenter the tag-control-protocol vsi command with only one or both of the following options:

keepalive

retry

In either case, if you reenter the tag-control-protocol vsi command, this causes the specified options to take on the newly specified values; the other options retain their previous values. To restore default values to all the options, enter the no tag-control-protocol command, followed by the tag-control-protocol vsi command.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure the VSI driver on the control interface:

interface atm 0/0
tag-control-protocol vsi 0 51

tag-switching advertise-tags

To control the distribution of locally assigned (incoming) labels via the Label Distribution Protocol (LDP), use the tag-switching advertise-tags command in global configuration mode. To disable label advertisement, use the no form of this command.

tag-switching advertise-tags [for access-list-number [to access-list-number]]

no tag-switching advertise-tags [for access-list-number [to access-list-number]]

Syntax Description

for access-list-number

(Optional) Specifies which destinations should have their labels advertised.

to access-list-number

(Optional) Specifies which LSR neighbors should receive label advertisements.

An LSR is identified by the router ID that is the first 4 bytes of its 6-byte LDP identifier.


Defaults

The labels of all destinations are advertised to all LSR neighbors.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

11.1 CT

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

To enable the distribution of all locally assigned labels to all LDP neighbors, use the tag-switching advertise-tags command.

You can enter multiple tag-switching advertise-tags commands. Taken together, they determine how local labels are advertised.


Note This command has no effect for a TC-ATM interface. The effect is always as if the tag-switching advertise-tags command had been executed.


Examples

In the following example, the router is configured to advertise all locally assigned labels to all LDP neighbors. This is the default.

tag-switching advertise-tags

In the following example, the router is configured to advertise to all LDP neighbors labels for networks 10.101.0.0 and 10.221.0.0 only:

access-list 1 permit 10.101.0.0 0.0.255.255
access-list 4 permit 10.221.0.0 0.0.255.255 
tag-switching advertise-tags for 1 
tag-switching advertise-tags for 4 

In the following example, the router is configured to advertise all labels to all LDP neighbors except neighbor 10.101.0.8:

access-list 1 permit any  
access-list 2 deny  10.101.0.8  
tag-switching advertise-tags  
tag-switching advertise-tags for 1 to 2

tag-switching atm allocation-mode

To control the mode used for handling label binding requests on TC-ATM interfaces, use the tag-switching atm allocation-mode command in global configuration mode. To disable this feature, use the no form of this command.

tag-switching atm allocation-mode {optimistic | conservative}

no tag-switching atm allocation-mode {optimistic | conservative}

Syntax Description

optimistic

Label binding is returned immediately, and packets are discarded until the downstream setup is complete.

conservative

Label binding is delayed until the label VC has been set up downstream.


Defaults

The default is conservative.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

11.1 CT

This command was introduced.


Examples

In the following example, the mode for handling binding requests is set to optimistic on a TC-ATM interface:

tag-switching atm allocation-mode optimistic

tag-switching atm control-vc

The tag-switching atm control-vc command is replaced by the mpls atm control-vc command. See the mpls atm control-vc command for more information.

tag-switching atm cos

To change the value of configured bandwidth allocation for QoS, use the tag-switching atm cos xtagatm interface configuration command.

tag-switching atm cos [available | standard | premium | control] weight

Syntax Description

available

(Optional) Specifies the weight for the available class. This is the lowest class priority.

standard

(Optional) Specifies the weight for the standard class. This is the next lowest class priority.

premium

(Optional) Specifies the weight for the premium class. This is the next highest class priority.

control

(Optional) Specifies the weight for the control class. This is the highest class priority.

weight

Specifies the total weight for all QoS traffic classes. This value ranges from 0 to 100.


Defaults

Available 50 percent, control 50 percent

Command Modes

xtagatm interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modifications

12.0(5)T

This command was introduced.


Examples

The following example shows output from this command:

tag-switching atm cos
interface XTagATM 0
	ip unnumbered loopback0
	no ip directed-broadcast
	no ip route-cache cef
	extended-port ATM1/0 bpx 10.2
	tag-switching atm cos available 50
	tag-switching atm cos control 50
	tag-switching atm vpi 2-5
	tag-switching ip

tag-switching atm disable-headend-vc

To remove all headend VCs from the MPLS LSC and disable its ability to function as an edge LSR, use the tag-switching atm disable-headend-vc command. To restore the headend VCs of the MPLS LSC and restores full edge LSR functionality, use the no form of this command.

tag-switching atm disable-headend-vc

no tag-switching atm disable-headend-vc

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(7)DC

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The command prevents LSC from initiating headend VCs and hence reduces the number of VCs used in the network. The LSC can still terminate tailend VCs, if required.

Examples

In the following example, the MPLS LSC is disabled from acting like an edge LSR and therefore cannot create headend LVCs.

tag-switching atm disable-headend-vc

tag-switching atm maxhops

To limit the maximum hop count to a value you have specified, use the tag-switching atm maxhops command in global configuration mode. To ignore the hop count, use the no form of this command.

tag-switching atm maxhops [number]

no tag-switching atm maxhops

Syntax Description

number

(Optional) Maximum hop count.


Defaults

The default is 254.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

11.1 CT

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

When an ATM-LSR receives a BIND REQUEST, it does not send a BIND back if the value in the request is equal to the maxhops value. Instead, the ATM-LSR or LSR returns an error that specifies that the hop count has been reached.

When an ATM-LSR initiates a request for a label binding, it includes a parameter specifying the maximum number of hops that the request should travel before reaching the edge of the ATM Label Switching region. This is used to prevent forwarding loops in setting up label paths across the ATM region.

Examples

The following example sets the hop count limit to 2:

tag-switching atm maxhops 2

Related Commands

Command
Description

show isis database verbose

Displays the requested entries from the ATM LDP label binding database.


tag-switching atm multi-vc

To configure a router subinterface to create one or more tag-VCs over which packets of different classes are sent, use the tag-switching atm multi-vc command in ATM subinterface configuration submode. To disable this option, use the no form of this command.

tag-switching atm multi-vc

no tag-switching atm multi-vc

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

ATM subinterface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

This option is valid only on ATM MPLS subinterfaces.

Examples

The following commands configure interface a2/0/0.1 on the router for MPLS QoS multi-VC mode:

configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
int a2/0/0.1 tag-switching
tag atm multi-vc 
exit
exit

tag-switching atm vc-merge

To control whether vc-merge (multipoint-to-point) is supported for unicast label VCs, use the tag-switching atm vc-merge command in global configuration mode. To disable this feature, use the no form of this command.

tag-switching atm vc-merge

no tag-switching atm vc-merge

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

The default is enabled if the hardware supports the ATM-VC merge capability.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

11.1 CT

This command was introduced.


Related Commands

Command
Description

show tag-switching atm-tdp capability

Displays the ATM LDP label capabilities.


tag-switching atm vpi

The tag-switching atm vpi command is replaced by the mpls atm vpi command. See the mpls atm vpi command for more information.

tag-switching atm vp-tunnel

To specify an interface or a subinterface as a VP tunnel, use the tag-switching atm vp-tunnel interface configuration command.

tag-switching atm vp-tunnel vpi

Syntax Description

vpi

Provides VPI value for the local end of the tunnel.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The tag-switching atm vp-tunnel and tag-switching atm vpi commands are mutually exclusive.

This command is available on both extended MPLS ATM interfaces and on LC-ATM subinterfaces of ordinary router ATM interfaces. The command is not available on the LightStream 1010 device, where all subinterfaces are automatically VP tunnels.

On an XTagATM interface, the tunnel/nontunnel status and the VPI value to be used in case the XTagATM interface is a tunnel are normally learned from the switch through VSI interface discovery. Therefore, it is not necessary to use the tag-switching atm vp-tunnel command on an XTagATM interface in most applications.

Examples

The following example shows how to specify an MPLS subinterface VP tunnel with a VPI value of 4.

tag-switching atm vp-tunnel 4

tag-switching cos-map

To create a class map that specifies how classes map to label VCs when combined with a prefix map, use the tag-switching cos-map command in global configuration mode.

tag-switching cos-map number

Syntax Description

number

Unique number for a QoS map (from 1 to 255).


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)T

This command was introduced.


Examples

This example shows how to create a class map:

tag-switching cos-map 55
class 1 premium
exit

Related Commands

Command
Description

class (MPLS)

Configures an MPLS QoS map that specifies how classes map to LVCs when combined with a prefix map.

show tag-switching cos-map

Displays the QoS map used to assign quantity of LVC and associated QoS of those LVCs.


tag-switching ip (global configuration)

The tag-switching ip command is replaced by the mpls ip command. See the mpls ip (global configuration) command for more information.

tag-switching ip (interface configuration)

The tag-switching ip command is replaced by the mpls ip command. See the mpls ip (interface configuration) command for more information.

tag-switching ip default-route

The tag-switching ip default-route command is replaced by the mpls ip default-route command. See the mpls ip default-route command for more information.

tag-switching mtu

The tag-switching mtu command is replaced by the mpls mtu command. See the mpls mtu command for more information.

tag-switching prefix-map

To configure a router to use a specified QoS map when a label destination prefix matches the specified access list, use the tag-switching prefix-map command in ATM subinterface configuration submode.

tag-switching prefix-map prefix-map access-list access-list cos-map cos-map

Syntax Description

prefix-map

A unique number for a prefix map.

access-list access list

A unique number for a simple IP access list.

cos-map cos-map

A unique number for a CoS map.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

ATM subinterface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

This is a global command used to link an access list to a QoS map.

Examples

The following example links an access list to a QoS map:

tag-switching prefix-map 55 access-list 55 cos-map 55

Related Commands

Command
Description

show tag prefix-map

Displays the prefix map used to assign a QoS map to network prefixes matching a standard IP access list.


tag-switching request-tags for

To restrict the creation of LVCs through the use of access lists on the LSC or label edge router, use the tag-switching request-tags for global configuration command. To disable this feature, use the no form of this command.

tag-switching request-tags for access-list

no tag-switching request-tags for

Syntax Description

access-list

A named or numbered standard IP access list.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.1(5)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The command includes the following usage guidelines:

You can specify either an access list number or name.

When creating an access list, the end of the access list contains an implicit deny statement for everything if it did not find a match before reaching the end.

If you omit the mask from an IP host address access list specification, 0.0.0.0 is assumed to be the mask.

Examples

In the following example, headend LVCs are prevented from being established from the LSC to all 198.x.x.x destinations. The following commands are added to the LSC configuration:

tag-switching request-tags for 1
access-list 1 deny 198.0.0.0 0.255.255.255
access-list 1 permit any

Related Commands

Command
Description

access list

Creates access lists.

ip access-list

Permits or denies access to IP addresses.


tag-switching tag-range downstream

The tag-switching tag-range command is replaced by the mpls label range command. See the mpls label range command for more information.

tag-switching tdp discovery

To configure the interval between transmission of LDP (TDP) discovery hello messages, or the hold time for a LDP transport connection, use the tag-switching tdp discovery command in global configuration mode.

tag-switching tdp discovery {hello | directed hello} {holdtime | interval} seconds

Syntax Description

hello

Configures the intervals and hold times for directly connected neighbors.

directed-hello

Configures the intervals and hold times for neighbors that are not directly connected (for example, LDP sessions that run through a LSP tunnel).

holdtime

The interval for which a connection stays up if no hello messages are received. The default is 15 seconds.

interval

The period between the sending of consecutive hello messages. The default is 5 seconds.

seconds

The hold time or interval.


Defaults

holdtime: 15 seconds
interval: 5 seconds

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

11.1 CT

This command was introduced.


Examples

In the following example, the interval for which a connection stays up if no hello messages are received is set to 5 seconds:

tag-switching tdp discovery hello holdtime 5

Related Commands

Command
Description

show tag-switching tdp parameters

Displays available LDP parameters.

tag-switching tdp holdtime

Enables LSP tunnel functionality on a device.


tag-switching tdp holdtime

To enable LSP tunnel functionality on a device, use the tag-switching tdp holdtime command in global configuration mode.

tag-switching tdp holdtime seconds

Syntax Description

seconds

The time for which an LDP session is maintained in the absence of LDP messages from the session peer device.


Defaults

15 seconds

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

11.1 CT

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

When an LDP session is initiated, the hold time is set to the lower of the values configured at the two ends.

Examples

In the following example, the hold time of LDP sessions is configured for 30 seconds:

tag-switching tdp holdtime 30

Related Commands

Command
Description

show tag-switching tdp parameters

Displays available LDP parameters.

tag-switching tdp discovery

Configures the interval between transmission of LDP discovery hello messages.


tag-switching tsp-tunnels (global configuration)

The tag-switching tsp-tunnels command is replaced by the mpls traffic-eng tunnels command. See the mpls traffic-eng tunnels (global) command for more information.

tag-switching tsp-tunnels (interface configuration)

The tag-switching tsp-tunnels command is replaced by the mpls traffic-eng tunnels command. See the mpls traffic-eng tunnels (interface) command for more information.

tunnel flow egress-records

To create a NetFlow record for packets that are encapsulated by a generic routing encapsulation (GRE) tunnel when both NetFlow and CEF are enabled, use the tunnel flow egress-records command in interface configuration mode. To disable NetFlow record creation, use the no form of this command.

tunnel flow egress-records

no tunnel flow egress-records

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

A NetFlow record for encapsulated packets is not created.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(2)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

When this command is enabled on a GRE tunnel with both Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) and NetFlow enabled, a NetFlow record is created for packets that are encapsulated by the tunnel.

Examples

The following example enables NetFlow record creation:

tunnel flow egress records

Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip cache flow

Displays NetFlow switching statistics.


tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng

To set the mode of a tunnel to MPLS for traffic engineering, use the tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng interface configuration command. To disable this feature, use the no form of this command.

tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng

no tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)S

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

This command specifies that the tunnel interface is for an MPLS traffic engineering tunnel and enables the various tunnel MPLS configuration options.

Examples

In the following example, the mode of the tunnel is set to MPLS traffic engineering:

Router(config-if)# tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng

Related Commands

Command
Description

tunnel mpls traffic-eng affinity

Configures an affinity for an MPLS traffic engineering tunnel.

tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute announce

Instructs the IGP to use the tunnel in its enhanced SPF calculation (if the tunnel is up).

tunnel mpls traffic-eng bandwidth

Configures the bandwidth required for an MPLS traffic engineering tunnel.

tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-option

Configures a path option.

tunnel mpls traffic-eng priority

Configures setup and reservation priority for an MPLS traffic engineering tunnel.


tunnel mode tag-switching

The tunnel mode tag-switching command is replaced by the tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng command. See the tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng command for more information.

tunnel mpls traffic-eng affinity

To configure an affinity (the properties the tunnel requires in its links) for an MPLS traffic engineering tunnel, use the tunnel mpls traffic-eng affinity interface configuration command. To disable this feature, use the no form of this command.

tunnel mpls traffic-eng affinity properties [mask mask value]

no tunnel mpls traffic-eng affinity properties [mask mask value]

Syntax Description

properties

Attribute values required for links carrying this tunnel. A 32-bit decimal number. Valid values are from 0x0 to 0xFFFFFFFF, representing 32 attributes (bits), where the value of an attribute is 0 or 1.

mask mask value

(Optional) Link attribute to be checked. A 32-bit decimal number. Valid values are from 0x0 to 0xFFFFFFFF, representing 32 attributes (bits), where the value of an attribute is 0 or 1.


Defaults

properties: 0X00000000
mask value: 0X0000FFFF

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)S

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The affinity determines the attributes of the links that this tunnel will use (that is, the attributes for which the tunnel has an affinity). The attribute mask determines which link attribute the router should check. If a bit in the mask is 0, an attribute value of a link or that bit is irrelevant. If a bit in the mask is 1, the attribute value of a link and the required affinity of the tunnel for that bit must match.

A tunnel can use a link if the tunnel affinity equals the link attributes and the tunnel affinity mask.

Any properties set to 1 in the affinity should also be 1 in the mask. In other words, affinity and mask should be set as follows:

tunnel_affinity = (tunnel_affinity and tunnel_affinity_mask)

Examples

In the following example, the affinity of the tunnel is set to 0x0101 mask 0x303:

Router(config-if)# tunnel mpls traffic-eng affinity 0x0101 mask 0x303

Related Commands

Command
Description

mpls traffic-eng attribute-flags

Sets the attributes for the interface.

tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng

Sets the mode of a tunnel to MPLS for traffic engineering.


tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute announce

To specify that the IGP should use the tunnel (if the tunnel is up) in its enhanced shortest path first (SPF) calculation, use the tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute announce interface configuration command. To disable this feature, use the no form of this command.

tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute announce

no tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute announce

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

The IGP does not use the tunnel in its enhanced SPF calculation.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)S

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Currently, the only way to forward traffic onto a tunnel is by enabling this feature or by explicitly configuring forwarding (for example, with an interface static route).

Examples

In the following example, the instruction is given that if this tunnel is up, the IGP should use the tunnel in its enhanced SPF calculation:

Router(config-if)# tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute announce

In the following example, the instruction is given that if the IGP is using this tunnel in its enhanced SPF calculation, the IGP should give it an absolute metric of 10:

Router(config-if)# tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute announce metric absolute 10

In the following example, the tunnel requires 100 kBps of bandwidth:

Router(config-if)# tunnel mpls traffic-eng bandwidth 100

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip route

Establishes static routes.

tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng

Sets the mode of a tunnel to MPLS for traffic engineering.


tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute metric

To specify the MPLS traffic engineering tunnel metric that the IGP enhanced SPF calculation uses, use the tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute metric interface configuration command. To disable this feature, use the no form of this command.

tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute metric {absolute | relative} value

no tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute metric

Syntax Description

absolute

Absolute metric mode; you can enter a positive metric value.

relative

Relative metric mode; you can enter a positive, negative, or zero value.

value

The metric that the IGP enhanced SPF calculation uses. The relative value can be from -10 to 10.


Note Even though the value for a relative metric can be from -10 to 10, configuring a tunnel metric with a negative value is considered a misconfiguration. If from the routing table the metric to the tunnel tail appears to be 4, then the cost to the tunnel tail router is actually 3 because 1 is added to the cost for getting to the loopback address. In this instance, the lowest value that you can configure for the relative metric is -3.



Defaults

The default is metric relative 0.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)S

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

If you enter a relative value that causes the tunnel metric to be a negative number, the configuration is invalid.

Examples

The following example designates that the IGP enhanced SPF calculation will use MPLS traffic engineering tunnel metric negative 1:

Router(config-if)# tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute metric relative -1

Related Commands

Command
Description

show mpls traffic-eng autoroute

Displays the tunnels announced to IGP, including interface, destination, and bandwidth.

tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute announce

Instructs the IGP to use the tunnel (if it is up) in its enhanced SPF calculation.


tunnel mpls traffic-eng bandwidth

To configure the bandwidth required for an MPLS traffic engineering tunnel, use the tunnel mpls traffic-eng bandwidth interface configuration command. To disable this feature, use the no form of this command.

tunnel mpls traffic-eng bandwidth bandwidth

no tunnel mpls traffic-eng bandwidth bandwidth

Syntax Description

bandwidth

The bandwidth required for an MPLS traffic engineering tunnel. Bandwidth is specified in kBps.


Defaults

Default bandwidth is 0.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)S

This command was introduced.


Examples

In the following example, the bandwidth required for an MPLS traffic engineering tunnel is 1000:

Router(config-if)# tunnel mpls traffic-eng bandwidth 1000 1Xwn

Related Commands

Command
Description

show mpls traffic-eng tunnels

Displays tunnel information.


tunnel mpls traffic-eng load-share

To determine load-sharing among two or more Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) traffic engineering (TE) tunnels that begin at the same router and go to an identical destination, use the tunnel mpls traffic-eng load-share command in interface configuration mode. To disable this feature, use the no form of this command.

tunnel mpls traffic-eng load-share value

no tunnel mpls traffic-eng load-share value

Syntax Description

value

A value from which the head-end router will calculate the proportion of traffic to be sent down each of the parallel tunnels. Range is between 1 and 1000000.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.1(3)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Each parallel tunnel must be configured with this command. Specify a value to indicate the proportion of total traffic you want to be allocated into each individual tunnel. For example, if there are to be three parallel tunnels, and you want Tunnel1 to carry half of the traffic and the other two tunnels to carry one-quarter, you should enter the following values:

Tunnel1 -- 2

Tunnel2 -- 1

Tunnel3 -- 1

The ability to divide bandwidth in unequal amounts across traffic engineering tunnels has a finite granularity. This granularity varies by platform, with both hardware and software limits. If load-sharing is configured so that it exceeds the available granularity, the following message is displayed:

@FIB-4-UNEQUAL: Range of unequal path weightings too large for prefix x.x.x.x/y. Some 
available paths may not be used.

To eliminate this message, it is recommended that you change the requested bandwidth or load-share.

Examples

In the following example, three tunnels are configured, with the first tunnel receiving half of the traffic and the other two tunnels receiving one-quarter:

interface Tunnel1
ip unnumbered Loopback0
no ip directed-broadcast
tunnel destination 41.41.41.41
tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng
tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-option 10 dynamic
tunnel mpls traffic-eng load-share 2

interface Tunnel2
ip unnumbered Loopback0
no ip directed-broadcast
tunnel destination 41.41.41.41
tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng
tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-option 10 dynamic
tunnel mpls traffic-eng load-share 1

interface Tunnel3
ip unnumbered Loopback0
no ip directed-broadcast
tunnel destination 41.41.41.41
tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng
tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-option 10 dynamic
tunnel mpls traffic-eng load-share 1 

Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip route

Displays routing table information about tunnels, including their traffic share.

tunnel mpls traffic-eng bandwidth

Configures bandwidth in Kbps for an MPLS traffic engineering tunnel.


tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-option

To configure a path option for an MPLS traffic engineering tunnel, use the tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-option interface configuration command. To disable this feature, use the no form of this command.

tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-option number {dynamic | explicit {name path-name |
path-number}} [lockdown]

no tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-option number {dynamic | explicit {name path-name |
path-number}} [lockdown]

Syntax Description

number

When multiple path options are configured, lower numbered options are preferred.

dynamic

Path of the LSP is dynamically calculated.

explicit

Path of the LSP is an IP explicit path.

name path-name

Path name of the IP explicit path that the tunnel uses with this option.

path-number

Path number of the IP explicit path that the tunnel uses with this option.

lockdown

(Optional) The LSP cannot be reoptimized.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)S

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

You can configure multiple path options for a single tunnel. For example, there can be several explicit path options and a dynamic option for one tunnel. Path setup preference is for lower (not higher) numbers, so option 1 is preferred.

Examples

In the following example, the tunnel is configured to use a named IP explicit path:

Router(config-if)# tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-option 1 explicit name test

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip explicit-path

Enters the subcommand mode for IP explicit paths and creates or modifies the specified path.

show ip explicit-paths

Displays the configured IP explicit paths.

tunnel mpls traffic-eng priority

Configures the setup and reservation priority for an MPLS traffic engineering tunnel.


tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-selection metric

To specify the metric type to use for path calculation for a tunnel, use the tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-selection metric command in interface configuration mode. To remove the specified metric type, use the no form of this command.

tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-selection metric {igp | te}

no tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-selection metric

Syntax Description

igp

Use the Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) metric.

te

Use the traffic engineering (TE) metric.


Defaults

The default is the te metric.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(18)ST

This command was introduced.

12.2(14)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(14)S.

12.2(28)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(28)SB.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.


Usage Guidelines

The metric type to be used for path calculation for a given tunnel is determined as follows:

If the tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-selection metric command was entered to specify a metric type for the tunnel, use that metric type.

Otherwise, if the mpls traffic-eng path-selection metric was entered to specify a metric type, use that metric type.

Otherwise, use the default (te) metric.

Examples

The following commands specify that the igp metric should be used when you are calculating the path for Tunnel102:

Router(config)# interface tunnel102
Router(config-if)# tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-selection metric igp

Related Commands

Command
Description

mpls traffic-eng path-selection metric

Specifies the metric type to use for path calculation for TE tunnels for which no metric has been explicitly configured.


tunnel mpls traffic-eng priority

To configure the setup and reservation priority for an MPLS traffic engineering tunnel, use the tunnel mpls traffic-eng priority interface configuration command. To disable this feature, use the no form of this command.

tunnel mpls traffic-eng priority setup-priority [hold-priority]

no tunnel mpls traffic-eng priority setup-priority [hold-priority]

Syntax Description

setup-priority

The priority used when signalling an LSP for this tunnel to determine which existing tunnels can be preempted. Valid values are from 0 to 7, where a lower number indicates a higher priority. Therefore, an LSP with a setup priority of 0 can preempt any LSP with a non-0 priority.

hold-priority

(Optional) The priority associated with an LSP for this tunnel to determine if it should be preempted by other LSPs that are being signalled. Valid values are from 0 to 7, where a lower number indicates a higher priority.


Defaults

setup-priority: 7
hold-priority: The same value as the setup-priority

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)S

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

When an LSP is being signaled and an interface does not currently have enough bandwidth available for that LSP, the call admission software preempts lower-priority LSPs so that the new LSP can be admitted. (LSPs are preempted if that allows the new LSP to be admitted.)

In the described determination, the new LSP's priority is its setup priority and the existing LSP's priority is its hold priority. The two priorities make it possible to signal an LSP with a low setup priority (so that the LSP does not preempt other LSPs on setup) but a high hold priority (so that the LSP is not preempted after it is established).

Setup priority and hold priority are typically configured to be equal, and setup priority cannot be better (numerically smaller) than the hold priority.

Examples

In the following example, a tunnel is configured with a setup and hold priority of 1:

Router(config-if)# tunnel mpls traffic-eng priority 1

Related Commands

Command
Description

tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng

Sets the mode of a tunnel to MPLS for traffic engineering.


tunnel tsp-hop

To define hops in the path for the label switching tunnel, use the tunnel tsp-hop command in interface configuration mode. To remove these hops, use the no form of this command.

tunnel tsp-hop hop-number ip-address [lasthop]

no tunnel tsp-hop hop-number ip-address [lasthop]

Syntax Description

hop-number

The sequence number of the hop being defined in the path. The first number is 1, which identifies the hop just after the head hop.

ip-address

The IP address of the input interface on that hop.

lasthop

(Optional) Indicates that the hop being defined is the final hop in the path (the tunnel destination).


Defaults

No hops are defined.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

11.1 CT

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The list of tunnel hops must specify a strict source route for the tunnel. In other words, the router at hop <n> must be directly connected to the router at hop <n>+1.

Examples

The following example shows the configuration of a two-hop tunnel. The first hop router/switch is 82.0.0.2, and the second and last hop is router/switch 81.0.0.2.

interface tunnel 5

tunnel mode tag-switching
ip unnumbered e0/1
  tunnel tsp-hop 1 82.0.0.2
  tunnel tsp-hop 2 81.0.0.2 lasthop

Related Commands

Command
Description

tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng

Sets the encapsulation mode of the tunnel to label switching.