Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference, Release 12.2
Configuration File Management Commands
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Configuration File Management Commands

Table Of Contents

Configuration File Management Commands

Flash Memory File System Types

Replaced Commands

boot buffersize

boot config

boot host

boot network

clear parser cache

configure terminal

configure memory

configure overwrite-network

parser cache

service compress-config

service config

show configuration

show derived-config

show file

show parser statistics

show running-config

show running-config map-class

show startup-config


Configuration File Management Commands


This chapter provides detailed descriptions of commands used to manage configuration files in Cisco IOS Release 12.2. Configuration files contain the set of commands used to customize the function of the Cisco IOS software.

For configuration information and examples, refer to the "Managing Configuration Files" chapter in the Release 12.2 Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide.

Flash Memory File System Types

Cisco platforms generally use one of three different Flash memory file system types. Some commands are supported on only one or two file system types. This chapter notes commands that are not supported on all file system types.

Use Table 31 to determine which Flash memory file system type your platform uses.

Table 31 Flash Memory File System Types

Type
Platforms

Class A

Cisco 7000 family, Cisco 12000 series routers, LightStream1010 switch

Class B

Cisco 1003, Cisco 1004, Cisco 1005, Cisco 2500 series, Cisco 3600 series, and Cisco 4000 series routers, and Cisco AS5200 access servers

Class C

Cisco MC3810 multiservice concentrators, disk0 of Cisco SC3640 System Controllers


Replaced Commands

Some commands found in this chapter in previous releases of this book have been replaced. Older commands generally continue to provide the same functionality in the current release, but are no longer documented. Support for the older version of these commands may already be removed on your system, or may be removed in a future Cisco IOS software release.

Table 32 maps the old commands to their replacements.

Table 32 Replaced Commands 

Old Command
New Command

configure network

copy ftp:[[[//[username[:password]@]location]/directory]/filename] system:running-config

configure overwrite-network

copy ftp:[[[//[username[:password]@]location]/directory]/filename] nvram:startup-config

copy rcp running-config

copy rcp:[[[//[username@]location]/directory]/filename] system:running-config

copy running-config rcp

copy system:running-config rcp:[[[//[username@]location]/directory]/filename]

copy running-config startup-config

copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config

Note The copy running-config startup-config command has been replaced by the command shown here. However, the copy running-config startup-config command will continue to be supported as a command alias for the copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config command.

 

copy running-config tftp

copy system:running-config tftp:[[[//location]/directory]/filename]

copy tftp running-config

copy tftp:[[[//location]/directory]/filename] system:running-config

copy tftp startup-config

copy tftp:[[[//location]/directory]/filename] nvram:startup-config

erase startup-config

erase nvram:

show configuration

more nvram:startup-config

show file

more

show running-config

more system:running-config

Note The show running-config command has been replaced by the command shown here. However, the show running-config command will continue to be supported as a command alias for the more system:running-config command.

 

show startup-config

more nvram:startup-config

Note The show startup-config command has been replaced by the command shown here. However, the show startup-config command will continue to be supported as a command alias for the more nvram:startup-config command.

 

write erase

erase nvram:

write memory

copy running-config startup-config

or

copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config

write network

copy system:running-config ftp:[[[//[username[:password]@]location]/directory]/filename]

write terminal

show running-config

or

more system:running-config


For more information about these command replacements, see the description of the Cisco IOS File System (IFS) in the "Using the Cisco IOS File System" chapter in the Release 12.2 Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide.

boot buffersize

The boot buffersize global configuration command no longer functions.

Executing this command has no effect on the system. Using this command will not generate CLI errors; the boot buffersize command syntax is still allowed to be entered at the CLI and in configuration files in order to accommodate existing configuration scripts used by customers.

boot config

To specify the device and filename of the configuration file from which the router configures itself during initialization (startup), use the boot config global configuration command. This command is only available on Class A file system platforms. To remove the specification, use the no form of this command.

boot config file-system-prefix:[directory/]filename

no boot config

Syntax Description

file-system-prefix:

File system, followed by a colon (for example, nvram:, flash:, or slot0:).

directory/

(Optional) File system directory the configuration file is located in, followed by a forward slash (/).

filename

Name of the configuration file.


Defaults

NVRAM (nvram:)

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

11.0

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

This command is only available on Class A file system platforms.

You set the CONFIG_FILE environment variable in the current running memory when you use the boot config command. This variable specifies the configuration file used for initialization (startup). The configuration file must be an ASCII file located in either NVRAM or Flash memory.


Note When you use this global configuration command, you affect only the running configuration. You must save the environment variable setting to your startup configuration to place the information under ROM monitor control and to have the environment variable function as expected. Use the copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config command to save the environment variable from your running configuration to your startup configuration.


The software displays an error message and does not update the CONFIG_FILE environment variable in the following situations:

You specify nvram: as the file system, and it contains only a distilled version of the configuration. (A distilled configuration is one that does not contain access lists.)

You specify a configuration file in the filename argument that does not exist or is not valid.

The router uses the NVRAM configuration during initialization when the CONFIG_FILE environment variable does not exist or when it is null (such as at first-time startup). If the software detects a problem with NVRAM or the configuration it contains, the device enters setup mode. See the "Setup Command" chapter in this publication for more information on the setup command facility.

When you use the no form of this command, the router returns to using the default NVRAM configuration file as the startup configuration.

Examples

In the following example, the first line specifies that the router should use the configuration file named router-config located in internal Flash memory to configure itself during initialization. The third line copies the specification to the startup configuration, ensuring that this specification will take effect upon the next reload.

Router(config)# boot config flash:router-config 
Router(config)# end 
Router# copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config 

The following example instructs a Cisco 7500 series router to use the configuration file named router-config located on the Flash memory card inserted in the second PCMCIA slot of the RSP card during initialization. The third line copies the specification to the startup configuration, ensuring that this specification will take effect upon the next reload.

Router (config)# boot config slot1:router-config 
Router (config)# end 
Router# copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config 

Related Commands

Command
Description

show bootvar

Displays the contents of the BOOT environment variable, the name of the configuration file pointed to by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, the contents of the BOOTLDR environment variable, and the configuration register setting.


boot host

To specify the host-specific configuration file to be used at the next system startup, use the boot host global configuration command. To restore the host configuration filename to the default, use the no form of this command.

boot host remote-url

no boot host remote-url

Syntax Description

remote-url

Location of the configuration file. Use the following syntax:

ftp:[[[//[username[:password]@]location]/directory]/filename]

rcp:[[[//[username@]location]/directory]/filename]

tftp:[[[//location]/directory]/filename]


Defaults

If you do not specify a filename using this command, the router uses its configured host name to request a configuration file from a remote server. To form the configuration filename, the router converts its name to all lowercase letters, removes all domain information, and appends -confg or -config.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

10.0

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

This command instructs the system to "Boot using network configuration file x," where x is the filename specified in the remote-url argument. This command specifies the remote location and filename of the network configuration file to be used at the next system startup, as well as the protocol to be used to obtain the file.

When booting from a network server, routers ignore routing information, static IP routes, and bridging information. As a result, intermediate routers are responsible for handling FTP, rcp, or TFTP requests. Before booting from a network server, verify that a server is available by using the ping command.

Use the service config command to enable the loading of the specified configuration file at reboot time. Without this command, the router ignores the boot network command and uses the configuration information in NVRAM. If the configuration information in NVRAM is invalid or missing, the service config command is enabled automatically.

The network server will attempt to load two configuration files from remote hosts. The first is the network configuration file containing commands that apply to all network servers on a network. Use the boot network command to identify the network configuration file. The second is the host configuration file containing commands that apply to one network server in particular. Use the boot host command to identify the host configuration file.


Note In releases prior to Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)T and 12.3(1)B, the service config command is used in conjunction with the boot host or boot network command. To enable the router to automatically configure the system from the file specified by the boot host or boot network command you must enter the service config command.

With Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)T , 12.3(1)B, and later, you no longer have to specify the service config command for the boot host or boot network command to be active.

If you specify both the no service config command and the boot host command, the router attempts to find the specified host configuration file.

The service config command can also be used without the boot host or boot network command. If you do not specify host or network configuration filenames, the router uses the default configuration files. The default network configuration file is network-confg. The default host configuration file is host-confg, where host is the hostname of the router. If the Cisco IOS software cannot resolve its hostname, the default host configuration file is router-confg.


Loading a Configuration File Using rcp

The rcp software requires that a client send the remote username on each rcp request to the network server. If the server has a directory structure (such as UNIX systems), the rcp implementation searches for the configuration files starting in the directory associated with the remote username.

When you load a configuration file from a server using rcp, the Cisco IOS software sends the first valid username in the following list:

1. The username specified in the file-URL, if a username is specified.

2. The username set by the ip rcmd remote-username command, if the command is configured.

3. The router host name.


Note An account for the username must be defined on the destination server. If the network administrator of the destination server did not establish an account for the username, this command will not execute successfully.


Loading a Configuration File Using FTP

The FTP protocol requires a client to send a remote username and password on each FTP request to a server. The username and password must be associated with an account on the FTP server. If the server has a directory structure, the configuration file or image copied from the directory associated with the username on the server. Refer to the documentation for your FTP server for more details.

When you load a configuration file from a server using FTP, the Cisco IOS software sends the first valid username in the following list:

1. The username specified in the boot host command, if a username is specified.

2. The username set by the ip ftp username command, if the command is configured.

3. Anonymous.

The router sends the first valid password in the following list:

1. The password specified in the boot host command, if a password is specified.

2. The password set by the ip ftp password command, if the command is configured.

3. The router forms a password username@routername.domain. The variable username is the username associated with the current session, routername is the configured host name, and domain is the domain of the router.

Examples

The following example sets the host filename to wilma-confg at address 192.168.7.19:

Router(config)# boot host tftp://192.168.7.19/usr/local/tftpdir/wilma-confg
Router(config)# service config

Related Commands

Command
Description

boot network

Specifies the remote location and filename of the network configuration file to be used at the next system boot (startup).

service config

Enables autoloading of configuration files from a network server.


boot network

To change the default name of the network configuration file from which to load configuration commands, use the boot network global configuration command. To restore the network configuration filename to the default, use the no form of this command.

boot network remote-url

no boot network remote-url

Syntax Description

remote-url

Location of the configuration file. Use the following syntax:

ftp:[[[//[username[:password]@]location]/directory]/filename]

rcp:[[[//[username@]location]/directory]/filename]

tftp:[[[//location]/directory]/filename]


Defaults

The default filename is network-config.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

10.0

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

This command instructs the system to "Boot using network configuration file x," where x is the filename specified in the remote-url argument. This command specifies the remote location and filename of the network configuration file to be used at the next system startup, as well as the protocol to be used to obtain the file.

When booting from a network server, routers ignore routing information, static IP routes, and bridging information. As a result, intermediate routers are responsible for handling FTP, rcp, or TFTP requests. Before booting from a network server, verify that a server is available by using the ping command.

Use the service config command to enable the loading of the specified configuration file at reboot time. Without this command, the router ignores the boot network command and uses the configuration information in NVRAM. If the configuration information in NVRAM is invalid or missing, the service config command is enabled automatically.

The network server will attempt to load two configuration files from remote hosts. The first is the network configuration file containing commands that apply to all network servers on a network. Use the boot network command to identify the network configuration file. The second is the host configuration file containing commands that apply to one network server in particular. Use the boot host command to identify the host configuration file.


Note In releases prior to Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)T and 12.3(1)B, the service config command is used in conjunction with the boot host or boot network command. To enable the router to automatically configure the system from the file specified by the boot host or boot network command you must enter the service config command.

With Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)T , 12.3(1)B, and later, you no longer have to specify the service config command for the boot host or boot network command to be active.

If you specify both the no service config command and the boot host command, the router attempts to find the specified host configuration file.

The service config command can also be used without the boot host or boot network command. If you do not specify host or network configuration filenames, the router uses the default configuration files. The default network configuration file is network-confg. The default host configuration file is host-confg, where host is the hostname of the router. If the Cisco IOS software cannot resolve its hostname, the default host configuration file is router-confg.


Loading a Configuration File Using rcp

The rcp software requires that a client send the remote username on each rcp request to the network server. If the server has a directory structure (such as UNIX systems), the rcp implementation searches for the configuration files starting in the directory associated with the remote username.

When you load a configuration file from a server using rcp, the Cisco IOS software sends the first valid username in the following list:

1. The username specified in the file-URL, if a username is specified.

2. The username set by the ip rcmd remote-username command, if the command is configured.

3. The router host name.


Note An account for the username must be defined on the destination server. If the network administrator of the destination server did not establish an account for the username, this command will not execute successfully.


Loading a Configuration File Using FTP

The FTP protocol requires a client to send a remote username and password on each FTP request to a server. The username and password must be associated with an account on the FTP server. If the server has a directory structure, the configuration file or image copied from the directory associated with the username on the server. Refer to the documentation for your FTP server for more details.

When you load a configuration file from a server using FTP, the Cisco IOS software sends the first valid username in the following list:

1. The username specified in the boot network command, if a username is specified.

2. The username set by the ip ftp username command, if the command is configured.

3. Anonymous.

The router sends the first valid password in the following list:

1. The password specified in the boot network command, if a password is specified.

2. The password set by the ip ftp password command, if the command is configured.

3. The router forms a password username@routername.domain. The variable username is the username associated with the current session, routername is the configured host name, and domain is the domain of the router.

Examples

The following example changes the network configuration filename to bridge_9.1 and uses the default broadcast address:

Router(config)# boot network tftp:bridge_9.1
Router(config)# service config

The following example changes the network configuration filename to bridge_9.1, specifies that rcp is to be used as the transport mechanism, and gives 172.16.1.111 as the IP address of the server on which the network configuration file resides:

Router(config)# service config
Router(config)# boot network rcp://172.16.1.111/bridge_9.1

Related Commands

Command
Description

boot host

Specifies the remote location and filename of the host-specific configuration file to be used at the next system boot (startup).

service config

Enables autoloading of configuration files from a remote host.


clear parser cache

To clear the parse cache entries and hit/miss statistics stored for the Parser Cache feature, use the clear parser cache command in privileged EXEC mode.

clear parser cache

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.1(5)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The Parser Cache feature optimizes the parsing (translation and execution) of Cisco IOS software configuration command lines by remembering how to parse recently encountered command lines, decreasing the time required to process large configuration files.

The clear parser cache command will free the system memory used by the Parser Cache feature and will erase the hit/miss statistics stored for the output of the show parser statistics EXEC command. This command is only effective when the Parser Cache feature is enabled.

Examples

The following example shows the clearing of the parser cache:

Router# show parser statistics

Last configuration file parsed:Number of Commands:1484, Time:820 ms

Parser cache:enabled, 1460 hits, 26 misses
Router# clear parser cache
Router# show parser statistics
Last configuration file parsed:Number of Commands:1484, Time:820 ms

Parser cache:enabled, 0 hits, 1 misses

Related Commands

Command
Description

parser cache

Enables or disables the Parser Cache feature.

show parser statistics

Displays statistics about the last configuration file parsed and the status of the Parser Cache feature.


configure terminal

To enter global configuration mode or to configure the system from the system memory, use the configure terminal privileged EXEC command.

configure terminal

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

10.0

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Use this command to enter global configuration mode. Note that commands in this mode are written to the running configuration file as soon as you enter them (using the Enter key or Carriage Return).

After you enter the configure command, the system prompt changes from <router-name># to <router-name>(config)#, indicating that the router is in global configuration mode. To leave global configuration mode and return to the privileged EXEC prompt, type end or press Ctrl-Z.

To view the changes to the configuration you have made, use the more system:running-config command or show running-config command in EXEC mode.

Examples

In the following example, the user enters global configuration mode:

Router# configure 

Configuring from terminal, memory, or network [terminal]?terminal 
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#

Related Commands

Command
Description

boot config

Specifies the device and filename of the configuration file from which the router configures itself during initialization (startup).

copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config

Saves the running configuration as the startup configuration file.

more system:running-config

Displays the currently running configuration.


configure memory

To configure the system from the system memory, use the configure memory privileged EXEC command.

configure memory

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

10.0

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

On all platforms except Class A Flash file system platforms, this command executes the commands located in in the configuration file in NVRAM (the "startup configuration file").

On Class A Flash file system platforms, if you specify the configure memory command, the router executes the commands pointed to by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable. The CONFIG_FILE environment variable specifies the location of the configuration file that the router uses to configure itself during initialization. The file can be located in NVRAM or any of the Flash file systems supported by the platform.

When the CONFIG_FILE environment variable specifies NVRAM, the router executes the NVRAM configuration only if it is an entire configuration, not a distilled version. A distilled configuration is one that does not contain access lists.

To view the contents of the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the show bootvar EXEC command. To modify the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the boot config command and then save your changes by issuing the copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config command.

After you enter the configure terminal command, the system prompt changes from <router-name># to <router-name>(config)#, indicating that the router is in global configuration mode. To leave global configuration mode and return to the privileged EXEC prompt, use the end command.

Examples

In the following example, a router is configured from the configuration file in the memory location pointed to by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable:

Router# configure memory

Related Commands

Command
Description

boot config

Specifies the device and filename of the configuration file from which the router configures itself during initialization (startup).

copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config

Saves the running configuration as the startup configuration file.

show bootvar

Displays the contents of the BOOT environment variable, the name of the configuration file pointed to by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, the contents of the BOOTLDR environment variable, and the configuration register setting.


configure overwrite-network

The configure overwrite-network has been replaced by the copy {ftp-url | rcp-url | tftp-url} nvram:startup-config command. See the description of the copy command in the "Cisco IOS File System Commands" chapter for more information.

parser cache

To reenable the Cisco IOS software parser cache after disabling it, use the parser cache global configuration command. To disable the parser cache, use the no form of this command.

parser cache

no parser cache

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

Parser cache is enabled by default.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.1(5)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The Parser Cache feature optimizes the parsing (translation and execution) of Cisco IOS software configuration command lines by remembering how to parse recently encountered command lines, decreasing the time required to process large configuration files.

The parser cache is enabled by default. However, if you wish to disable the parser cache, you may do so using the no parser cache command in global configuration mode. To reenable the parser cache after it has been disabled, use the parser cache command.

When the no parser cache is issued, the command line appears in the running configuration file. However, if the parser cache is reenabled, no command line appears in the running configuration file.

Examples

In the following example, the Cisco IOS software Parser Cache feature is disabled:

Router(config)# no parser cache 

Related Commands

Command
Description

clear parser cache

Clears the parse cache entries and hit/miss statistics stored for the Parser Cache feature.

show parser statistics

Displays statistics about the last configuration file parsed and the status of the Parser Cache feature.


service compress-config

To compress startup configuration files, use the service compress-config global configuration command. To disable compression, use the no form of this command.

service compress-config

no service compress-config

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

Disabled

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

10.0

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

After you configure the service compress-config command, the router will compress configuration files every time you save a configuration to the startup configuration. For example, when you enter the copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config command, the running configuration will be compressed before storage in NVRAM.

If the file compression succeeds, the following message is displayed:

Compressing configuration from configuration-size to compressed-size
[OK]

If the boot ROMs do not recognize a compressed configuration, the following message is displayed:

Boot ROMs do not support NVRAM compression Config NOT written to NVRAM

If the file compression fails, the following message is displayed:

Error trying to compress nvram

One way to determine whether a configuration file will be compressed enough to fit into NVRAM is to use a text editor to enter the configuration, then use the UNIX compress command to check the compressed size. To get a closer approximation of the compression ratio, use the UNIX compress -b12 command.

Once the configuration file has been compressed, the router functions normally. At boot time, the system recognizes that the configuration file is compressed, uncompresses it, and proceeds normally. A partition nvram:startup-config command uncompresses the configuration before displaying it.

To disable compression of the configuration file, enter configuration mode and specify the no service compress-config command. Then, exit global configuration mode and enter the copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config command. The router displays an OK message if it is able to write the uncompressed configuration to NVRAM. Otherwise, the router displays an error message indicating that the configuration is too large to store. If the configuration file is larger than the physical NVRAM, the following message is displayed:

##Configuration too large to fit uncompressed in NVRAM Truncate configuration? [confirm]

When the file is truncated, commands at the end of the file are erased. Therefore, you will lose part of your configuration. To truncate and save the configuration, type Y. To not truncate and not save the configuration, type N.

Examples

In the following example, the configuration file is compressed:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# service compress-config
Router(config)# end
Router#
%SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by console
Router# copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config
Building configuration...
Compressing configuration from 1179 bytes to 674 bytes
[OK]

Related Commands

Command
Description

partition nvram:startup-config

Separates Flash memory into partitions on Class B file system platforms.


service config

To enable autoloading of configuration files from a network server, use the service config global configuration command. To restore the default, use the no form of this command.

service config

no service config

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

Disabled, except on systems without NVRAM or with invalid or incomplete information in NVRAM. In these cases, autoloading of configuration files from a network server is enabled automatically.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

10.0

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Usually, the service config command is used in conjunction with the boot host or boot network command. You must enter the service config command to enable the router to automatically configure the system from the file specified by the boot host or boot network command.

With IOS software versions 12.3(2)T , 12.3(1)B, and later, you no longer have to specify the service config command for the boot host or boot network command to be active.

If you specify both the no service config command and the boot host command, the router attempts to find the specified host configuration file. The service config command can also be used without the boot host or boot network command. If you do not specify host or network configuration filenames, the router uses the default configuration files. The default network configuration file is network-confg. The default host configuration file is host-confg, where host is the hostname of the router. If the Cisco IOS software cannot resolve its hostname, the default host configuration file is router-confg.

Examples

In the following example, a router is configured to autoload the default network and host configuration files. Because no boot host or boot network commands are specified, the router uses the broadcast address to request the files from a TFTP server.

Router(config)# service config

The following example changes the network configuration filename to bridge_9.1, specifies that rcp is to be used as the transport mechanism, and gives 172.16.1.111 as the IP address of the server on which the network configuration file resides:

Router(config)# service config
Router(config)# boot network rcp://172.16.1.111/bridge_9.1

Related Commands

Command
Description

boot host

Changes the default name of the host configuration filename from which to load configuration commands.

boot network

Changes the default name of the network configuration file from which to load configuration commands.


show configuration

The show configuration command has been replaced by the show startup-config and more nvram:startup-config commands. See the description of the more command in the "Cisco IOS File System Commands" chapter for more information.

show derived-config

To display the composite results of all the configuration commands that apply to an interface, including commands that come from sources such as static templates, dynamic templates, dialer interfaces, and authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) per-user attributes, use the show derived-config command in privileged EXEC mode.

show derived-config [interface type number]

Syntax Description

interface type number

(Optional) Displays the derived configuration for a specific interface. If you use the interface keyword, you must specify the interface type and the interface number (for example, interface ethernet 0).


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.1

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Configuration commands can be applied to an interface from sources such as static templates, dynamic templates bound by resource pooling, dialer interfaces, AAA per-user attributes and the configuration of the physical interface. The show derived-config command displays all the commands that apply to an interface.

The output for the show derived-config command is nearly identical to that of the show running-config command. It differs when the configuration for an interface is derived from a template, a dialer interface, or some per-user configuration. In those cases, the commands derived from the template, dialer interface, and so on, will be displayed for the affected interface.

If the same command is configured differently in two different sources that apply to the same interface, the command coming from the source that has the highest precedence will appear in the display.

Examples

The following examples show sample output for the show running-config and show derived-config commands for serial interface 0:23 and dialer interface 0. The output of the show running-config and show derived-config commands is the same for dialer interface 0 because none of the commands that apply to that interface are derived from any sources other than the configuration of the dialer interface. The output for the show running-config and show derived-config commands for serial interface 0:23 differs because some of the commands that apply to serial interface 0:23 come from dialer interface 0.

Router# show running-config interface Serial0:23

Building configuration...

Current configuration :296 bytes
!
interface Serial0:23
 description PRI to ADTRAN (#4444150)
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 encapsulation ppp
 dialer rotary-group 0 
 isdn switch-type primary-dms100
 isdn incoming-voice modem
 isdn calling-number 4444150
 peer default ip address pool old_pool 
end

Router# show running-config interface Dialer0

Building configuration...

Current configuration :257 bytes
!
interface Dialer0 
 description Dialin Users
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 no ip proxy-arp
 encapsulation ppp
 dialer in-band
 dialer idle-timeout 30
 dialer-group 1
 peer default ip address pool new_pool
 ppp authentication pap chap callin 
end

Router# show derived-config interface Serial0:23

Building configuration...

Derived configuration :332 bytes
!
interface Serial0:23
 description PRI to ADTRAN (#4444150)
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 encapsulation ppp
 dialer rotary-group 0
 isdn switch-type primary-dms100
 isdn incoming-voice modem
 isdn calling-number 4444150
 peer default ip address pool new_pool 
 ppp authentication pap chap callin 
end

Router# show derived-config interface Dialer0

Building configuration...

Derived configuration :257 bytes
!
interface Dialer0 
 description Dialin Users
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 no ip proxy-arp
 encapsulation ppp
 dialer in-band
 dialer idle-timeout 30
 dialer-group 1
 peer default ip address pool new_pool
 ppp authentication pap chap callin 
end

Related Commands

Command
Description

show running-config

Displays the contents of the currently running configuration file or the configuration for a specific interface.


show file

The show file command has been replaced by the more command. See the description of the more command in the "Cisco IOS File System Commands" chapter for more information.

show parser statistics

To displays statistics about the last configuration file parsed and the status of the Parser Cache feature, use the show parser statistics command in privileged EXEC mode.

show parser statistics

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.1(5)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The show parser statistics command displays two sets of data:

The number of commands in the configuration file that was last copied into the running configuration, and the time it took for the system to parse them (a configuration file can be loaded into the running configuration at system startup, or by issuing commands such as the copy source running-config command).

The status of the Parser Cache feature (enabled or disabled) and the number of command matches (indicated by hits/misses) since the system was started or since the parser cache was cleared.

The Parser Cache feature optimizes the parsing (translation and execution) of Cisco IOS software configuration command lines by remembering how to parse recently encountered command lines, decreasing the time required to process large configuration files.

Examples

The following example shows sample output from the show parser statistics command:

Router# show parser statistics

Last configuration file parsed:Number of Commands:1484, Time:1272 ms

Parser cache:disabled, 0 hits, 2 misses

In this example, the Parser Cache feature is disabled, but shows the hit/miss statistics for the two commands issued while the parser cache was last enabled.

Table 33 describes the key output fields:

Table 33 show parser statistics Output Fields

Last configuration file parsed:

Displays statistics on the last configuration file copied into the running configuration (at startup or using the copy command).

Number of commands:

The number of command lines in the last configuration file parsed.

Time:

Time (in milliseconds) taken for the system to load the last configuration file.

Parser cache:

Displays whether the Parser Cache feature is enabled or disabled, and the hit/miss statistics related to the feature. Statistics are stored since the initialization of the system, or since the last time the parser cache was cleared.

hits

Number of commands the parser cache was able to parse more efficiently by matching them to similar commands executed previously.

misses

Number of commands the parser cache was unable to match to previously executed commands. The performance enhancement provided by the Parser Cache feature cannot be applied to unmatched commands.


In the following example the show parser statistics command is used to compare the parse-time of a large configuration file with the Parser Cache feature disabled and enabled. In this example, a configuration file with 1484 access list commands is loaded into the running configuration.

Router# configure terminal
!parser cache is disabled
Router(config)# no parser cache
!configuration file is loaded into the running configuration
Router# copy slot0:acl_list running-config
. . .
Router# show parser statistics
Last configuration file parsed:Number of Commands:1484, Time:1272 ms
 
Parser cache:disabled, 0 hits, 2 misses
 
!the parser cache is reenabled
Router(config)# parser cache
!configuration file is loaded into the running configuration
Router# copy slot0:acl_list running-config
. . .
Router# show parser statistics
Last configuration file parsed:Number of Commands:1484, Time:820 ms

Parser cache:enabled, 1460 hits, 26 misses

These results show an improvement to the load time for the same configuration file from 1272 milliseconds (ms) to 820 ms when the Parser Cache feature was enabled. As indicated in the "hits" field of the show command output, 1460 commands were able to be parsed more efficiently by the parser cache.

Related Commands

Command
Description

clear parser cache

Clears the parse cache entries and hit/miss statistics stored for the Parser Cache feature.

parser cache

Enables or disables the Parser Cache feature.


show running-config

To display the contents of the currently running configuration file or the configuration for a specific class map, interface, map class, policy map, or virtual circuit (VC) class, use the show running-config command in privileged EXEC mode.

show running-config [options]

Syntax Description

options

(Optional) One of the following options can be entered with the command:

brief—Displays the configuration without certification data.

class-map name—Displays class map information. The linenum keyword can be used with the class-map name option.

full—Displays the full configuration.

interface type number—Displays interface-specific configuration information. If you use the interface keyword, you must specify the interface type and the interface number (for example, interface ethernet 0). Common interfaces include async, ethernet, fastEthernet, group-async, loopback, null, serial, and virtual-template. Use the show run interface ? command to determine the interfaces available on your system.

linenumDisplays line numbers in the output. The brief or full keyword can be used with the linenum keyword.

map-class—Displays map class information. This option is described separately; see the show running-config map-class command page.

policy-map name—Displays policy map information. The linenum keyword can be used with the policy-map name option.

vc-class name—Displays VC class information (display available only on limited routers such as the Cisco 7500 series). The linenum keyword can be used with the vc-class name option.

|—Allows addition of output modifiers and is available with all the keywords for this command.


Defaults

The show running-config command without any arguments or keywords displays the entire contents of the running configuration file.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

11.0

This command was introduced.

12.0

This command was replaced by the more system:running-config command.

12.0(1)T

The output modifier (|) was added.

12.2(4)T

The linenum keyword was added.


Usage Guidelines

The show running-config command is technically a command alias of the more system:running-config command. Although more commands are recommended (due to their uniform structure across platforms and their expandable syntax), the show running-config command remains enabled to accommodate its widespread use, and to allow typing shortcuts such as show run.

The show running-config interface command is useful when there are multiple interfaces and you want to look at the configuration of a specific interface.

The linenum keyword causes line numbers to be displayed in the output. This option is useful for identifying a particular portion of a very large configuration.

Examples

The following example shows the configuration for serial interface 1:

Router# show running-config interface serial 1

Building configuration...

Current configuration:
!
interface Serial1
 no ip address
 no ip directed-broadcast
 no ip route-cache
 no ip mroute-cache
 shutdown
end

The following example shows the configuration for Ethernet interface 0/0. Line numbers are displayed in the output.

Router# show running-config interface ethernet 0/0 linenum 

Building configuration...

Current configuration : 104 bytes
 1 : !
 2 : interface Ethernet0/0
 3 :  ip address 10.4.2.63 255.255.255.0
 4 :  no ip route-cache
 5 :  no ip mroute-cache
 6 : end 

The following example shows how to set line numbers in the command output, and then use the output modifier to start the display at line 10:

Router# show running-config linenum | begin 10 

   10 : boot-start-marker
   11 : boot-end-marker
   12 : !
   13 : no logging buffered
   14 : enable password #####
   15 : !
   16 : spe 1/0 1/7
   17 :  firmware location bootflash:mica-modem-pw.2.7.1.0.bin
   18 : !
   19 : !
   20 : resource-pool disable
   21 : !
   22 : no aaa new-model
   23 : ip subnet-zero
   24 : ip domain name cisco.com
   25 : ip name-server 172.16.11.48
   26 : ip name-server 172.16.2.133
   27 : !
   28 : !
   29 : isdn switch-type primary-5ess
   30 : !
   .
   .
   .
   126 : end 

Related Commandsdoc-rtr53-02#show running-conf linenum | begin 10

Related Commands 10 : boot-start-marker

Related Commands 11 : boot-end-marker

Related Commands 12 : !

Related Commands 13 : no logging buffered

Related Commands 14 : enable password #1writer

Related Commands 15 : !

Related Commands 16 : spe 1/0 1/7

Related Commands 17 : firmware location bootflash:mica-modem-pw.2.7.1.0.bin

Related Commands 18 : !

Related Commands 19 : !

Related Commands 20 : resource-pool disable

Related Commands 21 : !

Related Commands 22 : no aaa new-model

Related Commands 23 : ip subnet-zero

Related Commands 24 : ip domain name cisco.com

Related Commands 25 : ip name-server 172.16.11.48

Related Commands 26 : ip name-server 172.16.2.133

Related Commands 27 : !

Related Commands 28 : !

Related Commands 29 : isdn switch-type primary-5ess

Related Commands 30 : !

Related Commands 31 : !

Related Commands

Command
Description

boot config

Specifies the device and filename of the configuration file from which the router configures itself during initialization (startup).

configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

copy running-config startup-config

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration. (Command alias for the copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config command.)

show running-config map-class

Displays only map-class configuration information from the running configuration file.

show startup-config

Displays the contents of NVRAM (if present and valid) or displays the configuration file pointed to by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable. (Command alias for the more:nvram startup-config command.)


show running-config map-class

To display only map-class configuration information from the running configuration file, use the show running-config map-class privileged EXEC command.

show running-config map-class [atm [map-class-name] | dialer [map-class-name]| frame-relay [map-class-name]]

Syntax Description

atm

(Optional) Displays only ATM map-class configuration lines.

dialer

(Optional) Displays only dialer map-class configuration lines.

frame-relay

(Optional) Displays only Frame Relay map-class configuration lines.

map-class-name

(Optional) Displays only configuration lines for the specified map-class.


Defaults

Displays all map-class configuration in the running configuration file.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.1

The map-class extension to the show running-config command was introduced to show only lines pertaining to dialer or Frame Relay map classes.

12.1(2)T

The atm, dialer, and frame-relay keywords and map-class-name argument were introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Use the show running-config map-class command to display the following information from the running configuration file:

All map classes configured on the router .

Map classes configured specifically for ATM, Frame Relay, or dialer .

A specific ATM, Frame Relay, or dialer map class.

Examples

The following output examples assume that a user has configured 2 Frame Relay map classes named "cir60" and "cir70," 1 ATM map class named "vc100," and 1 dialer map class named "dialer1."

All Map Classes Configured on the Router Example

Router# show running-config map-class 

Building configuration... 
Current configuration: 
! 
map-class frame-relay cir60 
 frame-relay bc 16000 
 frame-relay adaptive-shaping becn 
! 
map-class frame-relay cir70 
 no frame-relay adaptive-shaping 
 frame-relay priority-group 2 
! 
map-class atm vc100 
 atm aal5mux 
! 
map-class dialer dialer1 
 dialer idle-timeout 10 
end 

All Frame Relay Map Classes Example

Router# show running-config map-class frame-relay 

Building configuration... 
Current configuration: 
! 
map-class frame-relay cir60 
 frame-relay bc 16000 
 frame-relay adaptive-shaping becn 
! 
map-class frame-relay cir70 
 no frame-relay adaptive-shaping 
 frame-relay priority-group 2 
end 

A Specific Map Class Example

Router# show running-config map-class frame-relay cir60 

Building configuration... 
Current configuration: 
! 
map-class frame-relay cir60 
 frame-relay bc 16000 
 frame-relay adaptive-shaping becn 
end

Related Commands

Command
Description

map-class atm

Specifies the ATM map class for an SVC.

map-class dialer

Defines a class of shared configuration parameters associated with the dialer map command for outgoing calls from an ISDN interface and for PPP callback.

map-class frame-relay

Specifies a map class to define QoS values for a Frame Relay VC.

more system:running-config

Displays contents of the currently running configuration file (equivalent to the show running-config command.)


show startup-config

To display the contents of the configuration file that will be used at the next system startup, use the show startup-config or more nvram:startup-config command in Privileged EXEC mode.

show startup-config [| {begin | exclude | include} string]

Syntax Description

| begin string

(Optional) Begin the output from the first line to match the specified string. The pipe (|) is required.

| exclude string

(Optional) Exclude from the output any line that matches the specified string. The pipe (|) is required.

| include string

(Optional) Displays only lines that match the specified string. The pipe (|) is required.


Defaults

None.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

11.0

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The show startup-config command displays the contents of NVRAM (if present and valid) or displays the configuration file pointed to by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable.

As with all show commands, you can specify the output you are interested in more precisely using the pipe (|) option combined with the begin, include, and exclude keywords. For more information on these options, see the documentation of the more begin, more exclude, more include, show begin, show exclude, and show include commands.

In Cisco IOS Release 12.0 the show startup-config command was deprecated in favor of the more nvram:startup-config command. Although more commands are recommended (due to their uniform structure across platforms and their expandable syntax), the show startup-config command remains enabled to accommodate its widespread use, and to allow typing shortcuts such as show start.

Related Commands

Command
Description

boot config

Specifies the device and filename of the configuration file from which the router configures itself during initialization (startup).

copy running-config startup-config

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration. (Command alias for the copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config command.)