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Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

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Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

Table Of Contents

Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

Contents

Prerequisites for Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

Restrictions for Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

Information About Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

How Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling Works

How Layer 2 PDU Filtering Works

Configuring Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

Configuration Examples for Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

Configuring Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering: Example

Displaying Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering Statistics: Example

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance

Command Reference

l2protocol

show interfaces gigabitethernet l2protocol

Glossary


Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering


Layer 2 protocol tunneling allows service providers to carry traffic from multiple customers across a core network, and maintain the VLAN and Layer 2 protocol configurations of each customer without impacting the traffic of other customers. The Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling feature allows Layer 2 protocol data units (PDUs) to be tunneled across the core network without being interpreted and processed by intermediary network devices. Layer 2 PDU filtering allows a service provider to specify which Layer 2 PDUs are to be dropped at an ingress interface on a provider edge (PE) router. Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering provide an enhanced feature set for service providers that transmit customer VLAN traffic from metro Ethernet VPNs across an MPLS core network.

Feature History for Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

Release
Modification

12.0(28)S

This feature was introduced on 4-Port Gigabit Ethernet ISE line cards on the Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router.


Finding Support Information for Platforms and Cisco IOS Software Images

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco IOS software image support. Access Cisco Feature Navigator at http://www.cisco.com/go/fn. You must have an account on Cisco.com. If you do not have an account or have forgotten your username or password, click Cancel at the login dialog box and follow the instructions that appear.

Contents

Prerequisites for Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

Restrictions for Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

Information About Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

Prerequisites for Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

Transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling and PDU filtering are intended for use on provider edge (PE) routers in an MPLS-enabled service-provider core network.

Transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling and PDU filtering are supported on main Ethernet interfaces, 802.1Q (VLAN) subinterfaces, and stacked VLAN (802.1Q-in-Q) subinterfaces on which Layer 2 Ethernet over MPLS (EoMPLS) is enabled using the xconnect peer-ip-address vcid encapsulation mpls command, as shown in "Configuring Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering" section.


Note The xconnect encapsulation mpls command replaces the deprecated mpls l2transport route command used to configure EoMPLS.


Use the xconnect peer-ip-address vcid encapsulation mpls command to bind an 802.1Q VLAN attachment circuit to an Any Transport over MPLS (AToM) pseudowire for EoMPLS. For information about how to configure and use Layer 2 tunneling on the Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router, refer to Any Transport over MPLS.

EoMPLS transports Layer 2 Ethernet frames across an MPLS backbone, using a point-to-point virtual circuit (VC) between PE routers. Only the PE routers at the ingress and egress points of the MPLS core network know about the VC dedicated to transporting Layer 2 traffic between customer sites.

Restrictions for Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

You cannot configure both transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling and PDU filtering for a Layer 2 protocol (CDP, STP, or VTP) on the same main Ethernet interface or subinterface.

Information About Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

To configure the Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering features, you should understand the following concepts:

How Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling Works

How Layer 2 PDU Filtering Works

How Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling Works

Customer VLANs at different sites connected across a service-provider network need to run various Layer 2 protocols to scale their topology to include all remote VLAN sites and local sites. For example:

The Spanning-Tree Protocol (STP) must run properly so that each customer VLAN builds a spanning tree that includes the local site and all remote customer sites across the service-provider infrastructure.

The Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) must discover neighboring Cisco devices from local and remote customer VLAN sites.

The VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) must provide consistent VLAN configuration throughout all sites in a customer network.

Transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling is performed by provider edge (PE) routers on the inbound side of the service-provider network that overwrite the customer PDU-destination MAC address in an Ethernet packet with a well-known Cisco proprietary multicast address (01-00-0c-cd-cd-d0). The Ethernet packet is then transparently tunneled over the core network to a peer PE router. If Layer 2 protocol tunneling is configured on the PE router on the outbound side, the destination MAC address is restored in the Layer 2 protocol information so that packets are forwarded to all ports in the same metro VLAN.

Core routers and switches in the service-provider network do not intercept and process these packets, but forward them as normal packets. Layer 2 protocol data units (PDUs) for CDP, STP, or VTP are tunneled transparently across the service-provider network and delivered to a PE router on the outbound side of the network. In Figure 1, a Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router deployed in a point of presence (PE-POP) and a Cisco 7600 series router serve as the peer PE routers.

Figure 1 Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling: Example

As shown in Figure 1, Customer A has four switches in the same VLAN that are connected through the service-provider network. A Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router and a Cisco 7600 series router serve as the PE routers that encapsulate Layer 2 protocol packets with a well-known MAC address on the inbound side of the service-provider network.

PE Ethernet subinterfaces are connected to customer 802.1Q ports. The Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router supports transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling for CDP, STP, and VTP. The PE routers connected to customer switches perform the tunneling process.

With normal Layer 2 tunneling, identical packets are received by all PE router interfaces connected to the same customer VLAN with the following results:

Devices on each of a customer's sites are able to properly run STP and each customer VLAN can build a correct spanning tree based on parameters from all sites and not just from the local site.

CDP discovers and shows information about the other Cisco devices connected through the service-provider network.

VTP provides consistent VLAN configuration throughout the customer network, propagating through the service provider to all switches.

For transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling to occur, Layer 2 EoMPLS must be configured on the ingress and egress Ethernet main interfaces or subinterfaces of the PE routers. If the routers are not configured to tunnel Layer 2 PDUs, the peer PE router on the far end of the network cannot properly run the STP, CDP, and VTP protocols. For example, STP for a VLAN on a switch in Customer A, Site 1 will build a spanning tree on the switches at that site without considering convergence parameters based on Customer A's switch in Site 2.

You enable transparent Layer 2 tunneling by protocol (STP, CDP, or VTP) on the Ethernet interface (or subinterface) connected to a customer VLAN. Also, you can specify the MPLS EXP bits to be used for transparently tunneling Layer 2 PDUs.

You can enable transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling on:

A main Ethernet interface

An 802.1Q VLAN subinterface

An Ethernet subinterface configured for stacked VLAN (802.1Q-in-Q) processing. For more information about how to configure and use stacked VLAN processing, refer to Stacked VLAN Processing.

In each case, the encapsulation and de-encapsulation of the MAC address performed on Layer 2 protocol packets is the same.

How Layer 2 PDU Filtering Works

When transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling is configured and Layer 2 PDUs that enter the inbound PE router through the tunnel exit the router into the service-provider MPLS network, the router overwrites the customer PDU-destination MAC address with a well-known Cisco proprietary multicast address (01-00-0c-cd-cd-d0). The PE router on the outbound side restores the Layer 2 protocol and MAC address information and forwards the packets to all ports in the same metro VLAN. Therefore, the Layer 2 PDUs are kept intact and are transparently delivered across the service-provider network to the other side of the customer network.

With Layer 2 PDU filtering, you can configure certain Layer 2 PDU frames to be dropped before they are encapsulated on the inbound PE router and transparently sent across the service-provider core network.

The Layer 2 PDU frames are identified by protocol and a well-known destination MAC address when received on an inbound PE router. By using the l2protocol command with the drop keyword, you can specify which Layer 2 PDU frames are to be dropped and not transmitted across the core MPLS network.

Configuring Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

PREREQUISITES

On a main Ethernet interface or subinterface, you must enable EoMPLS using the xconnect encapsulation mpls command.

To configure and verify transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling and PDU filtering on a main Ethernet interface or subinterface, follow these steps:

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface type slot/port

Or

interface type slot/port.subinterface-number

4. (Optional) encapsulation dot1q sp-vlan-id

Or

encapsulation dot1q sp-vlan-id second-dot1q {ce-vlan-id | any}

5. xconnect peer-ip-address vcid encapsulation mpls

6. l2protocol {cdp | stp | vtp} [drop | tunnel [experimental mpls-exp-value] | experimental mpls-exp-value]

7. end

8. show interfaces gigabitethernet slot/port l2protocol

Or

show interfaces gigabitethernet slot/port.subinterface-number l2protocol

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface type slot/port


Or

interface type slot/port.subinterface-number

Example:

Router(config)# interface gigabitethernet 1/0.2

Enters interface or subinterface configuration mode to configure the Ethernet interface or subinterface.

Step 4 

encapsulation dot1q sp-vlan-id

Example:

Router(config-subif)# encapsulation dot1q 200


Or


encapsulation dot1q sp-vlan-id second-dot1q {ce-vlan-id | any}

Example:

Router(config-subif)# encapsulation dot1q 10 second-dot1q 100

(Optional) Use the encapsulation dot1q sp-vlan-id command only on an Ethernet subinterface to enable 802.1Q tunneling for the service-provider VLAN ID (sp-vlan-id) assigned to a specific customer.

For more information about using this command to configure 802.1Q encapsulation on VLAN packets, refer to IEEE 802.1Q-in-Q VLAN Tag Termination.

The encapsulation dot1q sp-vlan-id second-dot1q ce-vlan-id command enables a subinterface to process stacked VLAN (802.1Q-in-Q) Ethernet packets with the unique service-provider VLAN ID (sp-vlan-id) for the customer and the specified customer VLAN ID (ce-vlan-id) in their headers.

The range of valid CE-VLAN IDs is from 1 to 4095.

Use the any keyword to enable stacked VLAN processing on packets with customer VLAN IDs not specified in a separate encapsulation dot1q sp-vlan-id second-dot1q ce-vlan-id command on other subinterfaces under the same main Ethernet interface.

For more information about how to use this command to configure stacked VLAN (802.1Q-in-Q) processing, refer to Stacked VLAN Processing.

In the first example, a subinterface is configured for 802.1Q tunneling of packets with SP-VLAN ID 200.

In the second example, a subinterface is configured for stacked VLAN tunneling of packets with SP-VLAN ID 10 and CE-VLAN ID 100.

Step 5 

xconnect peer-ip-address vcid encapsulation mpls

Example:

Router(config-subif)# xconnect 192.16.0.1 50 encapsulation mpls

On a main Ethernet interface or subinterface, configures EoMPLS by binding an 802.1Q VLAN attachment circuit to a virtual circuit (VC) in an AToM pseudowire.

The peer-ip-address argument specifies the IP address of the peer PE router.

The vc-id argument is the 32-bit value that identifies the virtual circuit between the peer PE routers at each endpoint of the VC. You must configure the same VC ID on the peer PE router.

For more information about how to configure EoMPLS, refer to Any Transport over MPLS.

Step 6 

l2protocol {cdp | stp | vtp} {tunnel [experimental mpls-exp-value] | experimental mpls-exp-value}

Example:

Router(config-subif)# l2protocol cdp tunnel experimental 7

Configures transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling on the interface or subinterface for a specified Layer 2 protocol (CDP, STP, or VTP).

To transparently tunnel the specified Layer 2 PDU frames after changing the MAC destination address, enter the tunnel keyword.

To transparently tunnel the specified Layer 2 PDU frames after changing the MAC destination address and rewriting the experimental (EXP) field bit in MPLS labels, enter tunnel experimental mpls-exp-value, where mpls-exp-value is a value from 0 to 7.

To transparently tunnel the specified Layer 2 PDU frames in MPLS packets using EoMPLS (without transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling) and rewrite the specified experimental (EXP) field bit in MPLS labels, enter experimental mpls-exp-value, where mpls-exp-value is from 0 to 7.

In the example, all Ethernet VLAN packets with Layer 2 CDP headers are transparently tunneled after the EXP field is changed to 7.

Step 7 

l2protocol {cdp | stp | vtp} drop

Example:

Router(config-subif)# l2protocol stp drop

Configures the specified Layer 2 PDU frames to be dropped and not transmitted across the core MPLS network.

In the example, all Ethernet VLAN packets with Layer 2 STP headers are filtered out and not transmitted.

Step 8 

end

Example:

Router(config-subif)# end


Exits interface or subinterface configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 9 

show interfaces gigabitethernet slot/port l2protocol


Or


show interfaces gigabitethernet slot/port.subinterface-number l2protocol


Example:

Router# show interfaces gigabitethernet 1/0.2 l2protcol

(Optional) Verifies the transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling and PDU filtering configuration on a specified Gigabit Ethernet interface or subinterface.

Configuration Examples for Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering

This section provides the following configuration examples:

Configuring Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering: Example

Displaying Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering Statistics: Example

Configuring Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering: Example

The following example shows how to configure a Gigabit Ethernet subinterface on a Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router used as a PE router in a service-provider MPLS core network so that PDUs from Layer 2:

Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) are filtered out.

Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) are transmitted using normal Layer 2 protocol tunneling and changing the MPLS experimental bit to 4.

VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) are tunneled by assigning a well-known Cisco proprietary MAC address and changing the MPLS experimental bit to 0.

Note that this configuration example is valid for an Ethernet subinterface configured for 802.1Q VLAN tunneling.

Prerequisites

You must enable EoMPLS on an Ethernet subinterface using the xconnect encapsulation mpls command.

Router# enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface gigabitethernet 3/0.5
Router(config-subif)# encapsulation dot1Q 20
Router(config-subif)# xconnect 7.7.7.7 70 encapsulation mpls
Router(config-subif)# l2protocol cdp drop
Router(config-subif)# l2protocol stp experimental 4
Router(config-subif)# l2protocol vtp tunnel experimental 0
Router(config-subif)# end

Displaying Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering Statistics: Example

The following example shows how to display statistical information about the Layer 2 protocols that are tunneled and dropped on a Gigabit Ethernet subinterface at one end of a Layer 2 protocol tunnel:

Router# show interfaces gigabitethernet 3/0.5 l2protocol
GigabitEthernet3/0.5
Protocol			Pkts In			Chars In			Pkts Out			Chars Out
cdp			1000			64000			0			0
stp			1000			64000			0			0
vtp			1000			64000			0			0

Additional References

The following sections provide references related to the Transparent Layer 2 Protocol Tunneling and PDU Filtering feature:

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Interface commands: complete command syntax, command mode, defaults, usage guidelines, and examples

Cisco IOS Switching Services Configuration Guide, Release 12.3
Cisco IOS Switching Services Command Reference, Release 12.3

Description of software functionality and commands supported on the 4-Port Gigabit Ethernet ISE line card

4-Port Gigabit Ethernet ISE Line Card for Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router

Description of VLANs based on 802.1Q and 802.1Q-in-Q

Cisco Metro Ethernet Access Services

VLAN routing

Routing Between Virtual LANs Overview

Procedure for configuring EoMPLS

Any Transport over MPLS

Procedure for configuring VLANs for routing using 802.1Q VLAN encapsulation

"Configuring 802.1Q VLAN Encapsulation" section in Configuring Virtual LAN Encapsulation

Procedure for configuring support for double-tagged 802.1Q-in-Q VLANs on Cisco 75000 Series Ethernet subinterfaces

IEEE 802.1Q-in-Q VLAN Tag Termination

Procedure for configuring support for double-tagged, stacked VLAN (802.1Q-in-Q) processing on Cisco 12000 Series Ethernet subinterfaces

Stacked VLAN Processing


Standards

Standards
Title

IEEE 802.1Q


MIBs

MIBs
MIBs Link

No new or modified MIBs are supported by this feature, and support for existing MIBs has not been modified by this feature.

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs


RFCs

RFCs
Title

No new or modified RFCs are supported by this feature.


Technical Assistance

Description
Link

Technical Assistance Center (TAC) home page, containing 30,000 pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content.

http://www.cisco.com/public/support/tac/home.shtml


Command Reference

This section documents new and modified commands. All other commands used with this feature are documented in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2 command reference publications.

l2protocol

show interfaces gigabitethernet l2protocol

l2protocol

To configure transparent protocol tunneling and PDU filtering for Layer 2 control packets transmitted over an MPLS service-provider network, use the l2protocol command in interface or subinterface configuration mode.

l2protocol {cdp | stp | vtp} {drop | tunnel experimental mpls-exp-id | experimental mpls-exp-id}

no l2protocol {cdp | stp | vtp} {drop | tunnel experimental mpls-exp-id | experimental mpls-exp-id}

Syntax Description

cdp

Configures transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling or PDU filtering for Ethernet VLAN frames that contain Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) packets.

stp

Configures transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling or PDU filtering for Ethernet VLAN frames that contain Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) packets.

vtp

Configures transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling or PDU filtering for Ethernet VLAN frames that contain VLAN Trunk Protocol (VTP) packets.

drop

Configures PDU filtering to drop Ethernet VLAN frames that contain the specified Layer 2 protocol (CDP, STP, or VTP) packet.

tunnel

Configures transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling to transmit Ethernet VLAN frames that contain the specified Layer 2 protocol (CDP, STP, or VTP) packet.

tunnel experimental mpls-exp-id

Configures transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling to transmit Ethernet VLAN frames that contain the specified Layer 2 protocol (CDP, STP, or VTP) packet by imposing the specified mpls-exp-id value in the MPLS experimental field. Valid values are from 0 to 7.

experimental mpls-exp-id

Configures normal 802.1Q or stacked VLAN (802.1Q-in-Q) tunneling (without transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling) to transmit Ethernet VLAN frames that contain the specified Layer 2 protocol (CDP, STP, or VTP) packet by imposing the specified mpls-exp-id value in the MPLS experimental field. Valid values are from 0 to 7.


Defaults

This command has no default settings.

Command Modes

Interface configuration or subinterface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(28)S

This command was introduced on Cisco 12000 Series 4-Port Gigabit Ethernet ISE line cards.


Usage Guidelines

Layer 2 protocol tunneling allows Layer 2 protocol data units (PDUs) to be tunneled transparently through a service-provider network. Layer 2 PDUs, such as CDP, STP, and VTP, are transmitted between peer PE routers without being interpreted and processed by intermediary network devices.

Transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling is performed by PE routers on the inbound side of the service-provider network that overwrite the customer PDU-destination MAC address in an Ethernet packet with a well-known Cisco proprietary multicast address (01-00-0c-cd-cd-d0). Ethernet packets are transparently tunneled over the core network to a peer PE router. The PE router on the outbound side restores the Layer 2 protocol and MAC address information and forwards the packets to all ports in the same metro VLAN.

Layer 2 PDU filtering allows a service provider to specify which Layer 2 PDUs are to be dropped at an ingress interface on a PE router. The specified Layer 2 PDU frames are not transmitted over the core network, and are filtered before they are encapsulated for transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling.

Use the l2protocol command to configure transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling or PDU filtering on an Ethernet interface or subinterface in a PE router in an MPLS-enabled service-provider network.

The following prerequisite applies for configuring transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling and PDU filtering:

On a main Ethernet interface or subinterface, you must configure EoMPLS (using the xconnect encapsulation mpls command).

Although 802.1Q VLAN and stacked VLAN tunneling are not required for transparent Layer 2 protocol tunneling and/or PDU filtering, you can configure these features as follows:

On a main Ethernet interface, you enable 802.1Q tunneling using the encapsulation dot1q command.

On an Ethernet subinterface, you enable 802.1Q tunneling using the encapsulation dot1q command or stacked VLAN (802.1Q-in-Q) tunneling using the encapsulation dot1q second-dot1q command.

To verify a Layer 2 protocol tunneling or PDU filtering configuration on a Gigabit Ethernet interface or subinterface, use the show interfaces gigabitethernet l2protocol command.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure a Gigabit Ethernet subinterface on a Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router used as a PE router in a service-provider MPLS core network so that PDUs from Layer 2:

Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) frames are transmitted (without transparent Layer 2 tunneling) by changing the MPLS experimental bit to 5.

Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) frames are filtered out at the ingress PE router.

VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) frames are transparently tunneled by assigning a well-known Cisco proprietary MAC address and changing the MPLS experimental bit to 0.

Note that this configuration example applies to a Gigabit Ethernet subinterface configured for stacked VLAN 802.1Q-in-Q tunneling and EoMPLS to a destination address 7.7.7.7 on VC 70.

Router# enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface gigabitethernet 3/0.5
Router(config-subif)# encapsulation dot1q 20 second-dot1q 3
Router(config-subif)# xconnect 7.7.7.7 70 encapsulation mpls
Router(config-subif)# l2protocol cdp experimental 5
Router(config-subif)# l2protocol stp drop
Router(config-subif)# l2protocol vtp tunnel experimental 0
Router(config-subif)# end

Related Commands

Command
Description

show interfaces gigabitethernet l2protocol

Displays statistical information about Layer 2 protocol tunneling and PDU filtering on a main Gigabit Ethernet interface or subinterface.


show interfaces gigabitethernet l2protocol

To display statistical information about Layer 2 protocol tunneling and PDU filtering configured on a specified Gigabit Ethernet interface or subinterface, use the show interfaces gigabitethernet l2protocol command in privileged EXEC mode.

show interfaces gigabitethernet {slot/port | slot/port.subinterface-number} l2protocol

Syntax Description

slot/port

Slot and port numbers of a main Gigabit Ethernet interface.

slot/port.subinterface-number

Slot, port, and subinterface numbers of a Gigabit Ethernet subinterface.


Defaults

This command has no default settings.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(28)S

This command was introduced on Cisco 12000 Series 4-Port Gigabit Ethernet ISE line cards.


Usage Guidelines

Use the show interfaces gigabitethernet l2transport command to display statistics for Layer 2 protocol tunneling and PDU filtering configured on a Gigabit Ethernet interface or subinterface on a PE router in an MPLS service-provider network.

Examples

The following example shows how to display statistical information about Layer 2 protocol tunneling and PDU filtering configured on a Gigabit Ethernet subinterface:

Router# show interfaces gigabitethernet 2/0.1 l2protocol

GigabitEthernet2/0.1
Protocol			Pkts In			Chars In			Pkts Out			Chars Out
cdp			0			0			1000			38000
stp			0			0			1000			38000
vtp			0			0			1000			38000

Table 1 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 1 show interfaces gigabitethernet l2protocol Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Protocol

Layer 2 protocol data unit (PDU)

Pkts In

Number of packets received

Chars In

Number of bytes received

Pkts Out

Number of packets transmitted

Chars Out

Number of bytes transmitted


Related Commands

Command
Description

l2protocol

Configures Layer 2 protocol tunneling and PDU filtering for Layer 2 control packets transmitted over an MPLS service-provider network.


Glossary

802.1Q—IEEE 802.1Q protocol used to interconnect multiple switches and routers, and for defining VLAN topologies.

802.1Q-in-Q—Support for double-tagged VLAN Ethernet packets in which an 802.1Q tag from a customer VLAN (called CE-VLAN ID) is encapsulated in a second 802.1Q tag from a service-provider network (called an SP-VLAN ID).

Bridge protocol data unit (BPDU)—Spanning-Tree Protocol hello packet that is sent out at configurable intervals to exchange information among bridges in the network. See also PDU.

CDP—Cisco Discovery Protocol. CDP is primarily used to obtain protocol addresses of neighboring devices and discover the platform of those devices. CDP can also be used to display information about the interfaces a router uses.

CE router—Customer edge router. A router that is part of a customer network and that interfaces to a provider edge (PE) router.

CE-VLAN—Customer edge VLAN. 802.1Q tag used in packets received from customer VLANs that enter a service-provider network. In stacked VLAN (802.1Q-in-Q) processing, all customer VLAN IDs are encapsulated in a service-provider VLAN ID assigned to the customer. Also known as the "inner" VLAN ID in 802.1Q-in-Q encapsulation. See also SP-VLAN.

encapsulation—Wrapping of data in a particular protocol header. For example, Ethernet data is wrapped in a specific Ethernet header before network transit. See also tunneling.

EoMPLS—Ethernet over Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS). A tunneling mechanism that allows a service provider to tunnel customer Layer 2 traffic though a Layer 3 MPLS network. EoMPLS is a point-to-point solution only. EoMPLS is also known Layer 2 tunneling.

frame—Logical grouping of information sent as a data link layer unit over a transmission medium. Often refers to the header and trailer, used for synchronization and error control, that surround the user data contained in the unit.

ISE—IP Services Engine. ISE line cards for Cisco 12000 Series Internet Routers provide enhanced Layer 3 capabilities for high-speed customer aggregation, backbone connectivity, and peering solutions. These line cards are available in both concatenated and channelized versions.

Layer 2 Tunnel Protocol (L2TP)—An Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standards track protocol defined in RFC 2661 that provides tunneling of PPP. Based upon the best features of L2F and PPTP, L2TP provides an industry-wide interoperable method of implementing VPDN.

Layer 3 Switching—An Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standards track protocol defined in RFC 2661 that provides tunneling of PPP. Based upon the best features of L2F and PPTP, L2TP provides an industry-wide interoperable method of implementing VPDN.

MIB—Management Information Base. Database of network management information that is used and maintained by a network management protocol such as SNMP. The value of a MIB object can be changed or retrieved using SNMP commands, usually through a network management system (NMS). MIB objects are organized in a tree structure that includes public (standard) and private (proprietary) branches.

MPLS—Multiprotocol Label Switching. MPLS forwards IP traffic using a label. This label instructs the routers and switches in the network where to forward the packets based on pre-established IP routing information.

packet—Logical grouping of information that includes a header containing control information and (usually) user data. Packets most often are used to refer to network layer units of data.

PDU—Protocol data unit. OSI term for packet.

PE router—Provider edge router. A router that is part of a service provider's network and is connected to a customer edge (CE) router.

POP—Point of presence. In an Operations Support System (OSS), a physical location where an interexchange carrier installed equipment to interconnect with a local exchange carrier (LEC).

SP-VLAN—Service-provider VLAN. A second layer of 802.1Q tag added to the 802.1Q-tagged packets that enter a service-provider network. This is a unique VLAN ID assigned by a service provider to encapsulate all VLAN IDs from a given customer. Also known as the "outer" VLAN ID in 802.1Q-in-Q encapsulation. See also CE-VLAN.

STP—Spanning Tree Protocol. STP is a broadcast algorithm used by network bridge connections to dynamically discover a loop-free subset of the network topology while maintaining a path between every pair of LANs or VLANs in the network.

tunneling—Architecture that is designed to provide the services necessary to implement any standard point-to-point encapsulation scheme. See also encapsulation.

VLAN—Virtual LAN. Group of devices on one or more LANs that are configured (using management software) so that they can communicate as if they were attached to the same wire, when in fact they are located on a number of different LAN segments. Because VLANs are based on logical instead of physical connections, they are extremely flexible.

VPN— Virtual Private Network. Enables IP traffic to travel securely over a public TCP/IP network by encrypting all traffic from one network to another. A VPN uses tunnels to encrypt all information at the IP level.

VTP—VLAN Trunk Protocol. VTP is a Layer 2 messaging protocol that maintains VLAN configuration consistency by managing the addition, deletion, and renaming of VLANs on a network-wide basis. With VTP, you can make configuration changes centrally on one or more switches and have those changes automatically communicated to all the other switches in the network.


Note Refer to Internetworking Terms and Acronyms for terms not included in this glossary.