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Cisco IOS Software Releases 12.0 S

IP Services Engine Line Cards

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IP Services Engine Line Cards

Table Of Contents

IP Services Engine Line Cards

Feature Overview

Concatenated Line Cards

Concatenated 4-port OC-12/STM-4

Concatenated 16-port OC-3/STM-1

Channelized Line Cards

Channelized 4-port OC-12/STM-4

Channelized 16-port OC-3/STM-1

Channelization Support

Applications

Leased-Line Termination

Direct Customer Connectivity

Intra-POP Connectivity

Tier 1/2 Peering

Enhanced Features

Automatic Protection Switching (APS) and Multiplexed Switching Protection (MSP)

Encapsulation

Internet Protocol Version 4 (IPv4) Unicast Forwarding

Internet Protocol Version 4 (IPv4) Multicast

Extended Access Control Lists (xACL)

Committed Access Rate

Accounting and Statistics

Sampled NetFlow

Diagnostics and Tests

Protection Against Denial Of Service (DOS) Attacks

Benefits

Restrictions

Related Documents

Supported Platforms

Supported Standards, MIBs, and RFCs

Prerequisites

Configuration Tasks

Configuring a Concatenated Line Card

Specifying Framing and Encapsulation in a Concatenated Interface

Enabling Alarm Reporting in the Concatenated Interface

Setting the Bit Error Rate (BER) Thresholds in the Concatenated Interface

Starting Up the Interface and Saving the Configuration

Setting the System Clock for a Concatenated Line Card

Using Loopback Modes in the Concatenated Interface

Configuring APS for Concatenated ISE Line Cards

Configuring a Channelized Line Card

Configuring the Controller

Starting Up the Controller and Saving the Configuration

Setting the System Clock for a Channelized Line Card

Using Loopback Modes in the Controller

Defining Channelized Interfaces

Defining Channels for a SONET Port

Defining Channels for a SDH AU-4 Port

Defining Channels for a SDH AU-3 Port

Activating the Channelized Interfaces for a Line Card

Redefining Existing Channelizations

Shutting Down the Channelized Interfaces

Undefining the Channelized Interfaces

Defining and Activating the New Channelized Interfaces

Configuring a Channelized Interface

Selecting a Channelized Interface

Configuring a Channelized POS Interface

Configuring a Channelized DS-3 Interface

Configuring a Channelized E3 Serial Interface

Configuring APS for Channelized ISE Line Cards

Configuring the Loopback to be Associated with the Working Controller

Configuring the Working Controller

Configuring the Protect Controller

Verifying the Line Card Configuration

Verifying Concatenated Line Cards

Verifying Channelized ISE Line Cards

Configuration Examples

Examples to Configure Concatenated Line Cards

Examples to Configure Channelized Line Cards

Controller Configuration Examples

Examples to Define the Channelized Interfaces

Examples to Configure a Channelized Interface

Examples to Configure a Channelized POS Interface

Examples to Configure a Channelized DS-3 Serial Interface

Examples to Configure a E3 Serial Interface

Example to Configure APS for Channelized Interfaces

Command Reference

alarm-report

au-3 POS

au-3 serial

au-4 pos

au-4 VC-3 serial

ber-threshold

clock redundancy mode auto

clock redundancy mode manual internal

clock source

controller sysclock

dsu mode

interface

loopback

show controller

show controller sysclock

Glossary


IP Services Engine Line Cards


Feature History

Release
Modification

12.0(19)S

This feature was introduced for the Cisco 12000 series Internet router.


This document describes the software features of the Cisco IP Services Engine (ISE) line cards in the 12000 series Internet routers and includes the following sections:

Feature Overview

Supported Platforms

Supported Standards, MIBs, and RFCs

Prerequisites

Configuration Tasks

Configuration Examples

Command Reference

Glossary

Feature Overview

The IP Services Engine (ISE) line cards for the Cisco 12000 series Internet router provide enhanced Layer 3 capabilities for high-speed customer aggregation, backbone connectivity, and peering solutions. These line cards are available in both concatenated and channelized versions.

This section includes information on the following topics:

Concatenated Line Cards

Channelized Line Cards

Applications

Enhanced Features

Benefits

Restrictions

Related Documents

Concatenated Line Cards

In the concatenated versions of the ISE line cards, each physical port is assigned a single connection utilizing the entire bandwidth of that port.


Note For information regarding hardware installation and features, refer to the appropriate hardware installation publication listed in Related Documents.


The following concatenated line cards are supported for the Cisco 12000 series Internet routers:

Concatenated 4-port OC-12/STM-4

The 4-port POS OC-12/STM-4 line card provides the Cisco 12000 series Internet router with four 622-Mbps concatenated Packet-over-SONET (POS) interfaces on a single card.

Concatenated 16-port OC-3/STM-1

The 16-port POS OC-3/STM-1 line card provides the Cisco 12000 series Internet router with 16 155-Mbps concatenated POS interfaces on a single card.

Channelized Line Cards

In channelized line cards, each physical port can be configured to support multiple interfaces, or channels. Each channel is treated as a physical interface by the Cisco IOS software. Most of the functionality available on standard interfaces is also available on channelized interfaces. For example, it is possible to run different encapsulations on each of the different channels. Advanced functionality such as extended Access Control Lists (ACLs) and Committed Access Rate (CAR) can also be applied to connections using channelized interfaces.


Note For information regarding hardware installation and features, refer to the appropriate Cisco Systems publications listed in Related Documents.


The following channelized line cards are supported for the Cisco 12000 series Internet routers:

Channelized 4-port OC-12/STM-4

The channelized 4-port OC-12/STM-4 to DS-3/E3 line card supports both SONET and SDH framing and provides DS-3/E3 aggregation for the Cisco 12000 series Internet router. For SDH, both AU-3 and AU-4 mappings are supported. The line card interfaces with the Cisco 12000 series Internet router switch fabric and provides four OC-12/STM-4 duplex SC single-mode intermediate reach optical ports. Each of these ports can be configured with up to 12 channelized interfaces.

Channelized 16-port OC-3/STM-1

The channelized 16-port OC-3/STM-1 to DS-3/E3 line card supports both SONET and SDH framing and provides DS-3/E3 aggregation for the Cisco 12000 series Internet router. For SDH, both AU-3 and AU-4 mappings are supported. The line card interfaces with the Cisco 12000 series Internet router switch fabric and provides 16 OC-3/STM-1 duplex SC single-mode intermediate reach optical interfaces. Each physical port can carry up to three channelized interfaces.

For information regarding hardware installation and features, see the appropriate Cisco Systems publications listed in Related Documents.

Channelization Support

This section describes the channel capacity and support for each of the ISE line cards. This section also defines the channelization terms used in this document, and discusses the relationship between terms used in SONET and SDH framing. A further description of the SDH STM hierarchy is also included.

Port Capacity for Channelized Line Cards

Maximum Number of Channels per Port

Channel Combinations in the ISE Line Card Ports

European SDH Multiplexing Terms and Description

Port Capacity for Channelized Line Cards

Each channelized ISE line card contains a number of ports that offer certain signal capacities per port.

16-port OC-3/STM-1: 16 ports, each with a capacity of OC-3 or STM-1

4-port OC-12/STM-4: 4 ports, each with a capacity of OC-12 or STM-4

Maximum Number of Channels per Port

Each port can be channelized into multiple interfaces using a portion of the port's available bandwidth. The smallest channel is OC-1, which is carried by an STS-1 signal for SONET framing, and a VC-3 signal for SDH framing.

Therefore, the maximum number of STM-1/VC-3 channels per port for each ISE line card is:

16-port OC-3/STM-1: a maximum of 3 channels per physical port

4-port OC-12/STM-4: a maximum of 12 channels per physical port

In other words, the maximum channels per port = the maximum number of OC-1s/STS-1s/VC-3s for each port.

Table 1 shows how the optical carrier signal levels relate to the SONET and SDH framing signals. This table also shows the signal rates of these signals and the maximum number of serial interfaces that can be carried by the SONET/SDH signals.

Table 1 OC-n and SONET/SDH Signal Capacities

Optical Carrier Signal
SONET Signal
(North America)
SDH Signal
(Europe)
Signal Bit Rate
Serial Line Capacity

OC-1

STS-1

VC-3

51.84 Mbps

1 x DS-3/E3s

OC-3

STS-3

STM-1

155.52 Mbps

3 x DS-3/E3s

OC-12

STS-12

STM-4

622.08 Mbps

12 x DS-3/E3s

OC-48

STS-48

STM-16

2488.32 Mbps

48 x DS-3/E3s

Note "T3" is the North American term for DS-3.


Channel Combinations in the ISE Line Card Ports

The STS-1s/VC-3s can be configured as single STS-1 POS interfaces or as single DS-3 (T3) or E3 serial interfaces. These STS-1s/VC-3s can also be combined to create interfaces of larger capacity (for example, three STS-1s are combined to form an STS-3).

Table 2 shows the channelization combinations supported by each fiber port of the ISE line cards.

Table 2 ISE Line Card Channelization Support

Card Type
SONET Channelization
(per fiber port)
SDH-AU4 Channelization
(per fiber port)
SDH-AU3 Channelization
(per fiber port)

4-port OC-12/STM-4

STS-12c,

STS-3c,

STS-1:DS-3

or combination of

STS-3c and

STS-1:DS-3

STM-4,

STM-1,

TUG-3:VC-3:DS-3/E3

or combination of

STM-1 and

TUG-3:VC-3:DS-3/E3

STM-4.

STM-1,

VC-3:DS-3/E3

or combination of

STM-1 and

VC-3:DS-3 /E3

16-port OC-3/STM-1

STS-3c or

STS-1:DS-3

STM-1 or

TUG-3:VC-3:DS-3/E3

STM-1 or

VC-3:DS-3 /E3


European SDH Multiplexing Terms and Description

This section describes the relationship between the various levels of the SDH STM-n multiplexing hierarchy. To configure interfaces under SDH framing, the port controller is configured for either SDH AU-3 or SDH AU-4 framing, and the individual interface channels are defined and configured as either POS (STM-n) interfaces or serial (DS-3 or E3) interfaces.

At the user level, the following terms apply:

AU-3:
Administrative Unit 3 controller used in SDH framing to carry STM-n, DS-3 or E3 data.

AU-4:
Administrative Unit 4 controller used in SDH framing to carry STM-n, DS-3 or E3 data.

DS-3:
Serial interface that carries data at 44.736 Mbps. The North American term for DS-3 is T3.

E3:
Serial interface that carries data at 34.368 Mbps.

STM-n:
STM-1 is the base level signal for a POS interface (155.52 Mbps). Multiple STM-n signals can be multiplexed to form higher-capacity interfaces. For example, four STM-1 signals multiplexed together form a STM-4 signal.

TUG-3:
Tributary Unit Group 3 controller used to carry DS-3 data over TUG-2.

VC-3:
Virtual Container 3 used in SDH AU-4 framing to carry DS-3 or E3 serial data.

SDH STM-n Multiplexing Hierarchy

This section contains a technical description of the SDH STM-n multiplexing hierarchy as shown in Figure 1.

At the lowest level, PDH (plesiochronous digital hierarchy) signals are mapped into containers (C). The mapping process uses bit stuffing to generate synchronous containers with a common bit rate. Overhead bytes are then added to create virtual containers (VCs). The VCs are then aligned into tributary units (TUs) where pointer processing operations are implemented. This allows the TUs to be synchronously multiplexed into TU groups (TUGs). The TUGs are then multiplexed to become the payload of a High Order VC (HOVC) that includes its own overhead bytes. The HOVC is aligned into administrative units (AUs) by adding the AU pointer, then multiplexed into an AU group (AUG). Finally, the frame of a SDH Synchronous Transport Module level (STM-n) is created by multiplexing n AUGs and adding the multiplexer section and regenerator section overhead bytes (MSOH and RSOH).

The multiplexing hierarchy is the ITU-T SDH multiplexing hierarchy defined in ITU-T G.707.

Figure 1 SDH STM-n Multiplexing Hierarchy

Applications

This section describes applications of the ISE line cards in the 12000 series routers:

Leased-Line Termination

Direct Customer Connectivity

Intra-POP Connectivity

Tier 1/2 Peering

Leased-Line Termination

There are three primary leased line termination applications for the ISE line cards:

DS-3 lease-line termination

OC-3c lease-line termination

OC-12c leased-line termination

Figure 2 shows four different DS-3 deployment scenarios that could be used with the ISE line cards.

Scenario 1

In scenario 1, SONET add drop multiplexer (ADM) passes through the OC-12 from the 12000 series router to the remote digital access and crossconnect system (DACS). The receiving DACS demultiplexes the OC-12 to 12 DS-3s, or the OC-12 into OC-3s. These 12 DS-3s or 4 OC-3s are then deployed directly to the remote sites. The remote DACS is responsible for directly terminating the remote DS3 or OC-3 circuits.

Scenario 2

In scenario 2, the SONET ADM directly terminates the OC-12 and demultiplexes the OC-12 to 12 DS-3. The DS-3 is then connected to a Frame Relay switch. The Frame Relay switch is used as an aggregation device responsible for mapping the edge data link connection identifiers (which are based on DS1 or DS0 connections to the Frame Relay network), to the DS-3 connected to the SONET ADM. The ADM then maps the unchannelized DS-3 into a channelized OC-12/STM-4. The IP packets transverse the SONET ADM network within a channelized OC-12/STM-4. The ISE line cards strip off the SONET framing and route the IP packets to their destination.

Scenario 3

In scenario 3, the role of the SONET ADM takes on a more active role and is no longer a pass-through device. The SONET ADM demultiplexes the optical interface and provides the DS-3 interface directly to the remote user.

Scenario 4

In scenario 4, the channelized OC-12/STM-4 is used as a handoff to a long-distance carrier. This type of deployment is dependent upon the ability of the network provider to obtain channelized OC-12 interfaces from the long-distance carrier.

Figure 2

DS-3 Leased-Line Aggregation

Direct Customer Connectivity

The high density and enhanced edge features of the ISE line cards also allows Cisco 12000 series Internet routers to provide direct customer connections, as shown in Figure 3.

Figure 3 Direct Optical Customer Aggregation

Intra-POP Connectivity

With functionality such as accounting, statistics, and policy based routing, the ISE line cards can provide connectivity between 12000 series core and access routers.

Tier 1/2 Peering

At peering points, the ISP require full control of incoming information flows and accounting for these flows. The ISE line cards provide tier 1/2 peering functionality.

Enhanced Features

This section describes the advanced features supported by the ISE line cards. For additional Cisco Systems documentation on these topics, see Related Documents.

This section contains information on the following topics:

Automatic Protection Switching (APS) and Multiplexed Switching Protection (MSP)

Encapsulation

Internet Protocol Version 4 (IPv4) Unicast Forwarding

Internet Protocol Version 4 (IPv4) Multicast

Extended Access Control Lists (xACL)

Committed Access Rate

Accounting and Statistics

Sampled NetFlow

Diagnostics and Tests

Protection Against Denial Of Service (DOS) Attacks

Automatic Protection Switching (APS) and Multiplexed Switching Protection (MSP)

The APS feature allows switchover of packet-over-SONET (POS) circuits in the event of circuit failure. APS uses a 1+1 redundancy architecture: a "protect" POS interface in the network is configured as a backup for each "working" POS interface. When the working interface fails, the protect interface quickly assumes the traffic load. Normally, the protect and working interfaces are connected to a SONET ADM (add-drop multiplexer), which sends the same signal payload to the working and protect interfaces. For APS functionality on the channelized ISE line cards, the working line is configured under the working controller, and the protect line is configured under the protect controller.

This APS network survivability scheme is known in SDH networks as multiplexed switching protection (MSP). APS and MSP are fundamentally similar.


Note In channelized ISE line cards configured for APS, the channelizations for the working and protect ports must be identical. If the channel configuration is changed for a working port, those same changes must be made to the protection port (and vice versa). If the channelization configurations on the working and protect ports are different when a protection switch occurs, the traffic carried by any mis-matched interface will be lost.


See Related Documents for additional information on feature capability and configuration. See Configuring APS for Channelized ISE Line Cards for instructions to configure APS for ISE line cards.

Encapsulation

The WAN data link layer (Layer 2), defines how data is formatted, or framed, for transmission to remote sites. This formatting is referred to as encapsulation. Each interface on an ISE line card can be configured with one of the encapsulations described in this section.

See Configuration Tasks for instructions to configure an interface encapsulation.

See Related Documents for additional information on feature capability and configuration.

High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC)

HDLC is a bit-oriented, data link layer protocol derived from the Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC) encapsulation protocol. HDLC encapsulation is configured as the default encapsulation method on all ISE interfaces.

See the section on HDLC in the Cisco Systems publication Synchronous Data Link Control and Derivatives for additional information. This document is part of the Internetworking Technology Overview.

Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)

PPP provides a method for transmitting datagrams over serial point-to-point links. The ISE line cards support the following:

PPP encapsulation/termination per link

PPP over SONET/SDH

See the Cisco Systems publication Point-to-Point Protocol for additional information. This document is part of the Internetworking Technology Overview.

Frame Relay

See Related Documents for additional information on feature capability and configuration.

The ISE line cards support the following Frame Relay features:

UNI (User-Network Interface) termination.

Cisco, American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and International Telecommunications Union (ITU) Local Management Interface (LMI) with auto sensing.

Enhanced Local Management Interface (ELMI) address registration: this feature enables a network management system (NMS) to detect connectivity among the switches and routers in a network using the Enhanced Local Management Interface (ELMI) protocol. During ELMI version negotiation, neighboring devices exchange their management IP addresses and index. The NMS polls the devices to collect this connectivity information.

Inverse ARP. Inverse ARP is available for IP only in the ISE line cards. Frame Relay Inverse ARP is a method of building dynamic address mappings in Frame Relay networks. Inverse ARP allows the router or access server to discover the protocol address of a device associated with the virtual circuit.

Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) over Frame Relay. With CDP, network management applications can learn the device type and the SNMP agent address of neighboring devices. This enables applications to send SNMP queries to neighboring devices. CDP runs over the data link layer only. Therefore, two systems that support different network-layer protocols can learn about each other.

Internet Protocol Version 4 (IPv4) Unicast Forwarding

ISE line cards support the following IPv4 features.

See Related Documents for additional information on feature capability and configuration.

Distributed cisco express forwarding (dCEF) support
Cisco express forwarding (CEF) is advanced Layer 3 IP switching technology. CEF optimizes network performance and scalability for networks with large and dynamic traffic patterns, such as the Internet, on networks characterized by intensive web-based applications, or interactive sessions. When distributed CEF (dCEF) is enabled, the ISE line cards maintain an identical copy of the Forwarding Information Base (FIB) and adjacency tables. The line cards perform the express forwarding between port adapters, relieving the route processor of involvement in the switching operation.

Layer 3 load balancing using CEF.

The maximum transmission unit (MTU) is configurable to 9188 bytes (jumbo frame). MTU defines the largest size of packets that an interface can transmit without needing to fragment. IP packets larger than the MTU must go through IP fragmentation procedures.

Internet Protocol Version 4 (IPv4) Multicast

Traditional IP communication allows a host to send packets to a single host (unicast transmission) or to all hosts (broadcast transmission). IP multicast provides a third scheme, allowing a host to send packets to a subset of all hosts (group transmission). These hosts are known as group members.


Note ISE line cards conduct IPv4 multicast in software.


See Related Documents for additional information on feature capability and configuration.

The ISE line cards support the following multicast features:

Access Control Lists (ACLs) on multicast flows (see also Extended Access Control Lists (xACL)).

Identify IP multicast flows according to IP multicast addresses.

Dynamic Registration using Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP):
IGMP is used between hosts on a LAN and the router(s) on that LAN to track of which multicast groups the hosts are members.

Reverse Path Forwarding (RPF):
RPF is an algorithm used for forwarding multicast datagrams.

Protocol-Independent Multicast (PIM) sparse mode (SM) and dense mode (DM):
PIM is used between routers so that they can track which multicast packets to forward to each other and to their directly connected LANs. In populating the multicast routing table, dense-mode interfaces are always added to the table. Sparse-mode interfaces are added to the table only when periodic "Join" messages are received from downstream routers, or when there is a directly connected member on the interface.

Auto-RP (Rendezvous Point): this feature automates the distribution of group-to-RP mappings in a PIM network.

Multicast Source Discovery Protocol:
MSDP is a mechanism to connect multiple PIM sparse-mode (SM) domains.

Multiprotocol BGP Extensions for IP Multicast:
MBGP is an enhanced BGP that carries IP multicast routes. BGP carries two sets of routes, one set for unicast routing and one set for multicast routing. The routes associated with multicast routing are used by the Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) to build data distribution trees.

Extended Access Control Lists (xACL)

The ISE line cards support Extended ACLs for:

Incoming and outgoing traffic

Subinterfaces

Thousands of ACL and xACL entries

Access Control Lists (ACLs), sometimes called filters, provide a tool for network control and security, allowing you to filter packet flow into or out of switch router interfaces. Network operators can use ACLs to limit network traffic, and to restrict network use by certain users or devices. Standard IP ACLs use source addresses for matching operations. Extended IP ACLs use source and destination addresses for matching operations, as well as optional protocol type information for finer granularity of control. ACLs can be applied to an interface as either an inbound ACL or an outbound ACL.

See the "Access Control Lists" section for titles of Related Documents containing additional information on xACL features and configuration.

Properties of the ACLs in ISE Line Cards

Only one ACL can be applied to an interface for each direction.

Testing of the packet against an ACL stops after a match is found.

There is an implicit "deny all" entry at the end of every ACL.

New entries are always added to the end of the list.

Committed Access Rate

Committed Access Rate (CAR) enables the network operator to allocate bandwidth commitments and limitations to traffic sources and destinations, while specifying policies for handling traffic that exceeds the bandwidth allocation. CAR policies can be utilized at either the ingress or egress of the network. CAR thresholds may be applied by access port, by IP address, or by application flow. The CAR feature uses token bucket filters to measure traffic load and limit sources to bandwidth allocations while accommodating the inherently bursty nature of IP traffic. For traffic which exceeds allocated bandwidth, CAR utilizes extended ACLs to define policies including bandwidth utilization thresholds under which packet priority is modified or packets are dropped.

See the "Committed Access Rate" section for titles of Related Documents containing additional information on CAR features and configuration.

ISE line cards support the following CAR features for both Ingress and Egress interfaces:

Source IP address

Destination IP address

Protocol

Source port

Destination port

Precedence

Other L2, L3 and L4 bit fields

Classification using extended ACLs

When the packet has been classified as conforming or exceeding a particular rate limit, the router performs one of the following actions on the packet:

Transmit:
The packet is transmitted.

Drop:
The packet is dropped.

Set precedence and transmit:
The IP precedence bits in the packet header are rewritten. The packet is then transmitted.

Set QoS group and transmit:
The packet is assigned to a QoS group and transmitted.

Continue:
The packet is evaluated using the next rate policy. If there is not another rate policy, the packet is transmitted.

Accounting and Statistics

The following features are supported:

Packet accounting
The show interfaces command displays counters (packets and bytes) for each interface to reflect the actual number of packets received and transmitted. This also takes Random Early Discard (RED) drops into account. These counters do not reflect protocol or any sort of packet classification. Note that RED is an n algorithm where packets are dropped from a queue in order to provide better overall TCP performance under congested conditions.

Multicast packet accounting
Packet counts and byte counts are provided for the number of multicast packets that are received, switched, dropped, fail RPF test, and are punted to the local processor. This is provided per interface.

Per protocol (IP, MPLS) accounting
The show interfaces command breaks down the statistics by protocol on a per interface basis. These counters do not reflect RED drops.

Per adjacency accounting
Number of packets and byte count on a per adjacency basis. These counters are independent of any drop action that occurs subsequent to the switching.

Per destination CEF prefix (bytes and packets)

Per queue RED drops (packets)

For a single specified queue, per WRED drops (packets)

Per queue instantaneous and average queue depths (bytes and packets)

Per Frame Relay Permanent Virtual Circuit (PVC) statistics (bytes, packets and frames)

See the Related Documents for additional information.

Sampled NetFlow

The Sampled NetFlow feature allows you to sample IP packets being forwarded to routers, by allowing you to define the "x" interval with a value between a minimum and maximum. Sampling packets are accounted for in the NetFlow Flow Cache of the router. These sampling packets will substantially decrease the CPU utilization needed to account for NetFlow packets by allowing the majority of the packets to be switched faster, because they do not need to go through additional NetFlow processing.

See the "Netflow" section for titles of Related Documents containing additional information on feature capabilities and configuration.

Sampled Netflow in the ISE line cards includes support for the following records:

Source IP address

Destination IP address

Source TCP/UDP application port

Destination TCP/UDP application port

Next hop router IP address

Input physical interface index

Output physical interface index

Packet count for this flow

Byte count for this flow

Start of flow timestamp

End of flow timestamp

IP protocol

Type of Service (ToS) byte

TCP flags

Source Autonomous System (AS) number

Destination Autonomous System (AS) number

Source subnet mask

Destination subnet mask

Diagnostics and Tests

This section contains information on the support of loopback and diagnostic tools supported by the ISE line cards:

Loopbacks

CrashDump, Core Info, and Line Card Reset

Frame Relay Diagnostics and Troubleshooting

Loopbacks

Loopbacks are an important part of troubleshooting; they are used to isolate the fault on and end-to-end circuit (especially when the circuit is down). ISE line cards support loopback capability per subinterface and per port:

See Configuration Tasks for instructions on configuring interfaces for loopback mode. This section also contains information on the loopback modes available for each interface type.

See the "Loopbacks" section for titles of Related Documents containing additional information on loopback usage.

CrashDump, Core Info, and Line Card Reset

The ISE line cards support crash dump. core info and line card resets for protection in the event of a system failure.

Frame Relay Diagnostics and Troubleshooting

The Frame Relay Switching Diagnostics and Troubleshooting feature enhances Frame Relay switching functionality by providing tools for diagnosing problems in switched Frame Relay networks.

With the Frame Relay Switching Diagnostics and Troubleshooting feature, the show frame-relay pvc command has been enhanced to display both the number of packets dropped and the detailed reasons why the packets were dropped. This command has also been enhanced to display the local status, the Network-to-Network Interface (NNI) status, and the overall status of NNI PVCs.

If you observe a problem, the debug frame-relay switching command is used to display the status of packets on switched PVCs at regular intervals. This debug command displays information such as the number of packets that were switched, why packets were dropped, and changes in status of physical links and PVCs. Debug information is displayed only when there has been a change from one configured interval to the next.

See the Cisco Systems publication Frame Relay Switching Diagnostics and Troubleshooting, Cisco IOS Release 12.1 for additional information on the use of these commands.

Protection Against Denial Of Service (DOS) Attacks

The ISE line cards support the following features to help defeat denial of service (DOS) attacks:

For Attacks On Upstream Devices

Large numbers of line-rate xACLs are available. See Extended Access Control Lists (xACL) for more information.

For Attacks On The Router

There are several mechanisms available:

"Exception" packets detected as being incompatible with regular fastpath parameters are either dropped or sent to the local CPU. This does not effect the router's performance:

Packets sent to the local CPU are classified into three different RAW queues, which are processed in a strict priority order by the CPU. With this mechanism, the good packets are put in the higher priority queue, while the exception packets (such as IP options, TTL expire, no route found) are put into the low priority queue. If more packets arrive into this queue than the CPU queue threshold, the packets are dropped without a performance cost.

Packets are never sent directly from the fastpath to the route processor:
Packets are first sent to the local CPU where they can be throttled, and then sent to the route processor. This avoids the possibility that the route processor is overwhelmed by user packets. Packets directed to the router can also be rate limited using the usual CAR function without a performance penalty.

Benefits

The ISE line cards offer the following advantages:

High Speed Applications At The Network Edge

The ISE line cards provide a single platform architecture from backbone to edge: 12000 series routers can be utilized for applications at the edges of the Service Provider network as well as in the Internet core and backbone.

Reduced Cost Of Ownership

The enhanced edge functionality of the ISE line cards significantly decrease up-front procurement cost and life cycle costs.

Cisco Optical Internet Strategy Enabler

Allows high-speed direct Customer aggregation and the rapid shift from DS-3 speed to optical OC-3 or OC-12c speeds building upon Cisco Internetworking strategy. OC-48c backbone or peering capability will be available with Cisco IOS Release 12.0(20)S.

Provides Layer 3 Functionality At High Speeds

The ISE line cards provide the Layer 3 functionality of the Cisco 7500 edge routers at the high speeds of the Cisco 12000 series Internet router.

ISE Functionality In The Backbone

The ISE line cards provide enhanced functionality in the backbone, such extended access control lists (ACLs) and committed access rate (CAR).

Restrictions

E3 interfaces do not support DSU subrate bandwidth.

CAR supports up to five "continue" actions on the same CAR rule tree. If there are more than five continue actions, the ISE line card CPU is involved.

Related Documents

Refer to the following Cisco Systems publications for additional information on the topics and technologies discussed in this document.

Access Control Lists

Access Control Lists: Overview and Guidelines, Cisco Release 12.0

Configuring IP Services, Cisco IOS Release 12.0. This is a chapter in the Network Protocols Configuration Guide, Part 1. See the section "Filter IP Packets".

Automatic Protection Switching

Automatic Protection Switching of Packet-over-SONET Circuits

Cisco IOS Release 12.0 Interface Configuration Guide

Committed Access Rate

Configuring Committed Access Rate, Cisco IOS Release 12.0

Quality of Service Solutions Command Reference

Diagnostics

Troubleshooting Guides, Cisco IOS Release 11.2

DSU

Cisco Remote Connection Management Feature Module: contains information on configuring DSU modes.

Internetworking Primer, for descriptions of encapsulation methods, connectivity and the use of DSU.

Encapsulation

The following documents are part of the Internetworking Technology Overview:

Synchronous Data Link Control and Derivatives, for information on HDLC.

Point-to-Point Protocol

Frame Relay

Frame Relay

Frame Relay. Includes a general overview and information on LMI.

Frame Relay ELMI Address Registration, Cisco IOS Release 12.1

Configuring Frame Relay, Cisco IOS Release 12.0 for Frame Relay configuration. This document includes information on Inverse ARP.

Monitoring the Router and Network, for information on the Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP).

Frame Relay Commands, Cisco IOS Release 12.0

Frame Relay Switching Diagnostics and Troubleshooting, Cisco IOS Release 12.1

Hardware Installation (Concatenated Line Cards)

4-Port POS OC-12/STM-4 with Extended Feature Set Line Card Installation and Configuration

16-Port Packet-Over-SONET OC-3/STM-1 with Extended Feature Set Line Card Installation and Configuration

Hardware Installation (Channelized Line Cards)

4-Port Channelized OC-12/STM-4 to DS-3/E3 Line Card Installation and Configuration

16-Port Channelized OC-3/STM-1 to DS-3/E3 Line Card Installation and Configuration

Interface Configuration Guides

Cisco IOS Release 12.0 Interface Configuration Guide

Configuring Serial Interfaces, Cisco IOS Release 12.0

Cisco Remote Connection Management Feature Module: contains information on configuring DSU modes.

Cisco 12000 series Router Installation and Configuration Guide

IOS Command Reference

Command Reference Master Index, Cisco IOS Release 12.0

Cisco IOS Release 12.0 Interface Command Reference

IP Services Commands, Cisco IOS Release 12.0

Cisco IOS Software Command Summary

IP Routing and Addressing

Cisco IOS IP and IP Routing Configuration Guide

Cisco IOS Release 12.0 Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1: refer to the "IP Addressing Commands" chapter for information on IP addressing.

IPv4 Unicast Forwarding

Configuring IP Services, Cisco IOS Release 12.0

The following documents are part of the Cisco IOS Release 12.0 Cisco IOS Switching Services Configuration Guide:

Cisco Express Forwarding Overview

Configuring Cisco Express Forwarding

IPv4 Multicast Forwarding

Configuring IP Multicast Routing, Cisco IOS Release 12.0: for information on IGMP, RPF, PIM and autoRP.

Multicast Source Discovery Protocol, Cisco IOS Release 12.0

Multiprotocol BGP Extensions for IP Multicast, Cisco IOS Release 12.0

Loopbacks

Understanding Loopback Modes on Cisco Routers: for a general description of loopback modes and applications.

Cisco IOS Release 12.0 Interface Configuration Guide

Management Information Databases (MIBs)

Introduction to Cisco MIBs

Cisco Management Information Base (MIB) User Quick Reference

Netflow

NetFlow Services Solutions Guide: for general descriptions of netflow applications and features.

Sampled Netflow, Cisco IOS Release 12.0

Overview of Internetworking Methods and Terminology

Internetworking Primer: for descriptions of encapsulation methods, connectivity and the use of DSU.

Internetwork Design Guide

Internetworking Technology Overview

Release Notes (for Updated Information)

Release Notes for Cisco 7000 Family and Cisco 12000 Series Routers for Cisco IOS Release 12.0 S

Quality of Service (QoS)

Quality of Service (QoS) Networking: this document is part of the Internetworking Technology Overview.

Quality of Service Solutions Command Reference

Cisco IOS Quality of Service: this Cisco Systems web site contains introductions to the various QoS features. See http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/732/net_enabled/qos.html

SONET Technology

A Brief Overview of SONET Technology

Automatic Protection Switching of Packet-over-SONET Circuits

Supported Platforms

Cisco 12008 Internet router

Cisco 12012 Internet router

Cisco 12016 Internet router

Cisco 12410 Internet router

Cisco 12416 Internet router

Platform Support Through Feature Navigator

Cisco IOS software is packaged in feature sets that support specific platforms. To get updated information regarding platform support for this feature, access Feature Navigator. Feature Navigator dynamically updates the list of supported platforms as new platform support is added for the feature.

Feature Navigator is a web-based tool that enables you to quickly determine which Cisco IOS software images support a specific set of features and which features are supported in a specific Cisco IOS image.

To access Feature Navigator, you must have an account on Cisco.com. If you have forgotten or lost your account information, e-mail the Contact Database Administration group at cdbadmin@cisco.com. If you want to establish an account on Cisco.com, go to http://www.cisco.com/register and follow the directions to establish an account.

Feature Navigator is updated when major Cisco IOS software releases and technology releases occur. As of May 2001, Feature Navigator supports M, T, E, S, and ST releases. You can access Feature Navigator at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/fn

Supported Standards, MIBs, and RFCs

Standards

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature.

MIBs

ISE Line cards support the following MIBs with Cisco IOS Release 12.0(19)S:

MIB II, including interface extensions

BGP-4 MIB

CAR MIB

Cisco CAR MIB

Cisco CDP MIB

DS3/E3 MIB

SONET/SDH MIB

To obtain lists of supported MIBs by platform and Cisco IOS Release, and to download MIB modules, go to the Cisco MIB website on Cisco.com at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml

RFCs

RFC 1619, Point-to-Point Packet over SONET/SDH

RFC 1662, Point-to-Point Protocol in HDLC-like framing

Prerequisites

The following ISE line cards are supported with Cisco IOS Release 12.0(19)S or later:

4-OC12X/POS-SM-SC: 4-Port POS OC-12/STM-4 with Extended Feature Set Line Card (concatenated)

4-CHOC12/DS3-IR-SC: 4-Port Channelized OC-12/STM-4 to DS-3/E3 Line Card

16-OC3X/POS-IR-LC: 16-Port Packet-Over-SONET OC-3/STM-1 with Extended Feature Set Line Card (concatenated)

16-CHOC3/DS3-IR-LC: 16-Port Channelized OC-3/STM-1 to DS-3/E3 Line Card

Configuration Tasks

See the following sections to configure the ISE features.

Configuring a Concatenated Line Card

Configuring a Channelized Line Card

Configuring the Controller

Defining Channelized Interfaces

Redefining Existing Channelizations

Configuring a Channelized Interface

Configuring a Concatenated Line Card

By default, all interfaces on a new line card are disabled. To enable an interface, you must first choose the interface, and then issue the no shutdown command. When an interface on the line card is enabled with no additional changes to the configuration, the default interface configuration parameters are used.

This section describes the commands used to and modify the parameters on an interface. Each command includes information on the default setting. Each task in the following list is identified as either required or optional.

Specifying Framing and Encapsulation in a Concatenated Interface (required)

Enabling Alarm Reporting in the Concatenated Interface (optional)

Setting the Bit Error Rate (BER) Thresholds in the Concatenated Interface (optional)

Starting Up the Interface and Saving the Configuration (required)

Setting the System Clock for a Concatenated Line Card (required)

Using Loopback Modes in the Concatenated Interface (optional)

Configuring APS for Concatenated ISE Line Cards (optional)

For additional information on the Cisco IOS interface commands described in this section, refer to the Cisco Systems publication Cisco IOS Release 12.0 Interface Command Reference.


Note For information on the configuration and use of Bit Error Rate Testing (BERT), refer to the appropriate hardware installation publications as specified in Related Documents.


Specifying Framing and Encapsulation in a Concatenated Interface

This section contains information on the commands used to configure framing, encapsulation and related settings on a concatenated interface. The default setting for each command is included in the description.

Before using the configure command, you must enter the privileged level of the EXEC command interpreter with the enable command. The system will prompt you for a password (if required). Follow the following steps to specify the parameters for an interface. Press the Return key after each configuration step unless otherwise noted.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# configure terminal

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

Router(config)# interface POS slot/port

Selects the interface.

The port number is:

0 through 3 for the 4-port OC-12/STM-4 line card.

0 through 15 for the 16-port OC-3/STM-1 line card.

Refer to the hardware installation and configuration documents specified in Related Documents, for information on slot identification in the Cisco 12000 series Internet routers.

Step 3 

Router(config-if)# [no] POS framing [SDH | SONET]

Specifies the framing mode for the interface.

The default is SONET framing.

To return to the default SONET framing mode, use no POS framing.

Step 4 

Router(config-if)# [no] encapsulation [hdlc | ppp | frame-relay]

Sets the encapsulation method used by the interface. The ISE line cards support HDLC, PPP and Frame-Relay.

The default is HDLC encapsulation.

Step 5 

Router(config-if)# [no] pos flag J0 value

Sets the J0 byte. This is the section trace byte (formerly the C1 byte). For interoperability with SDH equipment in Japan, use the value 0x1.

The byte value can be 0 to 255.

The default is 1.

To remove the setting, use the no form of this command.

Note The pos flag command is used to set the SONET overhead bytes in the frame header to meet a specific standards requirement or to ensure interoperability with another vendor's equipment.

Step 6 

Router(config-if)# [no] pos flag S1S0 value

Sets the S1 and S0 bits (bits 5 and 6 of the H1 #1 payload pointer byte).

The S1 and S0 bits value can be 0 to 3.

The default is 0.

To remove the setting, use the no form of this command.

Step 7 

Router(config-if)# [no] pos flag C2 value

Sets the C2 byte value, the path signal identifier used to identify the payload content type.

The C2 value can be 0 to 255

The default C2 value is 207.

To remove the setting, use the no form of this command.

Step 8 

Router(config-if)# [no] transmitter-delay delay

Specifies a minimum dead-time after transmitting a packet.

delay can be 0 to 255.

The default is 1.

To restore the default value of 1, use the no form of this command.

Step 9 

Router(config-if)# [no] pos scramble-atm

Enables SONET payload scrambling on the POS interface.

The default is no scrambling.

To disable scrambling, use the no form of this command.

Step 10 

Router(config-if)# [no] CRC [16 | 32]

Sets the length of the cyclic redundancy check (CRC). CRC is an error-checking technique that uses a calculated numeric value to detect errors in transmitted data. The designators 16 and 32 indicate the length (in bits) of the frame check sequence (FCS). A CRC of 32 bits provides more powerful error detection, but adds overhead. Both the sender and receiver must use the same setting.

The options are 16 or 32 bits.

The default value is 32 bits.

To restore the default value, use the no form of this command.

Step 11 

Router(config-if)# [no] mtu value

Adjusts the maximum packet size or maximum transmission unit (MTU) size in bytes.

value can be 64 to 15360.

The default is 4470 (bytes).

To restore the MTU value to the default value, use the no form of this command.

Step 12 

Router(config-if)# [no] keepalive value

Sets the keepalive timer (in seconds) for the interface.

value is a number in seconds (0 to 32767).

The default value is 10 (seconds).

To turn off keepalives entirely, use the no form of this command.

Step 13 

Router(config-if)# [no] clock source [internal | line]

Specifies the clock source for the interface.

line specifies that the network clock source is used (default).

internal specifies that the internal clock source from the line card is used.

The default is the line clock. Use the no form of this command to restore the default value.

See the "Setting the System Clock for a Concatenated Line Card" section for more information on the use of this command.

Enabling Alarm Reporting in the Concatenated Interface

To enable reporting of selected alarms and signal events, use the following command.

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if)# [no] POS report
[b1-tca | b2-tca | slof | slos | lais | lrdi | b3-tca | pais | plop | prdi]

Permits selected SONET alarms to be logged to the console for the POS interface.

The default alarms to be logged include: sf-ber, slos, slof, b1-tca, b2-tca, b3-tca and plop.

To disable logging, use the no form of this command.

See Table 3 for descriptions of the alarms and events.


Table 3 SONET/SDH Alarm and Signal Events

Alarm/Signal
SONET Description
SDH Description

b1-tca

B1 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

B1 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

b2-tca

B2 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

B2 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

b3-tca

B3 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

B3 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

lais

Line Alarm Indication Signal (AIS-L)

Multiplexer Section Alarm Indication Signal (MS-AIS)

lrdi

Line Remote Defect Indication (RDI-L)

Multiplexer Section Remote Defect Indication (MS-RDI)

pais

Path Alarm Indication Signal, or Alarm Indication Signal—Path (AIS-P)

Administrative Unit Alarm Indication Signal (AU-AIS)

plop

Path Loss of Pointer, or Loss of Pointer—Path (LOP-P)

Administrative Unit Loss of Pointer (AU-LOP)

prdi

Path Remote Defect Indication, or Remote Defect Indication—Path (RDI-P)

High Order Path Remote Defect Indication (HP-RDI)

sd-ber

Line BIP BER in excess of the Signal Degrade (SD) threshold

Multiplexer Section BIP BER in excess of the Signal Degrade (SD) threshold

sf-ber

Line BIP BER in excess of the Signal Fail (SF) threshold

Multiplexer Section BIP BER in excess of the Signal Fail (SF) threshold

slof

Section Loss of Frame (LOF)

Regenerator Section Loss of Frame (LOF)

slos

Section Loss of Signal (LOS)

Regenerator Section Loss of Signal (LOS)


Setting the Bit Error Rate (BER) Thresholds in the Concatenated Interface

To set the threshold values for the BER Threshold Crossing Alarms, use the following interface configuration commands:

Command
Purpose

Set the Threshold values using the following commands:

Sets the bit error rate (BER) threshold of the specified alarms for the POS interface.

rate for each command can be 3 to 9.

The default rates are listed below.

Use the no form of the command to return the settings to the default rate

See Table 3 for descriptions of the alarms and events.

Router(config-if)# [no] POS threshold b1-tca rate

B1 BER threshold crossing alarm.
Default: 6 (10e-6)

Router(config-if)# [no] POS threshold b2-tca rate

B2 BER threshold crossing alarm.
Default: 6 (10e-6)

Router(config-if)# [no] POS threshold b3-tca rate

B3 BER threshold crossing alarm.
Default: 6 (10e-6)

Router(config-if)# [no] POS threshold sd-ber rate

Signal degrade BER threshold. Default: 6 (10e-6)

Router(config-if)# [no] POS threshold sf-ber rate

Signal failure BER threshold. Default: 3 (10e-3)


Starting Up the Interface and Saving the Configuration

On power up, the interfaces on a line card are shut down. To enable the interfaces, you must enter a no shutdown command in configuration mode for each interface.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config-if)# no shutdown

Enables all functions on the interface.

To disable an interface, use the no shutdown command. This command also marks the interface as unavailable.

The default is shutdown (the interface is disabled).

Step 2 

Router(config-if)# end

Exits configuration mode.

Step 3 

Router# copy running-config startup-config

Writes the new configuration to nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM).

Setting the System Clock for a Concatenated Line Card

This section describes configuration of the system clock. This configuration must be performed for each concatenated line card after the interfaces are configured and enabled.

The system clock provides a timing signal for line card traffic can be derived from either from an external clock source using a fiber port line, or from the line card itself using an internal clock.

Rules for Using a Line Clock Source

To use a line system clocking source, two interfaces are configured as "primary" and "secondary" line clock sources (as described in the following command section).

Both of the interfaces to be used as line clock sources must be configured with the command
clock source line (the default).

Interfaces to be used as line clock sources must also be enabled with the command no shutdown.

Rules for Using an Internal Clock Source

To use an internal clock source, the system clock is set to internal manual mode as described in the following section.

The interface ports must also be configured with the command clock source internal.


Note See Specifying Framing and Encapsulation in a Concatenated Interface for more information on changing the port clock source.


Auto and Manual Mode for System Clocking

The clock selection operates in one of two modes: "auto" or "manual".

Manual mode is used to specify an internal clock source for the system clock. The command is clock redundancy mode manual internal.

Auto mode is used to select two fiber port interfaces as "primary" and "secondary" sources for the line clock signal. This "auto" clock selection is made in descending order, depending on availability:

primary clock source: an interface designated by the user

secondary clock source: an interface designated by the user

internal clock source: internal clock (oscillator)

For example, if the primary clock source fails, the secondary clock source takes over; if the secondary clock source fails, the internal clock takes over.

The system can also be configured to revert to a higher priority clock source if the (previously failed) higher priority clock source has recovered. This is the revertive | non-revertive parameter in the clock mode command.


Note While a card is in "auto non-revertive" mode, the system telecombus clock can be manually switched to the highest priority clock currently available with the command: sysclock switch slot.


Follow these instructions to configure the system clock in a line card:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# config terminal

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

Router(config)# controller sysclock slot

Selects the slot where the line card is installed.

Step 3 

Router(config)# clock source primary port

Selects the port for the primary clock source.

This port (interface) must be enabled and have the clock source configured for clock source line.

The port ranges are:

0 through 3 for the 4 port OC-12 cards

0 through 15 for the 16 port OC-3 cards

The default is 0.

Step 4 

Router(config)# clock source secondary port

Selects the port for the secondary clock source.

This port (interface) must be enabled and have the clock source configured for clock source line.

The port ranges are:

0 through 3 for the 4 port OC-12 cards

0 through 15 for the 16 port OC-3 cards

The default is 1.

Step 5 

Router(config)# clock redundancy mode manual internal

or


Router(config)# clock redundancy mode auto [revertive | non-revertive]

Option 1: Sets the clock mode in manual mode to use an internal source for the system clock. This is the default setting for the system clock.

or

Option 2: Sets the clock mode in auto selection mode. Indicate if the auto mode should be revertive or non-revertive:

revertive: after a clock source failure, the system will revert back to a higher-priority source if the (previously failed) higher priority clock source has recovered.

non-revertive: will not revert to a higher priority clock source. The next available clock source in descending order will be chosen.

The default clock redundancy mode is:
clock redundancy mode manual internal

Note While a card is in "auto non-revertive" mode, the system clock can be manually switched to the highest priority clock currently available with the command: sysclock switch slot.

Step 6 

Router(config)# end

Exits configuration mode.

Step 7 

Router# copy running-config startup-config

To write the new configuration to nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM).

Using Loopback Modes in the Concatenated Interface

To test the interface, use the loopback interface configuration command.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# configure terminal

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

Router(config)# interface POS slot/port

Selects the interface.

Step 3 

Router(config-if)# [no] loopback [internal | line]

Enables or disables a loopback on the interface.

internal specifies a local loopback.

line specifies a network loopback.

The default is no loopback (loopbacks on the interface are disabled).

Configuring APS for Concatenated ISE Line Cards

Automatic Protection Switching (APS) allows switchover of traffic in the event of line failure. APS uses a 1+1 redundancy architecture: a "protect" POS interface in the network is configured as a backup for each "working" POS interface. When the working interface fails, the protect interface quickly assumes the traffic load. Normally, the protect and working interfaces are connected to a SONET ADM (add-drop multiplexer), which sends the same signal payload to the working and protect interfaces.

This APS network survivability scheme is known in SDH networks as multiplexed switching protection (MSP). APS and MSP are fundamentally similar.

Complete the following steps to configure APS for concatenated ISE line cards:


Step 1 Configuring the Loopback to be Associated with the Working Interface Router

Step 2 Configuring the Working Interface

Step 3 Configuring the Protect Interface


See Related Documents for information on additional APS documentation. For configuration examples, see Example to Configure APS for Concatenated Interfaces.


Note The command aps authenticate can be used to ensure that only valid packets are accepted on the OOB communication channel. This command is recommended but not mandatory. If this feature is used, the same authenticate string must be configured on both the working and protect interfaces. Please check to make sure the authenticate strings on both working and protect interfaces remain identical whenever the command "aps protect 1 ip-address" is entered.


Configuring the Loopback to be Associated with the Working Interface Router

Complete the following steps to configure the loopback to be associated with the working interface router. See Example to Configure APS for Concatenated Interfaces for an example configuration.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# interface loobacknumber

Selects the interface loopback.

Step 2 

Router(config-if)# ip address ip-address mask

Specifies the IP address.

ip-address is the IP address

mask is for the associated IP subnet

Step 3 

Router(config-if)# no ip directed-broadcast

Disables directed broadcast-to-physical broadcast translation on the interface.

Step 4 

Router(config-if)# no ip route-cache

Disables fast switching and autonomous switching.

Step 5 

Router(config-if)# no ip mroute-cache

Disables IP multicast fast switching.

Configuring the Working Interface

Complete the following steps to configure the working interface. See Example to Configure APS for Concatenated Interfaces for an example configuration.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# interface type slot/port

Selects the interface.

Step 2 

Router(config-if)# pos ais-shut

Sends the alarm indication signal - line (AIS-L) when the POS interface is placed in administrative shut down state. In APS environments, AIS-L can be used to force a protection switch.

Step 3 

Router(config-if)# aps group group-number

Specifies a protect-group number. This command allows more than one protect and working interface to be supported on a router. The aps group command must be configured on both the protect and working interfaces.

Step 4 

Router(config-if)# aps working circuit-number

Configures the POS interface as a working interface. Since only 1+1 APS is supported, this number is always 1.

Configuring the Protect Interface

Complete the following steps to configure the protect interface. See Example to Configure APS for Concatenated Interfaces for an example configuration.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# interface type slot/port

Selects the interface.

Step 2 

Router(config-if)# pos ais-shut

Sends the alarm indication signal - line (AIS-L) when the POS interface is placed in administrative shut down state. In APS environments, AIS-L can be used to force a protection switch.

Step 3 

Router(config-if)# aps group group-number

Specifies a protect-group number. This command allows more than one protect and working interface to be supported on a router. The aps group command must be configured on both the protect and working interfaces.

Step 4 

Router(config-if)# aps protect circuit-number ip-address

Enable a POS interface as a protect interface.

circuit-number is the number of the circuit of the associated working POS interface. Since only 1+1 APS is supported, this number is always "1".

ip-address is the IP address of the router that has the working POS interface.

Note Always configure the working interface before configuring the protect interface.

Configuring a Channelized Line Card

Channelized line cards allow each physical port to be configured into "channels". This feature allows multiple connections to be configured over a single physical port. Each of these channelized interfaces utilizes a portion of the port's available bandwidth. The entire bandwidth of a port can also be configured as a single channel, if required.

To configure the channels on an ISE channelized line card, the controller for each card is first configured to define framing type (SONET or SDH) and related parameters. When this is done, the controller is enabled and the system clock for that card is configured.

After the line card controller is configured, the individual channel interfaces are defined. Finally, those interfaces are configured for encapsulation and other parameters.


Note For information on the configuration and use of Bit Error Rate Testing (BERT), refer to the appropriate hardware installation publications as specified in Related Documents.


This section contains instructions to complete each of these configuration tasks. Each task is identified as required or optional:

Configuring the Controller (required)

Starting Up the Controller and Saving the Configuration (required)

Setting the System Clock for a Channelized Line Card (required)

Using Loopback Modes in the Controller (optional)

Defining Channelized Interfaces (required)

Activating the Channelized Interfaces for a Line Card (required)

Configuring a Channelized Interface (required)

Configuring APS for Channelized ISE Line Cards (optional)

Refer to the documents outlined in Related Documents for more information commands described in this section. Information on new and modified commands is contained in the "Command Reference" section.

Configuring the Controller

This section contains instructions to configure the attributes that apply to all traffic on the controller (physical port).

By default, all interfaces on a new line card are disabled. To enable an interface, you must first select the interface, and then issue the no shutdown command. When an interface on the line card is enabled with no additional changes to the configuration, the default parameters are used.

This section describes the commands used to select a controller and modify the parameters. This section also includes the default settings of each command. Each task in the list is identified as either required or optional.

Setting the Framing Type and Related Parameters for the Controller (required)

Enabling Alarm Reporting for the Controller (optional)

Setting the BER Threshold Values for the Controller (optional)


Note Scrambling is always enabled at the controller level and cannot be configured by the user.


Setting the Framing Type and Related Parameters for the Controller

This section contains instructions to set the framing type and related parameters for the controller. If SDH framing is used, you must also specify the Administrative Unit Group (AUG) mapping mode.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# configure terminal

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

Router (config)# controller sonet slot/port

Enters the controller configuration mode. This command also selects the physical port of the controller.

slot is the physical chassis slot of the channelized line card.

port is the physical interface on the line card.
[0...3] for the 4 port OC12/STM4
[0...15] for 16 port OC3/STM1

Refers to the hardware installation and configuration documents specified in Related Documents, for information on slot identification in the Cisco 12000 series Internet routers.

Step 3 

Router(config-controller)# [no] framing [SDH | SONET]

Specifies the framing type for the controller.

The default is SONET framing.

To return to the default SONET framing mode, use no framing.

Step 4 

Router(config-controller)# [no] aug-mapping [AU-3 | AU-4]

Optional: This command specifies the Administrative Unit Group (AUG) mapping mode used with SDH framing.

Note This command is available only when SDH framing is configured.

The default is no aug-mapping.

See Channelization Support for additional information on the channelization support for each of these Administrative Unit Groups (AUG).

Step 5 

Router(config-controller)# clock source [internal | line]

Specifies which clock source the controller uses to clock transmitted data.

line specifies that the network clock source is used (default).

internal specifies that the clock source from the line card is used.

The default is clock source line.

See the "Setting the System Clock for a Channelized Line Card" section for more information on the use of this command.

Step 6 

Router(config-controller)# overhead S1S0 number

Sets the S1 and S0 bits (bits 5 and 6 of the H1 number 1 payload pointer byte).

The S1 and S0 bits number can be 0 to 3.

For SDH framing, s1s0 number should be set to 2.

The default is 0.

Step 7 

Router(config-controller)# overhead J0 number

Sets the J0 byte. This is the section trace byte (formerly the C1 byte). This command is used to set the SONET overhead bytes in the frame header to meet a specific standards requirement or to ensure interoperability with another vendor's equipment.

number can be 0 to 255.

The default is 1.

Enabling Alarm Reporting for the Controller

To enable reporting of selected section and line alarms, use the following controller configuration command:

Command
Purpose

Router(config-controller)# alarm-report [b1-tca | b2-tca | lais | lrdi | sd-ber | sf-ber | slof | slos | all]

Permits selected alarms to be logged to the console.

The defaults are: sf-ber, slos, slof, b1-tca and b2-tca.

To disable logging of alarms, use the no form of this command.

The descriptions for these alarm and signal events are listed in Table 4.



Note See the interface configuration sections to configure path alarms.


Table 4 SONET/SDH Alarm and Signal Events

Alarm/Signal
SONET Description
SDH Description

b1-tca (default)

B1 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

B1 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

b2-tca (default)

B2 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

B2 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

lais

Line Alarm Indication Signal (AIS-L)

Multiplexer Section Alarm Indication Signal (MS-AIS)

lrdi

Line Remote Defect Indication (RDI-L)

Multiplexer Section Remote Defect Indication (MS-RDI)

sd-ber

Line BIP BER in excess of the Signal Degrade (SD) threshold

Multiplexer Section BIP BER in excess of the Signal Degrade (SD) threshold

sf-ber (default)

Line BIP BER in excess of the Signal Fail (SF) threshold

Multiplexer Section BIP BER in excess of the Signal Fail (SF) threshold

slof (default)

Section Loss of Frame (LOF)

Regenerator Section Loss of Frame (LOF)

slos (default)

Section Loss of Signal (LOS)

Regenerator Section Loss of Signal (LOS)

all

Selects all of the above.

Selects all of the above.


Setting the BER Threshold Values for the Controller

To set the values for the BER threshold crossing alarms, use the following controller configuration command:

Command
Purpose

Router(config-controller)# ber-threshold type value

Sets the threshold values for the BER Threshold Crossing Alarms.

type can be one of the thresholds listed in Table 5.

value is a number in the range from 3 to 9 that represents the bit error rate threshold value.

The default values are listed in Table 5.

Use the no form of each command to return the settings to the default values.


Table 5 BER Threshold Types and Default Values

Type
Default Value

b1-tca

6

b2-tca

6

sd-ber

6

sf-ber

3

Note: see Table 4 for SONET and SDH descriptions of the threshold types.


Starting Up the Controller and Saving the Configuration

On power up, the controllers on a line card are shut down. To enable the controllers, enter the command no shutdown in controller configuration mode.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config-controller)# no shutdown

Enables all functions on the selected controller.

The default is shutdown (the controller is disabled). This command also marks the controller as unavailable.

Step 2 

Router(config-controller)# end

Exits controller configuration mode.

Step 3 

Router# copy running-config startup-config

Writes the new configuration to nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM).

Setting the System Clock for a Channelized Line Card

This section describes the configuration of the system clock. This configuration must be performed for each channelized line card after the controllers are configured and enabled.

The system clock provides a timing signal for the line card traffic can be derived from either from an external clock source using a fiber port line controller, or from the line card itself using an internal clock.

Rules for Using a Line Clock Source

To use a network clocking source, you must specify two controllers to act as a "primary" and "secondary" line clock source.

Both of the controllers must be configured with the command clock source line (the default).

Controllers used as line clock sources must also be enabled with the command no shutdown.

Rules for Using an Internal Clock Source

To use an internal clock source, the system clock is set to internal manual mode as described in the following section.

The controller ports must also be configured for clock source internal.


Note See Configuring the Controller for more information on changing the port clock source.


Auto and Manual Mode for System Clocking

The clock selection operates in one of two modes: "auto" or "manual".

Manual mode is used to specify an internal clock source for the system clock. The command is clock redundancy mode manual internal.

Auto mode is used to select two fiber port interfaces as "primary" and "secondary" sources for the line clock signal. This "auto" clock selection is made in descending order, depending on availability:

primary clock source: an interface designated by the user

secondary clock source: an interface designated by the user

internal clock source: internal clock (oscillator)

For example, if the primary clock source fails, the secondary clock source takes over; if the secondary clock source fails, the internal clock takes over.

The system can also be configured to revert to a higher priority clock source if the (previously failed) higher priority clock source has recovered. This is the revertive | non-revertive parameter in the clock mode command.


Note While a card is in "auto non-revertive" mode, the system clock can be manually switched to the highest priority clock currently available with the command: sysclock switch slot.


Configure the system clock in a line card as described in the following section:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# config terminal

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

Router(config)# controller sysclock slot

Selects the slot where the line card is installed.

Step 3 

Router(config)# clock source primary port

Selects the controller port for the primary clock source.

This controller must be enabled and have the clock source configured for clock source line.

The port ranges are:

0 through 3 for the 4 port OC-12 cards

0 through 15 for the 16 port OC-3 cards

The default is 0.

Step 4 

Router(config)# clock source secondary port

Selects the port for the secondary clock source.

This controller must be enabled and have the clock source configured for clock source line.

The port ranges are:

0 through 3 for the 4 port OC-12 cards

0 through 15 for the 16 port OC-3 cards

The default is 1.

Step 5 

Router(config)# clock redundancy mode manual internal

or


Router(config)# clock redundancy mode auto [revertive | non-revertive]

Option 1: Sets the clock mode in manual mode to use an internal source for the system clock. This is the default setting for the system clock.

or

Option 2: Sets the clock mode in auto selection mode. Indicate if the auto mode should be revertive or non-revertive:

revertive: After a clock source failure, the system will revert back to a higher-priority source if the (previously failed) higher priority clock source has recovered.

non-revertive: Does not revert to a higher priority clock source. The next available clock source in descending order is chosen.

The default clock redundancy mode is:
clock redundancy mode manual internal

Note While a card is in "auto non-revertive" mode, the system clock can be manually switched to the highest priority clock currently available with the command: sysclock switch slot.

Step 6 

Router(config)# end

Exits configuration mode.

Step 7 

Router# copy running-config startup-config

Writes the new configuration to nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM).

Using Loopback Modes in the Controller

To test the port, use the loopback controller configuration command:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# configure terminal

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

Router (config)# controller sonet slot/port

Enters the controller configuration mode. This command also selects the physical port of the controller.

Step 3 

Router(config-controller)# [no] loopback [internal | line]

Enables or disables a loopback on the controller.

internal: Data is looped from the transmit path to the receive path allowing diagnostics to send data to itself without relying on any external connections.

line: Data is looped from the external port to the transmit port and back out the external port.

The default is no loopback.

no loopback disables loopbacks on the controller.

Defining Channelized Interfaces

After the controller of a channelized line card has been configured, the individual channelized interfaces can be defined. A channel is defined by "reserving" a fraction of the controller's available bandwidth.

Channels are defined for SONET, SDH AU-3 or SDH AU-4 ports. After the channels have been defined, you must activate the new configuration with the microcode reload command.

This section contains instructions to define channels for SONET and SDH ports. This section also contains instructions to activate the new channels, and to redefine channels on a previously configured port:

Defining Channels for a SONET Port

Defining Channels for a SDH AU-4 Port

Defining Channels for a SDH AU-3 Port

Activating the Channelized Interfaces for a Line Card

Redefining Existing Channelizations

Defining Channels for a SONET Port

A channel (such as a STS-3c or STS-12c) is formed by grouping 3 or 12 STS-1 channels together. The STS-1 channels are grouped by specifying a set of "start" and "end" channel numbers.

The start channel number also defines the interface number.

STS is the frame format used by SONET, with STS-1 being the base level signal at 51.84 Mbps. STS-1 frames are carried in an OC-1 signal. Faster SONET rates are defined as STS-n, where n is a multiple of 51.84 Mbps. For example, three STS-1 signals can be multiplexed together to form a STS-3 signal. See the "Channelization Support" section, for additional information on channel groupings and signal rates.


Note The channel definition commands in this section can only be used under a SONET port (the controller port parameter framing must be SONET, and aug-mapping must be disabled). Refer to Configuring the Controller for information on configuring these parameters.


Enter the commands in this section to define the SONET interfaces. Refer to the tables following these commands for information on available channel mappings.

Table 6 displays the available "SONET Channel Number Range" for start and end channel numbers.

Table 7 displays information on "SONET Channel Grouping and Time Slot Mapping".

The "Examples to Define Channels on SONET Ports" section provides a variety of examples for defining SONET channels on the line cards.

Command
Purpose

Router (config)# controller sonet slot/port

Enters the controller configuration mode. This command also selects the physical port of the controller.

Router(config-controller)# STS-1 start-channel - end-channel POS

Defines a concatenated channel, such as STS-3c or STS-12c.

start-channel also defines the interface number.

Router(config-controller)# STS-1 start-channel serial T3

Defines a DS-3 channel.

start-channel also defines the interface number.

Router(config-controller)# no STS-1 start-channel

Removes a channel.


Table 6

 
4-port-OC12/STM4
16-port-OC3/STM1

start-channel

[1...12]

[1...3]

end-channel

[3...12]

[3...3]


SONET Channel Number Range

Table 7 SONET Channel Grouping and Time Slot Mapping

Channel Number
Time Slot Number
STS-12 Interface #
STS-3c Interface #
STS-1:DS-3 Interface#
[1...12]
[1...3]

1

1

1

1

1

2

5

2

3

9

3

4

4

2

 

5

6

6

10

7

7

3

8

7

9

11

10

10

4

11

8

12

12


Defining Channels for a SDH AU-4 Port

This section contains instructions to define both POS and serial channelized interfaces in a SDH AU-4 port.

A DS-3 or E3 serial interface is defined by specifying a single AU-4 "start" number and a VC-3 number. The interface number for a DS-3 channel is start-au4-number:VC3-number.

A STM-1 POS channel is formed by specifying a single AU-4 "start" number. The interface number is the start-au4-number.

A STM-4 POS channel is formed by grouping four AU-4s (STM-1s). This is done by specifying a range of "start" and "end" AU-4 numbers. The interface number is the start-au4-number.

Each AU-4 consists of three VC-3s (AU-3s) numbered 1 to 3. See the "Channelization Support" section for more information on the SDH multiplexing hierarchy.


Note The channel definition commands in this section can only be used under a SDH AU-4 port. Refer to Configuring the Controller for information on setting these parameters.

Command
Purpose

Router (config)# controller sonet slot/port

Enters the controller configuration mode. This command also selects the physical port of the controller.

Router(config-controller)# AU-4 start-au4-number - end-au4-number POS

Defines a concatenated STM-16 or STM-4 channel.

start-au4-number also defines the interface number.

Router(config-controller)# AU-4 start-au4-number POS

Defines a STM-1 channel.

start-au4-number also defines the interface number.

Router(config-controller)# AU-4 start-au4-number VC-3 VC3-number serial [T3 | E3]

Defines a DS-3 or E3 channel.

The interface number is defined by start-au4-number:VC3-number

"T3" is equivalent to "DS-3".

Router(config-controller)# no AU-4 start-au4-number - end-au4-number POS

Undefines a STM-16 or STM-4 channel on a SDH AU-4 controller.

Router(config-controller)# no AU-4 start-au4-number POS

Undefines a STM-1 channel on a SDH AU-4 controller.

Router(config-controller)# no AU-4 start-au4-number VC-3 VC3-number serial [T3 | E3]

Undefines a DS-3 or E3 channel on a SDH AU-4 controller.

Note The SDH AU-4 Channel Number Range for each line card is shown in Table 8. This is the range of numbers used in the start-au4-number and end-au4-number fields. SDH AU-4 Grouping and Time Slot Mapping is shown in Table 9.


Table 8 SDH AU-4 Channel Number Range

 
4-port-OC12/STM4
16-port-OC3/STM1

start-au4-number

[1...4]

[1...1]

end-au4-number

[4...4]

[1...1]



Table 9 SDH AU-4 Grouping and Time Slot Mapping

 
DS-3 /E3 Interface Number
Time Slot Number
STM-4
(VC-4-4c)
Interface #
AU-4 #
(STM-1/VC-4) Interface #
VC3 #
[1...12]
[1...3]

1

1

1

1

1

2

5

2

3

9

3

2

1

2

 

2

6

3

10

3

1

3

2

7

3

11

4

1

4

2

8

3

12



Note The "Examples to Define Channels on SDH AU-4 Ports" section provides a variety of examples for defining SONET channels on the line cards.


Defining Channels for a SDH AU-3 Port

This section contains instructions to define both POS and serial channelized interfaces in a SDH AU-3 port.

A DS-3 or E3 serial interface is defined by specifying a single AU-3 "start" number.

A STM-1 POS channel is formed by grouping three AU-3s (VC-3s). This is done by specifying a range of "start" and "end" AU-3 numbers.

A STM-4 POS channel is formed by grouping 12 AU-3s (VC-3s). This is done by specifying a range of "start" and "end" AU-3 numbers.

The interface number is always the start-au3-number.

See the "Channelization Support" section for more information on the SDH multiplexing hierarchy.


Note The channel definition commands in this section can only be used under a SDH AU-3 port. Refer to Configuring the Controller for information on setting these parameters.


Command
Purpose

Router (config)# controller sonet slot/port

Enters the controller configuration mode. This command also selects the physical port of the controller.

Router(config-controller)# au-3 start-au3-number - end-au3-number POS

Defines a concatenated channel such as STM-4 or STM-1.

start-au3-number also defines the interface number.

Router(config-controller)# au-3 start-au3-number serial [T3 | E3]

Defines a DS-3 /E3 channel.

start-au3-number also defines the interface number.

Router(config-controller)# no au-3 start-au3-number

Undefines a channel on a SDH AU-3 controller.

Note The SDH AU-3 Channel Number Range is shown in Table 10. This is the range of numbers used in the start-au3-number and end-au3-number fields. SDH AU-3 Grouping and Time Slot Mapping is shown in Table 11.


Table 10 SDH AU-3 Channel Number Range

 
4-port OC-12/STM-4
16-port OC-3/STM-1

start-au3-number

[1...12]

[1...3]

end-au3-number

[3...12]

[3...3]


Table 11

Channel Number
Time Slot Number
STM-4
Interface #
STM-1
Interface #
AU-3#
(DS-3/E3 Interface#)
[1...12]
[1....3]

1

1

1

1

1

2

5

2

3

9

3

4

4

2

 

5

6

6

10

7

7

3

8

7

9

11

10

10

4

11

8

12

12


SDH AU-3 Grouping and Time Slot Mapping


Note The "Examples to Define Channels on SDH AU-3 Ports" section provides a variety of examples for defining SONET channels on the line cards.


Activating the Channelized Interfaces for a Line Card

After the SONET or SDH channels have been defined, you must activate the channels using the configuration command microcode reload slot. This command is also used to activate the channels after a change has been made to the channelization configuration.


Caution This command reloads the line card in the specified slot. Traffic is disrupted on all interfaces for that slot.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# configure terminal

Enters configuration mode, if necessary.

Step 2 

Router(config)# microcode reload slot

Activate the interfaces on each port for the line card in the specified slot. After entering the command, wait for the microcode reload to complete.

slot is the physical location of the ISE line card.

Step 3 

Router(config)# show controller provision slot

Displays the active interfaces for the line card in that slot. Use this command to verify that the defined interfaces are activated.

Step 4 

Router(config)# end

Exits configuration mode.

Redefining Existing Channelizations

To modify the existing channels on a line card controller, complete the following steps:

Shutting Down the Channelized Interfaces

Undefining the Channelized Interfaces

Defining and Activating the New Channelized Interfaces


Note In channelized ISE line cards configured for APS, the channelizations for the working and protect ports must be identical. If the channel configuration is changed for a working port, those same changes must be made to the protection port (and vice versa). If the channelization configurations on the working and protect ports are different when a protection switch occurs, the traffic carried by any mis-matched interface will be lost.


Shutting Down the Channelized Interfaces

Shut down each of the interfaces that will be reconfigured (complete the following steps for each interface):

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router# config terminal

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

Router(config)# interface [POS | SERIAL] slot/port channel

Selects the interface that will be reconfigured. See Selecting a Channelized Interface for more information on selecting the different interface types.

Step 3 

Router(config-if)# shut

Shuts down the selected channelized interface.

Undefining the Channelized Interfaces

To undefine the interfaces that will be reconfigured, first select the controller, then enter one of the following commands to undefine each channelized interface.

Command
Purpose

Router (config)# controller sonet slot/port

Enters the controller configuration mode and selects the physical port of the controller.

slot is the physical chassis slot of the line card.

port is the physical port on the line card.

Router(config-controller)# no STS-1 start-channel

Undefines a SONET channel.

Router(config-controller)# no AU-4 start-au4-number - end-au4-number POS

Undefines a STM-16 or STM-4 channel on a SDH AU-4 controller.

Router(config-controller)# no AU-4 start-au4-number POS

Undefines a STM-1 channel on a SDH AU-4 controller.

Router(config-controller)# no AU-4 start-au4-number VC-3 VC3-number serial [T3 | E3]

Undefines a DS-3 or E3 channel on a SDH AU-4 controller.

Router(config-controller)# no au-3 start-au3-number

Undefines a channel on a SDH AU-3 controller.

Defining and Activating the New Channelized Interfaces

To define and activate the new channelized interfaces, complete the following steps:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

See Defining Channelized Interfaces.

Defines the new interfaces.

Step 2 

See Activating the Channelized Interfaces for a Line Card.

Activates the interfaces on each port for the line card in the specified slot.

Step 3 

Router(config)# end

Exits configuration mode.

Configuring a Channelized Interface

After the channels have been defined as outlined in Defining Channelized Interfaces, the parameters for the individual interfaces (channels) can be set. Each channelized interface operates as a separate connection, and can be configured as outlined in this section.

By default, all interfaces are disabled. To enable an interface, you must first choose the interface, and then issue the no shutdown command. When an interface on the line card is enabled with no additional configuration, the default interface configuration parameters are used.

This section describes the commands used to select an interface and modify the parameters. This section also includes the default settings of each command.

Selecting a Channelized Interface

Configuring a Channelized POS Interface

Configuring a Channelized DS-3 Interface

Configuring a Channelized E3 Serial Interface

Selecting a Channelized Interface

Enter one of the following commands to select the appropriate interface. After the interface is selected, continue to the appropriate interface configuration section.

Command
Purpose

Router(config)# interface [POS | SERIAL] slot/port:start-channel-number

Selects an interface that has been configured with SONET framing.

[POS | SERIAL] specifies if the interface is POS or serial.

slot/port specifies the physical slot and port of the interface.

start-channel-number specifies the interface (channel) number.

Example: interface POS 5/3:1

Refer to Defining Channels for a SONET Port for additional information on these parameters.

Router(config)# interface [POS | SERIAL] slot/port:start-AU3-number

Selects an interface that has been configured with SDH framing and AU-3 mapping.

[POS | SERIAL] specifies if the interface is POS or serial.

slot/port specifies the physical slot and port of the interface.

start-AU3-number specifies the interface (channel) number.

Example: interface POS 4/2:1

Refer to Defining Channels for a SDH AU-3 Port for additional information on these parameters.

Router(config)# interface POS slot/port:start-AU4-number

Selects a POS interface that has been configured with SDH framing and AU-4 mapping.

slot/port specifies the physical slot and port of the interface.

start-AU4-number specifies the interface (channel) number.

Example: interface POS 3/1:2

Refer to Defining Channels for a SDH AU-3 Port for additional information on these parameters.

Router(config)# interface SERIAL slot/port.start-AU4-number:VC3-number

Selects a serial interface that has been configured with SDH framing and AU-4 mapping.

Example: interface serial 5/2.1:1


Configuring a Channelized POS Interface

Complete the following sections to configure a channelized POS interface:

Setting Encapsulation and Related Parameters on the POS Channelized Interface (required)

Enabling Alarm Reporting in the POS Channelized Interface (optional)

Setting the b3-tca Threshold Rate in the POS Channelized Interface (optional)

Starting Up the POS Channelized Interface and Saving the Configuration (required)

Using Loopback Modes in the POS Channelized Interface (optional)

Setting Encapsulation and Related Parameters on the POS Channelized Interface

After you have selected the interface as outlined in Selecting a Channelized Interface, complete the following steps:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config-if)# [no] encapsulation [hdlc | ppp | frame-relay]

Sets the encapsulation method used by the interface. The ISE line cards support HDLC, PPP and Frame-Relay.

The default is HDLC encapsulation.

Step 2 

Router(config-if)# [no] transmitter-delay value

Specifies a minimum dead-time after transmitting a packet.

The value can be 0 to 255.

The default is 1.

Use the no form of this command to restore the default value of 1.

Step 3 

Router(config-if)# [no] pos scramble-atm

Enables SONET payload scrambling on the POS interface.

The default is no scrambling.

To disable scrambling, use the no form of this command.

Step 4 

Router(config-if)# [no] CRC [16 | 32]

Sets the length of the cyclic redundancy check (CRC). CRC is an error-checking technique that uses a calculated numeric value to detect errors in transmitted data. The designators 16 and 32 indicate the length (in bits) of the frame check sequence (FCS). A CRC of 32 bits provides more powerful error detection, but adds overhead. Both the sender and receiver must use the same setting.

The default value for an OC-3c/STM-1 interface is 16 bits.

The default value for all other POS interface is 32 bits.

Use the no form of the command to restore the default value.

Step 5 

Router(config-if)# [no] mtu bytes

Adjusts the maximum packet size or maximum transmission unit (MTU) size in bytes.

bytes can be 64 to 15360.

The default is 4470 (bytes).

Use the no form of this command to restore the MTU value to the default value.

Step 6 

Router(config-if)#  [no] keepalive seconds

Sets the keepalive timer (in seconds) for the interface. The keepalive interval is the frequency at which the Cisco IOS software sends messages to ensure a network interface is alive.

Value is a number in seconds (0 to 32767).

The default value is 10 seconds.

To turn off keepalives entirely, use the no form of this command.

Step 7 

Router(config-if)# [no] pos flag C2 value

The command pos flag sets the SONET overhead bytes in the frame header to meet a specific standards requirement or to ensure interoperability with another vendor's equipment.

The command pos flag C2 value sets the C2 byte value, the path signal identifier used to identify the payload content type.

The C2 value can be 0 to 255.

The default C2 value is 207.

To remove the setting, use the no form of this command.

Enabling Alarm Reporting in the POS Channelized Interface

To enable reporting of selected path alarms, use the following interface configuration command:


Note See Enabling Alarm Reporting for the Controller to configure section and line alarms.


Command
Purpose

Router(config-if)# [no] POS report
[pais | plop | prdi | b3-tca | all]

Permits selected alarms and signal events to be logged to the console for the POS interface.

The default alarms to be logged are b3-tca and plop.

To disable logging of SONET alarms, use the no form of this command.

See Table 12 for descriptions of the alarms.


Table 12 SONET/SDH Alarm and Signal Events

Alarm/Signal
SONET Description
SDH Description

b3-tca

B3 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

B3 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

pais

Path Alarm Indication Signal, or Alarm Indication Signal—Path (AIS-P)

Administrative Unit Alarm Indication Signal (AU-AIS)

plop

Path Loss of Pointer, or Loss of Pointer—Path (LOP-P)

Administrative Unit Loss of Pointer (AU-LOP)

prdi

Path Remote Defect Indication, or Remote Defect Indication—Path (RDI-P)

High Order Path Remote Defect Indication (HP-RDI)

all

all of the above

all of the above


Setting the b3-tca Threshold Rate in the POS Channelized Interface

Enter the following command to set the B3 bit error rate (BER) threshold crossing alarm.

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if)# [no] POS threshold b3-tca rate

Sets the B3 bit error rate (BER) threshold crossing alarm.

rate can be 3 to 9

The default rate is 6 (10e-6)


Starting Up the POS Channelized Interface and Saving the Configuration

The shutdown command is used to enable or disable the channelized interface. Because the interface is disabled by default, use the no shutdown command to enable it. Complete the following steps after you have selected the interface as outlined in Selecting a Channelized Interface.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config-if)#  no shutdown

Enables all functions on the interface.

To restart a disabled interface, use the no shutdown. This command also marks the interface as unavailable.

The default is shutdown (the interface is disabled).

Step 2 

Router(config-if)# end

Exits configuration mode.

Step 3 

Router# copy running-config startup-config

Writes the new configuration to nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM).

Using Loopback Modes in the POS Channelized Interface

To test the interface, use the loopback configuration command. To use these commands, you must first select an interface as outlined in Selecting a Channelized Interface.

Note on Internal Loopbacks in the POS Channelized Interface

The internal or "local" loopback at the interface level is not a true loopback; the interface is forced to an "up" state so that it can be pinged. For this reason, the following restrictions apply for interfaces in internal ("local") loopback:

Interface counters do not increment.

BERT tests do not function (BERT traffic cannot be passed on this type of loopback).

Keepalives must be disabled with the no keepalive command.

The interface in internal/local loopback should not on the same subnet as any other interfaces on the router.

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if)# [no] loopback [internal | network]

Enables or disables a loopback on the interface.

internal specifies a local loopback. See the description above for information.

network specifies a network loopback. Loops the data back toward the network. Only data belonging to the interface is returned to the far-end.

The default is no loopback (disable loopbacks).

Router(config-if)#  no keepalive

Turns off keepalives when using the internal loopback (see previous above).


Configuring a Channelized DS-3 Interface

Complete the following sections to configure a channelized DS-3 interface:

Setting Encapsulation and Related Settings on the DS-3 Channelized Interface (required)

Configuring a Data Service Unit (DSU) on the DS-3 Channelized Interface (optional)

Using Loopback Modes on the DS-3 Channelized Interface (optional)

Enabling Alarm Reporting on the DS-3 Channelized Interface (optional)

Setting the b3-tca Threshold Rate on the DS-3 Channelized Interface (optional)

Starting Up the DS-3 Channelized Interface (required)

Setting Encapsulation and Related Settings on the DS-3 Channelized Interface

Complete the following steps after you have selected the interface as outlined in Selecting a Channelized Interface.

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if)# [no] encapsulation [hdlc | ppp | frame-relay]

Sets the encapsulation method used by the interface. The ISE line cards support HDLC, PPP and Frame-Relay.

The default is HDLC encapsulation.

Router(config-if)# [no] transmitter-delay value

Specifies a minimum dead-time after transmitting a packet.

The value can be 0 to 255.

The default is 1.

Use the no form of this command to restore the default value of 1.

Router(config-if)# [no] mtu value

Adjusts the maximum packet size or maximum transmission unit (MTU) size in bytes.

value can be 64 to 15360.

The default is 4470 (bytes).

Use the no form of this command to restore the MTU value to the default value.

Router(config-if)#  [no] keepalive seconds

Sets the keepalive timer (in seconds) for the interface. The keepalive interval is the frequency at which the Cisco IOS software sends messages to ensure a network interface is alive.

The default value is 10 seconds.

To turn off keepalives entirely, use the no form of this command.

Router(config-if)# [no] overhead C2 value

Sets the C2 byte value, the path signal identifier used to identify the payload content type. This sets the overhead bytes in the frame header to meet a specific standards requirement or to ensure interoperability with another vendor's equipment.

The C2 value can be 0 to 255.

The default C2 value is 4.

To remove the setting, use the no form of this command.

Router(config-if)# [no] overhead j1 message string

Configures the message text of the SDH high order path trace identifier (J1).

Note This parameter is only available if the fiber port is configured with SDH framing.

string can be up to 15 characters. If less than 15 characters are entered, then the message is padded with NULL. If more than 15 characters are entered, only the first 15 characters are taken.

The default value is 15 NULL characters.

Router(config-if)# [no] invert

Specifies data inversion.

The default is no invert.


Configuring a Data Service Unit (DSU) on the DS-3 Channelized Interface

There are two sides to the network, a local (near-end) side and a remote (far-end) side. The ISE line cards support third-party data service unit (DSU) vendors to enable connections between a Cisco 12000 series Internet router and another device.


Note Refer to the Cisco Systems publication Cisco Remote Connection Management Feature Module for additional information on the use and configuration of DSU connections.


You can connect the local (near-end) DS-3 port to the remote (far-end) DS-3 port using a third-party DSU. Then use the telnet command from the local DS-3 port to communicate with the remote DS-3 port to verify the DSU mode settings. If necessary, change the DSU mode settings on the local DS-3 port to match the DSU mode settings on the remote DS-3 port. After the local and remote DS-3 ports are configured with matching DSU mode settings, you can start passing data traffic between the near-end and the far-end of the network.

If the telnet command does not allow the local DS-3 port to communicate with the remote DS-3 port, the DSU mode settings on the local and remote DS-3 ports do not match using a third-party DSU. You can establish direct communication by removing the third-party DSU between the local and remote DS-3 ports, and using the default DSU mode, "Cisco". After you establish a direct connection between the local and remote DS-3 ports, you can use Cisco IOS software commands to verify the DSU mode settings on the remote DS-3 port.

After the local and remote DS-3 configuration settings match and you verify network connectivity, you can re-insert a third-party DSU into the configuration.

.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config-if)# [no] dsu mode [cisco | digital-link | kentrox | larscom | adtran | verilink]


Specifies the DSU mode used between the Cisco 12000 series router and another device,.

The Default is cisco.

Note If DSU mode is set to Kentrox, only full DS-3 bandwidth (44,210 Kbps) is supported. Subrate bandwidth is not available.

See Selecting a DSU Mode for more information.

Step 2 

Router(config-if)# [no] dsu remote fullrate

DSU remote fullrate sets the sending and receiving rate at the remote interface to fullrate if:

The remote end is a CISCO router

C-bit framing is configured on the interface.

The default is no dsu remote fullrate.

See Setting the Sending and Receiving Rate for more information.

Step 3 

Router(config-if)# [no] dsu bandwidth kbps

Sets the local (near-end) bandwidth. The local and remote DSU bandwidth configuration settings must match to enable network connectivity.

kbps is a value from 1 to 44210 kbps.

The default is 44210 kbps.

To return to the default bandwidth, use the no form of this command.

Note If DSU mode is set to Kentrox, only full DS-3/E3 bandwidth is supported. Subrate bandwidth is not available.

See Configuring the DSU Bandwidth Range for more information.

Step 4 

Router(config-if)# [no] framing [m13 | c-bit]

Specifies the framing type for DS-3 interfaces.

The default framing type is c-bit parity.

To restore the default framing type, use the no form of this command.

Step 5 

Router(config-if)# scramble

Enables payload scrambling on the interface.

To disable scrambling, use the no form of this command.

The default is no scrambling.

See Enabling Payload Scrambling for more information.

Step 6 

Router(config-if)# CRC [16 | 32]

Sets the length of the cyclic redundancy check (CRC). CRC is an error-checking technique that uses a calculated numeric value to detect errors in transmitted data. The designators 16 and 32 indicate the length (in bits) of the frame check sequence (FCS). Both the sender and receiver must use the same setting.

The options are 16 or 32 bits.

The default value is 16 bits.

Use the no form of the command to restore the default value.

See Configuring Cyclic Redundancy Checks for more information.

Step 7 

Router(config-if)# [no] dsu remote accept

Sets the local (near-end) DS-3 interface to accept incoming remote requests from the remote (far-end) port.

The default is accept.

Use the no form of this command to refuse incoming remote requests.


DSU subrate bandwidth availability is shown in Table 13.

Table 13 DS-3 Subrate Bandwidth

DSU Mode
Bandwidth Range (Kbps)
Bandwidth Incremental Unit (Kbps)

Digial-link

300 - 44,210

300

Larscom

3,158 - 44,210

3,158

Cisco

300 - 44,210

300

Adtran

75 - 44,210

75

Verlink (HDM-2182)

6,315 - 44,210

6,315

Note If DSU mode is set to Kentrox, only full DS-3 bandwidth is supported. Subrate bandwidth is not available.


The following sections explain how to use Cisco IOS commands for DSU configuration.


Note The local port and the remote port must have matching configuration.


Verifying Local and Remote DS3 Port Settings

You can use the telnet command to determine the DSU mode settings on the remote DS-3 port. After you verify the remote DS-3 port settings, you can change the local configuration parameters so that DSU mode settings are the same on both the local and remote DS-3 ports. You can set the DSU bandwidth to accept or reject the incoming remote requests from the local DS-3 port by entering the dsu remote accept interface configuration command.

Selecting a DSU Mode

DSU mode is characterized primarily by the bandwidth control (subrate) and payload scrambling. A DSU mode must always be present in a DS-3 interface configuration between two ports. Each line card interface or serial port interface can be configured to support third-party DSU modes, or the default mode, cisco. The local DS3 port configuration must match the remote DS3 port configuration.

Setting the Sending and Receiving Rate

The local and remote DS3 ports must also agree on whether to use a subrate or fullrate sending and receiving rate, because the speed of the sending and receiving rate is regulated by the DSU mode. If the sending and receiving rates do not match, they will not work. Subrates are specific to DSU modes and must be configured appropriately. The subrate sending and receiving rate is slower and less expensive than the faster, more expensive, fullrate. You can synchronize the local and remote DS3 ports sending and receiving rates by entering the DSU remote interface configuration command.

Configuring the DSU Bandwidth Range

The DSU bandwidth range is from 75 to 44,210 Kbps. The local port and the remote port must have matching configuration. Therefore, if you reduce the effective bandwidth to 3000 on the local port, you must do the same on the remote port by entering the dsu bandwidth interface configuration command.

Enabling Payload Scrambling

Payload (data) scrambling converts the data received by the local or remote DS-3 ports from any of the supported third-party DSU vendor modes as well as the default cisco mode. To enable payload scrambling on the local and remote DS3 ports, you must enter the scramble interface configuration command. If you do not enter the scramble command, payload scrambling remains disabled by default on the local and remote DS3 ports.

Configuring Cyclic Redundancy Checks

The DS-3 interface in an ISE line card uses a 16-bit Cyclic Redundancy Check by default, but also supports a 32-bit CRC to detect errors in transmitted data. You can set the CRC by entering the crc interface configuration command. The router that sends the data divides the bits in the frame message by a predetermined number to calculate a frame check sequence (FCS). Before sending the data, the router appends the FCS value to ensure that the frame message contents are exactly divisible by a predetermined number. The router that receives the data divides the frame message by the same predetermined number and calculates the FCS. If the result is not 0, the router that receives the data assumes that a transmission error has occurred and sends a request to the router to resend the data.


Note When enabling a 16-bit or 32-bit CRC on a local interface, ensure that the remote device is also configured for a 16-bit or 32-bit CRC.


Enabling Alarm Reporting on the DS-3 Channelized Interface

To enable reporting of selected alarms and signal events, use the following commands.

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if)# [no] alarm-report
[pais | plop | prdi | b3-tca | all]

Permits selected alarms and signal events to be logged to the console for the interface.

The default alarms to be logged are b3-tca and plop.

To disable logging of alarms, use the no form of this command.

See Table 14 for descriptions of the alarms.


Table 14 Alarm and Signal Events

Alarm/Signal
SONET Description
SDH Description

b3-tca

B3 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

B3 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

pais

Path Alarm Indication Signal, or Alarm Indication Signal—Path (AIS-P)

Administrative Unit Alarm Indication Signal (AU-AIS)

plop

Path Loss of Pointer, or Loss of Pointer—Path (LOP-P)

Administrative Unit Loss of Pointer (AU-LOP)

prdi

Path Remote Defect Indication, or Remote Defect Indication—Path (RDI-P)

High Order Path Remote Defect Indication (HP-RDI)

all

all of the above

all of the above


Setting the b3-tca Threshold Rate on the DS-3 Channelized Interface

Enter the following command to set the B3 bit error rate (BER) threshold crossing alarm.

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if)# [no] ber-threshold b3-tca rate

Sets the B3 bit error rate (BER) threshold crossing alarm.

rate can be 3 to 9.

The default rate is 6 (10e-6).


Starting Up the DS-3 Channelized Interface

The shutdown command is used to enable or disable the channelized interface. Since the interface is disabled by default, use the no shutdown command to enable it. Complete the following steps after you have selected the interface as outlined in Selecting a Channelized Interface.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config-if)# no shutdown

Enables all functions on the interface.

To restart a disabled interface, use the no shutdown command. This command also marks the interface as unavailable.

The default is shutdown (the interface is disabled).

Step 2 

Router(config-if)# end

Exits configuration mode.

Step 3 

Router# copy running-config startup-config

Writes the new configuration to nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM).

Using Loopback Modes on the DS-3 Channelized Interface

To test the interface, use the loopback configuration command. To use these commands, you must first select an interface as outlined in Selecting a Channelized Interface.

Note on Internal Loopbacks in the DS-3 Channelized Interface

The internal or "local" loopback at the interface level is not a true loopback; the interface is forced to an "up" state so that it can be pinged. For this reason, the following restrictions apply for interfaces in internal ("local") loopback:

Interface counters do not increment.

BERT tests do not function (BERT traffic cannot be passed on this type of loopback).

Keepalives must be disabled with the no keepalive command.

The interface in internal/local loopback should not on the same subnet as any other interfaces on the router.

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if)# [no] loopback [local | network | remote]

Enables or disables a loopback on the interface.

local is useful for forcing the interface to a UP state so that it can be pinged without having far-end of the interface connected.

network loops the data back toward the network.

remote requests that the remote end be put into network loopback so that data transmitted by the near-end can be looped back.

The default is no loopback. Use the no form of this command disable loopbacks on the interface.


Configuring a Channelized E3 Serial Interface

Complete the following sections to configure a channelized E3 Interface:

Verifying Remote-End Configuration for E3 Inter-operatability (required)

Setting the Encapsulation and Related Parameters for the Channelized E3 Interface (required)

Configuring a Data Service Unit (DSU) on the E3 Channelized Interface (optional)

Using Loopback Modes on the E3 Channelized Interface (optional)

Enabling Alarm Reporting on the E3 Channelized Interface (optional)

Setting the b3-tca Threshold Rate on the E3 Channelized Interface (optional)

Starting Up the E3 Channelized Interface (required)

Verifying Remote-End Configuration for E3 Inter-operatability

To connect an E3 interface on the ISE card with a far-end E3 interface on a different type of line card, the following configuration must be applied to the E3 interfaces at the far-end card:

Table 15

Far-end E3 port
Far-end Configuration Settings
Command

Cisco 12000 series router,
12 Port Packet over E3

DSU mode "kentrox"

dsu mode kentrox

Cisco C7200 and C7500,
2 port E3 port adaptor (PA) card

DSU mode "1"

dsu mode 1

Digital-link DL3100E E3 Access Multiplexer

DSU mode "clear channel"

clear channel mode


Configuration Settings for Far-end E3 ports

Setting the Encapsulation and Related Parameters for the Channelized E3 Interface

After you have selected the interface as outlined in Selecting a Channelized Interface, complete the following steps.

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if)# [no] encapsulation [hdlc | ppp | frame-relay]

Sets the encapsulation method used by the interface. The ISE line cards support HDLC, PPP and Frame-Relay.

The default is HDLC encapsulation.

Router(config-if)# [no] transmitter-delay value

Specifies a minimum dead-time after transmitting a packet.

The value can be 0 to 255.

The default is 1.

Use the no form of this command to restore the default value of 1.

Router(config-if)# [no] scramble

Enables payload scrambling on the interface.

The default is no scrambling.

To disable scrambling, use the no form of this command.

Router(config-if)# [no] CRC [16 | 32]

Sets the length of the cyclic redundancy check (CRC). CRC is an error-checking technique that uses a calculated numeric value to detect errors in transmitted data. The designators 16 and 32 indicate the length (in bits) of the frame check sequence (FCS). A CRC of 32 bits provides more powerful error detection, but adds overhead. Both the sender and receiver must use the same setting.

The options are 16 or 32 bits.

The default value is 16 bits.

Use the no form of this command to restore the default value.

Router(config-if)# [no] mtu value

Adjusts the maximum packet size or maximum transmission unit (MTU) size in bytes.

value can be 64 to 15360.

The default is 4470 (bytes).

Use the no form of this command to restore the MTU value to the default value.

Router(config-if)#  [no] keepalive value

Sets the keepalive timer (in seconds) for the interface.

value is a number in seconds (0 to 32767).

The default value is 10 (seconds).

To turn off keepalives entirely, use the no form of this command.

Router(config-if)# [no] overhead C2 value

Sets the C2 byte value, the path signal identifier used to identify the payload content type.

The C2 value can be 0 to 255

The default C2 value is 4.

To remove the setting, use the no form of this command.

Router(config-if)# [no] overhead j1 message string

Configures the message text of the SDH high order path trace identifier (J1).

Note This parameter is only available if the fiber port is configured with SDH framing.

string can be up to 15 characters. If less than 15 characters are entered, then the message is padded with NULL. If more than 15 characters are entered, only the first 15 characters are taken.

The default value is 15 NULL characters.

Router(config-if)# [no] national bit 1

Defines the national bit used by the interface.

The default is no national bit 1.

Router(config-if)# [no] invert

Specifies data inversion.

The default is no invert.


Configuring a Data Service Unit (DSU) on the E3 Channelized Interface

There are two sides to the network, a local (near-end) side and a remote (far-end) side. The ISE line cards support third-party data service unit (DSU) vendors to enable connections between a Cisco 12000 series Internet router and another device.


Note DSU subrate bandwidth (less than 34,010 Kbps) is not available for E3 interfaces.



Note Refer to the Cisco Systems publication Cisco Remote Connection Management Feature Module for additional information on the use and configuration of DSU connections.


You can connect the local (near-end) E3 port to the remote (far-end) E3 port using a third-party DSU. Then use the telnet command from the local E3 port to communicate with the remote E3 port to verify the DSU mode settings. If necessary, change the DSU mode settings on the local port to match the DSU mode settings on the remote port. After the local and remote ports are configured with matching DSU mode settings, you can start passing data traffic between the near-end and the far-end of the network.

If the telnet command does not allow the local E3 port to communicate with the remote E3 port, it indicates that the DSU mode settings on the local and remote E3 ports do not match using a third-party DSU. You can establish direct communication by removing the third-party DSU between the local and remote E3 ports, and using the default DSU mode, "Cisco". After you establish a direct connection between the local and remote E3 ports, you can use Cisco IOS software commands to verify the DSU mode settings on the remote E3 port.

After the local and remote E3 configuration settings match and you verify network connectivity, you can reinsert a third-party DSU into the configuration.

.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config-if)# [no] dsu mode [cisco | digital-link | kentrox | larscom | adtran | verilink]


Specifies the DSU mode used between the Cisco 12000 series router and another device,.

The default is cisco.

See Selecting a DSU Mode for more information.

Step 2 

Router(config-if)# scramble

Enables payload scrambling on the interface.

To disable scrambling, use the no form of this command.

The default is no scrambling.

See Enabling Payload Scrambling for more information.

Step 3 

Router(config-if)# crc [16 | 32]

Sets the length of the cyclic redundancy check (CRC). CRC is an error-checking technique that uses a calculated numeric value to detect errors in transmitted data. The designators 16 and 32 indicate the length (in bits) of the frame check sequence (FCS). Both the sender and receiver must use the same setting.

The options are 16 or 32 bits.

The default value is 16 bits.

Use the no form of the command to restore the default value.

See Configuring Cyclic Redundancy Checks for more information.


The following sections explain how to use Cisco IOS commands for DSU configuration.


Note The local port and the remote port must have matching configuration.


Verifying Local and Remote DS3 Port Settings

You can use the telnet command to determine the DSU mode settings on the remote port. After you verify the remote port settings, you can change the local configuration parameters so that DSU mode settings are the same on both the local and remote ports. You can set the DSU bandwidth to accept or reject the incoming remote requests from the local port by entering the dsu remote accept interface configuration command.

Selecting a DSU Mode

DSU mode is characterized primarily by the bandwidth control (subrate) and payload scrambling. A DSU mode must always be present in a E3 interface configuration between two ports. Each line card interface or serial port interface can be configured to support third-party DSU modes, or the default mode, cisco. The local E3 port configuration must match the remote E3 port configuration.

Enabling Payload Scrambling

Payload (data) scrambling converts the data received by the local or remote E3 ports from any of the supported third-party DSU vendor modes as well as the default cisco mode. To enable payload scrambling on the local and remote E3 ports, you must enter the scramble interface configuration command. If you do not enter the scramble command, payload scrambling remains disabled by default on the local and remote E3 ports.

Configuring Cyclic Redundancy Checks

The E3 interface in an ISE line card uses a 16-bit Cyclic Redundancy Check by default, but also supports a 32-bit CRC to detect errors in transmitted data. You can set the CRC by entering the crc interface configuration command. The router that sends the data divides the bits in the frame message by a predetermined number to calculate a frame check sequence (FCS). Before sending the data, the router appends the FCS value to ensure that the frame message contents are exactly divisible by a predetermined number. The router that receives the data divides the frame message by the same predetermined number and calculates the FCS. If the result is not 0, the router that receives the data assumes that a transmission error has occurred and sends a request to the router to resend the data.


Note When enabling a 16-bit or 32-bit CRC on a local interface, ensure that the remote device is also configured for a 16-bit or 32-bit CRC.


Enabling Alarm Reporting on the E3 Channelized Interface

To enable reporting of selected alarms and signal events, use the following commands.

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if)# [no] alarm-report
[pais | plop | prdi | b3-tca | all]

Permits selected alarms and signal events to be logged to the console for the interface.

The default alarms to be logged are b3-tca and plop.

To disable logging of alarms, use the no form of this command.

See Table 12 for descriptions of the alarms.


Table 16 Alarm and Signal Events

Alarm/Signal
SONET Description
SDH Description

b3-tca

B3 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

B3 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

pais

Path Alarm Indication Signal, or Alarm Indication Signal—Path (AIS-P)

Administrative Unit Alarm Indication Signal (AU-AIS)

plop

Path Loss of Pointer, or Loss of Pointer—Path (LOP-P)

Administrative Unit Loss of Pointer (AU-LOP)

prdi

Path Remote Defect Indication, or Remote Defect Indication—Path (RDI-P)

High Order Path Remote Defect Indication (HP-RDI)

all

all of the above

all of the above


Setting the b3-tca Threshold Rate on the E3 Channelized Interface

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if)# [no] ber-threshold b3-tca rate

Sets the B3 bit error rate (BER) threshold crossing alarm.

rate can be 3 to 9

The default rate is 6 (10e-6)


Starting Up the E3 Channelized Interface

The shutdown command is used to enable or disable the channelized interface. Since the interface is disabled by default, use the no shutdown command to enable it. Complete the following steps after you have selected the interface as outlined in Selecting a Channelized Interface.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config-if)#  no shutdown

Enables all functions on the interface.

To restart a disabled interface, use the no shutdown. This command also marks the interface as unavailable.

The default is shutdown (the interface is disabled).

Step 2 

Router(config-if)# end

Exits configuration mode.

Step 3 

Router# copy running-config startup-config

Writes the new configuration to nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM).

Using Loopback Modes on the E3 Channelized Interface

To test the interface, use the loopback configuration command. Complete the following steps after you have selected the interface as outlined in Selecting a Channelized Interface.

Note on Internal Loopbacks in the Channelized Interface

The local loopback at the interface level is not a true loopback; the interface is forced to an "up" state so that it can be pinged. For this reason, the following restrictions apply for interfaces in internal ("local") loopback:

Interface counters do not increment.

BERT tests will not function (BERT traffic cannot be passed on this type of loopback).

Keepalives must be disabled with the no keepalive command.

The interface in internal/local loopback should not on the same subnet as any other interfaces on the router.

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if)# [no] loopback [local | network]

Enables or disables a loopback on the interface.

local is useful for forcing the interface to a UP state so that it can be pinged without having far-end of the interface connected.

network loops the data back toward the network.

The default is no loopback. Use the no form of this command disable loopbacks on the interface.


Configuring APS for Channelized ISE Line Cards

Automatic Protection Switching (APS) allows switchover of circuits in the event of a line failure. APS uses a 1+1 redundancy architecture: a "protect" line is configured as a backup for each "working" line. When the working line fails, the protect line quickly assumes the traffic load. Normally, the protect and working lines are connected to a SONET ADM (add-drop multiplexer), which sends the same signal payload to the working and protect lines.

In channelized ISE line cards, APS protection is configured for each port controller. This provides protection for all the channelized interfaces configured on that port. The working line is configured under the working controller, and the protect line is configured under the protect controller.

This APS network survivability scheme is known in SDH networks as multiplexed switching protection (MSP). APS and MSP are fundamentally similar.


Note The channelizations for the working and protect line controllers must be identical. If the channel configuration is changed for a working line controller, those same changes must be made to the protection line controller (and vice versa). If the channelization configurations on the working and protect controllers are different when a protection switch occurs, the traffic carried by any mis-matched channelized interface will be lost.



Note The command aps authenticate can be used to ensure that only valid packets are accepted on the OOB communication channel. This command is recommended but not mandatory. If this feature is used, the same authenticate string must be configured on both the working and protect (interfaces) controllers. Please check to make sure the authenticate strings on both working and protect (interfaces) controllers remain identical whenever the command "aps protect 1 ip-address" is entered.


Complete the following steps to configure APS for channelized ISE line cards.


Step 1 Configuring the Loopback to be Associated with the Working Controller

Step 2 Configuring the Working Controller

Step 3 Configuring the Protect Controller


See Related Documents for information on additional APS documentation. See Example to Configure APS for Channelized Interfaces for an example configuration.

Configuring the Loopback to be Associated with the Working Controller

Complete the following steps to configure the loopback to be associated with the working controller. Refer to Example to Configure APS for Channelized Interfaces for an example configuration.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# interface loobacknumber

Selects the loopback.

Step 2 

Router(config-if)# ip address ip-address mask

Specifies the IP address.

ip-address is the IP address

mask is for the associated IP subnet

Step 3 

Router(config-if)# no ip directed-broadcast

Disables directed broadcast-to-physical broadcast translation on the controller.

Step 4 

Router(config-if)# no ip route-cache

Disables fast switching and autonomous switching.

Step 5 

Router(config-if)# no ip mroute-cache

Disables IP multicast fast switching.

Configuring the Working Controller

Complete the following steps to configure the "working" controller. See Example to Configure APS for Channelized Interfaces for an example configuration.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# controller type slot/port

Selects the controller.

Step 2 

Router(config-controller)# ais-shut

Sends the alarm indication signal-line (AIS-L) when the controller is placed in administrative shut down state. In APS environments, AIS-L can be used to force a protection switch.

Step 3 

Router(config-controller)# aps group group-number

Specifies a protect-group number. This command allows more than one protect and working controller to be supported on a router. The aps group command must be configured on both the protect and working controllers.

Step 4 

Router(config-controller)# aps working circuit-number

Configures the controller as a "working" controller and specifies an associated number. Since only 1+1 APS is supported, this number is always 1.

Configuring the Protect Controller

Complete the following steps to configure the "protect" controller. Always configure the working controller before configuring the protect controller.

See Example to Configure APS for Channelized Interfaces for an example configuration.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# controller type slot/port

Selects the controller.

Step 2 

Router(config-controller)# ais-shut

Sends the alarm indication signal - line (AIS-L) when the controller is placed in administrative shut down state. In APS environments, AIS-L can be used to force a protection switch.

Step 3 

Router(config-controller)# aps group group-number

Specifies a protect-group number. This command allows more than one protect and working controller to be supported on a router. The aps group command must be configured on both the protect and working controllers.

Step 4 

Router(config-controller)# aps protect circuit-number ip-address

Enable a controller as a "protect" controller.

circuit-number is the number of the circuit of the associated working POS interface. Since only 1+1 APS is supported, this number is always "1".

ip-address is the IP address of the router that has the working controller.

Verifying the Line Card Configuration

This section contains examples of the show commands used to verify the configuration of ISE line cards.

Verifying Concatenated Line Cards

Verifying the Basic Hardware and Software Settings of the Line Card

Verifying the Interface Configuration

Verifying the Configuration and Status of the System Clock

Verifying the APS Configuration for Concatenated Line Cards

Verifying Channelized ISE Line Cards

Verifying the Basic Hardware and Software Configuration of a Channelized Line Card

Verifying the Configuration of a Port Controller

Verifying the Interface Configurations

Verifying the Active Channelized Interfaces

Verifying the APS Configuration for Channelized Line Cards

Verifying Concatenated Line Cards

After configuring a concatenated line card, use show commands to display the status of the controller and interfaces.

This section contains examples of the show commands used to check the configuration of a concatenated 16-port POS OC-3/STM-1 line card.

Verifying the Basic Hardware and Software Settings of the Line Card

Verifying the Interface Configuration

Verifying the Configuration and Status of the System Clock

Verifying the APS Configuration for Concatenated Line Cards

Verifying the Basic Hardware and Software Settings of the Line Card

The show version command displays the configuration of the system hardware, the software release, the names and sources of configuration files, and the boot images.

router# show version
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software 
IOS (tm) GS Software (GSR-P-M), Experimental Version 12.0(20010608:063728) 
[rdubey-conn_isp.daily 301]
Copyright (c) 1986-2001 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Fri 13-Jul-01 03:24 by rdubey
Image text-base:0x60010950, data-base:0x6218A000

ROM:System Bootstrap, Version 11.2(17)GS2, [htseng 180] EARLY DEPLOYMENT RELEASE SOFTWARE 
(fc1)
BOOTLDR:GS Software (GSR-BOOT-M), Version 11.2(9)GS7, EARLY DEPLOYMENT, RELEASE SOFTWARE 
(fc1)

router uptime is 14 minutes
System returned to ROM by reload at 12:30:33 EST Tue Jul 17 2001
System restarted at 12:58:21 EST Tue Jul 17 2001
System image file is "tftp://10.1.2.253/gsr-p-mz.071301"

cisco 12012/GRP (R5000) processor (revision 0x01) with 262144K bytes of memory.
R5000 CPU at 200Mhz, Implementation 35, Rev 2.1, 512KB L2 Cache
Last reset from power-on

1 Route Processor Card
1 Clock Scheduler Card
3 Switch Fabric Cards
1 16-port OC3 POS controller (16 POS).
1 four-port OC12 POS controller (4 POS).
1 Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s)
20 Packet over SONET network interface(s)
507K bytes of non-volatile configuration memory.

20480K bytes of Flash PCMCIA card at slot 0 (Sector size 128K).
8192K bytes of Flash internal SIMM (Sector size 256K).
Configuration register is 0x0
router# 

Verifying the Interface Configuration

The show controller pos slot/port command displays information on framing, alarms and events and other interface parameters. The following example is for a line card in slot 2:

router# show controllers pos 2/0
POS2/0
SECTION
  LOF = 0          LOS    = 0                            BIP(B1) = 0
LINE
  AIS = 0          RDI    = 0          FEBE = 0          BIP(B2) = 0
PATH
  AIS = 0          RDI    = 0          FEBE = 0          BIP(B3) = 0
  LOP = 0          NEWPTR = 0          PSE  = 0          NSE     = 0
Active Defects:None
Active Alarms: None
Alarm reporting enabled for:SF SLOS SLOF B1-TCA B2-TCA PLOP B3-TCA 
Framing:SONET
APS
COAPS = 0          PSBF = 0         
  State:PSBF_state = False
  ais_shut = FALSE
  Rx(K1/K2):00/00  S1S0 = 00, C2 = CF
  Remote aps status non-aps; Reflected local aps status non-aps
CLOCK RECOVERY
  RDOOL = 0         
  State:RDOOL_state = False
PATH TRACE BUFFER :STABLE 
  Remote hostname :MFR2                    
  Remote interface:POS7/0        
  Remote IP addr  :2.0.1.2         
  Remote Rx(K1/K2):00/00  Tx(K1/K2):00/00
BER thresholds: SF = 10e-3  SD = 10e-6
TCA thresholds: B1 = 10e-6  B2 = 10e-6  B3 = 10e-6

(Additional display text is not shown.)

Verifying the Configuration and Status of the System Clock

The command show controller sysclock slot displays the status and configuration of a line card's system clock. The following example is for a line card in slot 5.

Router# show controller sysclock 5
SYSCLOCK 5
    Hardware version      : 4
    Clock mode            : manual internal
    Clock primary source  : port 0,up
    Clock secondary source: port 1,up
    PLL status            : up
    Current clock source  : internal slot

Verifying the APS Configuration for Concatenated Line Cards

To display information about the automatic protection switching (APS) configuration, use the EXEC command show aps.

Router#show aps 
POS6/1 APS Group 55:protect channel 0 (inactive) 
        bidirectional, revertive (2 min) 
        SONET framing; SONET APS signalling by default 
        Received K1K2:0x00 0x05 
                No Request (Null) 
        Transmitted K1K2:0x00 0x05 
                No Request (Null) 
        Working channel 1 at 44.44.44.44 (Enabled) 
        Remote APS configuration:protect 

POS6/0 APS Group 55:working channel 1 (active) 
        SONET framing; SONET APS signalling by default 
        Protect at 44.44.44.44 
        Remote APS configuration:(null) 

Verifying Channelized ISE Line Cards

After configuring a ISE channelized line card, use show commands to display the status of the card, controller and interfaces.

Verifying the Basic Hardware and Software Configuration of a Channelized Line Card

Verifying the Configuration of a Port Controller

Verifying the Configuration and Status of the System Clock

Verifying the Interface Configurations

Verifying the Active Channelized Interfaces

Verifying the APS Configuration for Channelized Line Cards

Verifying the Basic Hardware and Software Configuration of a Channelized Line Card

Use the show version command to display information about the line card. This output from this command displays the configured channels, the software release, the names and sources of configuration files, and the boot images.

router# show version
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software 
IOS (tm) GS Software (GSR-P-M), Experimental Version 12.0(20010808:140803) 
[zuobing-MainAA15 131]
Copyright (c) 1986-2001 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Fri 10-Aug-01 20:08 by zuobing
Image text-base:0x50010968, data-base:0x5218E000
ROM:System Bootstrap, Version 11.2(17)GS2, [htseng 180] EARLY DEPLOYMENT RELEASE SOFTWARE 
(fc1)
BOOTLDR:GS Software (GSR-BOOT-M), Version 11.2(9)GS7, EARLY DEPLOYMENT, RELEASE SOFTWARE 
(fc1)
router uptime is 3 minutes
System returned to ROM by reload at 04:16:53 EST Tue Aug 14 2001
System restarted at 04:18:38 EST Tue Aug 14 2001
System image file is "tftp://10.1.2.253/gsr-p-mz.120-19.S"
cisco 12012/GRP (R5000) processor (revision 0x01) with 262144K bytes of memory.
R5000 CPU at 200Mhz, Implementation 35, Rev 2.1, 512KB L2 Cache
Last reset from power-on
1 Route Processor Card
1 Clock Scheduler Card
3 Switch Fabric Cards
1 four-port OC12 POS controller (4 POS).
4 OC12 channelized to STS-12c/STM-4, STS-3c/STM-1 or DS-3/E3 controllers
1 Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s)
36 Serial network interface(s)
5 Packet over SONET network interface(s)
507K bytes of non-volatile configuration memory.
20480K bytes of Flash PCMCIA card at slot 0 (Sector size 128K).
8192K bytes of Flash internal SIMM (Sector size 256K).
Configuration register is 0x0
router# 

Verifying the Configuration of a Port Controller

Use the command show control sonet slot/port to verify the controller configuration for a physical fiber port. This command displays information on the framing, clock source and alarms enabled for the fiber port.

Router#show control sonet 3/1
SONET3/1
 Current state of the controller is up
 Framing is SONET
 Clock source is INTERNAL, Loopback is NONE

SECTION
  LOF = 0          LOS    = 0                            BIP(B1) = 0
LINE
  AIS = 0          RDI    = 0          FEBE = 147        BIP(B2) = 0

Active Defects: None
Active Alarms:  None
Alarm reporting enabled for: SF SLOS SLOF B1-TCA B2-TCA B3-TCA

APS
  COAPS = 0          PSBF = 0
  State: PSBF_state = False
  ais_shut = FALSE
  Rx(K1/K2): 00/00
BER thresholds:  SF = 10e-3  SD = 10e-6
TCA thresholds:  B1 = 10e-6  B2 = 10e-6

Verifying the Configuration and Status of the System Clock

The command show controller sysclock slot displays the status and configuration of a line card's system clock. The following example is for a line card in slot 5.

Router# show controller sysclock 5
SYSCLOCK 5
    Hardware version      : 4
    Clock mode            : manual internal
    Clock primary source  : port 0,up
    Clock secondary source: port 1,up
    PLL status            : up
    Current clock source  : internal slot

Verifying the Interface Configurations

Use the show contoller commands as specified in Table 17 to verify the configuration of individual channelized interfaces. This section includes examples of these commands for the following interface types:

Verifying a POS Interface Configuration

Verifying the Configuration for a Serial Interface with SDH Framing and AU-4 Mapping

Table 17 show controller Commands for Channelized ISE Interfaces

Interface Type
Show Controller Command

SONET framing
POS and serial interfaces

show controller sonet slot/port:sts1-number details

SDH framing, AU-3 mapping
POS and serial interfaces

show controller sonet slot/port:AU3-number details

SDH framing, AU-4 mapping
POS interfaces

show controller sonet slot/port:AU4-number details

SDH framing, AU-4 mapping
serial interfaces

show controller sonet slot/port.AU4-number:vc3-number details


Verifying a POS Interface Configuration

Use the show controller sonet command to verify the configuration of a POS interface.

router# show controller sonet 5/0:1
POS5/0:1
PATH
  AIS = 0          RDI    = 0          FEBE = 0          BIP(B3) = 0
  LOP = 0          NEWPTR = 0          PSE  = 0          NSE     = 0
Active Defects:None
Active Alarms: None
Alarm reporting enabled for:PLOP B3-TCA 
S1S0 = 00, C2 = CF
PATH TRACE BUFFER :STABLE 
  Remote hostname :                        
  Remote interface:              
  Remote IP addr  :                
  Remote Rx(K1/K2):  /    Tx(K1/K2):  /  
BER thresholds: B3 = 10e-6 

(Additional display text is not shown.)

Verifying the Configuration for a Serial Interface with SDH Framing and AU-4 Mapping

Use the show controller sonet command to verify the configuration of a serial interface. The following example shows the output for a DS3 or E3 serial interface configured with SDH framing and AU-4 mapping.

router# show controller sonet 3/0.1:1 details 
Serial3/0.1:1
Channelization: activated.
PATH
  AIS = 0          RDI    = 0          FEBE = 0          BIP(B3) = 0
  LOP = 0          NEWPTR = 0          PSE  = 0          NSE     = 0
Active Defects:None
Active Alarms: None
Alarm reporting enabled for:PLOP B3-TCA 
S1S0 = 02, C2 = 04
PATH TRACE BUFFER :STABLE 
  Path trace :MFR2.Ser3/0.1:1
4D 46 52 32 2E 53 65 72  33 2F 30 2E 31 3A 31       MFR2.Ser3/0.1:1
BER thresholds: B3 = 10e-6
Controller SONET 3/0, interface Serial3/0.1:1 (E3 channel 1)
 cdb = 0x52AD7B58, base_hwidb = 0x528049E0, chn_hwidb = 0x52811220
 ssb = 0x5371F124, ds = 0x536E5BA8
 Line state is up
  rxLOS inactive, rxLOF inactive, rxAIS inactive
  txAIS inactive, rxRAI inactive, txRAI inactive
 Current configurable parameter settings:
  Loopback is none
  DSU mode is cisco, DSU bandwidth limit is 34010 Kbps
  National bit is 0
  Payload scrambling is disabled, CRC is 16
  Bert pattern is disabled, Bert interval is 0
  Transmitter delay is 0, Encapsulation is HDLC, Invert data is disabled
  MTU is 4470
 Incoming far end requests:
  0 Total requests
  0 Loopback requests,  0 No loopback requests
  0 Full rate requests, 0 No full rate requests
  0 Rejected requests,  0 Unknown requests
 MIB information:
  Data in current interval (58 seconds elapsed):
   0 Line Code Violations, 0 P-bit Coding Violations
   0 C-bit Coding Violations
   0 P-bit Err Secs, 0 P-bit Sev Err Secs
   0 Sev Err Framing Secs, 0 Unavailable Secs
   0 Line Errored Secs, 0 C-bit Errored Secs, 0 C-bit Sev Err Secs
  Total Data (less than 1 interval collected):
  No alarms detected.

Verifying the Active Channelized Interfaces

Use the show controller provision slot command to display the status of all channelized interfaces in an ISE channelized line card.

router# show controller provision 5
Slot 5 :CH-OC12-4-X??, GULF Revision:2, Dynamic Provisioning:disabled 
         'microcode reload' required:No
         Interface POS5/0:1 :    activated
         Interface POS5/1:1 :    activated
         Interface POS5/1:2 :    activated
         Interface POS5/1:3 :    activated
         Interface POS5/1:4 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/2.1:1 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/2.1:2 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/2.1:3 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/2.2:1 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/2.2:2 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/2.2:3 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/2.3:1 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/2.3:2 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/2.3:3 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/2.4:1 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/2.4:2 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/2.4:3 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/3.1:1 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/3.1:2 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/3.1:3 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/3.2:1 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/3.2:2 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/3.2:3 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/3.3:1 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/3.3:2 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/3.3:3 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/3.4:1 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/3.4:2 :    activated
         Interface Serial5/3.4:3 :    activated

(Additional display text is not shown.)

Verifying the APS Configuration for Channelized Line Cards

To display information about the current automatic protection switching (APS) configuration, use the EXEC command show aps.

Router#show aps 
SONET3/1 APS Group 33:protect channel 0 (inactive) 
        bidirectional, revertive (2 min) 
        SONET framing; SONET APS signalling by default 
        Received K1K2:0x00 0x05 
                No Request (Null) 
        Transmitted K1K2:0x00 0x05 
                No Request (Null) 
        Working channel 1 at 11.11.11.11 (Enabled) 
        Remote APS configuration:(null) 

SONET3/0 APS Group 33:working channel 1 (active) 
        SONET framing; SONET APS signalling by default 
        Protect at 11.11.11.11 
        Remote APS configuration:(null) 

Configuration Examples

This section provides configuration examples for both concatenated and channelized line cards.

Examples to Configure Concatenated Line Cards

Examples to Configure Channelized Line Cards

Examples to Configure Concatenated Line Cards

This section contains examples to modify the various interface parameters of a concatenated line card. By default, the line card is disables. If the line card is simple enabled with no additional configuration, the default parameters will apply. Refer to Configuring a Concatenated Line Card for detailed instructions on the use of these commands and their default settings.

This section contains examples for the following:

Examples to Specify the Framing and Encapsulation

Example to Configure the System Clock in a Concatenated Line Card

Example to Configure APS for Concatenated Interfaces

Examples to Specify the Framing and Encapsulation

This example configures the interface at slot 2, port 1 for SONET framing and Frame Relay encapsulation. This example also shows how to start up the interface and save the configuration.

For the parameters not entered, the default values apply. See Specifying Framing and Encapsulation in a Concatenated Interface for more information.

Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface POS 2/1
Router(config-if)# POS framing SONET
Router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay
Router(config-if)# no shutdown
Router(config-if)# end
Router# copy running-config startup-config

Example to Configure the System Clock in a Concatenated Line Card

This example sets the system clock in slot 2 for auto revertative mode. The primary clock source is set to port 1, and the secondary clock source is set to port 2. Finally, the new settings are saved.

Router# config terminal
Router(config)# controller sysclock 2
Router(config)# clock source primary 1
Router(config)# clock source secondary 2
Router(config)# clock redundancy mode auto revertive
Router(config)# end
Router# copy running-config startup-config

Example to Configure APS for Concatenated Interfaces

This section contains an example to configure working and protect interfaces for APS.

Configure the Loopback

Router(config)# interface Loopback0
Router(config-if)# ip address 11.11.11.11 255.255.255.255
Router(config-if)# no ip directed-broadcast
Router(config-if)# no ip route-cache
Router(config-if)# no ip mroute-cache

Configure the Working Interface

Router(config)# interface POS6/0
Router(config-if)# pos ais-shut
Router(config-if)# aps group 20
Router(config-if)# aps working 1

Configure the Protect Interface

Router(config)# interface POS8/0
Router(config-if)# pos ais-shut
Router(config-if)# aps group 20
Router(config-if)# aps protect 1 11.11.11.11

Examples to Configure Channelized Line Cards

This section contains examples to configure a channelized line card. For information on the commands used in these examples, refer to Configuration Tasks and Command Reference.

Controller Configuration Examples

Examples to Configure the Controller

Examples to Enable the Controller and Save the Configuration

Examples to Set the System Clock

Examples to Put the Controller in Loopback Modes

Examples to Define the Channelized Interfaces

Examples to Define Channels on SONET Ports

Examples to Define Channels on SDH AU-4 Ports

Examples to Define Channels on SDH AU-3 Ports

Examples to Enable All Channels on a Line Card

Examples to Redefine the Channels on a Previously Configured Port

Examples to Configure a Channelized Interface

Examples to Configure a Channelized POS Interface

Examples to Configure a Channelized DS-3 Serial Interface

Examples to Configure a E3 Serial Interface

Example to Configure APS for Channelized Interfaces

Controller Configuration Examples

To configure a channelized line card, the controller for each physical port must first be configured. This section contains examples for the following topics:

Examples to Configure the Controller

Examples to Enable the Controller and Save the Configuration

Examples to Set the System Clock

Examples to Put the Controller in Loopback Modes

Examples to Configure the Controller

This example selects the physical interface at slot 3, port 1 for configuration:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# controller sonet 3/1

This example chooses SDH framing and sets the AUG mapping to AUG-3:

Router(config-controller)# framing sdh
Router(config-controller)# aug-mapping AU-3

This example selects the controller clock source to line:

Router(config-controller)# clock source line

This example enables "sd-ber" Alarm Reporting:

Router(config-controller)# alarm-report sd-ber

This example sets the BER Threshold Values for sd-ber to 4:

Router(config-controller)# ber-threshold sd-ber 4

Examples to Enable the Controller and Save the Configuration

This example starts up the controller in port 1 of the slot 3 ISE line card and saves the configuration:

Router(config)# controller sonet 3/1
Router(config-controller)# no shutdown

Router(config-controller)# end

Router# copy running-config startup-config

This example shuts down the controller in port 1 of the ISE line card in slot 3:

Router(config)# controller sonet 3/1
Router(config-controller)# shutdown

Router(config-controller)# end


Examples to Set the System Clock

This example configures the system clock for the line card in slot 5: the primary clock source is set to port 2 and the secondary clock source is set to port 3. Next, the clock redundancy is set to auto, in non-revertive mode. Finally, the new configuration is saved to NVRAM.

Router# config terminal
Router(config)# controller sysclock 5
Router(config)# clock source primary 2
Router(config)# clock source secondary 3
Router(config)# clock redundancy mode auto non-revertive

Router(config)# end

Router# copy running-config startup-config

See Setting the System Clock for a Channelized Line Card for additional descriptions of these parameters.

Examples to Put the Controller in Loopback Modes

The following example sets the controller in slot 6, port 0 to a local loopback:

Router(config)# controller sonet 6/0
Router(config-controller)# loopback internal

The following example the controller in slot 6, port 0 to a line loopback:

Router(config)# controller sonet 6/0
Router(config-controller)# loopback line

Examples to Define the Channelized Interfaces

This section contains examples to define and undefine serial and POS channelized interfaces:

Examples to Define Channels on SONET Ports

Examples to Define Channels on SDH AU-4 Ports

Examples to Define Channels on SDH AU-3 Ports

Examples to Enable All Channels on a Line Card

Examples to Redefine the Channels on a Previously Configured Port

Examples to Define Channels on SONET Ports

This section contains examples for defining SONET interface channels.

Configure a STS-3 Channel on a 16-port-OC3/STM-1 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/15
! Define interface #1 to be a STS-3c channels
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 1 - 3 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end

Configure a STS-12 Channel on a 4-port-OC12/STM-4 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/0
! Define interface #1 to be a STS-12c channel
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 1 - 12 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end 

Configure DS-3 Channels on a 16-port-OC3/STM-1 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/15
! Define interface #1 - #3 to be DS-3 channels
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 1 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 2 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 3 serial T3
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end 

Configure DS-3 and STS-3 Channels on a 4-port-OC12/STM-4 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/3
! Define interface #1 - #9 to be DS-3 serial channels
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 1 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 2 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 3 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 4 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 5 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 6 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 7 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 8 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 9 serial T3
! Define interface #10 to be STS-3c POS channel
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 10 - 12 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end 

Undefine a STS Interface

This example removes the interface number 4 from the controller.

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/0
! Undefine an interface
Router(config-controller)# no STS-1 4
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end

Examples to Define Channels on SDH AU-4 Ports

This section contains examples for defining SDH AU-4 channelized interfaces.

Configure a STM-1 Channel on a 16-port-OC3/STM-1 Line Card

This example assigns the entire bandwidth of a controller to a single channel.

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/15
Router(config-controller)# framing SDH
Router(config-controller)# aug-mapping AU-4
! Define interface #1 to be a STM-1 (VC-4) POS channel
Router(config-controller)# AU-4 1 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end

Configure a STM-4 Channel on a 4-port-OC12/STM-4 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/2
Router(config-controller)# framing SDH
Router(config-controller)# aug-mapping AU-4
! Define interface #1 to be a STM-4 (VC-4-4c) channel
Router(config-controller)# AU-4 1 - 4 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end 

Configure DS-3 Channels on a 16-port-OC3/STM-1 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/15
framing SDH
Router(config-controller)# aug-mapping AU-4
! Define interface 1:1, 1:2, 1: 3 to be DS-3 serial channels
Router(config-controller)# AU-4 1 VC-3 1 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-4 1 VC-3 2 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-4 1 VC-3 3 serial T3
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end 

Configure STM-1 and DS-3 Channels on a 4-port OC-12/STM-4 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/1
Router(config-controller)# framing SDH
Router(config-controller)# aug-mapping AU-4
! Define interface 1:1 , 1:2, 1:3, 2:1, 2:2, 2:3 to be DS-3 serial channels
Router(config-controller)# AU-4 1 VC-3 1 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-4 1 VC-3 2 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-4 1 VC-3 3 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-4 2 VC-3 1 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-4 2 VC-3 2 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-4 2 VC-3 3 serial T3
! Define interface #3 , #4 to be STM-1 (VC-4) POS channels
Router(config-controller)# AU-4 3 POS
Router(config-controller)# AU-4 4 POS 
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end 

Undefine STM-1 and DS-3 channels in a SDH AU-4 Port

! Enter configuration mode
RRouter# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 3/1
! Undefine an STM-1 POS interface
Router(config-controller)# no AU-4 1 POS
! Undefine an DS-3 serial interface
Router(config-controller)# no AU-4 2 VC-3 1 serial t3
! Exit Configuration Mode 
Router(config-controller)# end

Undefine a STM-4 channel in a SDH AU-4 port

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/2
! Undefine a STM-4 POS interface
Router(config-controller)# no AU-4 1 - 4 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end 

Examples to Define Channels on SDH AU-3 Ports

This section contains examples for defining SDH AU-3 interface channels.

Configure a STM-1 Channel on a 16-port-OC3/STM-1 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/15
Router(config-controller)# framing sdh 
Router(config-controller)# aug-mapping AU-3 
! Define interface #1 to be a STM-1 channel
Router(config-controller)# AU-3 1 - 3 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end

Configure a STM-4 Channel on a 4-port-OC12/STM-4 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/0
Router(config-controller)# framing sdh 
Router(config-controller)# aug-mapping AU-3 
! Define interface #1 to be a STM-4 channel
Router(config-controller)# AU-3 1 - 12 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end 

Configure Multiple DS-3 Channels on a 16-port-OC3/STM-1 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/15
Router(config-controller)# framing sdh 
Router(config-controller)# aug-mapping AU-3 
! Define interface #1 - #3 to be DS-3 serial channels
Router(config-controller)# AU-3 1 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-3 2 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-3 3 serial T3
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end 

Configure DS-3 and STM-1 Channels on a 4-port-OC12/STM-4 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/3
Router(config-controller)# framing sdh 
Router(config-controller)# aug-mapping AU-3 
! Define interface #1 - #9 to be DS-3 channels
Router(config-controller)# AU-3 1 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-3 2 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-3 3 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-3 4 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-3 5 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-3 6 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-3 7 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-3 8 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# AU-3 9 serial T3
! Define interface #10 to be a STM-1 channels
Router(config-controller)# AU-3 10 -12 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end 

Undefine a STM-1 Channel on a 16-port-OC3/STM-1 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/15
! Undefine a STM-1 interface
Router(config-controller)# no AU-3 1
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end

Undefine a STM-4 Channel on a 4-port-OC12/STM-4 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/0
! Undefine interface #1 
Router(config-controller)# no AU-3 1 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end 

Undefine a DS-3 Channel on a 16-port-OC3/STM-1 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
! Select a controller
Router(config)# controller sonet 2/15
! Undefine interface #1 
Router(config-controller)# no AU-3 1 
! Exit Configuration Mode
Router(config-controller)# end 

Examples to Enable All Channels on a Line Card

This example enables all the channelized interfaces configured for the line card in slot 3. Use the show controller provision command to verify that the interfaces are correctly configured and enabled.

Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# microcode reload 3
Router(config)# show controller provision 3
Router(config)# end

Caution The microcode reload command reloads the line card in the specified slot. Traffic will be disrupted on all interfaces for that slot.

Examples to Redefine the Channels on a Previously Configured Port

This section contains examples of the commands used to redefine the channels on a channelized ISE line card. This example redefines the channels for a SONET controller in port 3 of a 4-port OC-12/STM-4 line card (installed in slot 4 of the 12000 router chassis).

Table 18 is a comparison of the old configuration and the new configuration:

Table 18 Old and New Channel Configuration

 
Old
Interface Number
Old (From) Configuration
New (To) Configuration
New
Interface Number

1

1

STS-3c

DS-3

1

2

DS-3

2

3

DS-3

3

4

4

DS-3

no change

4

5

5

DS-3

no change

5

6

6

DS-3

no change

6

7

7

STS-3c

no change

7

8

9

10

10

DS-3

STS-3c

10

11

11

DS-3

12

12

DS-3


Examples

! Enter configuration mode
Router# config terminal
Router(config)#

! Disable the old interfaces that will be reconfigured
Router(config)# interface POS 4/3:1
Router(config-if)# shutdown 
Router(config-if)# interface POS 4/3:10
Router(config-if)# shutdown 
Router(config-if)# interface POS 4/3:11
Router(config-if)# shutdown 
Router(config-if)# interface POS 4/3:12
Router(config-if)# shutdown 
Router(config-if)# end
Router(config)# 

! Undefine the old interfaces that will be re-configured
Router(config)# controller sonet 4/3
Router(config-controller)# no STS-1 1
Router(config-controller)# no STS-1 10
Router(config-controller)# no STS-1 11
Router(config-controller)# no STS-1 12

! Define the new channelized interfaces
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 1 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 2 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 3 serial T3
Router(config-controller)# STS-1 10 - 12 POS 

! Activate the channelization change
Router(config-controller)# microcode reload 4

! Exit configuration mode
Router(config-controller)# end

Caution The microcode reload command reloads the line card in the specified slot. Traffic will be disrupted on all interfaces for that slot.

Examples to Configure a Channelized Interface

This section contains examples to configure the individual channelized interface.

Examples to Configure a Channelized POS Interface

Examples to Configure a Channelized DS-3 Serial Interface

Examples to Configure a E3 Serial Interface

Examples to Configure a Channelized POS Interface

! Enter configuration mode
Router(config)# config terminal
! Select an interface
Router(config)# interface POS 2/0:1
! configure SONET/SDH path overhead C2 byte
Router(config-if)# POS flag C2 22
!Start up the interface
Router(config-if)# no shutdown
! Exit configuration mode
Router(config-if)# end
!Save the configuration
Router# copy running-config startup-config

Examples to Configure a Channelized DS-3 Serial Interface

! Enter configuration mode
Router(config)# config terminal
! Select an interface
Router(config)# interface serial 2/1:4
!Select a DSU mode and bandwidth, if necessary
Router(config-if)# dsu mode digital-link
Router(config-if)# dsu bandwidth 1000 
!Start up the interface
Router(config-if)# no shutdown
! Exit configuration mode
Router(config-if)# end
!Save the configuration
Router# copy running-config startup-config

Examples to Configure a E3 Serial Interface

! Enter configuration mode
Router(config)# config terminal
! Select an interface
Router(config)# interface serial 5/2.1:1
!Select a DSU mode, if necessary
Router(config-if)# dsu mode digital-link
!Start up the interface
Router(config-if)# no shutdown
! Exit configuration mode
Router(config-if)# end
!Save the configuration
Router# copy running-config startup-config

Example to Configure APS for Channelized Interfaces

This section contains an example to configure working and protect interfaces for APS.

Configure the Loopback

Router(config)# interface Loopback0
Router(config-if)# ip address 11.11.11.11 255.255.255.255
Router(config-if)# no ip directed-broadcast
Router(config-if)# no ip route-cache
Router(config-if)# no ip mroute-cache

Configure the Working Interface

Router(config)# controller SONET3/1
Router(config-controller)# ais-shut
Router(config-controller)# aps group 33
Router(config-controller)# aps working 1

Configure the Protect Interface

Router(config)# controller SONET3/0
Router(config-controller)# ais-shut
Router(config-controller)# aps group 33
Router(config-controller)# aps protect 1 11.11.11.11

Command Reference

This section documents new and modified commands. All other commands used with this feature are documented in the Cisco IOS Release 12.0 command reference publications (see Related Documents).

alarm-report

au-3 POS

au-3 serial

au-4 pos

au-4 VC-3 serial

ber-threshold

clock redundancy mode auto

clock redundancy mode manual internal

clock source

controller sysclock

dsu mode

interface

loopback

show controller

alarm-report

To enable reporting of selected alarm and signal events for ISE line card controllers and serial interfaces, use the alarm-report configuration command. To disable reporting of alarm and signal events, use the no form of this command.

alarm-report {all | event}

no alarm-report

Syntax Description

all

Enables all of the alarm and signal events available for the interface or controller. See "Usage Guidelines" for more information on the events available with controllers and serial interfaces.

event

Enables reporting for the specified alarm or signal events listed.


Defaults

SONET/SDH controller default values: sf-ber, slos, slof, b1-tca and b2-tca

DS-3 and E3 channelized interface default values: b3-tca and plop

Command Modes

Controller configuration mode to specify alarm reporting in SONET/SDH controllers.

Interface configuration mode to specify alarm reporting in DS-3 and E3 serial channelized interfaces.

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(19)S

This command was introduced to support the ISE line cards.


Usage Guidelines

The following section and line alarms are available for SONET controllers:
[b1-tca | b2-tca | lais | lrdi | sd-ber | sf-ber | slof | slos | all]

The following alarms and signal events are available for DS-3 and E3 serial interfaces:
[pais | plop | prdi | b3-tca | all]

These alarms and signal events are described in Table 19.

Table 19 SONET/SDH Alarm and Signal Events

Alarm/Signal
SONET Description
SDH Description

b1-tca

B1 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

B1 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

b2-tca

B2 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

B2 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

b3-tca

B3 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

B3 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

lais

Line Alarm Indication Signal (AIS-L)

Multiplexer Section Alarm Indication Signal (MS-AIS)

lrdi

Line Remote Defect Indication (RDI-L)

Multiplexer Section Remote Defect Indication (MS-RDI)

pais

Path Alarm Indication Signal, or Alarm Indication Signal—Path (AIS-P)

Administrative Unit Alarm Indication Signal (AU-AIS)

plop

Path Loss of Pointer, or Loss of Pointer—Path (LOP-P)

Administrative Unit Loss of Pointer (AU-LOP)

prdi

Path Remote Defect Indication, or Remote Defect Indication—Path (RDI-P)

High Order Path Remote Defect Indication (HP-RDI)

sd-ber

Line BIP BER in excess of the Signal Degrade (SD) threshold

Multiplexer Section BIP BER in excess of the Signal Degrade (SD) threshold

sf-ber

Line BIP BER in excess of the Signal Fail (SF) threshold

Multiplexer Section BIP BER in excess of the Signal Fail (SF) threshold

slof

Section Loss of Frame (LOF)

Regenerator Section Loss of Frame (LOF)

slos

Section Loss of Signal (LOS)

Regenerator Section Loss of Signal (LOS)

all

Selects all of the available alarms for that interface.

Selects all of the available alarms for that interface.


Examples

The following example enables reporting for lais for port 1 of the ISE line card in slot 3 of a Cisco 12000 series Internet router:

Router(config)# controller sonet 3/1
Router(config-controller)# alarm-report lais

Related Commands

Command
Description

ber-threshold

Sets threshold values for the available BER threshold crossing alarms in controllers and channelized serial interfaces.

pos report

Enables reporting of alarms and signal events in POS channelized and concatenated interfaces.

pos threshold

Sets threshold values for the available BER threshold crossing alarms in POS channelized and concatenated interfaces.


au-3 POS

To define a channelized POS interface for an SDH AU-3 controller, use the au-3 POS controller configuration command. To remove a POS interface for an SDH AU-3 controller, use the no form of this command.

au-3 start-au-3-number - end-au-3-number POS

no au-3 start-au-3-number

Syntax Description

start-au-3-number

Beginning channel number used to form a POS interface in an SDH AU-3 controller. This number is also used to identify the channel.

end-au-3-number

Ending channel number used to form a POS interface in an SDH AU-3 controller.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

Controller configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(19)S

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

A POS channel is formed under SDH AU-3 mapping by grouping STM-1s together with a range of "start" and "end" AU-3 numbers.

A STM-1 POS channel is formed by three AU-3s (VC-3s).

A STM-4 POS channel is formed by 12 AU-3s (VC-3s).

The interface number is always the start-au3-number.

See Channelization Support for more information on the SDH multiplexing hierarchy.

See Defining Channels for a SDH AU-3 Port, for information on the channel numbers and mappings available for each line card.

Examples

Configure a STM-1 Channel on a 16-port-OC3/STM-1 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
config terminal
! Select a controller
controller sonet 2/15
framing sdh 
aug-mapping AU-3 
! Define interface #1 to be a STM-1 channel
AU-3 1 - 3 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
end

Undefine a STM-1 Channel on a 16-port-OC3/STM-1 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
config terminal
! Select a controller
controller sonet 2/15
! Undefine a STM-1 interface
no AU-3 1
! Exit Configuration Mode
end

Configure a STM-4 Channel on a 4-port-OC12/STM-4 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
config terminal
! Select a controller
controller sonet 2/0
framing sdh 
aug-mapping AU-3 
! Define interface #1 to be a STM-4 channel
AU-3 1 - 12 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
end 

Undefine a STM-4 Channel on a 4-port-OC12/STM-4 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
config terminal
! Select a controller
controller sonet 2/0
! Undefine interface #1 
no AU-3 1 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
end 

Related Commands

Command
Description

au-3 serial

Defines a serial interface for an SDH AU-3 controller.

au-4 VC-3 serial

Defines a serial interface for an SDH AU-4 controller.

au-4 POS

Defines a POS interface for an SDH AU-4 controller.


au-3 serial

To define a DS-3 (T3) or E3 serial interface for an SDH AU-3 controller, use the au-3 serial controller configuration command. To remove the serial interface for an SDH AU-3 controller, use the no form of this command.

au-3 start-au3-num serial [T3 | E3]

no au-3 start-au3-num

Syntax Description

start-au3-num

Specifies the channel number for a serial interface in a SDH AU-3 controller.

T3

Specifies that the interface is a T3 serial interface. "T3" is the North American term for DS-3.

E3

Specifies that the interface is an E3 serial interface.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

Controller configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(19)S

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

A DS-3 (T3) or E3 serial interface is defined by specifying a single AU-3 "start" number. The interface number is also identified by the start-au3-number.

See Channelization Support for more information on the SDH multiplexing hierarchy. See Defining Channels for a SDH AU-3 Port, for information on the channel numbers and mappings available for each line card.

Examples

Configure Multiple DS-3 Channels on a 16-port-OC3/STM-1 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
config terminal
! Select a controller
controller sonet 2/15
framing sdh 
aug-mapping AU-3 
! Define interface #1 - #3 to be DS-3 serial channels
AU-3 1 serial T3
AU-3 2 serial T3
AU-3 3 serial T3
! Exit Configuration Mode
end 

Undefine a DS-3 Channel on a 16-port-OC3/STM-1 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
config terminal
! Select a controller
controller sonet 2/15
! Undefine interface #1 
no AU-3 1 
! Exit Configuration Mode
end 

Related Commands

Command
Description

au-3 POS

Specifies POS interfaces in an SDH AU-3 controller.

au-4 VC-3 serial

Defines a serial interface for an SDH AU-4 controller.

au-4 POS

Defines a POS interface for an SDH AU-4 controller.


au-4 pos

To define a POS interface for an SDH AU-4 controller, use the au-4 POS controller configuration command. To remove the POS interface for an SDH AU-4 controller, use the no form of this command.

For STM-4 interfaces

au-4 start-au4-number - end-au4-number pos

no au-4 start-au4-number - end-au4-number pos

For STM-1 interfaces

au-4 start-au4-number pos

no au-4 start-au4-number pos

Syntax Description

start-au4-number

Beginning channel number used to form a POS interface in an SDH AU-4 controller. For an STM-1 interface, only the "start" number is required.
This number is also used to identify the channel.

end-au4-number

Ending channel number used to form a STM-4 or STM-16 POS interface in an SDH AU-4 controller. For an STM-1 interface, only the "start" number is required.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

Controller configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(19)S

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

An STM-1 POS channel is formed by specifying a single AU-4 start-au4-number number. The interface number is also the start-au4-number.

An STM-4 POS channel is formed by grouping four AU-4s (STM-1s). This is done by specifying a range of "start" and "end" AU-4 numbers (start-au4-number - end-au4-number). The interface number is also the start-au4-number.

See Channelization Support for more information on the SDH multiplexing hierarchy. See Defining Channels for a SDH AU-4 Port, for information on the channel numbers and mappings available for each line card.

Examples

Configure an STM-1 Channel on a 16-port-OC3/STM-1 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
config terminal
! Select a controller
controller sonet 2/15
framing SDH
aug-mapping AU-4
! Define interface #1 to be a STM-1 (VC-4) POS channel
AU-4 1 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
end

Undefine an STM-1 Channel on a 16-port-OC3/STM-1 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
config terminal
! Select a controller
controller sonet 2/15
framing SDH
aug-mapping AU-4
! undefine interface #1 
no AU-4 1 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
end

Configure an STM-4 Channel on a 4-port-OC12/STM-4 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
config terminal
! Select a controller
controller sonet 2/2
framing SDH
aug-mapping AU-4
! Define interface #1 to be a STM-4 (VC-4-4c) channel
AU-4 1 - 4 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
end 

Undefine an STM-4 Channel in a SDH AU-4 Port

! Enter configuration mode
config terminal
! Select a controller
controller sonet 2/2
! Undefine a STM-4 POS interface
no AU-4 1 - 4 POS
! Exit Configuration Mode
end 

Related Commands

Command
Description

au-4 VC-3 serial

Defines a serial interface for an SDH AU-4 controller.

au-3 POS

Defines a POS interface for an SDH AU-3 controller.

au-3 serial

Defines a serial interface for an SDH AU-4 controller.


au-4 VC-3 serial

To define a DS-3 (T3) or E3 serial interface for an SDH AU-4 controller, use the au-4 VC-3 serial controller configuration command. To remove the serial interface for an SDH AU-4 controller, use the no form of this command.

AU-4 start-au4-number VC-3 VC3-number serial [T3 | E3]

no AU-4 start-au4-number VC-3 VC3-number serial [T3 | E3]

Syntax Description

start-au4-number

Specifies the beginning channel number used to form a serial interface in a SDH AU-4 controller.

VC3-number

Specifies the VC-3 number for the serial interface.

T3

Specifies that the interface is a T3 serial interface. "T3" is the North American term for DS-3.

E3

Specifies that the interface is an E3 serial interface.


Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

Controller configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(19)S

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

A DS-3 or E3 serial interface is defined by specifying a single AU-4 "start" number and a VC-3 number. The interface number for a DS-3 channel is start-au4-number: VC3-number.

See Channelization Support for more information on the SDH multiplexing hierarchy. See Defining Channels for a SDH AU-4 Port, for information on the channel numbers and mappings available for each line card.

Examples

Configure DS-3 Channels on a 16-port-OC3/STM-1 Line Card

! Enter configuration mode
config terminal
! Select a controller
controller sonet 2/15
framing SDH
aug-mapping AU-4
! Define interface 1:1, 1:2, 1: 3 to be DS-3 serial channels
AU-4 1 VC-3 1 serial T3
AU-4 1 VC-3 2 serial T3
AU-4 1 VC-3 3 serial T3
! Exit Configuration Mode
end 

Undefine a DS-3 Channel in a SDH AU-4 Port

! Enter configuration mode
config terminal
! Select a controller
controller sonet 2/15
! Undefine an DS-3 serial interface
no AU-4 1 VC-3 1 serial T3
! Exit Configuration Mode 
end 

Related Commands

Command
Description

au-4 POS

Defines a POS interface for an SDH AU-4 controller.

au-3 POS

Defines a POS interface for an SDH AU-3 controller.

au-3 serial

Defines a serial interface for an SDH AU-3 controller.


ber-threshold

To set threshold values for the BER threshold crossing alarms and values for controllers and serial interfaces in the channelized ISE line cards, use the ber-threshold controller configuration command. To restore the default value for each BER type, use the no form of this command.

ber-threshold type value

no ber-threshold type

Syntax Description

type

type can be one of the available BER thresholds. For DS-3/E3 channelized interface, the b3-tca is available. For controllers, the b1-tca, b2-tca, sd-ber and sf-ber are supported.

value

A number in the range from 3 to 9 that represents the BER threshold value.


Defaults

For sf-ber, the default value is 3 (10e-3).

For b1-tca, b2-tca, b3-tca, and sf-ber the default rate is 6 (10e-6).

Command Modes

Controller configuration for controllers.

Interface configuration for channelized interfaces.

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(19)S

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Table 20 shows the default values and descriptions for the various threshold types.

Table 20 BER Threshold Types and Default Values for Channelized ISE Line Cards

Type
Default Value
Support
SONET Description
SDH Description

b1-tca

6 (10e-6)

Controller configuration

B1 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

B1 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

b2-tca

6 (10e-6)

Controller configuration

B2 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

B2 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

b3-tca

6 (10e-6)

DS-3/E3 channelized interface configuration

B3 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

B3 BER Threshold Crossing Alarm

sd-ber

6 (10e-6)

Controller configuration

Line BIP BER in excess of the Signal Degrade (SD) threshold

Multiplexer Section BIP BER in excess of the Signal Degrade (SD) threshold

sf-ber

3 (10e-3)

Controller configuration

Line BIP BER in excess of the Signal Fail (SF) threshold

Multiplexer Section BIP BER in excess of the Signal Fail (SF) threshold


Examples

The following example changes the value for the sd-ber threshold for port 1 of the ISE line card in slot 3 of a Cisco 12000 series Internet router:

Router(config)# controller sonet 3/1
Router(config-controller)# ber-threshold sd-ber 5 

Related Commands

Command
Description

alarm-report

Enables reporting of selected alarm and signal events for ISE line card controllers and serial interfaces.

pos report

Enables reporting of alarms and signal events in POS channelized and concatenated interfaces.

pos threshold

Sets threshold values for the available BER threshold crossing alarms in POS channelized and concatenated interfaces.


clock redundancy mode auto

To set an ISE line card to automatically choose the system clocking source, use the command clock redundancy mode auto in global configuration mode. To set the line card system clock to the default internal source, use the no form of this command.

clock redundancy mode auto [revertive | non-revertive]

no clock redundancy mode auto

Syntax Description

revertive

After a clock source failure, the system reverts to a higher-priority source if the (previously failed) higher-priority clock source has recovered.

non-revertive

After a clock source failure, the system does not revert to a higher-priority clock source. The next available clock source in descending order is chosen.


Defaults

The default clock redundancy mode is clock redundancy mode manual internal. This can be accessed with the command no clock redundancy mode auto.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(19)S

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Either the revertive or non-revertive parameters must be entered. This parameter determines if the system clock should revert to a higher priority clock source if the (previously failed) higher priority clock source has recovered.

Auto mode is used to select two fiber port interfaces as "primary" and "secondary" sources for the line clock signal. This "auto" clock selection is made in descending order, depending on availability:

primary clock source: an interface designated by the user

secondary clock source: an interface designated by the user

internal clock source: internal clock (oscillator)

For example, if the primary clock source fails, the secondary clock source takes over; if the secondary clock source fails, the internal clock takes over.

Examples

This example configures the system clock for the line card in slot 5: the primary clock source is set to port 2 and the secondary clock source is set to port 3. Next, the clock redundancy is set to auto, in non-revertive mode. Finally, the new configuration is saved to NVRAM.

Router# config terminal
Router(config)# controller sysclock 5
Router(config)# clock source primary 2
Router(config)# clock source secondary 3
Router(config)# clock redundancy mode auto non-revertive

Router(config)# end

Router# copy running-config startup-config

Related Commands

Command
Description

controller sysclock slot

Selects the slot of the ISE line card to configure the system clock.

clock redundancy mode manual internal

Sets the system clock for a line card to internal mode.

clock source

Selects the ports for the "primary" and "secondary" system clock sources when the ISE line card is configured in "auto" mode.


clock redundancy mode manual internal

To manually set the system clock for an ISE line card to internal clocking mode, use the command clock redundancy mode manual internal in global configuration mode.

clock redundancy mode manual internal

Syntax Description

internal

Specifies an internal clock for the system clocking source in a line card.


Defaults

The default clock redundancy mode is clock redundancy mode manual internal.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(19)S

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

This command manually sets the system clocking mode to internal. This command does not have a no form.

Examples

This example manually configures the system clock for the line card in slot 5 to the internal source.

Router# config terminal
Router(config)# controller sysclock 5
Router(config)# clock redundancy mode manual internal

Router(config)# end

Related Commands

Command
Description

controller sysclock slot

Selects the slot of the ISE line card to configure the system clock.

clock redundancy mode auto

Sets the system clock selection for a line card to auto mode.

clock source

Selects the ports for the "primary" and "secondary" system clock sources when the ISE line card is configured in "auto" mode.


clock source

To specify the slot number of the primary and secondary clock source for an ISE line card system clocking source, use the clock source command in global configuration mode. To set the clock source to the default port values, use the no form of this command.

clock source [primary | secondary] port

no clock source [primary | secondary]

Syntax Description

primary

The primary port used for the system clock when the clock mode is set to "auto".

secondary

The secondary port used for the system clock if the "primary" port fails or becomes unavailable.

port

Specifies the port for the "primary" or "secondary" system clock source.


Defaults

For the "primary" system clock source, the default is slot 0

For the "secondary" system clock source, the default is slot 1

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(19)S

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

When an ISE line card is set to clock redundancy mode auto, the system selects a clocking source in the following descending order, depending on availability:

primary clock source: an interface designated by the user.

secondary clock source: an interface designated by the user.

internal clock source: internal clock (oscillator)

For example, if the primary clock source fails, the secondary clock source takes over; if the secondary clock source fails, the internal clock takes over.

Examples

This example configures the system clock for the line card in slot 5: the primary clock source is set to port 2 and the secondary clock source is set to port 3. Next, the clock redundancy is set to auto, in non-revertive mode. Finally, the new configuration is saved to NVRAM.

Router# config terminal
Router(config)# controller sysclock 5
Router(config)# clock source primary 2
Router(config)# clock source secondary 3
Router(config)# clock redundancy mode auto non-revertive

Router(config)# end

Router# copy running-config startup-config

Related Commands

Command
Description

controller sysclock slot

Selects the slot of the ISE line card to configure the system clock.

clock redundancy mode manual internal

Sets the system clock for a line card to internal mode.

clock redundancy mode auto

Sets the system clock selection for a line card to auto mode.


controller sysclock

To select the slot of an ISE line card to configure the system clock, use the controller sysclock command in global configuration mode. This command does not have a no form.

controller sysclock slot

Syntax Description

slot

Selects the sysclock controller of the ISE line card to allow configuration of the system telecombus clock.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(19)S

This command was introduced.


Examples

This example configures the system clock (controller sysclock) for the line card in slot 5: the primary clock source is set to port 2 and the secondary clock source is set to port 3. Next, the clock redundancy is set to auto, in non-revertive mode. Finally, the new configuration is saved to NVRAM.

Router# config terminal
Router(config)# controller sysclock 5
Router(config)# clock source primary 2
Router(config)# clock source secondary 3
Router(config)# clock redundancy mode auto non-revertive

Router(config)# end

Router# copy running-config startup-config 

Related Commands

Command
Description

clock redundancy mode manual internal

Sets the system clock for a line card to internal mode.

clock redundancy mode auto

Sets the system clock selection for a line card to auto mode.

clock source

Selects the ports for the "primary" and "secondary" system clock sources when the ISE line card is configured in "auto" mode.


dsu mode

To configure the DSU mode on a DS-3 or E3 channelized interface in an ISE line card, use the dsu mode interface configuration command. To return to the default cisco mode, use the no form of this command.

This command was modified to support the following modes for use with the ISE line cards:

dsu mode [cisco | digital-link | kentrox | larscom | adtran | verilink]

no dsu mode

Syntax Description

cisco

Selects a self-synchronous scrambler compatible with cisco DSU. This is the default DSU mode.

digital-link

Selects a self-synchronous scrambler mode compatible with digital-link DSU.

kentrox

Selects a self-synchronous scrambler mode compatible with kentrox DSU.

larscom

Selects a self-synchronous scrambler mode compatible with larscom DSU.

adtran

Selects a self-synchronous scrambler mode compatible with adtran DSU.

verilink

Selects a self-synchronous scrambler mode compatible with verilink DSU.


Defaults

The default DSU mode is "cisco".

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

11.2(11)GS

This command was introduced.

12.0(5)S

This command was introduced in Cisco IOS Release 12.0S.

12.0(19)S

This command was modified for use with the ISE line cards in the Cisco 12000 series Internet routers.


Usage Guidelines

There are two sides to the network, a local (near-end) side and a remote (far-end) side. The ISE line cards support third-party data service unit (DSU) vendors to enable connections between a Cisco 12000 series Internet router and another device.

Refer to the Cisco Systems publication Cisco Remote Connection Management Feature Module for additional information on the use and configuration of DSU connections.

Examples

The following example sets the DSU mode to kentrox:

Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface serial 2/0:1
Router(config-if)# dsu mode kentrox

Related Commands

Command
Description

dsu remote fullrate

dsu remote fullrate sets the sending and receiving rate at the remote interface to fullrate if:

The remote end is a Cisco router.

C-bit framing is configured on the interface.

This command is not supported in E3 interfaces.

dsu bandwidth kbps

Sets the local (near-end) bandwidth. The local and remote DSU bandwidth configuration settings must match to enable network connectivity. This command is not supported in E3 interfaces.

dsu remote accept

Sets the local (near-end) DS-3 interface to accept incoming remote requests from the remote (far-end) port. This command is not supported in E3 interfaces.


interface

To select an interface and enter interface configuration mode, use the interface command in global configuration mode. This command has been modified for use with the channelized ISE line cards.

To select a channelized interface that has been configured with SONET framing:

interface [POS | serial] slot/port:start-channel-number

To select a channelized interface that has been configured with SDH framing and AU-3 mapping:

interface [POS | serial] slot/port:start-AU3-number

To select a channelized POS interface that has been configured with SDH framing and AU-4 mapping:

interface POS slot/port:start-AU4-number

To select a channelized serial interface that has been configured with SDH framing and AU-4 mapping:

interface serial slot/port.start-AU4-number:VC3-number

Syntax Description

POS

Indicates a POS interface.

serial

Indicates a serial interface.

slot

Specifies the chassis slot where the line card is installed. Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for slot and port information.

port

Specifies the physical port of the interface. Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for slot and port information.

start-channel-number

Specifies the interface (channel) number of an interface with SONET framing.

start-AU3-number

Specifies the interface (channel) number of an interface with SDH AU-3 framing.

start-AU4-number

Specifies the interface (channel) number of an interface with SDH AU-4 framing.

VC3-number

Specifies the VC-3 number for the serial interface.


Defaults

No interface is specified.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

11.2

This command was introduced.

12.0(19)S

This command was modified to include support for ISE line card channelized interfaces.


Usage Guidelines

This command does not have a no form.

Examples

The following example selects a channelized interface configured with SONET framing:

Router(config)# interface POS 5/3:1
Router(config-if)# 

The following example selects a channelized interface configured with SDH framing and AU-3 mapping.

Router(config)# interface POS 4/2:1
Router(config-if)# 

The following example selects a POS channelized interface configured with SDH framing and AU-4 mapping.

Router(config)# interface POS 3/1:2
Router(config-if)# 

The following example selects a serial channelized interface configured with SDH framing and AU-4 mapping.

Router(config)# interface serial 5/2.1:1
Router(config-if)#  

Related Commands

Command
Description

interface POS slot/port

Selects an interface for the concatenated ISE line cards.


loopback

To place a channelized interface in loopback mode, use the loopback command in interface configuration mode. This command has been modified for use with the channelized interfaces in the ISE line cards for the Cisco 12000 series Internet routers. To disable loopbacks, use the no form of this command.

To place a SONET channelized interface in loopback mode:

loopback [internal | network]

no loopback

To place a DS-3 channelized serial interface in loopback mode:

loopback [local | network | remote]

no loopback

To place an E3 channelized serial interface in loopback mode:

loopback [local | network]

no loopback

Syntax Description

internal

Specifies a local loopback on a SONET channelized interface.

Note On Internal ("Local") Loopbacks in the Channelized Interface

The internal or "local" loopback at the channelized interface level is not a true loopback; the interface is forced to an "up" state so that it can be pinged. For this reason, the following restrictions apply for interfaces in internal ("local") loopback:

Interface counters do not increment.

BERT tests will not function (BERT traffic cannot be passed on this type of loopback).

Keepalives must be disabled with the command no keepalive.

The interface in internal/local loopback should not on the same subnet as any other interfaces on the router.

local

Specifies a local loopback on a DS-3 or E3 serial channelized interface. See the previous description for internal.

network

Specifies a network loopback. Loops the data back toward the network. Only data belonging to the interface is returned to the far-end.

remote

Requests that the remote end be put into network loopback so that data transmitted by the near-end can be looped back.


Defaults

Loopbacks are disabled by default.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

10.0

This command was introduced.

12.0(19)S

The loopback command was modified for use with the ISE line cards in the Cisco 12000 series Internet router.


Usage Guidelines

See Related Documents for titles of Cisco Systems publications that contain additional information on the use of loopback diagnostics.

Examples

The following example places a serial interface in remote loopback mode:

Router(config)# interface serial 5/2.1:1

Router(config-if)# loopback remote

Related Commands

Command
Description

loopback [internal | line]

This command is used to place controllers and concatenated interfaces in loopback mode.


show controller

To display the configuration settings for a controller or interface in a channelized ISE line card, use the show controller command in EXEC configuration mode. This command does not have a no form.

The following command is used to display information for the fiber port controller.

show controller slot/port

Table 21 shows the commands used to display information for channelized interfaces.

Table 21 show controller Commands for Channelized ISE Interfaces

Interface Type
Show Controller Command

SONET framing
POS and serial interfaces

show controller sonet slot/port:sts1-number [details | bert]

SDH framing, AU-3 mapping
POS and serial interfaces

show controller sonet slot/port:AU3-number [details | bert]

SDH framing, AU-4 mapping
POS interfaces

show controller sonet slot/port:AU4-number [details | bert]

SDH framing, AU-4 mapping
serial interfaces

show controller sonet slot/port.AU4-number:vc3-number [details | bert]


Syntax Description

slot

Backplane slot number.

port

Port number of the controller.

sts1-number

Beginning SONET channel number that defines the interface.

AU3-number

Beginning SDH-AU3 channel number that defines the interface.

AU4-number

Beginning channel number that defines a POS interface in SDH framing with AU-4 mapping.

vc3-number

VC-3 number that defines a serial interface in SDH framing with AU-4 mapping.

details

Displays all available configuration details.

bert

Displays information on BERT (bit error rate testing).


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

11.2

This command was introduced.

12.0(19)S

This command was modified to support the channelized ISE line cards.


Usage Guidelines

Enter the show controller slot/port command to display configuration information for a fiber port controller.

To display configuration information for a channelized interface, enter the appropriate command as shown in Table 21.

Examples

The following example displays configuration information for the fiber port controller including framing, clock source and alarms.

Router# show control sonet 3/1
SONET3/1
 Current state of the controller is up
 Framing is SONET
 Clock source is INTERNAL, Loopback is NONE

SECTION
  LOF = 0          LOS    = 0                            BIP(B1) = 0
LINE
  AIS = 0          RDI    = 0          FEBE = 147        BIP(B2) = 0

Active Defects: None
Active Alarms:  None
Alarm reporting enabled for: SF SLOS SLOF B1-TCA B2-TCA B3-TCA

APS
  COAPS = 0          PSBF = 0
  State: PSBF_state = False
  ais_shut = FALSE
  Rx(K1/K2): 00/00
BER thresholds:  SF = 10e-3  SD = 10e-6
TCA thresholds:  B1 = 10e-6  B2 = 10e-6


Verifying the Configuration for a Serial Interface with SDH Framing and AU-4 Mapping

The following example shows the configuration of a serial interface for a serial interface configured with SDH framing and AU-4 mapping.

router# show controller sonet 3/0.1:1 details 
Serial3/0.1:1
Channelization: activated.
PATH
  AIS = 0          RDI    = 0          FEBE = 0          BIP(B3) = 0
  LOP = 0          NEWPTR = 0          PSE  = 0          NSE     = 0
Active Defects:None
Active Alarms: None
Alarm reporting enabled for:PLOP B3-TCA 
S1S0 = 02, C2 = 04
PATH TRACE BUFFER :STABLE 
  Path trace :MFR2.Ser3/0.1:1
4D 46 52 32 2E 53 65 72  33 2F 30 2E 31 3A 31       MFR2.Ser3/0.1:1
BER thresholds: B3 = 10e-6
Controller SONET 3/0, interface Serial3/0.1:1 (E3 channel 1)
 cdb = 0x52AD7B58, base_hwidb = 0x528049E0, chn_hwidb = 0x52811220
 ssb = 0x5371F124, ds = 0x536E5BA8
 Line state is up
  rxLOS inactive, rxLOF inactive, rxAIS inactive
  txAIS inactive, rxRAI inactive, txRAI inactive
 Current configurable parameter settings:
  Loopback is none
  DSU mode is cisco, DSU bandwidth limit is 34010 Kbps
  National bit is 0
  Payload scrambling is disabled, CRC is 16
  Bert pattern is disabled, Bert interval is 0
  Transmitter delay is 0, Encapsulation is HDLC, Invert data is disabled
  MTU is 4470
 Incoming far end requests:
  0 Total requests
  0 Loopback requests,  0 No loopback requests
  0 Full rate requests, 0 No full rate requests
  0 Rejected requests,  0 Unknown requests
 MIB information:
  Data in current interval (58 seconds elapsed):
   0 Line Code Violations, 0 P-bit Coding Violations
   0 C-bit Coding Violations
   0 P-bit Err Secs, 0 P-bit Sev Err Secs
   0 Sev Err Framing Secs, 0 Unavailable Secs
   0 Line Errored Secs, 0 C-bit Errored Secs, 0 C-bit Sev Err Secs
  Total Data (less than 1 interval collected):
  No alarms detected.

show controller sysclock

To display the status of the system clock, use the show controller sysclock command in EXEC mode. This command does not have a no form.

show controller sysclock slot

Syntax Description

slot

Backplane slot where the line card is installed.


Defaults

No default behavior or values.

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(19)S

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Use this command to verify the configuration and status of the system clock (sysclock) for an ISE line card.

Examples

The following example displays the status and configuration of the system clock for the line card in slot 5.

Router# show controller sysclock 5
SYSCLOCK 5
    Hardware version      : 4
    Clock mode            : manual internal
    Clock primary source  : port 0,up
    Clock secondary source: port 1,up
    PLL status            : up
    Current clock source  : internal slot

Related Commands

Command
Description

controller sysclock slot

Selects the slot of the ISE line card to configure the system clock.

clock redundancy mode auto

Sets the system clock selection for a line card to auto mode.

clock redundancy mode manual internal

Sets the system clock for a line card to internal mode.

clock source

Selects the ports for the "primary" and "secondary" system clock sources when the ISE line card is configured in "auto" mode.



Glossary

ACEAccess Control Entry (element of an ACL).

ACL Access Control List. Access lists filter network traffic by controlling whether routed packets are forwarded or blocked at the router's interfaces. The router examines each packet to determine whether to forward or drop the packet, based on the criteria specified within the access lists. See also EACL.

ADMAdd Drop Multiplexer. A multiplexer capable of extracting lower-rate signals from, and inserting lower-rate signals into, a higher-rate multiplexed signal without completely demultiplexing the signal.

ANSIAmerican National Standards Institute.

APSautomatic protection switching. SONET switching mechanism that routes traffic from working lines to protect them in case of a line card failure or fiber cut.

ASAutonomous System. A group of routers under a common administration.

AU-4—Administrative Unit 4.

AU-3—Administrative Unit 3.

AUG—Administrative Unit Group.

BER—Bit Error Rate.

BERT—Bit Error Rate Test. Bit error rate is the probability that a bit error could occur on any given bit on a line.

CAR Committed Access Rate. A Cisco IOS software feature that allows a stream of traffic to be rate limited and given a user-specified priority.

CDPCisco Discovery Protocol.

CEF—Cisco Express Forwarding. Layer 3 switching technology. CEF can also refer to central CEF mode, one of the two modes of CEF operation that enables a route processor to perform express forwarding.

COS—Class of Service: the process of treating one set of traffic differently from another set of traffic.

CRC—Cyclic Redundancy Check. A technique for using overhead bits to detect transmission errors.

DACS—Digital Access and Crossconnect System. AT&T's term for a digital cross connect system.

dCEF—Distributed Cisco Express Forwarding. One of two modes of CEF operation that enables line cards to perform the express forwarding between port adapters.

DE—Discard Eligibility: a bit in the Frame Relay header.

Dedicated Line—Communications line that is indefinitely reserved for transmissions, rather than switched as transmission is required.

DLCI— Data Link Connection Identifier. The ID on a packet which identifies it as belonging to a particular Frame Relay virtual circuit. In Frame Relay, multiple logical channels are multiplexed over a single physical channel. The DLCI says which of these logical channels a particular data frame belongs to.

DS1—Digital Signal Level 1. A U.S. standard for high-speed data transmission over a T1 line at a data rate of 1.544 megabits per second (Mbps).

DS3—Digital Signal Level 3. A U.S. standard for high-speed data transmission over a T3 line at a data rate of 44.736 Mbps.

DSU—Data Service Unit. Part of the customer premises equipment used to interface to a digital circuit. A DSU is effectively a high-speed modem (with data rates of 34 or 45 Mbps).

E3— Wide-area digital transmission scheme used predominantly in Europe that carries data at a rate of 34.368 Mbps. E3 lines can be leased for private use from common carriers. See also DS-3.

ELMI—Enhanced Local Management Interface.

Extended ACL—Extended Access Control Lists (xACL). xACL provides an extended form of ACLs with more criteria for classifying traffic based on a combination of TCP/IP header fields.

FCS—Frame Check Sequence.

FIB—Forwarding Information Base. A component of CEF. FIB is the lookup table the router uses to make destination-based switching decisions during CEF operation. It maintains a mirror image of the forwarding information stored in the IP routing table.

HDLC—High-level Data Link Control. Bit-oriented synchronous data link layer protocol developed by ISO. HDLC specifies a data encapsulation method on synchronous serial links using frame characters and checksums.

ICMP—Internet Control Message Protocol.

IGMP—Internet Group Management Protocol.

IP— Internet Protocol.

IPv4— Internet Protocol version 4.

ITU—International Telecommunications Union.

kbps—kilobytes per second.

Leased Line—Transmission line reserved by a communications carrier for the private use of a customer. A leased line is a type of dedicated line.

LMI—Local Management Interface.

MIB—Management Information Base: a collection of readable (and sometimes writable) variables inside the router relating to a certain functional area (such as SONET or BGP).

MPLS—Multiprotocol Label Switching: a mechanism whereby packets are forwarded by reading and replacing a fixed length "label" which is attached to the packet.

MSP—multiplexed switching protection. SDH switching mechanism that routes traffic from working lines to protect them in case of a line card failure or fiber cut. Similar to APS used in SONET switching.

MTU—Maximum Transmission Unit. MTU defines the largest size of packets that an interface can transmit without needing to fragment. IP packets larger than the MTU must go through IP fragmentation procedures.

NVRAM—nonvolatile random access memory.

OC-nOptical Carrier. Series of physical protocols (such as OC-1, OC-2 and OC-3) defined for SONET optical signal transmissions. OC signal levels put STS frames onto multi-mode fiber-optic line at a variety of speeds. The base rate is 51.84 Mbps (OC-1); each signal level thereafter operates at a speed divisible by that number (thus, OC-3 runs at 155.52 Mbps).

PDH—Plesiochronous Digital Hierarchy. PDH is the conventional multiplexing technology for network transmission systems. The transmitter adds dummy information bits to allow multiple 2-Mbit/s channels to be bit interleaved. The receiver discards these bits after the signals have been demultiplexed.

PIM—Protocol-Independent Multicast.

POS—Packet over SONET. Enables routers to send native IP packets directly over SONET/SDH frames.

PPP—Point-to-Point Protocol.

Precedence—A 3-bit field within the TOS bits.

PVC—Permanent Virtual Circuit.

QOS—Quality Of Service. QOS is a set of parameters that describe a flow of data, such as: guaranteed bandwidth, delay, and delivery guarantee.

QPPB—QoS policy Propagation.

RED—Random Early Discard: an algorithm where packets are dropped from a queue in order to provide better overall TCP performance under congested conditions.

RFP—Reverse Path Forwarding.

SDH—Synchronous Digital Hierarchy. An international digital telecommunications network hierarchy which standardizes transmission around the bit rate of 51.84 megabits per second, which is also called STS-1. Multiples of this bit rate comprise higher bit rate streams. Thus STS-3 is 3 times STS-1, STS-12 is 12 times STS-1, and so on. SONET equipment is generally used in North America and SDH equipment is generally used everywhere else in the world.

SNMP—Simple Network Management Protocol. Internet standard for remote management of network devices.

SONET—Synchronous Optical NETwork. A broadband networking standard based on point-to-point optical fibre networks. SONET carries circuit-switched data in frames at speeds in multiples of 51.84 megabits per second (Mbps). OC-1 is 51.84 Mbps. OC-3 is 3 times OC-1, OC-12 is 12 times OC-1, and so on. SONET is the American version of SDH.

STM—Synchronous Transport Module. The frame format used by SDH, with STM-1 being the base level signal at 155.52 Mbps. A STM-1 frame can be carried in an OC-3 signal. Multiple lower level signals can be multiplexed together to form higher level signals. For example, four STM-1 signals multiplexed together will form a STM-4 signal. STM-1 is the SDH equivalent of a SONET STS-3 frame.

STM-N—Synchronous Transport Module-Level N (N x 155.52 Mbps: N = 1, 4, 16, or 64).

STS—Synchronous Transport Signal. The frame format used by SONET, with STS-1 being the base level signal at 51.84 Mbps. A STS-1 frame can be carried in an OC-1 signal. Faster SONET rates are defined as STS-n, where n is a multiple of 51.84 Mbps. For example, three STS-1 signals can be multiplexed together to form a STS-3 signal. A STS-3 SONET frame is the equivalent of a STM-1 SDH frame.

STS-N—Synchronous Transport Signal-Level N (N x 51.84 Mbps: N = 1, 3, 12, 48, or 192).

T1—A digital carrier facility used to transmit a DS1 formatted digital stream at 1.544 Mbps.

T3—A digital carrier facility used to transmit a DS3 formatted digital stream at 44.746 Mbps.

TCP—Transport Control Protocol.

TE—Traffic Engineering.

TOS—Type of Service. 8 bits in the IP header governing Quality of Service.

TU-n—Tributary Unit-level n (n=11, 12, 2, or 3).

TUG—Tributary Unit Group.

TUG-n—Tributary Unit Group n (n=2 or 3).

UDP—User Datagram Protocol. Connectionless transport layer protocol in the TCP/IP protocol stack. UDP is a simple protocol that exchanges datagrams without acknowledgments or guaranteed delivery, requiring that error processing and retransmission be handled by other protocols. UDP is defined in RFC 768.

UNI—User-Network Interface. An interoperability standard for the interface between the routers located in a private network and the switches located within the public carrier networks.

VC—Virtual Circuit.

VC-4—Virtual Container-4.

VC-3—Virtual Container-3.

VPN—Virtual Private Network.

WRED—Weighted RED. A way of using multiple sets of RED parameters to achieve COS for various traffic types into one queue.

xACL—See Extended ACL.