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NSF/SSO--MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

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NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Table Of Contents

NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Content

Prerequisites for NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Restrictions for NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Information About NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Overview of MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Benefits of MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

How to Configure NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Enabling RSVP Graceful Restart Globally

Enabling RSVP Graceful Restart on an Interface

Setting a DSCP Value

Setting a Value to Control the Hello Refresh Interval

Setting a Value to Control the Missed Refresh Limit

Verifying the RSVP Graceful Restart Configuration

Configuration Examples for NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Configuring NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart: Example

Verifying the NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart Configuration: Example

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance

Command Reference

clear ip rsvp high-availability counters

debug ip rsvp high-availability

debug ip rsvp sso

debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

show ip rsvp counters

show ip rsvp counters state teardown

show ip rsvp hello

show ip rsvp hello client lsp detail

show ip rsvp hello client lsp summary

show ip rsvp hello client neighbor detail

show ip rsvp hello client neighbor summary

show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart

show ip rsvp hello instance detail

show ip rsvp hello instance summary

show ip rsvp high-availability counters

show ip rsvp high-availability database

show ip rsvp high-availability summary

Feature Information for NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Glossary


NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart


First Published: August 2, 2004
Last Updated: June 29, 2007

The NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart feature allows a Route Processor (RP) to recover from disruption in control plane service without losing its Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) forwarding state.

Cisco nonstop forwarding (NSF) with stateful switchover (SSO) provides continuous packet forwarding, even during a network processor hardware or software failure. In a redundant system, the secondary processor recovers control plane service during a critical failure in the primary processor. SSO synchronizes the network state information between the primary and the secondary processor.

Finding Feature Information in This Module

Your Cisco IOS software release may not support all of the features documented in this module. To reach links to specific feature documentation in this module and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, use the "Feature Information for NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart" section.

Finding Support Information for Platforms and Cisco IOS and Catalyst OS Software Images

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco IOS and Catalyst OS software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Content

Prerequisites for NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Restrictions for NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Information About NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

How to Configure NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Configuration Examples for NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Additional References

Command Reference

Feature Information for NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Glossary

Prerequisites for NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Configure Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) graceful restart in full mode.

Configure RSVP graceful restart on all interfaces of the neighbor that you want to be restart-capable.

Configure the redundancy mode as SSO. See the Stateful Switchover feature module for more information.

Enable NSF on the routing protocols running among the provider routers (P), provider edge (PE) routers, and customer edge (CE) routers. The routing protocols are as follows:

Border Gateway Protocol (BGP)

Open Shortest Path First (OSPF)

Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS)

See the Cisco Nonstop Forwarding feature module for more information.

Enable MPLS.

Configure traffic engineering (TE).

Restrictions for NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

RSVP graceful restart supports node failure only.

Unnumbered interfaces are not supported.

You cannot enable RSVP fast reroute (FRR) hello messages and RSVP graceful restart on the same router.

Configure this feature on Cisco 7600 series routers with dual RPs only.

You cannot enable primary one-hop autotunnels, backup autotunnels, or autotunnel mesh groups on a router that is also configured with SSO and Route Processor Redundancy Plus (RPR+). This restriction does not prevent an MPLS TE tunnel that is automatically configured by TE autotunnel from being successfully recovered if any midpoint router along the label-switched path (LSP) of the router experiences an SSO.

MPLS TE LSPs that are fast reroutable cannot be successfully recovered if the LSPs are FRR active and the Point of Local Repair (PLR) router experiences an SSO.

When you configure RSVP graceful restart, you must use the neighbor's interface IP address.

Information About NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

To configure the NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart feature, you should understand the following concepts:

Overview of MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Benefits of MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Overview of MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

RSVP graceful restart allows RSVP TE-enabled nodes to recover gracefully following a node failure in the network such that the RSVP state after the failure is restored as quickly as possible. The node failure may be completely transparent to other nodes in the network.

RSVP graceful restart preserves the label values and forwarding information and works with third-party or Cisco routers seamlessly.

RSVP graceful restart depends on RSVP hello messages to detect that a neighbor went down. Hello messages include Hello Request or Hello Acknowledgment (ACK) objects between two neighbors.

As shown in Figure 1, the RSVP graceful restart extension to these messages adds an object called Hello Restart_Cap, which tells neighbors that a node may be capable of recovering if a failure occurs.

Figure 1 How RSVP Graceful Restart Works

The Hello Restart_Cap object has two values: the restart time, which is the sender's time to restart the RSVP_TE component and exchange hello messages after a failure; and the recovery time, which is the desired time that the sender wants the receiver to synchronize the RSVP and MPLS databases.

In Figure 1, RSVP graceful restart help neighbor support is enabled on Routers 1 and 3 so that they can help a neighbor recover after a failure, but they cannot perform self recovery. Router 2 has full SSO help support enabled, meaning it can perform self recovery after a failure or help its neighbor to recover. Router 2 has two RPs, one that is active and one that is standby (backup). A TE LSP is signaled from Router 1 to Router 4.

Router 2 performs checkpointing; that is, it copies state information from the active RP to the standby RP, thereby ensuring that the standby RP has the latest information. If an active RP fails, the standby RP can take over.

Routers 2 and 3 exchange periodic graceful restart hello messages every 10,000 milliseconds (ms) (10 seconds), and so do Routers 2 and 1 and Routers 3 and 4. Assume that Router 2 advertises its restart time = 60,000 ms (60 seconds) and its recovery time = 60,000 ms (60 seconds) as shown in the following example:

23:33:36: Outgoing Hello:
23:33:36:   version:1 flags:0000 cksum:883C ttl:255 reserved:0 length:32
23:33:36:  HELLO                type HELLO REQUEST length 12:
23:33:36:   Src_Instance: 0x6EDA8BD7, Dst_Instance: 0x00000000
23:33:36:  RESTART_CAP          type 1 length 12:
23:33:36:   Restart_Time: 0x0000EA60, Recovery_Time: 0x0000EA60

Router 3 records this into its database. Also, both neighbors maintain the neighbor status as UP. However, Router 3's control plane fails at some point (for example, a primary RP failure). As a result, RSVP and TE lose their signaling information and states although data packets continue to be forwarded by the line cards.

When Router 3 declares communication with Router 2 lost, Router 3 starts the restart time to wait for the duration advertised in Router 2's restart time previously recorded (60 seconds). Routers 1 and 2 suppress all RSVP messages to Router 3 except hellos. Router 3 keeps sending the RSVP PATH and RESV refresh messages to Routers 4 and 5 so that they do not expire the state for the LSP; however, Routers 1 and 3 suppress these messages for Router 2.

When Routers 1 and 3 receive the hello message from Router 2, Routers 1 and 3 check the recovery time value in the message. If the recovery time is 0, Router 3 knows that Router 2 was not able to preserve its forwarding information, and Routers 1 and 3 delete all RSVP state that they had with Router 2.

If the recovery time is greater than 0, Router 1 sends Router 2 PATH messages for each LSP that it had previously sent through Router 2. If these messages were previously refreshed in summary messages, they are sent individually during the recovery time. Each of these PATH messages includes a Recovery_Label object containing the label value received from Router 2 before the failure.

When Router 3 receives a PATH message from Router 2, Router 3 sends a RESV message upstream. However, Router 3 suppresses the RESV message until it receives a PATH message. When Router 2 receives the RESV message, it installs the RSVP state and reprograms the forwarding entry for the LSP.

Benefits of MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

State Information Recovery

RSVP graceful restart allows a node to perform self recovery or to help its neighbor recover state information when there is an RP failure or the device has undergone an SSO.

Session Information Recovery

RSVP graceful restart allows session information recovery with minimal disruption to the network.

Increased Availability of Network Services

A node can perform a graceful restart to help itself or a neighbor recover its state by keeping the label bindings and state information, thereby providing a faster recovery of the failed node and not affecting currently forwarded traffic.

How to Configure NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

This section contains the following procedures:

Enabling RSVP Graceful Restart Globally (required)

Enabling RSVP Graceful Restart on an Interface (required)

Setting a DSCP Value (optional)

Setting a Value to Control the Hello Refresh Interval (optional)

Setting a Value to Control the Missed Refresh Limit (optional)

Verifying the RSVP Graceful Restart Configuration (optional)

Enabling RSVP Graceful Restart Globally

Perform this task to enable RSVP graceful restart globally.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode {help-neighbor | full}

4. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode (help-neighbor | full)

Example:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode full

Enables RSVP TE graceful restart capability on an RP.

Enter the help-neighbor keyword to enable a neighboring router to restart after a failure.

Enter the full keyword to enable a router to perform self recovery or to help a neighbor recover after a failure.

Step 4 

exit

Example:

Router(config)# exit

(Optional) Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Enabling RSVP Graceful Restart on an Interface

Perform this task to enable RSVP graceful restart on an interface.


Note You must repeat this procedure for each of the neighbor router's interfaces.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface type number

4. Repeat Step 3 as needed to configure additional interfaces.

5. ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor ip-address

6. Repeat Step 5 as needed to configure additional IP addresses on a neighbor router's interfaces.

7. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface type number

Example:

Router(config)# interface POS 1/0/0

Configures the interface type and number and enters interface configuration mode.

Step 4 

Repeat Step 3 as needed to configure additional interfaces.

(Optional) Configures additional interfaces.

Step 5 

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor ip-address

Example:

Router(config-if)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor 10.0.0.0

Enables support for RSVP graceful restart on routers helping their neighbors recover TE tunnels following SSO.

Note The IP address must be that of the neighbor's interface.

Step 6 

Repeat Step 5 as needed to configure additional IP addresses on a neighbor router's interfaces.

(Optional) Configures additional IP addresses on a neighbor router's interfaces.

Step 7 

exit

Example:

Router(config-if)# exit

(Optional) Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Setting a DSCP Value

Perform this task to set a differentiated services code point (DSCP) value.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp num

4. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp num

Example:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp 30

Sets a DSCP value on a router with RSVP graceful restart enabled.

Step 4 

exit

Example:

Router(config)# exit

(Optional) Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Setting a Value to Control the Hello Refresh Interval

Perform this task to set a value to control the hello refresh interval.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval interval-value

4. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval interval-value

Example:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval 5000

Sets the value to control the request interval in graceful restart hello messages. This interval represents the frequency at which RSVP hello messages are sent to a neighbor; for example, one hello message is sent per each interval.

Note If you change the default value for this command and you also changed the RSVP refresh interval using the ip rsvp signalling refresh interval command, ensure that the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval command is less than the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello refresh interval command. Otherwise, some or all of the label-switched paths (LSPs) may not be recovered after an SSO has occurred.

Step 4 

exit

Example:

Router(config)# exit

(Optional) Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Setting a Value to Control the Missed Refresh Limit

Perform this task to set a value to control the missed refresh limit.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses msg-count

4. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses msg-count

Example:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses 5

Specifies how many sequential RSVP TE graceful restart hello acknowledgments (ACKs) a node can miss before the node considers communication with its neighbor lost.

Note If you change the default value for this command and you are also using the ip rsvp signalling hello refresh misses command, ensure that the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses command is less than the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello refresh misses command. Otherwise, some or all of the LSPs may not be recovered after an SSO has occurred.

Step 4 

exit

Example:

Router(config)# exit

(Optional) Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Verifying the RSVP Graceful Restart Configuration

Perform this task to verify the RSVP graceful restart configuration.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart

3. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

(Optional) Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart

Example:

Router# show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart

Displays information about the status of RSVP graceful restart and related parameters.

Step 3 

exit

Example:

Router# exit

(Optional) Returns to user EXEC mode.

Configuration Examples for NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

This section provides the following configuration examples:

Configuring NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart: Example

Verifying the NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart Configuration: Example

Configuring NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart: Example

In the following example, RSVP graceful restart is enabled globally and on a neighbor router's interfaces as shown in Figure 2. Related parameters, including a DSCP value, a refresh interval, and a missed refresh limit are set.

Figure 2 Sample Network Configuration

enable
configure terminal
ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode full
interface POS 1/0/0
 ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor 10.0.0.1 
 ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor 10.0.0.2 
 exit
ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp 30
ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval 50000
ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses 5 
exit

Verifying the NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart Configuration: Example

The following example verifies the status of RSVP graceful restart and the configured parameters:

Router# show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart

Graceful Restart: Enabled (full mode)
  Refresh interval: 10000 msecs
  Refresh misses: 4
  DSCP:0x30
  Advertised restart time: 30000 msecs
  Advertised recovery time: 120000 msecs
  Maximum wait for recovery: 3600000 msecs

Additional References

The following sections provide references related to the NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart feature.

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

RSVP commands: complete command syntax, command mode, defaults, usage guidelines, and examples

Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Command Reference, Release 12.2SX

Quality of service (QoS) features including signaling, classification, and congestion management

Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide, Release 12.4

Stateful switchover

Stateful Switchover feature module

Cisco nonstop forwarding

Cisco Nonstop Forwarding feature module

Information on stateful switchover, Cisco nonstop forwarding, graceful restart

NSF/SSO - MPLS LDP and LDP Graceful Restart feature module

Hello messages for state timeout

MPLS Traffic Engineering—RSVP Hello State Timer feature module


Standards

Standards
Title

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature.


MIBs

MIBs
MIBs Link

No new or modified MIBS are supported by this feature, and support for existing MIBs has not been modified by this feature.

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs


RFCs

RFCs
Title

RFC 3209

RSVP-TE: Extensions to RSVP for LSP Tunnels

RFC 3473

Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS) Signaling Resource Reservation Protocol-Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE) Extensions

RFC 4558

Node-ID Based Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) Hello: A Clarification Statement


Technical Assistance

Description
Link

The Cisco Support website provides extensive online resources, including documentation and tools for troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with Cisco products and technologies.

To receive security and technical information about your products, you can subscribe to various services, such as the Product Alert Tool (accessed from Field Notices), the Cisco Technical Services Newsletter, and Really Simple Syndication (RSS) Feeds.

Access to most tools on the Cisco Support website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport


Command Reference

This section documents only commands that are new or modified.

clear ip rsvp high-availability counters

debug ip rsvp high-availability

debug ip rsvp sso

debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

show ip rsvp counters

show ip rsvp counters state teardown

show ip rsvp hello

show ip rsvp hello client lsp detail

show ip rsvp hello client lsp summary

show ip rsvp hello client neighbor detail

show ip rsvp hello client neighbor summary

show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart

show ip rsvp hello instance detail

show ip rsvp hello instance summary

show ip rsvp high-availability counters

show ip rsvp high-availability database

show ip rsvp high-availability summary

clear ip rsvp high-availability counters

To clear (set to zero) the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) high availability (HA) counters that are being maintained by a Route Processor (RP), use the clear ip rsvp high-availability counters command in privileged EXEC mode.

clear ip rsvp high-availability counters

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

No counters are cleared until you issue the command.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRA

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRB

Support for In-Service Software Upgrade (ISSU) was added.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

Use the clear ip rsvp high-availability counters command to clear (set to zero) the HA counters, which include state, ISSU, resource failures, and historical information.

Examples

The following example clears all the HA information currently being maintained by the RP:

Router# clear ip rsvp high-availability counters

Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip rsvp high-availability counters

Displays the RSVP-TE HA counters that are being maintained by an RP.


debug ip rsvp high-availability

To display debugging output for Resource Reservation Protocol traffic engineering (RSVP-TE) high availability (HA) activities that improve the accessibility of network resources, use the debug ip rsvp high-availability command in privileged EXEC mode. To disable debugging output, use the no form of this command.

debug ip rsvp high-availability {all | database | errors | events | fsm | issu | messages}

no debug ip rsvp high-availability {all | database | errors | events | fsm | issu | messages}

Syntax Description

all

Displays debugging output for all RSVP-TE HA categories except for the dumping of messages.

database

Displays information about read and write operations to and from the checkpointed database during the RSVP-TE HA activities.

errors

Displays errors encountered by RSVP-TE during HA activities.

events

Displays significant RSVP-TE stateful switchover (SSO) events during RSVP-TE HA activities, such as:

RSVP-TE process events

RSVP-TE Route Processor (RP) state (active, standby, and recovery) changes

Recovery period beginning and end

Redundant Facility (RF) events handled by RSVP-TE

fsm

Displays significant events for the RSVP-TE checkpointed database finite state machine (fsm) during the RSVP-TE HA activities.

issu

Displays information about RSVP-TE In-Service Software Upgrade (ISSU) activity.

messages

Displays information about Checkpointing Facility (CF) messages sent by RSVP-TE between the active RP and the standby RP.


Command Default

Debugging is not enabled.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRA

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRB

Support for ISSU was added.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

This command displays information about RSVP-TE activities, before and after SSO, that improve the availability of network resources and services.

Examples

The following example is sample output from the debug ip rsvp high-availability all command, which turns on debugging for IP RSVP-TE HA events, messages, database, errors, fsm, and ISSU:

Router# debug ip rsvp high-availability all

RSVP HA all debugging is on 

Router# show debug        <---- This command displays the debugging that is enabled.

IP RSVP HA debugging is on for: 
   events
   messages
   database
   errors
   fsm
   issu

This sample debugging output is displayed as an SSO recovery begins on the standby router in the process of the standby router becoming active.


Note The prefix in the debug output is composed of label switched path (LSP) 5-tuples in the following format: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]. The 10.0.0.3 represents the source address, the 61 represents the LSP ID, the 10.0.0.9 represents the tunnel destination (tunnel tail), the10 represents the tunnel ID, and the [10.0.0.3] represents the extended tunnel ID.


*May 12 19:46:14.267: RSVP-HA: session 
65.39.97.4_18698[0.0.0.0]:rsvp_ha_read_lsp_head_info: Read LSP Head info: tun_id: 10
*May 12 19:46:14.267: RSVP-HA: session 10.0.0.1_10[0.0.0.0]: rsvp_ha_db_entry_find: 
lsp_head entry found
*May 12 19:46:14.267: rsvp_ha_read_lsp_head_info: entry found
*May 12 19:46:14.267: RSVP-HA:rsvp_ha_read_lsp_head_info: Read LSP Head info: tun_id: 10
*May 12 19:46:14.267: RSVP-HA: session 10.221.123.48_10[0.0.0.0]: rsvp_ha_db_entry_find: 
lsp_head entry found
*May 12 19:46:14.267: rsvp_ha_read_lsp_head_info: entry found
*May 12 19:46:15.995: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by console
*May 12 19:46:20.803: RSVP-HA: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: rsvp_ha_db_entry_find: 
lsp entry found
*May 12 19:46:20.803: rsvp_ha_read_generic_info: lsp entry found
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: session 10.0.0.9_10[0.0.0.0]:rsvp_ha_write_generic_info: 
Writing lsp_head info
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: session 10.0.0.9_10[0.0.0.0]: rsvp_ha_db_entry_find: 
lsp_head entry not found
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: session 10.0.0.9_10[0.0.0.0]: 
rsvp_ha_handle_wr_entry_not_found: 
entry not found, type =lsp_head, action: Add
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: session 10.0.0.9_10[0.0.0.0]: rsvp_ha_db_entry_create: 
Created lsp_head entry
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: session 10.0.0.9_10[0.0.0.0]:rsvp_ha_set_entry_state: None 
-> Send-Pending
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: session 10.0.0.9_10[0.0.0.0]: rsvp_ha_db_wavl_entry_insert: 
Inserted entry into lsp_head Write DB, Send_Pending tree
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: session 
10.0.0.9_10[0.0.0.0]:rsvp_ha_fsm_wr_event_add_entry: add lsp_head entry to Write DB
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: 
rsvp_ha_write_generic_info: Writing lsp info
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: rsvp_ha_db_entry_find: 
lsp entry not found
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: 
rsvp_ha_handle_wr_entry_not_found: entry not found, type =lsp, action: Add
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: 
rsvp_ha_db_entry_create: Created lsp entry
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA:10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: 
rsvp_ha_set_entry_state: None -> Send-Pending
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: 
rsvp_ha_db_wavl_entry_insert: Inserted entry into lsp Write DB, Send_Pending tree
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: 
rsvp_ha_fsm_wr_event_add_entry: add lsp entry to Write DB
*May 12 19:46:20.807: rsvp_ha_rd_remove_lsp_head_info: Event RD: remove lsp_head_info
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: session 10.27.90.140_10[0.0.0.0]:  
rsvp_ha_db_entry_find: lsp_head entry found
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: session 10.0.0.9_10[0.0.0.0]: rsvp_ha_db_wavl_entry_remove: 
Removed entry from lsp_head Read DB, Checkpointed tree
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: session 10.0.0.9_10[0.0.0.0]: rsvp_ha_db_entry_free: 
Freeing lsp_head entry
*May 12 19:46:20.807: RSVP-HA: session 10.0.0.9_10[0.0.0.0]:rsvp_ha_set_entry_state: 
Checkpointed -> None
.
.
.

The following example shows how to turn debugging off for this command:

Router# no debug ip rsvp high-availability all

RSVP HA all debugging is off

Related Commands

Command
Description

debug ip rsvp sso

Displays debugging output for RSVP signalling when the graceful restart feature is configured.

debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso

Displays debugging output for MPLS traffic engineering HA activities during the graceful switchover from an active RP to a redundant standby RP.


debug ip rsvp sso

To display debugging output for Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) signaling when the graceful restart feature is configured, use the debug ip rsvp sso command in privileged EXEC mode. To disable debugging, use the no form of this command.

debug ip rsvp sso

no debug ip rsvp sso

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

Debugging is disabled.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRA

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

This command displays debugging output from RSVP signaling during and after the Route Processor (RP) stateful switchover when system control and routing protocol execution is transferred from the active RP to the redundant standby RP. The SSO process occurs when the active router becomes unavailable, so that no interruption of network services occurs. The command displays information about the activities that RSVP performs when you configure a graceful restart, such as:

Writing checkpointing information into the write database when a new traffic engineering (TE) label switched path (LSP) is signaled on the active RP

Recovering the LSP checkpointed information from the read database after SSO

Displaying information about LSPs not recovered

Examples

The following is sample output from the debug ip rsvp sso command that was displayed during a successful SSO on the standby router as it became active:

Router# debug ip rsvp sso

RSVP sso debugging is on 

Router#

Note The prefix in the debug output is composed of LSP 5-tuples in the following format: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]. The 10.0.0.3 represents the source address, the 61 represents the LSP ID, the 10.0.0.9 represents the tunnel destination (tunnel tail), the10 represents the tunnel ID, and the [10.0.0.3] represents the extended tunnel ID.


*May 12 20:12:38.175: RSVP-HA: begin recovery, send msg to RSVP
*May 12 20:12:38.175: RSVP: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: event: new Path received 
during RSVP or IGP recovery period
*May 12 20:12:38.175: RSVP: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: 
rsvp_ha_sb_event_new_path_received: lsp_info found, attempt to recover lsp
*May 12 20:12:38.175: RSVP: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: set psb_is_recovering flag
*May 12 20:12:38.179: RSVP: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]:rsvp_ha_sb_set_path_info: 
Recovering: Set next_hop and next_idb in psb
*May 12 20:12:38.179: RSVP: 
10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]:rsvp_ha_mark_lsp_if_recoverable: LSP is recoverable 
(ERO expansion. not needed)
*May 12 20:12:38.179: RSVP-HA: rsvp_ha_sb_handle_recovery_start: Recovery period start: 
set GR recovery time.
*May 12 20:12:38.179: RSVP_HA: checkpoint hello_globals_info
*May 12 20:12:38.179: RSVP-HELLO: rsvp_ha_update_all_gr_hi: Updating all GR HIs with new 
src_instance
*May 12 20:12:38.183: RSVP: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: prevent populating output; 
LSP is recovering
*May 12 20:12:38.187: RSVP: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: prevent populating output; 
LSP is recovering
*May 12 20:12:38.939: RSVP: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: 
rsvp_ha_sb_event_new_resv_received: event: Resv for LSP received during recovery period
*May 12 20:12:38.943: RSVP: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: 
rsvp_ha_event_lsp_create_head: psb found
*May 12 20:12:38.943: RSVP: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: 
rsvp_ha_event_lsp_create_head: event: LSP created at head-end, try to checkpoint it
*May 12 20:12:38.943: RSVP: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: LSP was checkpointed
*May 12 20:12:38.943: RSVP-HA: 10.0.0.3_61->10.0.0.9_10[10.0.0.3]: 
rsvp_ha_sb_event_lsp_head_recovered: event: LSP head was recovered
*May 12 20:12:38.943: RSVP-HA: recovery period over, send msg to RSVP
*May 12 20:12:38.947: RSVP-HA: rsvp_ha_sb_handle_recovery_end: Deleting state for LSPs not 
recovered
Router#

The following example shows how to turn debugging off for this command:

Router# no debug ip rsvp sso

RSVP sso debugging is off

Related Commands

Command
Description

debug ip rsvp high-availability

Displays debugging output for RSVP-TE HA activities that improve the accessibility of network resources.

debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso

Displays debugging output for MPLS traffic engineering HA activities during the graceful switchover from an active RP to a redundant standby RP.


debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso

To display debugging output for Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) traffic engineering high availability (HA) activities during the graceful switchover from an active Route Processor (RP) to a redundant standby RP, use the debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso command in privileged EXEC mode. To disable debugging output, use the no form of this command.

debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso {auto-tunnel | errors | link-management {events | standby | recovery | checkpoint} | tunnel {events | standby | recovery}}

no debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso {auto-tunnel | errors | link-management {events | standby | recovery | checkpoint} | tunnel {events | standby | recovery}}

Syntax Description

auto-tunnel

Displays information about autotunnel activity during the MPLS traffic engineering stateful switchover (SSO) process.

errors

Displays errors encountered during the MPLS traffic engineering SSO process.

link-management

Displays information about link management activity during the MPLS traffic engineering SSO process.

events

Displays significant events that occur during the MPLS traffic engineering SSO process.

standby

Displays information about the standby behavior during the MPLS traffic engineering SSO process.

recovery

Displays information about recovery activity during the MPLS traffic engineering SSO process.

checkpoint

Display information about checkpointing activities during the MPLS traffic engineering SSO process. Checkpointing occurs when a message is sent and acknowledged.

tunnel

Displays information about tunnel activity during the MPLS traffic engineering SSO process.


Command Default

Debugging is disabled until you issue this command with one or more keywords.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRA

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

This command displays debugging output about the SSO process for MPLS traffic engineering tunnels, autotunnels, and link management systems. The SSO process occurs when the active router becomes unavailable and system control and routing protocol execution is transferred from the now inactive RP to the redundant standby RP, thus providing uninterrupted network services.

Examples

The following is sample output from the debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso command when you enabled debugging keywords to monitor the SSO process for tunnels and link management systems as the standby router becomes active:

Router# debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso link-management events

MPLS traffic-eng SSO link management events debugging is on

Router# debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso link-management recovery

MPLS traffic-eng SSO link management recovery debugging is on

Router# debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso link-management standby

MPLS traffic-eng SSO link management standby behavior debugging is on

Router# debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso link-management checkpoint

MPLS traffic-eng SSO link management checkpointed info debugging is on

Router# debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso tunnel standby

MPLS traffic-eng SSO tunnel standby behavior debugging is on

Router# debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso tunnel recovery

MPLS traffic-eng SSO tunnel head recovery debugging is on

Router# debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso tunnel events 

MPLS traffic-eng SSO events for tunnel heads debugging is on

Router# debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso errors

MPLS traffic-eng SSO errors debugging is on

Router# show debug      <-----This command displays the debugging that is enabled.

MPLS TE:
  MPLS traffic-eng SSO link management events debugging is on
  MPLS traffic-eng SSO link management recovery debugging is on
  MPLS traffic-eng SSO link management standby behavior debugging is on
  MPLS traffic-eng SSO link management checkpointed info debugging is on
  MPLS traffic-eng SSO tunnel standby behavior debugging is on
  MPLS traffic-eng SSO tunnel head recovery debugging is on
  MPLS traffic-eng SSO events for tunnel heads debugging is on
  MPLS traffic-eng SSO errors debugging is on
Router#

Standby-Router#

Following is the sample debugging output displayed during a successful SSO recovery on the standby router as it becomes active:

*May 12 20:03:15.303: RRR_HA_STATE: Told to wait for IGP convergence
*May 12 20:03:14.807: %FABRIC-SP-STDBY-5-FABRIC_MODULE_ACTIVE: The Switch Fabric Module in 
slot 5 became active.
*May 12 20:03:15.763: RRR_HA_REC: Attempting to recover last flooded info; protocol: OSPF, 
area: 0
*May 12 20:03:15.763: RRR_HA_REC: recovered ospf area 0 instance 0x48FFF240
*May 12 20:03:15.763: RRR_HA_REC: recovered system info
*May 12 20:03:15.763: RRR_HA_REC: recovered link[0] info
*May 12 20:03:15.763: RRR_HA: Recovered last flooded info for igp: OSPF, area: 0
*May 12 20:03:15.763: Pre announce tunnel 10
*May 12 20:03:15.763: TSPVIF_HA_EVENT: added Router_t10 to dest list
*May 12 20:03:15.763: TSPVIF_HA_EVENT: Completed announcement of 1 tunnel heads to IGP
*May 12 20:03:15.763: TSPVIF_HA_REC: Attempting to recover Tunnel10 after SSO
*May 12 20:03:15.763: LSP-TUNNEL-REOPT: Tunnel10 [61] set to recover
*May 12 20:03:15.763: TSPVIF_HA_REC: Recovered number hops = 5
*May 12 20:03:15.763: TSPVIF_HA_REC: recovered ospf area 0 instance 0x48FFF240
*May 12 20:03:15.763: TSPVIF_HA_REC: Recovered Hop 0: 10.0.3.1, Id: 10.0.0.3 Router Node 
(ospf) flag:0x0
*May 12 20:03:15.763: TSPVIF_HA_REC: Recovered Hop 1: 10.0.3.2, Id: 10.0.0.7 Router Node 
(ospf) flag:0x0
*May 12 20:03:15.763: TSPVIF_HA_REC: Recovered Hop 2: 10.0.6.1, Id: 10.0.0.7 Router Node 
(ospf) flag:0x0
*May 12 20:03:15.763: TSPVIF_HA_REC: Recovered Hop 3: 10.0.6.2, Id: 10.0.0.9 Router Node 
(ospf) flag:0x0
*May 12 20:03:15.763: TSPVIF_HA_REC: Recovered Hop 4: 10.0.0.9, Id: 10.0.0.9 Router Node 
(ospf) flag:0x0
*May 12 20:03:15.763: TSPVIF_HA_REC: signalling recovered setup for Tunnel10: popt 1
[61], weight 2
*May 12 20:03:15.891: TSPVIF_HA_REC: recovered Tu10 forwarding info needed by query
*May 12 20:03:15.891: TSPVIF_HA_REC:     output_idb: GigabitEthernet3/2, output_nhop: 
180.0.3.2
Standby-Router#
Router#
*May 12 20:03:25.891: TSPVIF_HA_REC: recovered Tu10 forwarding info needed by query
*May 12 20:03:25.891: TSPVIF_HA_REC:     output_idb: GigabitEthernet3/2, output_nhop: 
10.0.3.2
*May 12 20:03:35.891: TSPVIF_HA_REC: recovered Tu10 forwarding info needed by query
*May 12 20:03:35.891: TSPVIF_HA_REC:     output_idb: GigabitEthernet3/2, output_nhop: 
10.0.3.2
*May 12 20:03:35.895: RRR_HA_STATE: IGP flood prevented during IGP recovery
*May 12 20:03:38.079: LSP-TUNNEL-REOPT: Tunnel10 [61] received RESV for recovered setup
*May 12 20:03:38.079: LSP-TUNNEL-REOPT: Tunnel10 [61] removed as recovery
*May 12 20:03:38.079: TSPVIF_HA_EVENT: notifying RSVP HA to add lsp_info using key 
10.0.0.3->10.0.0.9 Tu10 [61] 10.0.0.3
*May 12 20:03:38.079: TSPVIF_HA_EVENT: updated 7600-1_t10 state; action = add; result = 
success
*May 12 20:03:38.079: TSPVIF_HA_EVENT: 7600-1_t10 fully recovered; rewrite refreshed
*May 12 20:03:38.079: TSPVIF_HA_EVENT: notifying CBTS bundle about Router_t10
*May 12 20:03:38.079: TSPVIF_HA_EVENT: notifying RSVP HA to remove lsp_info using key 
10.0.0.3->10.0.0.9 Tu10 [61] 10.0.0.3
*May 12 20:03:38.079: RRR_HA: Received notification recovery has ended.  Notify IGP to 
flood.
*May 12 20:03:38.079: TSPVIF_HA_EVENT: Received notification recovery has ended
*May 12 20:03:38.079: TSPVIF_HA_STANDBY: prevent verifying setups; IGP has not converged
*May 12 20:03:38.083: TSPVIF_HA_STANDBY: preventing new setups; reason: IGP recovering
*May 12 20:03:38.083: TSPVIF_HA_STANDBY: prevent verifying setups; IGP has not converged
*May 12 20:03:38.083: TSPVIF_HA_STANDBY: preventing new setups; reason: IGP recovering
*May 12 20:03:38.083: RRR_HA_STATE: IGP flood prevented during IGP recovery
7600-1#
*May 12 20:03:47.723: RRR_HA: Received notification that RIB table 0 has converged.
*May 12 20:03:47.723: RRR_HA: Received notification all RIBs have converged.  Notify IGP 
to flood.
*May 12 20:03:47.723: RRR_HA_STATE: Told not to wait for IGP convergence
*May 12 20:03:47.723: RRR_HA_INFO: update flooded system info; action = add; result = 
success
*May 12 20:03:47.723: LM System key::
*May 12 20:03:47.723:   Flooding Protocol: ospf
*May 12 20:03:47.723:   IGP Area ID: 0
*May 12 20:03:47.723: LM Flood Data::
*May 12 20:03:47.723:   LSA Valid flags: 0x0  Node LSA flag: 0x0
*May 12 20:03:47.723:   IGP System ID: 10.0.0.3  MPLS TE Router ID: 10.0.0.3
*May 12 20:03:47.723:   Flooded links: 1  TLV length: 0 (bytes)
*May 12 20:03:47.723:   Fragment id: 0
*May 12 20:03:47.723: rrr_ha_lm_get_link_info_size: link size: 212 bytes; num TLVs: 0
*May 12 20:03:47.723: rrr_ha_sizeof_lm_link_info: link size: 212 bytes; num TLVs: 0
*May 12 20:03:47.723: RRR_HA_INFO: update flooded link[0] info; action = add; 
result = success
*May 12 20:03:47.723: RRR HA Checkpoint Info Buffer::
*May 12 20:03:47.723:   Info Handle:          0x490BB1C8
*May 12 20:03:47.723:   Max Size:             212
*May 12 20:03:47.723:   Info Size:            212
*May 12 20:03:47.723:   Info Write Pointer:   0x490BB29C
*May 12 20:03:47.723: LM Link key::
*May 12 20:03:47.723:   Flooding Protocol: ospf  IGP Area ID: 0  Link ID: 0 
(GigabitEthernet3/2)
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Ifnumber: 5  Link Valid Flags: 0x193B
*May 12 20:03:47.723      Link Subnet Type: Broadcast
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Local Intfc ID: 0  Neighbor Intf ID: 0
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Link IP Address: 10.0.3.1
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Neighbor IGP System ID: 10.0.3.2  Neighbor IP Address: 10.0.0.0
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     IGP Metric: 1  TE Metric: 1
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Physical Bandwidth: 1000000 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Res. Global BW: 3000 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Res. Sub BW: 0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Upstream::
Router#
*May 12 20:03:47.723:                              Global Pool   Sub Pool  
*May 12 20:03:47.723:                              -----------   ----------
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Reservable Bandwidth[0]:           0            0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Reservable Bandwidth[1]:           0            0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Reservable Bandwidth[2]:           0            0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Reservable Bandwidth[3]:           0            0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Reservable Bandwidth[4]:           0            0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Reservable Bandwidth[5]:           0            0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Reservable Bandwidth[6]:           0            0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Reservable Bandwidth[7]:           0            0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Downstream::
*May 12 20:03:47.723:                              Global Pool   Sub Pool  
*May 12 20:03:47.723:                              -----------   ----------
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Reservable Bandwidth[0]:        3000            0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Reservable Bandwidth[1]:        3000            0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Reservable Bandwidth[2]:        3000            0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.723:     Reservable Bandwidth[3]:        3000            0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.727:     Reservable Bandwidth[4]:        3000            0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.727:     Reservable Bandwidth[5]:        3000            0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.727:     Reservable Bandwidth[6]:        3000            0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.727:     Reservable Bandwidth[7]:        2900            0 kbits/sec
*May 12 20:03:47.727:     Affinity Bits: 0x0
*May 12 20:03:47.727:     Protection Type: Capability 0,  Working Priority 0
*May 12 20:03:47.727:     Number of TLVs: 0
*May 12 20:03:47.727: RRR_HA: Updated flood state for ospf area 0 with 1 links); result = 
success
Router#

The following example shows how to turn off debugging:

Router# no debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso link-management events

MPLS traffic-eng SSO link management events debugging is off

Router# no debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso link-management recovery

MPLS traffic-eng SSO link management recovery debugging is off

Router# no debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso link-management standby

MPLS traffic-eng SSO link management standby behavior debugging is off

Router# no debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso link-management checkpoint

MPLS traffic-eng SSO link management checkpointed info debugging is off

Router# no debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso tunnel standby

MPLS traffic-eng SSO tunnel standby behavior debugging is off

Router# no debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso tunnel recovery

MPLS traffic-eng SSO tunnel head recovery debugging is off

Router# no debug mpls traffic-eng ha sso tunnel events

MPLS traffic-eng SSO events for tunnel heads debugging is off

Router# no debug mpls traffic-eng ha errors

MPLS traffic-eng SSO errors debugging is off

Related Commands

Command
Description

debug ip rsvp high-availability

Displays debugging output for RSVP HA activities that improve the accessibility of network resources.

debug ip rsvp sso

Displays debugging output for RSVP activities during the graceful switchover from an active RP to a redundant RP.


ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp

To set the differentiated services code point (DSCP) value that is in the IP header of a Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) graceful restart hello message, use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp command in global configuration mode. To set the DSCP to its default value, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp num

no ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp

Syntax Description

num

DSCP value. Valid values are from 0 to 63.


Defaults

The default DSCP value is 48.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

If a link is congested, set the DSCP to a value higher than 0 to reduce the likelihood that hello messages get dropped.

The DSCP applies to the RSVP hellos created on a specific router. You can configure each router independently for the DSCP.

Examples

In the following example, hello messages have a DSCP value of 30:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp 30

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

Sets the hello request interval in graceful restart hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

Sets the missed refresh limit in graceful restart hello messages.


ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode

To enable Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) graceful restart support capability on a Route Processor (RP), use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode command in global configuration mode. To disable graceful restart capability, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode {help-neighbor | full}

no ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode

Syntax Description

help-neighbor

Enables support for a neighboring router to restart after a failure.

full

Enables support for a router to perform self recovery or help a neighbor restart after a failure.


Command Default

Graceful restart is disabled until you issue this command.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced as ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor.

12.2(33)SRA

The full keyword was added.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor command to enable support capability for a neighboring router to restart after a failure.

Use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode full command to enable support capability for a router to begin self recovery or help its neighbor to restart on platforms that support stateful switchover (SSO), such as Cisco 7600 series routers, provided that you have installed and configured a standby RP.

Examples

In the following example, an RP is configured with support capability to perform self recovery after a failure:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode full

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp

Sets the DSCP value in the IP header of a RSVP TE graceful restart hello message.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor

Enables RSVP-TE graceful restart support capability on a neighboring router.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

Sets the value to control the request interval in graceful restart hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

Sets the value to control the missed refresh limit in graceful restart hello messages.

show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart

Displays information about RSVP-TE graceful restart hello messages.


ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor


Note Effective with Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA, the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor command is replaced by the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode command. See the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode command for more information.


To enable Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) graceful restart capability on a neighboring router, use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor command in global configuration mode. To disable graceful restart capability, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor

no ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

Graceful restart is disabled.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was replaced by the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode command.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor command to restart a neighboring router.

Examples

In the following example, graceful restart is enabled:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp

Sets the DSCP value in the IP header of a RSVP TE graceful restart hello message.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

Sets the value to control the request interval in graceful restart hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

Sets the value to control the missed refresh limit in graceful restart hello messages.


ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor

To enable Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) graceful restart support capability on a neighboring router, use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor command in interface configuration mode. To disable graceful restart capability, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor ip-address

no ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor ip-address

Syntax Description

ip-address

The IP address of a neighbor on a given interface.


Command Default

No neighboring routers have support for restart capability enabled until you issue this command.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRA

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor command to enable support for graceful restart on routers helping their neighbors recover TE tunnels following stateful switchover (SSO).


Note You must issue this command on every interface of the neighboring router that you want to help restart.


Examples

The following example configures graceful restart on POS interface 1/0/0 of a neighboring router with the IP address 10.0.0.1:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# interface POS1/0/0
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor 10.0.0.1

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode

Enables RSVP-TE graceful restart support capability on an RP.

show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart

Displays information about RSVP-TE graceful restart hello messages.


ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

To configure the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) refresh interval in graceful restart hello messages, use the ip rsvp signalling hello grateful-restart refresh interval command in global configuration mode. To set the interval to its default value, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval interval-value

no ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

Syntax Description

interval-value

Frequency, in milliseconds (ms), at which a node sends hello messages to a neighbor. Valid values are from 1000 to 30000.


Defaults

10000 milliseconds (10 seconds)

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

A node periodically generates a hello message containing a Hello Request object for all its neighbors. The frequency of those hello messages is determined by the hello interval.


Note If you change the default value for this command and you are also using the ip rsvp signalling refresh interval command, ensure that the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval command is less than the value for the ip rsvp signalling refresh interval command. Otherwise, some or all of the label-switched paths (LSPs) may not be recovered after a stateful switchover (SSO) has occurred. We recommend that the value for the ip rsvp signalling refresh interval command be twice the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval command.


Examples

In the following example, hello requests are sent to a neighbor every 5000 ms:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval 5000

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp

Sets the DSCP value in the IP header of a RSVP TE graceful restart hello message.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

Sets the missed refresh limit in graceful restart hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling refresh interval

Specifies the interval between sending refresh messages for each RSVP state.


ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

To specify how many sequential Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) graceful restart hello acknowledgments (ACKs) a node can miss before the node considers communication with its neighbor lost, use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses command in global configuration mode. To return the missed refresh limit to its default value, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses msg-count

no ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

Syntax Description

msg-count

The number of sequential hello acknowledgments (ACKs) that a node can miss before RSVP considers the state expired and tears it down. Valid values are from 4 to 10.


Defaults

The default for the msg-count argument is 4.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH


Usage Guidelines

A hello message comprises a hello message, a Hello Request object, and a Hello ACK object. Each request is answered by an acknowledgment. If a link is congested or a router has a heavy load, set this number to a value higher than the default value to ensure that hello does not falsely declare that a neighbor is down.


Note If you change the default value for this command and you are also using the ip rsvp signalling hello refresh misses command, ensure that the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses command is less than the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello refresh misses command. Otherwise, some or all of the label-switched paths (LSPs) may not be recovered after a stateful switchover (SSO) has occurred. We recommend that the value for the ip rsvp signalling refresh misses command be twice the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses command.


Examples

In the following example, if the node does not receive five sequential hello acknowledgments, the node declares that its neighbor is down:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses 5

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp

Sets the DSCP value in graceful restart hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

Sets the refresh interval in graceful restart hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling refresh misses

Specifies the number of successive refresh messages that can be missed before RSVP removes a state from the database.


show ip rsvp counters

To display the number of Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) messages that were sent and received on each interface, use the show ip rsvp counters command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

show ip rsvp counters [authentication] [interface type number | summary | neighbor]

Syntax Description

authentication

(Optional) Displays a list of RSVP authentication counters.

interface type number

(Optional) Number of RSVP messages sent and received for the specified interface name.

summary

(Optional) Displays the cumulative number of RSVP messages sent and received by the router over all interfaces.

neighbor

(Optional) Displays the number of RSVP messages sent and received by the specified neighbor.


Defaults

If you enter the show ip rsvp counters command without a keyword, the command displays the number of RSVP messages that were sent and received for each interface on which RSVP is configured.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(14)ST

This command was introduced.

12.2(13)T

The neighbor keyword was added, and the command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T.

12.2(15)T

The output was modified to show the errors counter incrementing whenever an RSVP message is received on an interface with RSVP authentication enabled, but the authentication checks failed on that message.

12.2(11)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(11)S.

12.0(22)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(22)S.

12.0(29)S

The authentication keyword was added and the command output was modified to include hello and message queues information.

12.2(28)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(28)SB.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Examples

The following example shows the values for the number of RSVP messages of each type that were sent and received by the router over all interfaces, including the hello and message queues information:

Router# show ip rsvp counters summary

All Interfaces          Recv      Xmit                        Recv      Xmit
    Path                  110        15    Resv                   50        28
    PathError               0         0    ResvError               0         0
    PathTear                0         0    ResvTear                0         0
    ResvConf                0         0    RTearConf               0         0
    Ack                     0         0    Srefresh                0         0
    Hello                5555      5554    IntegrityChalle         0         0
    IntegrityRespon         0         0    DSBM_WILLING            0         0
    I_AM_DSBM               0         0
    Unknown                 0         0    Errors                  0         0

Recv Msg Queues                Current       Max
    RSVP                             0         2
    Hello (per-I/F)                  0         1
    Awaiting Authentication          0         0

Table 1 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 1 show ip rsvp counters summary Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

All Interfaces

Types of messages displayed for all interfaces.

Note Hello is a summary of graceful restart, reroute (hello state timer), and Fast Reroute messages.

Recv

Number of messages received on the specified interface or on all interfaces.

Xmit

Number of messages transmitted from the specified interface or from all interfaces.

Recv Msg Queues

Queues for received messages for RSVP, hello per interface, and awaiting authentication. Current = number of messages queued. Max = maximum number of messages ever queued.


Related Commands

Command
Description

clear ip rsvp counters

Clears (sets to zero) all IP RSVP counters that are being maintained.


show ip rsvp counters state teardown

To display counters for Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) events that caused a state to be torn down, use the show ip rsvp counters state teardown command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

show ip rsvp counters state teardown

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip rsvp counters state teardown command when a label-switched path (LSP) is down. If graceful restart triggered the state teardown, the numbers in the Path, Resv-In, and Resv-Out columns in the example below are greater than 0.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp counters state teardown command:

Router# show ip rsvp counters state teardown

States
  Reason for Teardown                          State torn down
                                                 Path    Resv-In   Resv-Out
  PathTear arrival                                  0          0          0
  ResvTear arrival                                  0          0          0
  Local application requested tear                  0          0          0
  Output or Input I/F went down                     0          0          0
  Missed refreshes                                  0          0          0
  Preemption                                        0          0          0
  Backup tunnel failed for FRR Active LSP           0          0          0
  Reroutabilty changed for FRR Active LSP           0          0          0
  Hello RR Client (HST) requested tear              0          0          0
  Graceful Restart (GR) requested tear              0          0          0
  Downstream neighbor SSO-restarting                0          0          0
  Resource unavailable                              0          0          0
  Policy rejection                                  0          0          0
  Policy server sync failed                         0          0          0
  Traffic control error                             0          0          0
  Error in received message                         0          0          0
  Non RSVP HOP upstream, TE LSP                     0          0          0
  Other                                             0          0          0


Table 2 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 2 show ip rsvp counters state teardown Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

States

RSVP state, including path state block (PSB) and reservation state block (RSB) information.

Reason for Teardown

Event triggering the teardown.


Related Commands

Command
Description

clear ip rsvp counters

Clears (sets to zero) all IP RSVP counters that are being maintained.


show ip rsvp hello

To display hello status and statistics for Fast Reroute, reroute (hello state timer), and graceful restart, use the show ip rsvp hello command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

show ip rsvp hello

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(22)S

This command was introduced.

12.0(29)S

The command output was modified to include graceful restart, reroute (hello state timer), and Fast Reroute information.

12.2(18)SXD1

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXD1.

12.2(33)SRA

The command output was modified to show whether graceful restart is configured and full mode was added.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB2.


Examples

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp hello command:

Router# show ip rsvp hello

Hello:
Fast-Reroute/Reroute: Enabled
Statistics: Disabled
GracefulRestart: Enabled, mode: full

Table 3 describes the significant fields shown in the display. The fields describe the processes for which hello is enabled or disabled.

Table 3 show ip rsvp hello Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Fast-Reroute/Reroute

Status of fast reroute/reroute. Values are as follows:

Enabled—Fast reroute and reroute (hello for state timer) are activated (enabled).

Disabled—Fast reroute and reroute (hello for state timer) are not activated (disabled).

Statistics

Status of hello statistics. Valid values are as follows:

Enabled—Statistics are configured. Hello packets are time-stamped when they arrive in the hello input queue for the purpose of recording the time required until they are processed.

Disabled—Hello statistics are not configured.

Shutdown—Hello statistics are configured but not operational. The input queue is too long (that is, more than 10,000 packets are queued).

GracefulRestart

Restart capability:

Enabled—Restart capability is activated for a router (full mode) or its neighbor (help-neighbor).

Disabled—Restart capability is not activated.


Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello (configuration)

Enables hello globally on the router.

ip rsvp signalling hello statistics

Enables hello statistics on the router.

show ip rsvp hello statistics

Displays how long hello packets have been in the hello input queue.


show ip rsvp hello client lsp detail

To display detailed information about Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) client hellos for label-switched paths (LSPs), use the show ip rsvp hello client lsp detail command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

show ip rsvp hello client lsp detail

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip rsvp hello client lsp detail command to display information about the LSPs, including IP addresses and their types.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp hello client lsp detail command:

Router# show ip rsvp hello client lsp detail

Hello Client LSPs (all lsp tree)

  Tun Dest: 10.0.1.1  Tun ID: 14  Ext Tun ID: 172.16.1.1
  Tun Sender: 172.16.1.1  LSP ID: 31
    Lsp flags: 0x32
    Lsp GR DN nbr: 192.168.1.1
    Lsp RR DN nbr: 10.0.0.3 HST

Table 4 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 4 show ip rsvp hello client lsp detail Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Hello Client LSPs

Current clients include graceful restart (GR), reroute (RR) (hello state timer), and fast reroute (FRR).

Tun Dest

IP address of the destination tunnel.

Tun ID

Identification number of the tunnel.

Ext Tun ID

Extended identification number of the tunnel. Usually, this is the same as the source address.

Tun Sender

IP address of the tunnel sender.

LSP ID

Identification number of the LSP.

Lsp flags

LSP database information.

Lsp GR DN nbr

IP address of the LSP graceful restart downstream neighbor.

Lsp RR DN nbr

IP address LSP reroute downstream neighbor; HST = hello state timer.


Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip rsvp hello

Displays hello status and statistics for fast reroute, reroute (hello state timer), and graceful restart.


show ip rsvp hello client lsp summary

To display summary information about Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) client hellos for label-switched paths (LSPs), use the show ip rsvp hello client lsp summary command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

show ip rsvp hello client lsp summary

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip rsvp hello client lsp summary command to display information about LSPs, including IP addresses and identification numbers.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp hello client lsp summary command:

Router# show ip rsvp hello client lsp summary

Local           Remote          tun_id  lsp_id  FLAGS       
10.1.1.1        172.16.1.1        14      31      0x32

Table 5 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 5 show ip rsvp hello client lsp summary Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Local

IP address of the tunnel sender.

Remote

IP address of the tunnel destination.

tun_id

Identification number of the tunnel.

lsp_id

Identification number of the LSP.

FLAGS

Database information.


Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip rsvp hello

Displays hello status and statistics for fast reroute, reroute (hello state timer), and graceful restart.


show ip rsvp hello client neighbor detail

To display detailed information about Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) client hellos for neighbors, use the show ip rsvp hello client neighbor detail command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

show ip rsvp hello client neighbor detail

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip rsvp hello client neighbor detail command to display information about the hello neighbors, including their state and type.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp hello client neighbor detail command:

Router# show ip rsvp hello client neighbor detail

Hello Client Neighbors

  Remote addr 10.0.0.1,  Local addr  10.0.0.3
    Nbr State: Normal    Type: Reroute
    Nbr Hello State: Up
    LSPs protecting: 1
    I/F: Et1/3

  Remote addr 172.16.1.1,  Local addr  192.168.1.1
    Nbr State: Normal    Type: Graceful Restart
    Nbr Hello State: Lost
    LSPs protecting: 1

Table 6 describes the significant fields shown in the display. The fields provide information that uniquely identifies the neighbors. Clients can include graceful restart, reroute (hello state timer), and fast reroute.

Table 6 show ip rsvp hello client neighbor detail Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Remote addr

IP address of the remote neighbor. For graceful restart, this is the neighbor router's ID; for fast reroute and hello state timer (reroute), this is one of the neighbor's interface addresses.

Local addr

IP address of the local neighbor. For graceful restart, this is the neighbor router's ID; for fast reroute and hello state timer (reroute), this is one of the neighbor's interface addresses.

Nbr State

State of the neighbor; values can be the following:

Normal = neighbor is functioning normally.

Restarting = neighbor is restarting.

Recover Nodal = neighbor is recovering from node failure.

HST_GR_LOST = HST (hello state timer for reroute) is lost; waiting to see if graceful restart (GR) is also lost.

WAIT PathTear = PathTear message is delayed to allow traffic in the pipeline to be transmitted.

Type

Type of client; graceful restart, Reroute (hello state timer), or Fast Reroute.

Nbr Hello State

State of hellos for the neighbor. Values are Up (node is communicating with its neighbor) and Lost (communication has been lost or never was established).

LSPs protecting

Number of LSPs being protected.

I/F

Interface name and number associated with the hello instance.


Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip rsvp hello

Displays hello status and statistics for fast reroute, reroute (hello state timer), and graceful restart.


show ip rsvp hello client neighbor summary

To display summary information about Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) client hellos for neighbors, use the show ip rsvp hello client neighbor summary command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

show ip rsvp hello client neighbor summary

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip rsvp hello client neighbor summary command to display information about the neighbors,including state, type, and hello instance status.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp hello client neighbor summary command:

Router# show ip rsvp hello client neighbor summary

Local	Remote	Type	NBR_STATE	HI_STATE	LSPs
10.0.0.1	10.0.0.3	RR	Normal	Up	1
172.16.1.1	192.168.1.1	GR	Normal	Lost	1

Table 7 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 7 show ip rsvp hello client neighbor summary Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Local

IP address of the tunnel sender.

Remote

IP address of the tunnel destination.

Type

Type of client; graceful restart (GR), reroute (RR (hello state timer)), or fast reroute (FRR).

NBR_STATE

State of the neighbor; values can be the following:

Normal = neighbor is functioning normally.

Restarting = neighbor is restarting.

Recover Nodal = neighbor is recovering from node failure.

HST_GR_LOST = HST (hello state timer for reroute) is lost; waiting to see if graceful restart (GR) is also lost.

WAIT PathTear = PathTear message is delayed to allow traffic in the pipeline to be transmitted.

HI_STATE

State of hello instances for the neighbor. Values are Up (node is communicating with its neighbor) and Lost (communication has been lost or never was established).

LSPs

Number of LSPs going to or coming from the neighbor.


Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip rsvp hello

Displays hello status and statistics for fast reroute, reroute (hello state timer), and graceful restart.


show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart

To display information about Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) graceful restart hellos, use the show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

The command output was modified to show whether graceful restart is configured and full mode was added.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart command to display the status of graceful restart and related statistics.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart command:

Router# show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart

Graceful Restart: Enabled (full mode)
  Refresh interval: 10000 msecs
  Refresh misses: 4
  DSCP: 0x30
  Advertised restart time: 30000 msecs
  Advertised recovery time: 120000 msecs
  Maximum wait for recovery: 3600000 msecs

Table 8 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 8 show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Graceful Restart

Restart capability:

Enabled—Restart capability is activated for a router (full mode) or its neighbor (help-neighbor).

Disabled—Restart capability is not activated.

Refresh interval

Frequency in milliseconds (ms) with which a node sends a hello message to its neighbor.

Refresh misses

Number of missed hello messages that trigger a neighbor down event upon which stateful switchover (SSO) procedures are started.

DSCP

The differentiated services code point (DSCP) value in the IP header of the hello messages.

Advertised restart time

The time, in ms, that is required for the sender to restart the RSVP-TE component and exchange hello messages after a failure.

Advertised recovery time

The time, in ms, within which a recovering node wants its neighbor router to resynchronize the RSVP or Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) forwarding state after SSO.

Note A zero value indicates that the RSVP or MPLS forwarding state is not preserved after SSO.

Maximum wait for recovery

The maximum amount of time, in ms, that the router waits for a neighbor to recover.


Related Commands

Command
Description

clear ip rsvp high-availability counters

Clears (sets to zero) the RSVP-TE HA counters that are being maintained by an RP.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode

Enables RSVP-TE graceful restart support capability on an RP.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor

Enables RSVP-TE graceful restart support capability on a neighboring router.

show ip rsvp hello

Displays hello status and statistics for fast reroute, reroute (hello state timer), and graceful restart.


show ip rsvp hello instance detail

To display detailed information about a hello instance, use the show ip rsvp hello instance detail command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

show ip rsvp hello instance detail [filter destination ip-address]

Syntax Description

filter destination ip-address

(Optional) IP address of the neighbor node.


Command Default

Detailed information about a hello instance is not displayed.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(22)S

This command was introduced.

12.0(29)S

The command output was modified to include graceful restart, hello state timer (reroute), and fast reroute information.

12.2(18)SXD1

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXD1.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB2.


Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip rsvp hello instance detail command to display information about the processes (clients) currently configured.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp hello instance detail command:

Router# show ip rsvp hello instance detail

Neighbor 10.0.0.3  Source  10.0.0.2
    Type: Active    (sending requests)
    I/F:  Serial2/0
    State:   Up        (for 2d19h2d19h)
    Clients: ReRoute
    LSPs protecting: 1
    Missed acks: 4, IP DSCP: 0x30
    Refresh Interval (msec)
      Configured: 6000
      Statistics: (from 40722 samples)
        Min:      6000
        Max:      6064
        Average:  6000
        Waverage: 6000 (Weight = 0.8)
        Current:  6000
    Last sent Src_instance: 0xE617C847
    Last recv nbr's Src_instance: 0xFEC28E95
    Counters:
      Communication with neighbor lost:
        Num times:                    0
        Reasons:
          Missed acks:                0
          Bad Src_Inst received:      0
          Bad Dst_Inst received:      0
          I/F went down:              0
          Neighbor disabled Hello:    0
      Msgs Received:   55590
           Sent:       55854
           Suppressed: 521

  Neighbor 10.0.0.8 Source  10.0.0.7
    Type: Passive   (responding to requests)
    I/F:  Serial2/1
    Last sent Src_instance: 0xF7A80A52
    Last recv nbr's Src_instance: 0xD2F1B7F7
    Counters:
      Msgs Received:   199442
           Sent:       199442

Table 9 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 9 show ip rsvp hello instance detail Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Neighbor

IP address of the adjacent node.

Source

IP address of the node that is sending the hello message.

Type

Values are Active (node is sending a request) and Passive (node is responding to a request).

I/F

Interface from which hellos are sent for this instance. Any means that the hellos can be sent out any interface.

State

Status of communication. Values are as follows:

Up—Node is communicating with its neighbor.

Lost—Communication has been lost.

Init—Communication is being established.

Clients

Clients that created this hello instance; they include graceful restart, ReRoute (hello state timer), and Fast Reroute.

LSPs protecting

Number of LSPs that are being protected by this hello instance.

Missed acks

Number of times that communication was lost due to missed acknowledgments (ACKs).

IP DSCP

IP differentiated services code point (DSCP) value used in the hello IP header.

Refresh Interval (msec)

The frequency (in milliseconds) with which a node generates a hello message containing a Hello Request object for each neighbor whose status is being tracked.

Configured

Configured refresh interval.

Statistics

Refresh interval statistics from a specified number of samples (packets).

Min

Minimum refresh interval.

Max

Maximum refresh interval.

Average

Average refresh interval.

Waverage

Weighted average refresh interval.

Current

Current refresh interval.

Last sent Src_instance

The last source instance sent to a neighbor.

Last recv nbr's Src_instance

The last source instance field value received from a neighbor. (0 means none received.)

Counters

Incremental information relating to communication with a neighbor.

Num times

Total number of times that communication with a neighbor was lost.

Reasons

Subsequent fields designate why communication with a neighbor was lost.

Missed acks

Number of times that communication was lost due to missed ACKs.

Bad Src_Inst received

Number of times that communication was lost due to bad source instance fields.

Bad Dst_Inst received

Number of times that communication was lost due to bad destination instance fields.

I/F went down

Number of times that the interface became unoperational.

Neighbor disabled Hello

Number of times that a neighbor disabled hello messages.

Msgs Received

Number of messages that were received.

Sent

Number of messages that were sent.

Suppressed

Number of messages that were suppressed due to optimization.


Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello (configuration)

Enables hello globally on the router.

ip rsvp signalling hello statistics

Enables hello statistics on the router.

show ip rsvp hello

Displays hello status and statistics for Fast reroute, reroute (hello state timer), and graceful restart.

show ip rsvp hello instance summary

Displays summary information about a hello instance.


show ip rsvp hello instance summary

To display summary information about a hello instance, use the show ip rsvp hello instance summary command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

show ip rsvp hello instance summary

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(22)S

This command was introduced.

12.0(29)S

The command output was modified to include graceful restart, reroute (hello state timer), and fast reroute information.

12.2(18)SXD1

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXD1.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB2.


Examples

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp hello instance summary command:

Router# show ip rsvp hello instance summary

Active Instances:
  Client  Neighbor        I/F        State      LostCnt  LSPs Interval
  RR      10.0.0.3        Se2/0      Up               0     1 6000    
  GR      10.1.1.1        Any        Up              13     1 10000   
  GR      10.1.1.5        Any        Lost             0     1 10000   
  GR      10.2.2.1        Any        Init             1     0 5000    

Passive Instances:
  Neighbor        I/F       
  10.0.0.1        Se2/1     

Active = Actively tracking neighbor state on behalf of clients:
         RR = ReRoute, FRR = Fast ReRoute, or GR = Graceful Restart
Passive = Responding to hello requests from neighbor

Table 10 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 10 show ip rsvp hello instance summary Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Active Instances

Subsequent fields describe the active nodes that are sending hello requests.

Client

Client(s) on behalf of which hellos are sent; they include GR (graceful restart), RR (reroute = hello state timer), and FRR (Fast Reroute).

Neighbor

IP address of the adjacent node. For graceful restart, this is the neighbor router's ID; for Fast Reroute and hello state timer (reroute), this is one of the neighbor's interface addresses.

I/F

Interface from which hellos are sent for this instance. Any means that the hellos can be sent out any interface.

State

Status of communication. Values are as follows:

Up—Node is communicating with its neighbor.

Lost—Communication has been lost.

Init—Communication is being established.

LostCnt

Number of times that communication was lost with the neighbor.

LSPs

Number of label-switched paths (LSPs) protected by this hello instance.

Interval

Hello refresh interval in milliseconds.

Passive Instances

Subsequent fields describe the passive nodes that are responding to hello requests.

Neighbor

IP address of adjacent node. For graceful restart, this is the neighbor router's ID; for Fast Reroute and hello state timer (reroute), this is one of the neighbor's interface addresses.

I/F

Interface from which hellos are sent for this instance. Any means that the hellos can be sent out any interface.


Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello (configuration)

Enables hello globally on the router.

ip rsvp signalling hello statistics

Enables hello statistics on the router.

show ip rsvp hello

Displays hello status and statistics for fast reroute, reroute (hello state timer), and graceful restart.

show ip rsvp hello instance detail

Displays detailed information about a hello instance.


show ip rsvp high-availability counters

To display all Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) high availability (HA) counters that are being maintained by a Route Processor (RP), use the show ip rsvp high-availability counters command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

show ip rsvp high-availability counters

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRA

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRB

Support for In-Service Software Upgrade (ISSU) was added.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip rsvp high-availability counters command to display the HA counters, which include state, ISSU, checkpoint messages, resource failures, and errors.

The command output differs depending on whether the RP is active or standby. (See the "Examples" section for more information.)

Use the clear ip rsvp high-availability counters command to clear all counters.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp high-availability counters command on the active RP:

Router# show ip rsvp high-availability counters

State: Active

Bulk sync
  initiated: 3

Send timer
  started: 1

Checkpoint Messages (Items) Sent
  Succeeded:      3  (6)
    Acks accepted:3  (6)
    Acks ignored:     (0)
    Nacks:        0  (0)
  Failed:         0  (0)
  Buffer alloc:   3
  Buffer freed:   3

ISSU:
  Checkpoint Messages Transformed:
    On Send:
      Succeeded:         3
      Failed:            0
      Transformations:   0
    On Recv:
      Succeeded:         0
      Failed:            0
      Transformations:   0

  Negotiation:
    Started:              3
    Finished:             3
    Failed to Start:      0
    Messages:
      Sent:
        Send succeeded:   21
        Send failed:      0
        Buffer allocated:        21
        Buffer freed:            0
        Buffer alloc failed:     0
      Received:
        Succeeded:        15
        Failed:           0
        Buffer freed:     15

  Init:
    Succeeded:            1
    Failed:               0

  Session Registration:
    Succeeded:            2
    Failed:               0

  Session Unregistration:
    Succeeded:            2
    Failed:               0

Errors:
  None

Table 11 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 11 show ip rsvp high-availability counters—Active RP Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

State

The RP state:

Active—Active RP.

Bulk sync

The number of requests made by the standby RP to the active RP to resend all write database entries:

Initiated—The number of bulk sync operations initiated by the standby RP since reboot.

Send timer

The write database timer.

Checkpoint Messages (Items) Sent

The details of the bundle messages or items sent since booting.

Succeeded

The number of bundle messages or items sent from the active RP to the standby RP since booting. Values are the following:

Acks accepted—The number of bundle messages or items sent from the active RP to the standby RP.

Acks ignored—The number of bundle messages or items sent by the active RP, but rejected by the standby RP.

Nacks—The number of bundle messages or items given to the checkpointing facility (CF) on the active RP for transmitting to the standby RP, but failed to transmit.

Failed

The number of bundle messages or items the active RP attempted to send the standby RP when the send timer updated, but received an error back from CF.

Buffer alloc

Storage space allocated.

Buffer freed

Storage space available.

ISSU

In-Service Software Upgrade (ISSU) counters.

Checkpoint Messages Transformed

The details of the bundle messages or items transformed (upgraded or downgraded for compatibility) since booting so that the active RP and the standby RP can interoperate.

On Send

The number of messages sent by the active RP that succeeded, failed, or were transformations.

On Recv

The number of messages received by the active RP that succeeded, failed, or were transformations.

Negotiation

The number of times that the active RP and the standby RP have negotiated their interoperability parameters.

Started

The number of negotiations started.

Finished

The number of negotiations finished.

Failed to Start

The number of negotiations that failed to start.

Messages

The number of negotiation messages sent and received. These messages can be succeeded or failed.

Send succeeded—Number of messages sent successfully.

Send failed—Number of messages sent unsuccessfully.

Buffer allocated—Storage space allowed.

Buffer freed—Storage space available.

Buffer alloc failed—No storage space available.

Init

The number of times the RSVP ISSU client has successfully and unsuccefully (failed) initialized.

Session Registration

The number of session registrations, succeeded and failed, performed by the active RP whenever the standby RP reboots.

Session Unregistration

The number of session unregistrations, succeeded and failed, before the standby RP resets.

Errors

The details of errors or caveats.


The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp high-availability counters command on the standby RP:

Router# show ip rsvp high-availability counters

State: Standby
 
Checkpoint Messages (Items) Received
  Valid:        1  (2)
  Invalid:      0  (0)
  Buffer freed: 1
 
ISSU:
  Checkpoint Messages Transformed:
    On Send:
      Succeeded:         0
      Failed:            0
      Transformations:   0
    On Recv:
      Succeeded:         1
      Failed:            0
      Transformations:   0
 
  Negotiation:
    Started:              1
    Finished:             1
    Failed to Start:      0
    Messages:
      Sent:
        Send succeeded:   5
        Send failed:      0
        Buffer allocated:        5
        Buffer freed:            0
        Buffer alloc failed:     0
      Received:
        Succeeded:        7
        Failed:           0
        Buffer freed:     7
 
  Init:
    Succeeded:            1
    Failed:               0
 
  Session Registration:
    Succeeded:            0
    Failed:               0
 
  Session Unregistration:
    Succeeded:            0
    Failed:               0
          
Errors:
  None

Table 12 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 12 show ip rsvp high-availability counters—Standby RP Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

State

The RP state:

Standby—Standby (backup) RP.

Checkpoint Messages (Items) Received

The details of the messages or items received by the standby RP. Values are the following:

Valid—The number of valid messages or items received by the standby RP.

Invalid—The number of invalid messages or items received by the standby RP.

Buffer freed—Amount of storage space available.

ISSU

ISSU counters.

Note For descriptions of the ISSU fields, see Table 11.

Errors

The details of errors or caveats.


Related Commands

Command
Description

clear ip rsvp high-availability counters

Clears (sets to zero) the RSVP-TE HA counters that are being maintained by an RP.

show ip rsvp high-availability database

Displays the contents of the RSVP-TE HA read and write databases used in TE SSO.

show ip rsvp high-availability summary

Displays summary information for an RSVP-TE HA RP.


show ip rsvp high-availability database

To display the contents of the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) high availability (HA) read and write databases used in traffic engineering (TE), use the show ip rsvp high-availability database command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

show ip rsvp high-availability database {hello | link-management {interfaces | system} | lsp [filter destination ip-address | filter lsp-id lsp-id | filter source ip-address | filter tunnel-id tunnel-id] | lsp-head [filter number] | summary}

Syntax Description

hello

Displays information about the hello entries in the read and write databases.

link-management

Displays information about the link-management entries in the read and write databases.

interfaces

Displays information about the link-management interfaces in the read and write databases.

system

Displays information about the link-management system in the read and write databases.

lsp

Displays information about the label-switched path (LSP) entries in the read and write databases.

filter destination ip-address

(Optional) Displays filtered information on the IP address of the destination (tunnel tail).

filter lsp-id lsp-id

(Optional) Displays filtered information on a specific LSP ID designated by a number from 0 to 65535.

filter source ip-address

(Optional) Displays filtered information on the IP address of the source (tunnel head).

filter tunnel-id tunnel-id

(Optional) Displays filtered information on a specific tunnel ID designated by a number from 0 to 65535.

lsp-head

Displays information about the LSP-headend entries in the read and write databases.

filter number

(Optional) Displays filtered information on a specific LSP-head router designated by a number from 0 to 65535.

summary

Displays cumulative information about the entries in the read and write databases.


Command Default

Information displays for the database selected.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRA

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRB

The command output was modified to display the result of a loose hop expansion performed on the router.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip rsvp high-availability database command to display information about the entries in the read and write databases.

Use the show ip rsvp high-availability database lsp command to display loose hop information. A loose hop expansion can be performed on a router when the router processes the explicit router object (ERO) for an incoming path message. After the router removes all local IP addresses from the incoming ERO, it finds the next hop. If the ERO specifies that the next hop is loose instead of strict, the router consults the TE topology database and routing to determine the next hop and output interface to forward the path message. The result of the calculation is a list of hops; that list is placed in the outgoing ERO and checkpointed with the LSP data as the loose hop information.

Use the show ip rsvp high-availability database lsp-head command on a headend router only. On other routers, this command gives no information.

Examples

Hello Example on Active RP

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp high-availability database hello command on an active Route Processor (RP):

Router# show ip rsvp high-availability database hello

HELLO WRITE DB
   Header:
     State: Checkpointed     Action: Add
     Seq #: 1                Flags: 0x0
   Data:
     Last sent Src_instance: 0xDE435865

HELLO READ DB

Table 11 describes the significant fields shown in the displays.

Table 13 show ip rsvp high-availability database hello—Active RP Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

HELLO WRITE DB

Storage area for active RP hello data consisting of checkpointed RSVP-TE information that is sent to the standby RP when it becomes the active RP and needs to recover LSPs. This field is blank on a standby RP.

Header

Header information.

State

Status of an entry. Values are as follows:

Checkpointed—Entries have been sent and acknowledged by the standby RP.

Send-Pending—Entries are waiting to be sent.

Ack-Pending—Entries have been sent, but not acknowledged.

Action

Action taken. Values are as follows:

Add—Adding an item to the standby RP.

Modify—Modifying an item on the standby RP.

Remove—Removing an item from the standby RP.

Delete—Deleting an item from the standby RP. This action appears temporarily while the active RP awaits an acknowledgment (ack) of the delete operation.

Seq #

Numbers used by the active and standby RPs to synchronize message acks and negative acknowledgments (nacks) to messages sent.

Flags

Attribute used to identify or track data.

Data

Information.

Last sent SRC_instance

Last source instance identifier sent.

HELLO READ DB

Storage area for standby RP hello data. This field is blank on an active RP except when it is in recovery mode.


Hello Example on Standby RP

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp high-availability database hello command on a standby RP:

Router# show ip rsvp high-availability database hello

HELLO WRITE DB

HELLO READ DB
   Header:
     State: Checkpointed     Action: Add
     Seq #: 1                Flags: 0x0
   Data:
     Last sent Src_instance: 0xDE435865

These fields are the same as those for the active RP described in Table 11 except they are now in the read database for the standby RP.

Link-Management Interfaces Example on an Active RP

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp high-availability database link-management interfaces command on an active RP:

Router# show ip rsvp high-availability database link-management interfaces

TE LINK WRITE DB
Flooding Protocol: ospf  IGP Area ID: 0  Link ID: 0 (GigabitEthernet3/2)
  Header:
    State: Checkpointed     Action: Add
    Seq #: 4                Flags: 0x0
  Data:
        Ifnumber: 5  Link Valid Flags: 0x193B
        Link Subnet Type: Broadcast
        Local Intfc ID: 0  Neighbor Intf ID: 0
        Link IP Address: 172.16.3.1
        Neighbor IGP System ID: 172.16.3.2  Neighbor IP Address: 10.0.0.0
        IGP Metric: 1  TE Metric: 1
        Physical Bandwidth: 1000000 kbits/sec
        Res. Global BW: 3000 kbits/sec
        Res. Sub BW: 0 kbits/sec
        Upstream::
                                 Global Pool   Sub Pool  
                                 -----------   ----------
        Reservable Bandwidth[0]:           0            0 kbits/sec
        Reservable Bandwidth[1]:           0            0 kbits/sec
        Reservable Bandwidth[2]:           0            0 kbits/sec
        Reservable Bandwidth[3]:           0            0 kbits/sec
        Reservable Bandwidth[4]:           0            0 kbits/sec
        Reservable Bandwidth[5]:           0            0 kbits/sec
        Reservable Bandwidth[6]:           0            0 kbits/sec
        Reservable Bandwidth[7]:           0            0 kbits/sec
        Downstream::
                                 Global Pool   Sub Pool  
                                 -----------   ----------
        Reservable Bandwidth[0]:        3000            0 kbits/sec
        Reservable Bandwidth[1]:        3000            0 kbits/sec
        Reservable Bandwidth[2]:        3000            0 kbits/sec
        Reservable Bandwidth[3]:        3000            0 kbits/sec
        Reservable Bandwidth[4]:        3000            0 kbits/sec
        Reservable Bandwidth[5]:        3000            0 kbits/sec
        Reservable Bandwidth[6]:        3000            0 kbits/sec
        Reservable Bandwidth[7]:        2900            0 kbits/sec
        Affinity Bits: 0x0
        Protection Type: Capability 0,  Working Priority 0
        Number of TLVs: 0

Table 14 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 14 show ip rsvp high-availability database link-management interfaces—Active RP Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

TE LINK WRITE DB

Storage area for active TE RP link data. This field is blank on a standby RP.

Flooding Protocol

Protocol that is flooding information for this area. ospf = Open Shortest Path First.

IGP area ID

Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) identifier for the area being flooded.

Link ID

Link identifier and interface for the area being flooded.

Header

Header information.

State

Status of an entry. Values are as follows:

Checkpointed—Entries have been sent and acknowledged by the standby RP.

Send-Pending—Entries are waiting to be sent.

Ack-Pending—Entries have been sent, but not acknowledged.

Action

Action taken. Values are as follows:

Add—Adding an item to the standby RP.

Modify—Modifying an item on the standby RP.

Remove—Removing an item from the standby RP.

Delete—Deleting an item from the standby RP. This action appears temporarily while the active RP awaits an ack of the delete operation.

Seq #

Numbers used by the active and standby RPs to synchronize message acks and nacks to messages sent.

Flags

Attribute used to identify or track data.

Data

Information.

Ifnumber

Interface number.

Link Valid Flags

Attributes used to identify or track links.

Link Subnet Type

Subnet type of the link. Values are as follows:

Broadcast—Data for multiple recipients.

Point-to-Point—Unidirectional or bidirectional connection between two end systems.

Point-to-Multipoint—Unidirectional connection in which a single source end system (known as a root node) connects to multiple destination end systems (known as leaves).

Nonbroadcast Multiaccess—A network in which data is transmitted directly from one computer to another over a virtual circuit or across a switching fabric.

Unknown subnet type—Subnet type not identified.

Local Intfc ID

Local interface identifier.

Neighbor Intf ID

Neighbor's interface identifier.

Link IP Address

IP address of the link.

Neighbor IGP System ID

Neighbor system identifier configured using IGP.

Neighbor IP Address

Neighbor's IP address.

IGP Metric

Metric value for the TE link configured using IGP.

TE Metric

Metric value for the TE link configured using Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS)-TE.

Physical Bandwidth

Link bandwidth capacity (in kilobits per second).

Res. Global BW

Amount of reservable global pool bandwidth (in kilobits per second) on this link.

Res. Sub BW

Amount of reservable subpool bandwidth (in kilobits per second) on this link.

Upstream

Header for the following section of bandwidth values.

Global Pool

Global pool bandwidth (in kilobits per second) on this link.

Sub Pool

Subpool bandwidth (in kilobits per second) on this link.

Reservable Bandwidth [1]

Amount of bandwidth (in kilobits per second) available for reservations in the global TE topology and subpools.

Downstream

Header for the following section of bandwidth values.

Affinity Bits

Link attributes required in tunnels.

Protection Type

LSPs protected by fast reroute (FRR). Capability = LSPs capable of using FRR. Working Priority = LSPs actually using FRR.

Number of TLVs

Number of type, length, values (TLVs).


The fields for a standby RP are the same as those described in Table 14 except they are now in the TE link read database instead of the TE link write database that is used by an active RP.

Link-Management System Example on an Active RP

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp high-availability database link-management system command on an active RP:

Router# show ip rsvp high-availability database link-management system

TE SYSTEM WRITE DB
Flooding Protocol: OSPF  IGP Area ID: 0
  Header:
    State: Checkpointed     Action: Modify
    Seq #: 4                Flags: 0x0
  Data:
    LM Flood Data::
      LSA Valid flags: 0x0  Node LSA flag: 0x0
      IGP System ID: 172.16.3.1  MPLS TE Router ID: 10.0.0.3
      Flooded links: 1  TLV length: 0 (bytes)
      Fragment id: 0


TE SYSTEM READ DB

Table 15 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 15 show ip rsvp high-availability database link-management system—Active RP Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

TE SYSTEM WRITE DB

Storage area for active TE RP system data. This field is blank on a standby RP.

Flooding Protocol

Protocol that is flooding information for this area. OSPF = Open Shortest Path First.

IGP Area ID

IGP identifier for the area being flooded.

Header

Header information.

State

Status of an entry. Values are as follows:

Checkpointed—Entries have been sent and acknowledged by the standby RP.

Send-Pending—Entries are waiting to be sent.

Ack-Pending—Entries have been sent, but not acknowledged.

Action

Action taken. Values are as follows:

Add—Adding an item to the standby RP.

Modify—Modifying an item on the standby RP.

Remove—Removing an item from the standby RP.

Delete—Deleting an item from the standby RP. This action appears temporarily while the active RP awaits an ack of the delete operation.

Seq #

Numbers used by the active and standby RPs to synchronize message acks and nacks to messages sent.

Flags

Attribute used to identify or track data.

Data

Information.

LM Flood Data

Link management (LM) flood data.

LSA Valid flags

Link-state advertisement (LSA) attributes.

Node LSA flag

LSA attributes used by a router.

IGP System ID

Identification (IP address) that IGP flooding uses in this area to identify this node.

MPLS TE Router ID

MPLS TE router identifier (IP address).

Flooded links

Number of flooded links.

TLV length

TLV length in bytes.

Fragment id

Fragment identifier for this link.

TE SYSTEM READ DB

Storage area for standby TE RP system data. This field is blank on a standby RP.


The fields for a standby RP are the same as those described in Table 15 except they are now in the TE system read database instead of the TE system write database that is used by an active RP.

LSP Example on an Active RP

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp high-availability database lsp command on an active RP:

Router# show ip rsvp high-availability database lsp

LSP WRITE DB
Tun ID: 10   LSP ID: 8
  Dest:   10.0.0.9
  Sender: 10.0.0.3     Ext. Tun ID: 10.0.0.3
  Header:
    State: Checkpointed     Action: Add
    Seq #: 3                Flags: 0x0
  Data:
    InLabel: -
    Out I/F: Gi3/2
    Next-Hop: 172.0.3.2
    OutLabel: 17

Loose hop info:
  10.0.0.2 13.0.0.2 13.0.0.3 10.1.1.1

LSP READ DB

Table 16 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 16 show ip rsvp high-availability database lsp—Active RP Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

LSP WRITE DB

Storage area for active RP LSP data. This field is blank on a standby RP.

Tun ID

Tunnel identifier.

LSP ID

LSP identifier.

Dest

Tunnel destination IP address.

Sender

Tunnel sender IP address.

Ext. Tun ID

Extended tunnel identifier; usually set to 0 or the sender's IP address.

Header

Header information.

State

Status of an entry. Values are as follows:

Checkpointed—Entries have been sent and acknowledged by the standby RP.

Send-Pending—Entries are waiting to be sent.

Ack-Pending—Entries have been sent, but not acknowledged.

Action

Action taken. Values are as follows:

Add—Adding an item to the standby RP.

Modify—Modifying an item on the standby RP.

Remove—Removing an item from the standby RP.

Delete—Deleting an item from the standby RP. This action appears temporarily while the active RP awaits an ack of the delete operation.

Seq #

Numbers used by the active and standby RPs to synchronize message acks and nacks to messages sent.

Flags

Attribute used to identify or track data.

Data

Information.

InLabel

Incoming label identifier.

Out I/F

Outgoing interface.

Next-Hop

Next hop IP address.

OutLabel

Outgoing label identifier.

Loose hop info

Lists the loose hop expansions performed on the router, or specifies None.

LSP READ DB

Storage area for standby RP LSP data. This field is blank on an active RP.


The fields for a standby RP are the same as those described in Table 16 except they are now in the LSP read database instead of the LSP write database that is used by an active RP.

LSP-Head Example on an Active RP

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp high-availability database lsp-head command on an active RP:

Router# show ip rsvp high-availability database lsp-head

LSP_HEAD WRITE DB
  Tun ID: 10
  Header:
    State: Checkpointed     Action: Add
    Seq #: 3                Flags: 0x0
  Data:
    lsp_id: 8, bandwidth: 100, thead_flags: 0x1, popt: 1
    output_if_num: 5, output_nhop: 172.16.3.2
    RRR path setup info
      Destination: 10.0.0.9, Id: 10.0.0.9 Router Node (ospf) flag:0x0
      IGP: ospf, IGP area: 0, Number of hops: 5, metric: 2
      Hop 0: 172.16.3.1, Id: 172.16.3.1 Router Node (ospf), flag:0x0
      Hop 1: 172.16.3.2, Id: 10.0.0.7 Router Node (ospf), flag:0x0
      Hop 2: 172.16.6.1, Id: 10.0.0.7 Router Node (ospf), flag:0x0
      Hop 3: 172.16.6.2, Id: 10.0.0.9 Router Node (ospf), flag:0x0
      Hop 4: 10.0.0.9, Id: 10.0.0.9 Router Node (ospf), flag:0x0


LSP_HEAD READ DB

Table 17 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 17 show ip rsvp high-availability database lsp-head—Active RP Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

LSP_HEAD WRITE DB

Storage area for active RP LSP-head data. This field is blank on a standby RP.

Tun ID

Tunnel identifier.

Header

Header information.

State

Status of an entry. Values are as follows:

Checkpointed—Entries have been sent and acknowledged by the standby RP.

Send-Pending—Entries are waiting to be sent.

Ack-Pending—Entries have been sent, but not acknowledged.

Action

Action taken. Values are as follows:

Add—Adding an item to the standby RP.

Modify—Modifying an item on the standby RP.

Remove—Removing an item from the standby RP.

Delete—Deleting an item from the standby RP. This action appears temporarily while the active RP awaits an ack of the delete operation.

Seq #

Numbers used by the active and standby RPs to synchronize message acks and nacks to messages sent.

Flags

Attribute used to identify or track data.

Data

Information.

lsp_id

LSP identifier.

bandwidth

Bandwidth on the LSP.

thead_flags

Tunnel head attribute used to identify or track data.

popt

Parsing option number.

output_if_num

Output interface number.

output_nhop

Output next hop IP address.

RRR path setup info

Routing with Resource Reservation (RRR) path information.

Destination

Destination IP address.

Id

IP address and protocol of the routing node. Values are the following:

ospf = Open Shortest Path First.

isis = Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System.

flag

Attribute used to track data.

IGP

Interior Gateway Protocol. ospf = Open Shortest Path First.

IGP area

IGP area identifier.

Number of hops

Number of connections or routers.

metric

Routing cost.

Hop

Hop's number and IP address.

Id

IP address and protocol of the routing node. Values are the following:

ospf = Open Shortest Path First.

isis = Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System.

flag

Attribute used to track data.

LSP_HEAD READ DB

Storage area for standby RP LSP-head data. This field is blank on an active RP.


The fields for a standby RP are the same as those described in Table 17 except they are now in the LSP_head read database instead of the LSP_head write database that is used by an active RP.

Summary Example on an Active RP

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp high-availability database summary command on an active RP:

Router# show ip rsvp high-availability database summary

Write DB:
  Send-Pending:     0
  Ack-Pending :     0
  Checkpointed:    10
  Total       :    10

Read DB:
  Total       :     0 

Table 18 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 18 show ip rsvp high-availability database summary—Active RP Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Write DB

Storage area for active RP summary data. This field is blank on a standby RP.

Send-Pending

Entries are waiting to be sent.

Ack-Pending

Entries have been sent, but are waiting to be acknowledged.

Checkpointed

Entries have been sent and acknowledged.

Total

Total number of entries in the write DB.

Read DB

Storage area for standby RP summary data. This field is blank on an active RP.

Total

Total number of entries in the read DB.


Summary Example on a Standby RP

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp high-availability database summary command on a standby RP:

Router# show ip rsvp high-availability database summary

Write DB:
  Send-Pending:     0
  Ack-Pending :     0
  Checkpointed:     0
  Total       :     0

Read DB:
  Total       :    10 

Table 19 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 19 show ip rsvp high-availability database summary—Standby RP Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Write DB

Storage area for active RP summary data.

Send-Pending

Entries are waiting to be sent.

Ack-Pending

Entries have been sent, but are waiting to be acknowledged.

Checkpointed

Entries have been sent and acknowledged.

Total

Total number of entries in the write DB.

Read DB

Storage area for standby RP summary data. This field is blank on an active RP.

Total

Total number of entries in the read DB.


Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip rsvp high-availability counters

Displays all RSVP HA counters that are being maintained by an RP.

show ip rsvp high-availability summary

Displays summary information for an RSVP HA RP.


show ip rsvp high-availability summary

To display summary information for a Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) high availability (HA) Route Processor (RP), use the show ip rsvp high-availability summary command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

show ip rsvp high-availability summary

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

User EXEC
Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRA

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

Use the show ip rsvp high-availability summary command to display information about the HA parameters currently configured on an RP.

The command output differs depending on whether the RP is active or standby.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp high-availability summary command on an active RP:

Router# show ip rsvp high-availability summary

State:
Graceful-Restart: Enabled, mode: full
HA state: Active
Checkpointing: Allowed
Messages:
Send timer: not running (Interval: 1000 msec)
Items sent per Interval: 200
CF buffer size used: 2000


Note On a standby RP, only the first three lines of the output are displayed. On an active RP, all lines are displayed.


Table 20 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 20 show ip rsvp high-availability summary Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

State

Status of graceful restart and HA.

Graceful Restart

Restart capability:

Enabled—Restart capability is activated for a router (full mode) or its neighbor (help-neighbor).

Disabled—Restart capability is not activated.

HA state

The RP state, which is the following:

Active—Active RP.

Standby—Standby (backup) RP.

Recovering—The active RP is in recovery period.

Checkpointing

The function that copies state information (write database entries) from the active RP to the standby RP. Values are the following:

Allowed—Functioning normally.

Not Allowed—Checkpointing is not allowed. Reasons may be that the RP is not present or not ready.

Messages

The checkpointed messages that the active RP sends to the standby RP during a specified interval.

Send timer

The write database timer. Values are the following:

running—Entries are in the write database in the send-pending state and checkpointing is allowed.

not running—Checkpointing is not allowed or the write database is empty.

Note Entries in the write database can be in the following states:

Send-Pending—The entry has not been sent to the standby RP yet.

Ack-Pending—The entry was sent to the standby RP, but no acknowledgment was received from the standby RP yet.

Checkpointed—The checkpointing facility (CF) message has been acknowledged by the standby RP, which notifies the active RP.

Interval

Time, in milliseconds (ms), when the active RP sends messages to the standby RP.

Items sent per Interval

The number of database entries (data that has been taken from the write database and packed into bundle message for transmitting to the standby RP), which the active RP sends to the standby RP each time the write database timer activates.

CF buffer size used

Amount of storage space, in bytes, used by the checkpointing facility.


In some cases, the checkpointing field displays Not Allowed. Here is an excerpt from sample output:

Checkpointing: Not Allowed
Peer RP Present : No
RF Comm. Up : No
Flow Control On : No
CF Comm. Up : No
RF Ready to Recv: No


Note If checkpointing is allowed, the attributes displayed in the sample output do not appear. Refer to the show ip rsvp high-availability summary command output on an active RP for more details.


Table 21 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 21 show ip rsvp high-availability summary—Checkpointing Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Peer RP Present : No

The active RP cannot communicate with any peer RP.

Note This can happen if the standby RP is removed, or if it is temporarily unavailable, such as during a restart.

RF Comm. Up : No

The redundant facility (RF) on the active RP is unable to communicate with the RF on the standby RP.

Flow Control On : No

The active RP cannot send Internet Protocol communications (IPC) messages (using checkpointing) to the standby RP because flow control is off.

CF Comm. Up : No

The TE CF client on the active RP is unable to communicate with the TE CF client on the standby RP.

RF Ready to Recv : No

The RF on the standby RP is not ready to receive checkpoint messages.


The following is sample output from the show ip rsvp high-availability summary command after a stateful switchover (SSO) has occurred.

Router# show ip rsvp high-availability summary 

State:
 Graceful-Restart: Enabled
 HA state: active
Checkpointing: Allowed
Recovery Time (msec)
 Advertised:    120000 msec
 Last recorded: 75012 msec
Messages:
 Send timer: not running (Interval:1000)
 Items sent per Interval: 200

Table 22 describes the significant fields shown in the display

.

Table 22 show ip rsvp high-availability summary—After an SSO Field Descriptions

Field
Description

Advertised

The advertised recovery time, in milliseconds.

Last recorded

The last recorded recovery time, in milliseconds.


Related Commands

Command
Description

clear ip rsvp high-availability counters

Clears (sets to zero) the RSVP-TE HA counters that are being maintained by an RP.

show ip rsvp high-availability counters

Displays the RSVP-TE HA counters that are being maintained by an RP.

show ip rsvp high-availability database

Displays the contents of the RSVP-TE HA read and write databases used in TE SSO.


Feature Information for NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Table 23 lists the release history for this feature.

Not all commands may be available in your Cisco IOS software release. For release information about a specific command, see the command reference documentation.

Cisco IOS software images are specific to a Cisco IOS software release, a feature set, and a platform. Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco IOS software image support. Access Cisco Feature Navigator at http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. You must have an account on Cisco.com. If you do not have an account or have forgotten your username or password, click Cancel at the login dialog box and follow the instructions that appear.


Note Table 23 lists only the Cisco IOS software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given Cisco IOS software release. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that Cisco IOS software release also support that feature.


Table 23 Feature Information for NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart

12.0(29)S
12.2(33)SRA
12.2(33)SRB
12.2(33)SXH

The NSF/SSO—MPLS TE and RSVP Graceful Restart feature allows an RP or its neighbor to recover from disruption in control plane service without losing its MPLS forwarding state.

In 12.0(29)S, this feature was introduced as MPLS Traffic Engineering—RSVP Graceful Restart and allowed a neighboring RP to recover from disruption in control plane service without losing its MPLS forwarding state.

In 12.2(33)SRA, this feature was integrated and new commands were added.

In 12.2(33)SRB, support was added for ISSU and SSO recovery of LSPs that include loose hops.

In 12.2(33)SXH, this feature was integrated.


Glossary

DSCP—differentiated services code point. Six bits in the IP header, as defined by the IETF. These bits determine the class of service provided to the IP packet.

Fast Reroute—A mechanism for protecting MPLS traffic engineering (TE) LSPs from link and node failure by locally repairing the LSPs at the point of failure, allowing data to continue to flow on them while their headend routers attempt to establish end-to-end LSPs to replace them. FRR locally repairs the protected LSPs by rerouting them over backup tunnels that bypass failed links or nodes.

graceful restart—A process for helping an RP restart after a node failure has occurred.

headend—The router that originates and maintains a given LSP. This is the first router in the LSP's path.

hello instance—A mechanism that implements the RSVP hello extensions for a given router interface address and remote IP address. Active hello instances periodically send hello request messages, expecting Hello ACK messages in response. If the expected ACK message is not received, the active hello instance declares that the neighbor (remote IP address) is unreachable (that is, it is lost). This can cause LSPs crossing this neighbor to be fast rerouted.

IGP—Interior Gateway Protocol. Internet protocol used to exchange routing information within an autonomous system. Examples of common Internet IGPs include IGRP, OSPF, and RIP.

ISSU—In Service Software Upgrade. Software upgrade without service interruption.

label—A short, fixed-length data identifier that tells switching nodes how to forward data (packets or cells).

LSP—label-switched path. A configured connection between two routers, in which MPLS is used to carry packets.

MPLS—Multiprotocol Label Switching. A method for forwarding packets (frames) through a network. MPLS enables routers at the edge of a network to apply labels to packets (frames). ATM switches or existing routers in the network core can switch packets according to the labels.

RSVP—Resource Reservation Protocol. A protocol that supports the reservation of resources across an IP network. Applications running on IP end systems can use RSVP to indicate to other nodes the nature (bandwidth, jitter, maximum burst, and so on) of the packet streams they want to receive.

state—Information that a router must maintain about each LSP. The information is used for rerouting tunnels.

tailend—The router upon which an LSP is terminated. This is the last router in the LSP's path.

TE—traffic engineering. The techniques and processes used to cause routed traffic to travel through the network on a path other than the one that would have been chosen if standard routing methods had been used.

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