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Cisco IOS Software Releases 12.0 S

Quality of Service for Aggregate VLAN Traffic on Cisco 12000 Series ISE Line Cards

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Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

Table Of Contents

Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

Contents

Prerequisites for Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

Restrictions for Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

Information About Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

Configuring Quality of Service

Defining a Traffic Class Using Match Commands

Configuring Quality of Service on an Aggregate Class of VLAN Traffic

Benefits of Configuring a QoS Policy on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

How to Configure Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

Configuration Example for Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance

Command Reference

match vlan

show class-map

Glossary


Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic


The match vlan command allows you to use the Modular Quality of Service Command-Line Interface (MQC) to configure a Quality of Service (QoS) policy on a group of VLAN subinterfaces. This feature allows service providers to offer improved service by applying one QoS policy on an aggregate class of traffic received from one or more VLANs over a group of subinterfaces.

Feature Specifications for the Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

Feature History
 
Release
Modification

12.0(26)S

This feature was introduced on the Cisco 12000 series 4-Port Gigabit Ethernet IP Services Engine (ISE) line card.

Supported Platforms

Cisco 12000 series


Finding Support Information for Platforms and Cisco IOS Software Images

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco IOS software image support. Access Cisco Feature Navigator at http://www.cisco.com/go/fn. You must have an account on Cisco.com. If you do not have an account or have forgotten your username or password, click Cancel at the login dialog box and follow the instructions that appear.

Contents

Prerequisites for Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

Restrictions for Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

Information About Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

How to Configure Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

Configuration Example for Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

Additional References

Command Reference

Glossary

Prerequisites for Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

The following prerequisite applies to Quality of Service policy on aggregate VLAN traffic:

In IOS Release 12.0(26)S, this feature is supported only on VLAN subinterfaces on a 4-Port Gigabit Ethernet ISE line card in the Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router.

Restrictions for Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

The following restrictions apply to the configuration of a Quality of Service policy on aggregate VLAN traffic over a group of 4-Port Gigabit Ethernet ISE subinterfaces:

A child service policy applied to a parent class map (other than class-default) is supported only on a main interface. In the following example, the child policy map parent1 is supported only on a main interface because it is applied to parent class vlan_grp1:

policy-map parent1
  class vlan_grp1
    shape average 128000
   service-policy child1
  class class-default
    shape average 128000000
   service-policy child2

A parent class map can include only match-vlan commands. No other types of match commands are supported. For example, the following class map cannot be used as a parent class map since it includes a match ip precedence command:

class-map match-any invalid_group
  match vlan  350
  match vlan  310-315
  match ip precedence 2

The match vlan command is not supported in a class map that includes a child service policy. In the following example, the match vlan 311 command is not valid because it is included in class2, a class map that is included in child service policy child1:

class-map match-all class1
  match ip precedence 2
class-map match-all class2
  match ip precedence 3
  match vlan 311
policy-map child1
  class class1
    shape average 64000
   set ip precedence 4
  class class2
    shape average 64000
   set ip precedence 2
policy-map parent1
  class vlan_grp1
    shape average 128000
   service-policy child1

When used in a parent class map for ingress traffic, a child service policy cannot include any other action besides the service-policy command. In the following example, ingress_parent1 is a valid ingress policy:

policy-map ingress_parent1
  class vlan_grp1
   service-policy child2
  class class-default
   service-policy child1

The next example shows an invalid ingress policy in which the parent class vlan_grp1 includes a shape command in addition to a child service policy:

policy-map invalid_ingress_parent1
  class vlan_grp1
   shape average 128000
   service-policy child2
  class class-default
   service-policy child1

When used in a parent class map for egress traffic, a child service policy supports only the service-policy and shape commands. The next example shows an invalid egress policy because it includes a non-shape (police) action below parent class vlan_grp1:

policy-map parent1
  class vlan_grp1
   police cir 640000 bc 4470 be 4470 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop
   service-policy child1
  class class-default
    shape average 128000000
   service-policy child2

You cannot configure a policy map (with the service-policy command) on a subinterface configured with a VLAN ID that is also used in a match-vlan command on the main interface. In the following example, service-policy and rate-limit commands are not supported under VLANs 350, 310-315, 450 and 410 because they are part of a VLAN group on the main interface:


class-map match-any vlan_grp1
  match vlan  350
  match vlan  310-315
class-map match-any vlan_grp2
  match vlan  450
  match vlan  410
policy-map parent1
  class vlan_grp1
    shape average 128000
   service-policy child1
  class vlan_grp2
    shape average 128000000
   service-policy child2

On the egress side of a main interface, a shape action is required in the VLAN group class map if the child policy contained in the class map requires a queue. In a child policy, actions such as bandwidth, shape, red, qlimit, and priority require a queue. If you include only a set or police command in a child service policy, a shape command is not required in the parent class.

In the following example, a shape command is required in class statement cust1 because this statement contains the child policy child1, and the policy map child1 contains a shape command (under class statements prec1 and prec2) that requires a queue:

policy-map child1
    class prec1
      set ip precedence 4
      shape average 12800000
    class prec2
      set ip precedence 5
      shape average 12800000
policy-map parent1
    class cust1
      shape average 128640000 
      service-policy child1 

Information About Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

This section describes concepts required for using the MQC to configure QoS policies on aggregate VLAN traffic over groups of Cisco 12000 series ISE interfaces or subinterfaces.

Configuring Quality of Service

Defining a Traffic Class Using Match Commands

Configuring Quality of Service on an Aggregate Class of VLAN Traffic

Benefits of Configuring a QoS Policy on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

Configuring Quality of Service

Configuring a Quality of Service (QoS) policy typically requires classifying traffic into classes, configuring policies applied to those traffic classes, and attaching policies to interfaces.

The MQC allows you to configure QoS policies for one or more traffic classes and apply QoS policies to an interface or subinterface.

You must follow these basic steps to configure and apply a modular quality of service policy:

1. Define a traffic class with the class-map command.

2. Create a service policy by associating the traffic class with one or more QoS policies (using the policy-map command).

3. Attach the service policy to the interface with the service-policy command.

Defining a Traffic Class Using Match Commands

You use the class-map command to define and isolate a a specific traffic flow (or class) from all other traffic. The class map defines the criteria to use to match against a specific traffic flow to further define it.

A traffic class contains three major elements: a name, a series of match commands, and an instruction on how to evaluate these match commands. The traffic class is named in the class-map command line.

Match commands are used to specify various criteria for classifying packets. Packets are checked to see whether they match the criteria specified in the match commands; if a packet matches the specified criteria, the packet is considered a member of the class and is forwarded according to the QoS specifications set in the service policy. Packets that fail to meet any of the matching criteria are classified as members of the default class.

The MQC does not necessarily require that you associate only one traffic class to one QoS service policy. Multiple traffic classes can be associated with a single service policy.

For information about the default class and how to use MQC to define a traffic class, refer to the Modular Quality of Service Command-Line Interface at http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios120/120newft/120limit/120xe/120xe5/mqc/mcli.htm.

Configuring Quality of Service on an Aggregate Class of VLAN Traffic

The QoS policies that you configure using the MQC are normally applied to a main interface or a subinterface. However, starting in IOS Release 12.0(26)S, on a Cisco 12000 series 4-Port Gigabit Ethernet ISE line card, you can apply a QoS policy to an aggregate class of traffic received over a group of subinterfaces. To do so, you use the match vlan command in class-map configuration mode.

The match vlan command allows you to define a class of traffic received from one or more VLANs. This allows service providers to offer improved service by applying one QoS policy on an aggregate class of VLAN traffic received over a group of subinterfaces. MQC actions such as shaping and bandwidth can be configured in the QOS policy applied to the aggregate class of VLAN traffic.

Use the match vlan command when you configure the class map (with the class-map command) for aggregate VLAN traffic. You can then associate the traffic class with one or more QoS policies (using the policy-map command) and later apply the service policy to one or more interfaces (the service-policy command).

For information about how to use the service-policy and policy-map command to complete a QoS configuration, refer to the Modular Quality of Service Command-Line Interface at http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios120/120newft/120limit/120xe/120xe5/mqc/mcli.htm.

Benefits of Configuring a QoS Policy on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

Because the match vlan command allows you to define a class of traffic received from one or more VLANs, service providers can offer improved service by applying one QoS policy on an aggregate class of VLAN traffic received over a group of subinterfaces. You can then configure MQC actions, such as shaping and bandwidth, in the QOS policy applied to the aggregate class of VLAN traffic.

How to Configure Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to create a class map and to define the match criterion to classify traffic for one or more VLANs:

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. class-map class-map-name

4. match vlan {vlan-id | vlan-id1-vlan-id2}

5. end

6. show class-map

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

class-map class-map-name

Example:

Router (config)# class-map vlan_grp3

Creates a class map using the name you enter for the traffic class and enters class-map configuration mode.

Step 4 

match vlan {vlan-id | vlan-id1-vlan-id2}

Example:

Router (config-cmap)# match vlan 2 4-6

Defines one or more VLANs to use as match criteria against incoming packets to classify traffic.

Step 5 

end

Example:

Router (config-cmap)# end

Returns to global configuration mode.

Step 6 

show class-map

Example:

Router (config)# show class-map

Verifies your class map configuration.

Configuration Example for Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic

This example shows how to configure a class of aggregate VLAN traffic and apply a service policy to it, using an existing business policy map and shaping the aggregate VLAN traffic, by following these steps:

1. Use the match vlan command to configure a class map (group1) for aggregate VLAN traffic received on VLANs 1 through 5.

2. Configure the class maps for various classes of business traffic: Voice over IP (VoIP), silver class (bus-lat), and gold class (bus-th).

3. Configure the child service policy (SLA) to apply to the business classes configured in Step 2.

4. Configure a service policy (parent4) to apply to the VLAN traffic class (group1) in which aggregate VLAN traffic is shaped to 512 Mbps and the child service policy SLA is applied.

class-map match-any group1
   match vlan  1-5
class-map match-any voip
   match ip dscp 40
class-map match-any bus-lat
   Match ip dscp 32
   Match ip dscp 24
class-map match-any bus-th
   Match ip dscp 16
   Match ip dscp 48
policy-map SLA
   class bus-th
      bandwidth remaining percent 80
      random-detect dscp-based
      random-detect dscp 8 10 packets 20 packets 1
      random-detect dscp 16 110 packets 367 packets 1
      random-detect dscp 48 200 packets 400 packets 1
      police cir 25600000 conform-burst 4470 excess-burst 4470 conform-action
set-dscp-transmit  16 exceed-action set-dscp-transmit 8
   class voip
      priority
      police cir 192000000 conform-burst 4470 excess-burst 4470 conform-action transmit  
exceed-action drop
   class bus-lat
      bandwidth percent 10
      bandwidth remaining percent 1
      queue-limit 75 packets
      police cir 256000000 conform-burst 4470 excess-burst 4470 conform-action transmit  
exceed-action drop
   class class-default
      bandwidth remaining percent 19
      random-detect dscp-based
      random-detect dscp 0 110 packets 367 packets 1
policy-map parent4
    class group1
      shape average 512000000
      service-policy SLA

Additional References

For additional information related to the Quality of Service on Aggregate VLAN Traffic feature, refer to the following references:

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Configuring QoS Policies Using the Modular QoS CLI

Modular Quality of Service Command-Line Interface

match (class-map configuration)

IOS Commands

Configuring QoS

Catalyst 3550 Multilayer Switch Software Configuration Guide

Configuring 802.1Q VLAN Encapsulation

Configuring Virtual LAN Encapsulation


Standards

Standards
Title

None

 

MIBs

MIBs
MIBs Link

None

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs


RFCs

RFCs
Title

None

 

Technical Assistance

Description
Link

Technical Assistance Center (TAC) home page, containing 30,000 pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content.

http://www.cisco.com/public/support/tac/home.shtml


Command Reference

This section documents new commands. All other commands used with this feature are documented in the Cisco IOS Release 12.0(26)S command reference publications.

match vlan

show class-map

match vlan

To define the VLAN IDs used as match criteria to classify a class of traffic, use the match-vlan command in class map configuration mode. To disable the VLAN IDs used as match criteria, use the no form of this command.

match-vlan {vlan-id | vlan-id1-vlan-id2}

no match-vlan {vlan-id | vlan-id1-vlan-id2}

Syntax Description

vlan-id

VLAN ID used as match criteria to classify a class of traffic. The valid values are from 1 to 4094.

vlan-id1-vlan-id2

A range of VLAN IDs used as match criteria to classify a class of traffic. You can enter up to 30 vlan-id1-vlan-id2 values in a match vlan command. Use a hyphen to separate the VLAN IDs in each range. Use a space to separate each range of VLAN IDs. The valid values for each vlan-id is 1 to 4094.


Defaults

By default, no match criterion is defined.

Command Modes

Class map configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(26)S

This command was introduced on Cisco 12000 series ISE line cards.


Usage Guidelines

You can use both the vlan-id and vlan-id1-vlan-id2 arguments in the same match vlan command.

Examples

The following example shows how to use both the vlan-id and vlan-id1-vlan-id2 match criteria to configure class map vgroup1 that includes traffic from VLANs 3 to 5 and 20:

Router (config)# class-map vgroup1
Router (config-cmap)# match-vlan 3-5 20

The next example shows how to use multiple match vlan statements in the same class map to configure a class of aggregate VLAN traffic:

Router (config)# class-map match-any cust1
Router (config-cmap)# match-vlan 301
Router (config-cmap)# match-vlan 400
Router (config-cmap)# match-vlan 500-510
Router (config-cmap)# match-vlan 600 610-611 613

The following example shows how to use a no match vlan statement to remove VLAN 104 from the previously configured class map cust1 that included aggregate VLAN traffic from VLANs 100 and 102 through 106. Note that you cannot remove VLAN 104 from class cust1 of aggregate VLAN traffic just by entering the no match vlan 104 command:

Router (config)# class-map match-any cust1
Router (config-cmap)# match-vlan 100 102-106
Router (config-cmap)# end

Router (config)# class-map match-any cust1
Router (config-cmap)# no match-vlan 100 102-106
Router (config-cmap)# match-vlan 100 102-103 105-106

Related Commands

Command
Description

class-map

Creates a class map for the specified class.

policy-map

Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy.

service-policy

Attaches a policy map to an input interface, output interface, or subinterface


show class-map

To display information about a class map configured for an aggregate VLAN group, use the show class-map command in global configuration mode.

show class-map class-name

no show class-map class-name

Syntax Description

class-name

Name of the class map.


Defaults

This command has no default settings.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(7)S

This command was introduced in the Release 12.0 S train.


Usage Guidelines

Use the show class-map command to verify the VLANs included in a class of aggregate VLAN traffic.

Examples

The following example shows how to display the current configuration of a class map that specifies match criteria for selecting traffic from VLAN 350 and VLANs 310 to 315:

Router (config)# show class-map vlan_grp1
class-map match-any vlan_grp1
  match vlan  350
  match vlan  310-315

Related Commands

Command
Description

class-map

Creates a class map for the specified class.

show policy-map

Displays policy map information.


Glossary

ISE—IP Services Engine. ISE line cards for Cisco 12000 series Internet Routers provide enhanced Layer 3 capabilities for high-speed customer aggregation, backbone connectivity, and peering solutions. These line cards are available in both concatenated and channelized versions.

MQC—Modular Quality of Service Command-Line Interface. A CLI used to configure Quality of Service that allows users to specify a traffic class independently of QoS policies.

QoS—Quality of Service. The performance of a transmission across a network. To ensure that receivers get the quality they expect—a video image that is smooth rather than choppy, for example—various strategies have been developed that enable routers to give preference to one set of packets over others that arrive at the routers at the same moment. These strategies are known as Quality of Service features.


Note Refer to the Internetworking Terms and Acronyms for terms not included in this glossary.