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4-Port ATM ISE Line Card for Cisco 12000 Series Routers

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Software Configuration of ATM ISE Line Cards for Cisco 12000 Series Routers

Table Of Contents

Software Configuration of ATM ISE Line Cards for Cisco 12000 Series Routers

Contents

Prerequisites for the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

Restrictions for the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

Information About the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

Features of the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

Layer 3-Specific Features

Layer 2-Specific Features

How to Perform a Basic Configuration of the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

Configuring an ATM Interface

Default Interface Configuration

Configuration Basics

Configuring UNI and NNI Cell Support

Troubleshooting Tips

How to Configure Layer 3 Terminated VCs on the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

Configuring Layer 3 Terminated Virtual Circuits

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuring ATM Shaping on Terminated VCs

Restrictions

Configuring OAM Management on Terminated VCs

Configuring Quality of Service on Terminated VCs

Configuring Traffic Policing

Configuring a Per-VC Queue Limit

Configuring Per-VC WRED

Configuring Per-VC MDRR and Low Latency Queueing

Configuring the set Commands

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuring and Managing VC Bundles

Creating a VC Bundle

Applying Bundle-Level Parameters

Committing a VC to a Bundle

Applying Parameters to Individual VCs

VC Bundle Examples

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuring Bridged PVCs

How to Configure AToM VCs on the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

Configuring Layer 2 AToM Virtual Circuits

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuring AToM VCs

Prerequisites

Configuring ATM AAL5 over MPLS

Configuring ATM Cell Relay over MPLS on PVCs

Configuring ATM Cell Relay over MPLS on PVPs

Configuring ATM Cell Relay over MPLS on a Port

Configuring ATM Cell Packing over MPLS on PVCs

Configuring ATM Cell Packing over MPLS on PVPs

Configuring ATM Cell Packing over MPLS on a Port

Configuring OAM Emulation on AToM VCs

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuring ATM Shaping on AToM VCs

Restrictions

Configuring Cell Relay over MPLS on PVCs

Configuring Cell Relay over MPLS on PVPs

Configuring Cell Packing over MPLS on PVCs

Configuring Cell Packing over MPLS on PVPs

Configuring AAL5 over MPLS on PVCs

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuring Cell-Based Traffic Policing on AToM VCs

Restrictions

Configuring CBR or UBR.1 Policing

Configuring VBR.1 Policing

Configuring VBR.2 Policing

Configuring VBR.3 Policing

Attaching a Service Policy to a PVC

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuring Experimental Mapping

Configuring Experimental Bits on PVCs

Configuring Experimental Bits on a Port

Troubleshooting ATM Errors on the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

Troubleshooting Commands

show interfaces atm

show controller traffic

show controller atm

Obtaining Per-VC Counters

Debugging Unexpected TX Drops on a VC

Upgrading the FPGA Image

Configuring Modular QoS CLI

Defining a Traffic Class

Using the class-map match-any and class-map match-all Commands

Creating a Traffic Policy

Commands for Egress Traffic

Commands for Ingress Traffic

Attaching a Traffic Policy to a PVC

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance

Command Reference

police rate

random-detect dscp

Glossary


Software Configuration of ATM ISE Line Cards for Cisco 12000 Series Routers


This feature module describes the software configuration for the Cisco 4-Port ATM Internet Services Engine (ISE) line cards in the Cisco 12000 Series Router. The line card comes in two variations: OC-12c/STM-4c and OC-3c/STM-1; otherwise, the features are the same on both cards.

Feature History for the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

Release
Modification

12.0(25)S

The 4-Port OC-12c/STM-4c ATM ISE line card was introduced.

12.0(26)S2

The 4-Port OC-3c/STM-1 ATM ISE line card was integrated into 12.0(26)S.

12.0(27)S1

The 4-Port OC-3c/STM-1 ATM ISE line card was introduced. AToM, Layer 2/Layer 3 features on a single port and enhanced QoS policing features were introduced.


Finding Support Information for Platforms and Cisco IOS Software Images

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco IOS software image support. Access Cisco Feature Navigator at http://www.cisco.com/go/fn. You must have an account on Cisco.com. If you do not have an account or have forgotten your username or password, click Cancel at the login dialog box and follow the instructions that appear.

Contents

Prerequisites for the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

Restrictions for the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

Information About the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

How to Perform a Basic Configuration of the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

How to Configure Layer 3 Terminated VCs on the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

How to Configure AToM VCs on the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

Troubleshooting ATM Errors on the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

Configuring Modular QoS CLI

Additional References

Command Reference

Glossary

Prerequisites for the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

There are no prerequisites for using the 4-port ATM ISE line card.

Restrictions for the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

Restrictions and limitations for the 4-Port ATM ISE line cards are listed in Table 1 and Table 2.

Table 1 Supported Values for 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

Feature
Limitation

Maximum number of cell packing or policing VCs1

508 per port2

Maximum number of active VCs3 :
Layer 2
Layer 3


10244 per port and card
20473 per port and card

Range of VPI5 values

Varies with vc-per-vp value.
In Release 12.0(25)S: up to 255
In Release 12.0(27)S:
UNI VPIs—up to 255; NNI VPIs—up to 4095

Range of VCI6 values

Varies with vc-per-vp value, up to 65,535

1 VC=virtual circuit.

2 Hardware limitation.

3 Subject to overall system limitation and configuration.

4 If cell packing or policing are configured, the remaining 516 available VCs can be configured for cell relay over MPLS or AAL5 over MPLS.

5 VPI=virtual path identifier.

6 VCI=virtual channel identifier.


Table 2 Scalability Limitations for the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card 

Feature
Layer 2 Limitation

Maximum number of AToM Tunnels per port

1024

Maximum number of AToM Tunnels per line card

1024

Maximum number of AToM Tunnels per router

2048

Maximum number of AToM Tunnels per port with features1

508

Maximum number of AToM Tunnels per port with cell packing

508

Maximum number of AToM Tunnels per line card with features1

1024

Maximum number of AToM Tunnels per line card with cell packing

1024

1 Includes features such as policing


Information About the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

The 4-Port ATM ISE line cards, which deliver line rate OC-12c/STM-4c or OC-3c/STM-1 bandwidth, provide enhanced Layer 2 and Layer 3 capabilities for high-speed customer aggregation, backbone connectivity, and peering solutions. These cards perform traffic shaping and per-virtual circuit (VC) queueing, and support per-VC Modified Deficit Round Robin (MDRR) with per-VC low latency queueing (LLQ). They also support Any Transport over MPLS (AToM), enhanced traffic policing, and the ability to configure both AToM VCs and terminated VCs on a single port.

MDRR is implemented on a per-VC basis with up to eight queues per VC, where one of the queues is a low latency queue (LLQ). Both per-VC Weighted Random Early Detection (WRED) and per-VC MDRR are performed in the hardware.

The 4-Port OC-12c/STM-4c ATM ISE line card provides the Cisco 12000 Series Router with four 622-Mbps ATM interfaces. The 4-Port OC-3c/STM-1 ATM ISE line card provides four 155-Mbps ATM interfaces. The cards communicate with the Cisco 12000 Series Router switch fabric.

Features of the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

The following are the features supported by the 4-Port ATM ISE line cards:

Traffic shaping on a per-VC and per-virtual path (VP) basis with a minimum granularity of 1 Kbps, in compliance with I.371 granularity definition.

Per-VC queueing using configurable per-VC queue limits or per-VC WRED.

A VC address can be any of the virtual path identifier (VPI) and virtual channel identifier (VCI) range. User-network interface (UNI) VPIs can be in the range of 0..255; network-to-network interface (NNI) VPIs can be in the range of 0..4095. VCIs can be in the range 0..65,535.

Per-VC statistics through hardware.

Per-port statistics through hardware.

AAL5 [I.362] [I.363] reassembly and segmentation.

Non-real-time variable bit rate (VBR-nrt) and real time variable bit rate (VBR-rt) traffic shaping with 99+ percent shaping accuracy.

Constant bit rate (CBR) traffic shaping with 99+ percent shaping accuracy.

Unspecified bit rate (UBR) with support for optional peak cell rate (PCR) parameter with 99+ percent shaping accuracy.

VP tunnel traffic shaping for the full range of VPI on UNI interfaces—up to 256 VP tunnels per port.

Maximum transmission unit (MTU) of up to 9180 bytes.

Each VC supports up to 9K MTU.

F4 and F5 flows of operation, administration, and maintenance (OAM) cells and OAM management specified as requirements by [UNI 3.x] [I.610].

Layer 3-Specific Features

Supports up to 2047 traffic-shaped VC connections per interface.1

Bidirectional OC-12c/STM-4c line rate for 64-byte packets (two cells) on all four ports. This is an aggregate line rate of approximately 2.8 million packets per second.

Bidirectional OC-3c/STM-1 full line rate for any packet size on all four ports.

Support for up to 120 distinct WRED profiles per interface. These profiles are configurable using Cisco IOS software.

ATM VC bundle management.

MPLS Traffic Engineering (TE), including Single Area (OSPF,ISIS), DS-TE (OSPF,ISIS), Autobandwidth, TE Metrics (OSPF,ISIS), TE Node Exclusion (OSPF,ISIS), Multiarea (OSPF,ISIS).

Support for thousands of ACL/xACL entries, including both ingress and egress for interfaces and subinterfaces.

Committed Access Rate (CAR), including CAR action continue, including both ingress and egress for interfaces and subinterfaces.

Policy-based routing (PBR) for interfaces and subinterfaces.

Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) policy accounting.

Unicast reversepath forwarding (uRPF) loose mode.

Sophisticated MQC classifications based on IP ACL/xACL, IP precedence/DSCP, MPLS EXP, QoS groups, and more.

IP and MPLS traffic marking

QoS Policy Propagation via BGP (QPPB)

Ingress IP-based traffic shaping.

Netflow, including sampled ingress/egress Netflow, aggregated Netflow, and MPLS-aware Netflow.

High Availability, including route processor redundancy (RPR), RPR+, and Stateful Switchover (SSO).

ATM OAM F5 continuity check.

MPLS virtual private network (VPN).

UNI 3.x and Interim Local Management Interface (ILMI).

Switched virtual circuit (SVC) support for point-to-point and point-to-multipoint connections.

Multicast packet replication.

ATM cell loss priority (CLP) bit setting.

MPLS VPN Inter-AS.

MPLS VPN carrier supporting carrier (CsC).

Layer 2-Specific Features

Supports up to 2047 traffic-shaped VC connections per interface.2

Any Transport over Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) [AToM].

ATM OAM Emulation

Cell-based policing

Experimental bit marking

Cell packing for port, VC, and VP modes

Cell relay for port, VC, and VP modes

How to Perform a Basic Configuration of the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

The 4-port ATM ISE line cards provide the ability to configure Layer 2 AToM VCs as well as Layer 3 terminated VCs. On any individual ATM interface, you can configure both AToM VCs and terminated VCs as required. The configurations of these are discussed in subsequent sections in this document. This section provides basic ATM interface configuration information and discusses those features that are applicable to both AToM VCs and terminated VCs.

Configuring ATM interfaces and virtual circuits is described in the following sections:

Configuring an ATM Interface

Configuring UNI and NNI Cell Support

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuring an ATM Interface

Use the show running-config command to display current port configuration information. On power up, the interface on a new 4-Port ATM ISE line card is shut down. To enable the interface, you must enter a no shutdown command in configuration mode.

Default Interface Configuration

When the 4-Port ATM ISE line card is enabled (taken out of shutdown) with no additional configuration commands applied, the default interface configuration file parameters, described in Table 3, are used.

Table 3 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card Default Configuration Values

Parameter
Configuration File Entry
Default Value

Maximum transmission unit (MTU)

[no] mtu bytes

4470 bytes

Maximum numbers of virtual circuits

[no] atm maxvc numvc

2047

Loopback

[no] loopback [diagnostic | line]

no loopback

Internal clock

[no] atm clock internal

no atm clock internal

SONET framing

[no] atm sonet stm-4

no atm sonet stm-4


Configuration Basics

After you verify that the new 4-Port ATM ISE line card is installed correctly, use the configure command to configure the new interface. Be prepared with the information that you will need, such as the interface IP address.

The Cisco 12000 Series Router identifies an interface address by its line card slot number and port number, in the format slot/port. Because each 4-Port ATM ISE line card contains four ATM interfaces, the port numbers are 0 to 3. For example, the slot/port address of an ATM interface on a 4-Port ATM ISE line card installed in line card slot 2 is 2/0 to 2/3.

Use the following procedure to create a basic configuration, including enabling an interface and specifying IP routing. You might also need to enter other configuration subcommands, depending on the requirements for your system configuration.

(For descriptions of configuration subcommands and the configuration options available, refer to the appropriate software publications in the "Related Documents" section.)

SUMMARY STEPS

1. show version

2. show interfaces

3. enable

4. configure terminal

5. interface atmslot/port

6. no shutdown

7. Ctrl-Z

8. copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

show version

Confirm that the system recognizes the line card.

Step 2 

show interfaces

Check the status of each port on the line card.

Step 3 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 4 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 5 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/3

Enter interface configuration mode for the specified ATM interface.

Step 6 

no shutdown

Example:

Router(config-if)# no shutdown

Change the state of the interface to up and enable the interface.

Step 7 

Press Ctrl-Z

Exit configuration mode.

Perform this after completing all desired configuration commands on the interface or subinterface.

Step 8 

copy running-config startup-config

Write the new configuration to memory.

Configuring UNI and NNI Cell Support

You can designate that the cell format for an interface be either User Network Interface (UNI) or Network Node Interface (NNI). The default setting is UNI. Use the atm maxvpi-bits command to change the maximum VPI range from 0..255 (UNI) to 0..4095 (NNI).

Router(config)# interface atm 2/2
Router(config-if)# atm maxvip-bits 12

To change the interface setting back to NNI, use the no form of this command: no maxvip-bits 12.

This configuration should be entered before the connection is added.

Troubleshooting Tips

To verify the operation of the interfaces configured on the 4-Port ATM ISE line card, use the following commands:

Command
Purpose

Router# show version

Displays the configuration of the system hardware, the software release, the names and sources of configuration files, and the boot images. Verify that the list includes the newly configured 4-Port ATM ISE line card ports and interfaces.

Router# show gsr

Displays information about the hardware modules installed in the Cisco 12000 Series Router.

Router# show interfaces atm slot/port

Displays information about the ATM interfaces. For example, to display information about slot 2, port 0, enter:

Router# show interfaces atm2/0

Router# show running-config

Displays information about the currently running configuration in RAM.

To display information about the current state of the ATM network, use the following commands:

Command
Purpose

Router# show atm interface atm slot/port

Displays current ATM-specification information about the 4-Port ATM ISE line card interface.

Router# show atm traffic

Displays current ATM statistics.

How to Configure Layer 3 Terminated VCs on the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

The following configuration tasks are described in this section:

Configuring Layer 3 Terminated Virtual Circuits

Configuring ATM Shaping on Terminated VCs

Configuring OAM Management on Terminated VCs

Configuring Quality of Service on Terminated VCs

Configuring and Managing VC Bundles

Configuring Bridged PVCs

Configuring Layer 3 Terminated Virtual Circuits

A virtual circuit (VC) is a point-to-point connection between two ATM devices. A VC is established for each ATM end node with which the router communicates. The characteristics of the VC are established when it is created and include the following for the 4-Port ATM ISE line cards:

Quality of service (QoS)

ATM adaptation layer (AAL) mode

Encapsulation type (LLC/SNAP, IP MUX, and NLPID)

Peak and average transmission rates

Permanent virtual circuits (PVCs) configured on the router remain active until the circuit is removed from the configuration. All virtual circuit characteristics apply to PVCs. When a PVC is configured, all configuration options are passed to the 4-Port ATM ISE line card. These PVCs are written to the nonvolatile RAM (NVRAM) as part of the configuration and are used when the Cisco IOS image is reloaded.

When you create a PVC, you create a virtual circuit descriptor (VCD) and attach it to the VPI and VCI. The VCD tells the card which VPI/VCI to use for a particular packet. The 4-Port ATM ISE line card requires this feature to manage the packets for transmission. The number chosen for the VCD is independent of the VPI/VCI used.

A permanent virtual path (PVP) is like a bundle of VCs, transporting all cells with a common VPI, rather than a specific VPI and VCI.

PVCs are created and configured using the pvc command in interface configuration mode. PVPs are created and configured using the atm pvp command in interface configuration mode.

The syntax of the pvc command is as follows:

pvc [name] vpi/vci

The syntax of the atm pvp command is:

atm pvp vpi

vpi is the ATM network VPI to use for this virtual circuit, in the range of 0 to 255 for UNI or 0 to 4095 for NNI; vci is the ATM network VCI to use for this virtual circuit, in the range of 0 to 655,535.

Troubleshooting Tips

To display information about the connected virtual circuits, use the following commands:

Command
Purpose

Router# show atm pvc

Displays current ATM PVC information.

Router# show atm vc

Displays current ATM VC information.

Configuring ATM Shaping on Terminated VCs

The 4-Port ATM ISE line cards support IP traffic shaping on terminated VCs. The following ATM shaping options are available:

Constant bit rate (CBR)—Supports real-time applications that request a static amount of bandwidth that is continuously available for the duration of the connection. (See Step 5.)

Real-time variable bit rate (VBR-rt)—Supports real-time applications that have bursty transmission characteristics. (See Step 6.)

Non-real-time variable bit rate (VBR-nrt)—Supports non-real-time applications with bursty transmission characteristics that tolerate high cell delay, but require low cell loss. (See Step 7.)

Unspecified bit rate (UBR)—Supports non-real-time applications that tolerate both high cell delay and cell loss on the network. There are no network service-level guarantees for the UBR service category, and therefore it is a best-effort service. (See Step 8.)

To configure ATM shaping, perform the shaping commands in PVC mode. You should use only one of the shaping commands in Step 5 through Step 8, depending on the type of shaping to be configured.

Restrictions

CDVT

When traffic shaping is configured on a VC, the cell delay variation (CDV) is set for the VC. This value will change according to the shaping class defined. The cell delay variation tolerance (CDVT) values are shown in Table 4.

Table 4 CDVT per Traffic Class for Traffic Shaping

Traffic Class
OC-12c/STM-4c Line Card
OC-3c/STM-1 Line Card

CBR

70 msec

70 msec

UBR

185 msec

305 msec

VBR-RT

70 msec

70 msec

VBR-NRT

185 msec

305 msec



Note For VBR connections in which the sustainable cell rate (SCR) is not equal to the PCR value, the CDVT is significantly lower.


Decreased VC Throughput

If you configure a VC on a 4-Port OC-12/STM-4 ATM ISE interface with a peak cell rate (PCR) or sustainable cell rate (SCR) greater than OC-6 (using the ubr, vbr-nrt, vbr-rt, or cbr commands), and attach a traffic policy with MDRR (configured using the bandwidth command) to the interface for specified traffic classes, when traffic on the interface from the specified classes is equal to or greater than the configured PCR or SCR values, frequent queueing and dequeueing changes occur between the MDRR queues and may cause a decreased VC throughput.

Decreased throughput is more likely to occur when the traffic consist of small packets and when a high amount of traffic is sent toward the high-priority queue. Such traffic will increase significantly the frequency of switches between queues, which may cause the nonpriority queues to lose their bandwidth. Therefore, when configuring a VC to more than OC-6, it is recommended to limit the high priority traffic using the police command.

SUMMARY STEPS

Use either Step 5, Step 6, Step 7 or Step 8 depending on the desired shaping.

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface atmslot/port.subinterface

4. pvc vpi/vci

5. cbr pcr

6. vbr-rt pcr scr

7. vbr-nrt pcr scr

8. ubr pcr

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface atmslot/port.subinterface

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0.2

Specifies an ATM interface or subinterface to configure.

Configure subinterfaces so that you can take advantage of access list definitions for the IP traffic.

Step 4 

pvc [name] vpi/vci
Example:
Router(config-if)# pvc 0/100 

Specifies a PVC with the specified VPI and virtual circuit identifier (VCI).

Step 5 

cbr pcr 

Router(config-if-vc)# cbr 155000

Specifies CBR shaping.

The pcr value indicates the peak cell rate. The range is from 38 to 622,000 Kbps.


Note Use either Step 5, Step 6, Step 7, or Step 8.


Step 6 

vbr-rt pcr scr burst
Example:

Router(config-if-vc)# vbr-rt 100000 40000 200000

Specifies VBR-rt shaping.

The pcr value indicates the peak cell rate, and its range is from 38 to 622,000 Kbps. The scr value indicates the sustainable cell rate, and its range is from 38 to pcr Kbps. The burst value indicates the burst size, in number of cells.

Step 7 

vbr-nrt pcr scr mbs
Example:

Router(config-if-vc)# vbr-nrt 100000 40000 200000

Specifies VBR-nrt shaping.

The pcr value indicates the peak cell rate, and its range is from 38 to 622,000 Kbps. The scr value indicates the sustainable cell rate, and its range is from 38 to pcr Kbps. The mbs value indicates the maximum burst size, in number of cells.

Step 8 

ubr pcr 
Example:

Router(config-if-vc)# ubr 100000

Specifies UBR shaping.

The pcr value indicates the peak cell rate, and its range is from 38 to 622,000 Kbps.

Configuring OAM Management on Terminated VCs

OAM may be enabled for PVC or SVC management on terminated VCs. To configure OAM management for an ATM Layer 3 PVC, perform the following procedure.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface atmslot/port.subinterface [point-to-point | multipoint]

4. pvc vpi/vci

5. oam-pvc manage

6. oam retry up-count down-count retry-frequency

7. oam-pvc manage cc {end | segment} [direction {both | sink | source}] [keep-vc-up [end aisrdi failure | seg aisrdi failure]]

8. oam retry cc {end | segment} [activation-count [deactivation-count [retry-frequency]]]

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface atmslot/port.subifnum {point-to-point | multipoint}

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/3.2 point-to-point

Specify the new ATM subinterface to configure.

Step 4 

pvc [name] vpi/vci

Example:

Router(config-subif)# pvc 10/50

Specify an ATM PVC.

Step 5 

oam-pvc manage [frequency]

Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# oam-pvc manage

Enable OAM management.

Step 6 

oam retry up-count down-count retry-frequency

Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# oam retry 3 5 1

(Optional) Specify OAM management parameters for re-establishing and removing a PVC connection.

Use the up-count argument to specify the number of consecutive end-to-end F5 OAM loopback cell responses that must be received in order to change a PVC connection state to up. Use the down-count argument to specify the number of consecutive end-to-end F5 OAM loopback cell responses that are not received in order to tear down a PVC. Use the retry-frequency argument to specify the frequency (in seconds) at which end-to-end F5 OAM loopback cells should be transmitted when a change in UP/DOWN state is being verified. For example, if a PVC is up and a loopback cell response is not received after the frequency (in seconds) specified using the oam-pvc command, then loopback cells are sent at the retry-frequency to verify whether or not the PVC is down.

Step 7 

oam-pvc manage cc {end | segment} [direction {both | sink | source}] [keep-vc-up [end aisrdi failure | seg aisrdi failure]]

Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# oam-pvc manage cc segment direction source

Configures ATM OAM F5 continuity check (CC) management to detect connectivity failures at the ATM layer.

Step 8 

oam retry cc {end | segment} [activation-count [deactivation-count [retry-frequency]]]

Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# oam retry cc segment 10 10 30

Configures the retry count and the frequency at which CC activation and deactivation requests are sent to the device at the other end of the PVC or the segment.

OAM Management

By default, end-to-end F5 OAM loopback cell generation is turned off for each PVC. A PVC is determined as down when any of the following is true on that PVC:

The router does not receive a loopback reply after a configured number of retries of sending end-to-end F5 OAM loopback cells.

The router receives a Virtual Circuit-Alarm Indication Signal (VC-AIS) cell.

The router receives a Virtual Circuit-Remote Detect Indicator (VC-RDI) cell.

A PVC is determined as up when all the following are true on that PVC:

The router receives a configured number of successive end-to-end F5 OAM loopback cell replies.

The router does not receive VC-AIS cell for 3 seconds.

The router does not receive VC-RDI cell for 3 seconds.

Note the following regarding OAM management:

When OAM management is not enabled, loopback (LB) cells received by the PVC are looped back to the sender, and for any received F4/F5-AIS, F4/F5-RDI cells are transmitted via this PVC, but the PVC state is not changed.

The 4-Port ATM ISE line card supports OAM management enabled mode for the entire range of VCs supported, while using the default frequency of 10 seconds on all VCs. The minimum OAM LB cell frequency of 1 second is currently permitted over no more then 50 PVCs (chassis performance limitation), and the default interval of 10 seconds is used for the rest of the PVCs.

OAM F5 Continuity Check

The 4-Port ATM ISE line card also provides OAM support for the use of F5 segment and end-to-end continuity check (CC) cells to detect connectivity failures at the ATM layer. It also generates various Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) notifications when CC cells indicate virtual circuit (VC) connectivity failure

ATM OAM F5 CC cells provide an in-service tool optimized to detect connectivity problems at the VC level of the ATM layer. CC cells are sent between a router designated as the source location and a router designated as the sink location. The local router can be configured as the source, the sink, or both.

The 4-Port ATM ISE line card implements two types of OAM cells: CC cells for fault management and CC cells for activation and deactivation. Fault management cells detect connectivity failures. Activation and deactivation cells initiate the activation or deactivation of continuity checking.

Configuring Quality of Service on Terminated VCs

Quality of Service (QoS) on terminated VCs is configured using the Modular QoS CLI (MQC). MQC allows users to create traffic policies and attach these policies to interfaces. A traffic policy contains a traffic class and one or more QoS features. A traffic class is used to classify traffic, and the QoS features in the traffic policy determine how to treat the classified traffic.

To configure and enable QoS on terminated VCs, you must define a traffic class, create a traffic policy, and attach this traffic policy to the PVC. See the "Configuring Modular QoS CLI" section for detailed instructions on how to complete these tasks.

The following tasks use the MQC to configure QoS on terminated VCs:

Configuring Traffic Policing

Configuring a Per-VC Queue Limit

Configuring Per-VC WRED

Configuring Per-VC MDRR and Low Latency Queueing

Configuring the set Commands

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuring Traffic Policing

This task describes how to configure traffic policing using the MQC. Traffic policing can be configured for either ingress or egress traffic.

This task illustrates the use of the match access-group command. For information on other match options, refer to the "Configuring Modular QoS CLI" section.

When traffic policing is configured, packets coming into interface are evaluated by the token bucket algorithm to determine whether they conform to or exceed the specified parameters. The conform-action, exceed-action, and violate-action parameters in the police command determine what is done with the packets.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. class-map class-map-name

4. match access-group access-group

5. exit

6. policy-map policy-name

7. class class-name

8. police bps burst-normal burst-max conform-action action exceed-action action violate-action action

9. exit

10. exit

11. interface atmslot/port.subifnum

12. pvc vpi/vci

13. service-policy {input | output} policy-name

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

class-map class-map-name

Example:

Router(config)# class-map acgroup2

Specifies the user-defined name of the traffic class.

Step 4 

match access-group access-group

Example:

Router(config-cmap)# match access-group 2

Specifies the numbered access list against whose contents packets are checked to determine if they belong to the class.

Step 5 

exit

Exits class-map mode.

Step 6 

policy-map policy-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map police

Specifies the name of the traffic policy to configure.

Step 7 

class class-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class acgroup2

Specifies the name of a predefined class, which was defined with the class-map command, to be included in the traffic policy.

Step 8 

Router(config-pmap-c)# police bps burst-normal burst-max conform-action action exceed-action action violate-action action

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# police 8000 2000 4000 conform-action transmit exceed-action set-qos-transmit 4

Specifies a maximum bandwidth usage by a traffic class through the use of a token bucket algorithm.

Step 9 

exit

Exits policy-map class mode.

Step 10 

exit

Exits policy-map mode

Step 11 

interface atmslot/port.subifnum

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0.1

Specifies the ATM subinterface to configure.

Step 12 

pvc vpi/vci

Example:

Router(config-subif)# pvc 10/50

Specifies the ATM PVC to attach the traffic policy to.

Step 13 

service-policy {input | output} policy-name

Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# service-policy input police

Attaches the traffic policy to the PVC.

The command syntax of the police command allows you to specify the action to be taken on a packet when you enable the action keyword. The actions resulting from the keyword choices are listed in Table 5.

Table 5 police Command Action Keywords

Keyword
Resulting Action

drop

Drops the packet.

set-clp-transmit

Sets the ATM CLP bit and sends the packet. This is supported for egress only.

set-discard-class-transmit new-class

Sets the discard-class and sends the packet. This is supported for ingress on terminated VCs only.

set-dscp-transmit dscp

Sets the differentiated services code point (DSCP) value and sends the packet.

set-mpls-exp-imposition-transmit mpls-exp

Sets the experimental value at tag imposition and sends the packet. This is supported for ingress on terminated VCs only.

set-mpls-exp-topmost-transmit mpls-exp

Sets the experimental value on the topmost label and sends the packet. This is supported on terminated VCs only.

set-prec-transmit new-prec

Sets the IP precedence and sends the packet.

set-qos-transmit new-qos

Sets the QoS group and sends the packet. This is supported for ingress only.

transmit

Sends the packet.


Configuring a Per-VC Queue Limit

Use this task to configure a per-VC queue limit on a single egress or ingress queue.

Restrictions

A queue limit cannot be configured together with WRED.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map policy-name

4. class class-default

5. queue-limit cells cells (for egress queue) or queue-limit packets packets (for ingress queue)

6. exit

7. exit

8. interface atmslot/port.subifnum

9. pvc vpi/vci

10. service-policy {input | output} policy-name

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map policy-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map qlimit1

Specifies the name of the traffic policy to configure.

Step 4 

class class-default

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class-default

Specifies to configure the default class.

Step 5 

queue-limit cells cells

or

queue-limit packets packets

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 576 cells

Specifies the maximum number of cells or packets queued for a traffic class that has a bandwidth configuration or class-default specified. Ingress queues are defined in packets and egress queues are defined in cells.

Step 6 

exit

Exits policy-map class mode.

Step 7 

exit

Exits policy-map mode.

Step 8 

interface atmslot/port.subifnum point-to-point

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm4/0.1

Specifies the ATM subinterface to configure.

Step 9 

pvc vpi/vci

Example:

Router(config-subif)# pvc 4/11

Specifies the ATM PVC to attach the traffic policy to.

Step 10 

service-policy {input | output} policy-name

Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# service-policy output qlimit1

Attaches the traffic policy to the PVC.

Configuring Per-VC WRED

Use this task to configure DSCP-based or precedence-based WRED on a VC. WRED can be configured on both ingress or egress queues, where ingress queues are defined in terms of packets and egress queues are defined in terms of cells.

Restrictions

Random-detect cannot be configured on a class that has priority configured.

No more than three different Random Early Detection (RED) profiles can be configured on one class of service (COS) queue.

SUMMARY STEPS

For precedence-based WRED use Step 7; for DSCP-based WRED use Step 8 or Step 9.

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map policy-name

4. class class-name

5. random-detect

6. random-detect exponential-weighting-constant n

7. random-detect precedence precedence min-threshold {cells | packets} max-threshold {cells | packets} [mark-prob-denominator]

8. random-detect dscp-based

9. random-detect dscp dscpvalue min-threshold {cells | packets} max-threshold {cells | packets} [mark-probability-denominator]

10. exit

11. exit

12. interface atmslot/port.subifnum

13. pvc vpi/vci

14. service-policy output policy-name

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map policy-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map wred-1

Specifies the name of the traffic policy to configure.

Step 4 

class class-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class1

Specifies to configure the first class.

Step 5 

random-detect

Enables a weighted random early detection (WRED) drop policy for a traffic class that has a bandwidth configuration or class-default specified.

Step 6 

random-detect exponential-weighting-constant n

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect exponential-weighting-constant 10

Configures a WRED exponential weighting constant on a per-COS-queue basis.

Step 7 

random-detect precedence precedence min-threshold {cells | packets} max-threshold {cells | packets} [mark-prob-denominator]

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect precedence 4 500 cells 1100 cells 1

Specifies the minimum and maximum cell thresholds and, optionally, the mark-probability denominator for the precedence value.

Specify cells for egress and packets for ingress.


Note Use this step to configure precedence-based WRED.


Step 8 

random-detect dscp-based

Indicates that WRED is to use the DSCP value when it calculates the drop probability for the packet.


Note Use this step to configure DSCP-based WRED.


Step 9 

random-detect dscp dscpvalue min-threshold {cells | packets} max-threshold {cells | packets} [mark-probability-denominator]

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect dscp 1 300 cells 700 cells 1

Specifies the minimum and maximum cell thresholds and, optionally, the mark-probability denominator for the DSCP value.

Specify cells for egress and packets for ingress.


Note Use this step to configure DSCP-based WRED.


Step 10 

exit

Exits policy-map class mode.

Step 11 

exit

Exits policy-map mode.

Step 12 

interface atmslot/port.subifnum

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0.1

Specifies the ATM subinterface to configure.

Step 13 

pvc vpi/vci

Example:

Router(config-subif)# pvc 1/1

Specifies the ATM PVC to attach the policy map to.

Step 14 

service-policy output policy-name

Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# service-policy output wred-1

Attaches the policy map to the PVC.

Configuring Per-VC MDRR and Low Latency Queueing

This task configures egress MDRR.

Using egress MDRR, the 4-Port ATM ISE line card supports up to eight queues for classes of traffic per VC. One of the queues is always reserved for a special class called class-default. Up to seven of the classes are normal queues, including the class-default queue. The eighth class is always a low latency queue.

The class, class-default, is always configured, and it consumes one of the eight queues. If not configured explicitly, it is configured implicitly. When the bandwidth command is used, at least 1 percent of traffic must be reserved for the class-default queue. All packets that do not match any user-defined class on the policy map are considered to belong to class-default, and therefore enter the default queue.

The low latency queue, or priority queue, is also always created. All traffic sourced from the router (including ping traffic and multicast traffic) uses this queue, regardless of classification.

Bandwidth percentages are converted into weights in units of ATM cells. The weights are internally proportioned such that the bandwidth is divided accurately among VCs.

The following are recommendations for configuring per-VC MDRR on the 4-Port ATM ISE line card:

Set the bandwidth to be at least 10 percent in each class. The default class, class-default, should also have at least 10 percent of the bandwidth allocation; therefore, you should ensure that the bandwidth allocated to all configured classes is less that 90 percent.

Set the MTU as low as possible on each subinterface, using the ip mtu command, while still avoiding fragmentation. Fragmentation causes extreme performance degradation, because it is done in the slow path. Do not decrease the MTU to the point where it causes fragmentation.


Note Changing MTU settings may cause all VCs on the interface or subinterface to be torn down and set back up.


If none of the classes is a priority class, the maximum number of classes that can be configured with the bandwidth command, excluding the class-default class, is six. When class-default is not specified, at least 1 percent must be allocated to this class.

If priority is not specified on any class, then any form of the bandwidth command can be used. If the priority command is configured without a police command (drop exceed-action), then the only form of the bandwidth command that is allowed on the other classes in the policy map is the bandwidth remaining command. If a police command is used on the priority queue, then all forms of the bandwidth commands are allowed.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map policy-name

4. class class-name

5. priority

6. class class-name

7. bandwidth remaining percent percent

8. class class-default

9. exit

10. exit

11. interface atmslot/port.subifnum

12. pvc vpi/vci

13. service-policy output policy-name

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map policy-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map WRED-MDRR-POLICY-1

Specifies the name of the traffic policy to configure.

Step 4 

class class-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class1

Specifies to configure the first class.

Step 5 

priority

Specifies the class as the priority class.

Step 6 

class class-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class2

Specifies to configure the second class.

Step 7 

bandwidth remaining percent percent

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining percent 50

Specifies a minimum bandwidth guarantee to a traffic class.

Here the minimum bandwidth guarantee is based on the remaining bandwidth available. If there is no available bandwidth, the class will receive no bandwidth, regardless of the percent specified.

Step 8 

class class-default

Explicitly specifies to configure the default class.

Step 9 

exit

Exits policy-map class mode.

Step 10 

exit

Exits policy-map mode.

Step 11 

interface atmslot/port.subifnum

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0.1

Specifies the ATM subinterface to configure.

Step 12 

pvc vpi/vci

Example:

Router(config-subif)# pvc 1/1

Specifies the ATM PVC to attach the policy map to.

Step 13 

service-policy output policy-name

Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# service-policy output WRED-MDRR-POLICY-1

Attaches the policy map to the PVC.


Note If the class-default is not explicitly configured, it is implicitly configured. All remaining bandwidth is allocated to class-default.



Note VCs with a configured bandwidth (using the bandwidth command) are limited to a peak cell rate (PCR) of 299,520 Kbps on the 4-Port OC-12c/STM-4c ATM ISE line card.


Examples

Following are additional examples of configuring MDRR:

Configuring Per-VC MDRR and Low Latency Queueing with Queue Limits

Configuring Per-VC MDRR and Policed Low Latency Queueing

Configuring Per-VC MDRR and Low Latency Queueing with Queue Limits

In the following example, per-VC MDRR and LLQ are configured with nondefault queue limits.

Configure the policy map as shown in the example:

Router(config)# policy-map MDRRandQlimit
Router(config-pmap)# class class1
Router(config-pmap-c)# priority
Router(config-pmap-c)# class class2
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining percent 50
Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 576 cells
Router(config-pmap-c)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 576 cells

After the policy map has been created, configure it on the VC using the service-policy command.

Configuring Per-VC MDRR and Policed Low Latency Queueing

If the police command is used with the exceed-action set to drop on the priority queue, then the bandwidth command can be used with either a percent or kbps specified.

The following example uses the bandwidth percent command to guarantee bandwidth to nonpriority classes. Twenty percent of the VC rate is guaranteed to class2.

Router(config)# policy-map MDRR-POLICE-LLQ
Router(config-pmap)# class class1
Router(config-pmap-c)# priority 
Router(config-pmap-c)# police 64000000 conform-action transmit exceed drop
Router(config-pmap-c)# class class2
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 20
Router(config-pmap-c)# end
Router#

The next example uses the bandwidth remaining percent command, and specifies that 20 percent of the remaining bandwidth is guaranteed to class2.

Router(config)# policy-map MDRR-POLICE-LLQ
Router(config-pmap)# class class1
Router(config-pmap-c)# priority 
Router(config-pmap-c)# police 64000000 conform-action transmit exceed drop
Router(config-pmap-c)# class class2
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining percent 20
Router(config-pmap-c)# end
Router#

After the policy map has been created, configure it on the VC using the service-policy command.

Configuring the set Commands

This task illustrates how to configure the toggling of various bits, such as the ATM CLP, the IP DSCP, the IP precedence, and the MPLS experimental. Setting of the ATM CLP bit is only supported on egress queues; setting of all other bits is supported on both ingress and egress queues.

In this task, use one of either Step 8, Step 9, Step 10, Step 11, or Step 12, depending on what bits you need to configure.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. class-map class-map-name

4. match ip precedence numbers

5. exit

6. policy-map policy-name

7. class class-name

8. set atm-clp

9. set ip precedence value

10. set ip dscp ip-dscp-value

11. set mpls experimental value

12. set qos-group value

13. exit

14. exit

15. interface atmslot/port.subifnum

16. pvc vpi/vci

17. service-policy input policy-name

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

class match-any class-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class match-any prec345

Specifies the user-defined name of the traffic class. The match-any keyword specifies a logical OR operator for all matching statements under this traffic class.

Step 4 

match ip precedence numbers

Example:

Router(config-cmap)# match ip precedence 3 4 5

Specifies up to eight IP precedence values used as match criteria.

Step 5 

exit

Exits class-map mode.

Step 6 

policy-map policy-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map SET_ATM_CLP

Specifies the name of the traffic policy to configure.

Step 7 

class prec345

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class prec345

Specifies the name of a predefined class, which was defined with the class-map command, to be included in the traffic policy.

Step 8 

set atm-clp

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# set atm-clp

Sets the ATM cell loss priority bit to 1.


Note Use either Step 8, Step 9, Step 10, Step 11, or Step 12, depending on what bits you need to configure.


Step 9 

set ip precedence

Specifies the IP precedence of packets within a traffic class. The IP precedence value can be any value between 0 and 7.

Step 10 

set ip dscp ip-dscp-value

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# set ip dscp 31

Specifies the IP DSCP of packets within a traffic class. The IP DSCP value can be any value between 0 and 63.

Step 11 

set mpls experimental value

Designates the value to which the MPLS bits are set if the packets match the specified policy map.

Step 12 

set qos-group value

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# set qos-group 10

Specifies a QoS group value to associate with the packet. The QoS group value can be any value between 0 and 99.

Step 13 

exit

Exits policy-map class mode.

Step 14 

exit

Exits policy-map mode.

Step 15 

interface atmslot/port.subifnum

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0.1

Specifies the ATM subinterface to configure.

Step 16 

pvc vpi/vci

Example:

Router(config-subif)# pvc 10/50

Specifies the ATM PVC to attach the policy map to.

Step 17 

service-policy input policy-name

Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# service-policy output SET_ATM_CLP

Attaches the policy map to the PVC.

Examples

Following are examples of configuring the IP DSCP value and the ATM CLP bit:

Configuring the IP DSCP Value

Configuring the ATM CLP Bit on a Per-Queue Basis with Per-VC MDRR

Configuring the ATM CLP Bit on Class-Default Queue with Per-VC MDRR

Configuring the ATM CLP Bit by Traffic Policing

Configuring the IP DSCP Value

This example marks packets of class1 by setting the IP differentiated services code point (DSCP):

Router(config)# policy-map QOS-SET
Router(config-pmap)# class class1
Router(config-pmap-c)# set ip dscp 63
Router(config-pmap-c)# class class2
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 30
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)#

In the above example, class1 is configured with a nonqueueing feature. Traffic that is matched to class1 is considered to belong to this class for purposes of the nonqueueing feature, but for purposes of queueing, the packet will go into the default queue.

After the policy map has been created, configure it on the VC using the service-policy command.

Configuring the ATM CLP Bit on a Per-Queue Basis with Per-VC MDRR

This example configures the CLP bit setting on a per-queue basis. Precedence 0 and 1 go to the queue of class prec01 with CLP bit off; precedence 2 goes to the queue of class prec2 with the CLP on; precedence 3, 4, and 5 go to the queue of class prec345 with the CLP on; all other traffic goes to the queue of class-default with the CLP bit off.

Router(config)# class-map match-any prec01
Router(config-cmap)# match ip prec 0 1

Router(config)# class-map match-any prec2
Router(config-cmap)# match ip prec 2

Router(config)# class-map match-any prec345
Router(config-cmap)# match ip prec 3 4 5

Router(config)# policy-map SET_ATM_CLP
Router(config-pmap)# class prec01
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# class prec2
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# set atm-clp 
Router(config-pmap-c)# class prec345
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# set atm-clp 
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

After the policy map has been created, configure it on the VC using the service-policy command.

Configuring the ATM CLP Bit on Class-Default Queue with Per-VC MDRR

This example configures the CLP bit setting on part of the traffic of the class-default queue. Precedence 0, 1 go to the queue of class prec01 with the CLP bit off; precedence 3, 4, and 5 go to the queue of class class-default with the CLP on; all other traffic goes to the queue of class-default with the CLP bit off.

Router(config)# class-map match-any prec01
Router(config-cmap)# match ip prec 0 1

Router(config)# class-map match-any prec345
Router(config-cmap)# match ip prec 3 4 5

Router(config)# policy SET_ATM_CLP
Router(config-pmap)# class prec01
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# class prec345
Router(config-pmap-c)# set atm-clp 
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

After the policy map has been created, configure it on the VC using the service-policy command.

Configuring the ATM CLP Bit by Traffic Policing

This example uses traffic policing to mark packets by setting the ATM CLP bit:

Router(config)# policy-map POLIC_SET_ATM_CLP
Router(config-pmap)# class class1
Router(config-pmap-c)# police 64000000 conform-action transmit exceed-action 
  set-clp-transmit 
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

After the policy map has been created, configure it on the VC using the service-policy command.

Troubleshooting Tips

Use the show class-map class-name command to display the information relating to a traffic class. Use the show policy-map command to display the configuration of a traffic policy and its associated traffic classes. Forms of these commands are listed in the table below.

Command
Purpose

Router# show class-map

Displays all traffic class information.

Router# show class-map class-name

Displays the traffic class information for the user-specified traffic class.

Router# show policy-map

Displays all configured service policies.

Router# show policy-map policy-map-name

Displays the user-specified traffic policy.

Router# show policy-map interface

Displays configurations and statistics of all input and output policies attached to an interface.

Router# show policy-map interface interface-spec

Displays configuration and statistics of the input and output policies attached to a particular interface.

Router# show policy-map interface interface-spec input

Displays configuration and statistics of the input policy attached to an interface.

Router# show policy-map interface interface-spec output

Displays configuration and statistics of the output policy attached to an interface.

Router# show policy-map [interface [interface-spec [input | output] [class class-name]]]]

Displays the configuration and statistics of the class name configured in the policy.


Configuring and Managing VC Bundles

See the following sections for configuration tasks for the VC bundle management feature. Each task in the list is identified as either required or optional.

Creating a VC Bundle

Applying Bundle-Level Parameters

Committing a VC to a Bundle

Applying Parameters to Individual VCs

VC Bundle Examples

Troubleshooting Tips

Creating a VC Bundle

To create a bundle and enter bundle configuration mode, in which you can assign attributes and parameters to the bundle and all its member VCs, use the following command in subinterface configuration mode:

Command
Purpose

Router (config-subif)# bundle bundle-name

Creates the VC bundle specified as bundle-name and enters bundle configuration mode.


Applying Bundle-Level Parameters

Bundle-level parameters can be applied either by assigning VC classes or by directly applying them to the bundle.

Parameters applied through a VC class assigned to the bundle are superseded by those applied at the bundle level. Bundle-level parameters are superseded by parameters applied to an individual VC.

The following sections describe applying bundle-level parameters:

Configuring Bundle-Level Parameters

Configuring VC Class Parameters to Apply to a Bundle

Attaching a VC Class to a Bundle

Configuring Bundle-Level Parameters

Configuring bundle-level parameters is optional if a class is attached to the bundle to configure it.

To configure parameters that apply to the bundle and all its members, use the following commands in bundle configuration mode, as needed:

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if-atm-bundle)# protocol protocol {protocol-address | inarp} [[no] broadcast]

Configures a static map or enables Inverse Address Resolution (Inverse ARP) or Inverse ARP broadcasts for the bundle.

Router(config-if-atm-bundle)# encapsulation aal-encap

Configures the ATM adaptation layer (AAL) and encapsulation type for the bundle.

Router(config-if-atm-bundle)# inarp minutes

Configures the Inverse ARP time period for all VC bundle members.

Router(config-if-atm-bundle)# broadcast

Enables broadcast forwarding for all VC bundle members.

Router(config-if-atm-bundle)# ilmi manage

Enables ILMI management.

Router(config-if-atm-bundle)# oam retry [up-count] [down-count] [retry-frequency]

Configures the VC bundle parameters related to OAM management.

Router(config-if-atm-bundle)# oam-bundle [manage] [frequency]

Enables end-to-end F5 OAM loopback cell generation and OAM management for all VCs in the bundle.


Configuring VC Class Parameters to Apply to a Bundle

Use of a VC class allows you to configure a bundle by applying multiple attributes to it at one time because you apply the class itself to the bundle. Use of a VC class allows you to generalize a parameter across all VCs, after which (for some parameters) you can modify that parameter for individual VCs. (See the "Applying Parameters to Individual VCs" section for more information.)

To configure a VC class to contain commands that configure VC members of a bundle when the class is applied to that bundle, use the following command in vc-class configuration mode. To enter vc-class configuration mode, use the vc-class atm command.

Command
Purpose

Router(config-vc-class)# oam-bundle [manage] [frequency]

Enables end-to-end F5 OAM loopback cell generation and OAM management for all VCs in the bundle.


In addition to the oam-bundle command, you can add the following commands to a VC class to be used to configure a bundle: bump, precedence, mpls experimental, and protect commands. For more information about these commands, refer to the ATM VC Bundle Management on Cisco 12000 Series 8-Port OC_3 STM-1 ATM Line Cards document.

Attaching a VC Class to a Bundle

To attach a preconfigured VC class containing bundle-level configuration commands to a bundle, use the following command in bundle configuration mode:

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if-atm-bundle)# class-bundle vc-class-name

Configures a bundle with the bundle-level commands contained in the specified VC class.


Parameters set through bundle-level commands contained in the VC class are applied to the bundle and all its VC members. Bundle-level parameters applied through commands configured directly on the bundle supersede those applied through a VC class.

Note that some bundle-level parameters applied through a VC class or directly to the bundle can be superseded by commands that you directly apply to individual VCs in bundle-vc configuration mode. For more information on bundle-vc configuration mode, see "Committing a VC to a Bundle" in the following section.

Committing a VC to a Bundle

To add a VC to an existing bundle and enter bundle-vc configuration mode, use the following command in bundle configuration mode:

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if-atm-bundle)# pvc-bundle pvc-name [vpi/] [vci]

Adds the specified VC to the bundle and enters bundle-vc configuration mode to configure the specified VC bundle member.


For information on how to create a bundle and configure it, see the "Creating a VC Bundle" section and the "Applying Bundle-Level Parameters" section.

Applying Parameters to Individual VCs

Parameters can be applied to individual VCs either by using VC classes or by directly applying them to the bundle members.

Parameters applied to an individual VC supersede bundle-level parameters. Parameters applied directly to a VC take precedence over the same parameters applied within a class to the VC at the bundle-vc configuration level.

The following should be noted regarding parameters applied to individual VCs:

Policing in a policy-map is performed on the aggregate traffic of the bundle. In other words, policing is not per VC, but rather for the whole subinterface.

MDRR defined using the bandwidth command is applied to each VC separately. In other words, the weight of the MDRR will be relative to the traffic passing on each VC and not relative to the traffic passing on the bundle.

The following sections describe applying parameters to individual VCs:

Configuring a VC Bundle Member Directly

Configuring VC Class Parameters to Apply to a VC Bundle Member

Applying a VC Class to a Discrete VC Bundle Member

Configuring a VC Not to Accept Bumped Traffic

Configuring a VC Bundle Member Directly

Configuring VC bundle members directly is optional if a VC class is attached to the bundle member.

To configure an individual VC bundle member directly, use the following commands in bundle-vc configuration mode:

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if-atm-member)# bump {implicit | explicit precedence-level | traffic}

Configures the bumping rules for the VC bundle member.

Router(config-if-atm-member)# mpls experimental [other | range]

Specifies which MPLS experimental bit values can be mapped to a member of a VC bundle.

Router(config-if-atm-member)# precedence [other | range]

Configures the precedence levels that apply to the VC bundle member.

Router(config-if-atm-member)# protect {group | vc}

Configures the bundle member to be an individually protected VC bundle member.

Router(config-if-atm-member)# service-policy {input | output} policy-map-name

Attaches a policy map to a member of a VC bundle.


Note Only one traffic policy can be applied to all VCs belonging to the same interface.


Router(config-if-atm-member)# ubr [pcr]

Configures UBR as the traffic shaping rule for the VC, qualified by an optional peak cell rate (pcr).

Router(config-if-atm-member)# vbr-nrt pcr scr [mbs]

Configures VBR-NRT as the traffic shaping rule for the VC, qualified by peak cell rate, sustainable cell rate (scr), and optional maximum burst cell size (mbs).

Router(config-if-atm-member)# vbr-rt pcr scr [mbs]

Configures VBR-RT as the traffic shaping rule for the VC, qualified by peak cell rate, sustainable cell rate (scr), and optional maximum burst cell size (mbs).

Router(config-if-atm-member)# cbr [pcr]

Configures CBR as the traffic shaping rule for the VC, qualified by an optional peak cell rate (pcr).


Parameters set directly for a VC at the bundle-vc configuration level take precedence over values for these parameters set for the VC at any other level, including application of a VC class at the bundle-vc configuration level.

Configuring VC Class Parameters to Apply to a VC Bundle Member

To configure a VC class to contain commands that configure a specific VC member of a bundle when the class is applied to it, use the following commands in bundle-vc configuration mode, as needed. To enter vc-class configuration mode, use the vc-class atm command in global configuration mode.

Command
Purpose

Router(config-vc-class)# oam-bundle [manage] [frequency]

Enables end-to-end F5 OAM loopback cell generation and OAM management for all VCs in the bundle.

Router(config-vc-class)# bump {implicit | explicit precedence-level | traffic}

Configures the bumping rules for the VC.

Router(config-vc-class)# precedence [other | range]

Configures the precedence levels for the VC.

Router(config-vc-class)# mpls experimental [other | range]

Specifies which MPLS experimental bit values for a virtual circuit (VC) class can be mapped to a member of the VC bundle.

Router(config-vc-class)# protect {group | vc}

Configures the VC either to belong to the protected group of the bundle or to be an individually protected VC bundle member.

Router(config-vc-class)# ubr [pcr]

Configures UBR as the traffic shaping rule for the VC, qualified by an optional peak cell rate (pcr).

Router(config-vc-class)# vbr-nrt pcr scr [mbs]

Configures VBR-NRT as the traffic shaping rule for the VC, qualified by peak cell rate, sustainable cell rate (scr), and optional maximum burst cell size (MBS).

Router(config-vc-class)# vbr-rt pcr scr [mbs]

Configures VBR-RT as the traffic shaping rule for the VC, qualified by peak cell rate (pcr), sustainable cell rate (scr), and optional maximum burst cell size (mbs).

Router(config-vc-class)# cbr [pcr]

Configures UBR as the traffic shaping rule for the VC, qualified by an optional peak cell rate (pcr).


Applying a VC Class to a Discrete VC Bundle Member

To attach a preconfigured VC class containing bundle-level commands to a bundle member, use the following command in bundle-vc configuration mode:

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if-atm-member)# class-vc vc-class-name

Assigns a VC class to a VC bundle member.


Parameters that configure a VC that are contained in a VC class assigned to that VC are superseded by parameters that are directly configured for the VC through discrete commands entered in bundle-vc configuration mode.

Configuring a VC Not to Accept Bumped Traffic

To configure an individual VC bundle member not to accept traffic that otherwise might be directed to it if the original VC carrying the traffic goes down, use the following command in bundle-vc configuration mode:

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if-atm-member)# no bump traffic

Configures the VC not to accept any bumped traffic that would otherwise be redirected to it.


VC Bundle Examples

VC Bundle Configuration on an IP Subinterface Example

VC Bundle Configuration Using MPLS and Service Policies Example

VC Bundle Configuration Using a VC Class Example

CLP Bit Setting on a Per-Experimental Basis with VC Bundling

VC Bundle Configuration on an IP Subinterface Example

This example configures a VC bundle with eight member VCs on an IP subinterface.

interface ATM5/0.2 point-to-point
 ip address 1.5.0.1 255.255.255.0
 no ip directed-broadcast
 no atm enable-ilmi-trap
 bundle b502
  pvc-bundle 1/107
   precedence 7
  pvc-bundle 1/106
   precedence 6
  pvc-bundle 1/105
   precedence 5
  pvc-bundle 1/104
   precedence 4
  pvc-bundle 1/103
   precedence 3
  pvc-bundle 1/102
   precedence 2
  pvc-bundle 1/101
   precedence 1
  pvc-bundle 1/100
   precedence other
 !

VC Bundle Configuration Using MPLS and Service Policies Example

This example configures a VC bundle with three member VCs on a MPLS-enabled subinterface. Each of the bundle members has the same traffic policy attached.

interface ATM5/1.1 point-to-point
 ip address 1.1.2.1 255.255.255.0
 no ip directed-broadcast
 no atm enable-ilmi-trap
 bundle b511
  oam retry 3 5 1
  oam-bundle manage
  pvc-bundle 1/103
   service-policy out high
   mpls experimental 5-7
  pvc-bundle 1/102
   service-policy out high
   mpls experimental 2-4
  pvc-bundle 1/101
   service-policy out high
   mpls experimental 0-1
!
 tag-switching ip
!

VC Bundle Configuration Using a VC Class Example

This example shows how to configure a VC bundle using VC classes.

interface ATM2/1.1 point-to-point
  ip address 2.1.2.1 255.255.255.0
  no ip directed-broadcast
  no atm enable-ilmi-trap
  bundle b211
    pvc-bundle lab-control 0/33 
      class-vc control-class
    pvc-bundle lab-premium 0/34 
      class-vc premium-class
      vbr-nrt 100000  100000  8000
      mpls experimental 0-6 
    pvc-bundle lab-priority 0/35 
      class-vc priority-class
    pvc-bundle lab-basic 0/36 
      class-vc basic-class
  !
  tag-switching ip

CLP Bit Setting on a Per-Experimental Basis with VC Bundling

CLP bit setting can be combined with VC bundling by configuring VC bundling on a group of VCs as desired, creating a policy map with CLP bit setting configured as desired, and then configuring the CLP bit setting.

This example configures VC bundling and CLP bit setting on a per-experimental basis. There are two VCs. Experimental 0 and 1 go to VC 1 with CLP on. Experimental 2 and 3 go to VC 1 with CLP off. Experimental 4 and 5 go to VC 2 with CLP on, and experimental 6 and 7 go to VC 2 with CLP off. This does not require a hierarchical policy, because there is only one queue per VC.


Note This example uses matching conditions based on the match mpls experimental command. This usage causes CLP bits to be set based on the incoming MPLS experimental bits. You can just as easily use the IP precedence bits to do this matching instead of the MPLS experimental bits.


class-map match-any exp01
  match mpls experimental 0 1
class-map match-any exp45
  match mpls experimental 4 5
policy set-clp-0145
  class exp01
    set atm-clp
  class exp45
    set atm-clp
interface atm4/0.1 point-to-point
  ip address 4.0.1.1 255.255.255.0
  bundle my-paris2-bundle
    pvc-bundle 40/1
      precedence 0-3
      service-policy output set-clp-0145
    pvc-bundle 40/2
      precedence 4-7
      service-policy output set-clp-0145
  !
  tag-switching ip

Troubleshooting Tips

To gather information on VC bundles so as to monitor them or to troubleshoot problems that pertain to their configuration or use, use the following commands in privileged EXEC mode, as needed:

Command
Purpose

Router# show atm bundle bundle-name

Displays the bundle attributes assigned to each VC bundle member and the current working status of the VC bundle members.

Router# show atm bundle bundle-name statistics [detail]

Displays statistics or detailed statistics on the specified VC bundle.

Router# show atm map

Displays a list of all configured ATM static maps to remote hosts on an ATM network and on ATM bundle maps.

Router# debug atm bundle adjacency events

Displays information about ATM bundle adjacency change events.

Router# debug atm bundle errors

Displays information on bundle errors.

Router# debug atm bundle events

Displays a record of bundle events.


Configuring Bridged PVCs

The purpose of bridged permanent virtual circuits (BPVCs) is to allow ATM interfaces in the Cisco high-end router to be used in an edge or aggregation role and connect to a Cisco Catalyst switch or to another remote device that supports bridged-format RFC 1483 PDUs only.


Note Only Ethernet frames using Ethernet v2 format are supported. IEEE 802.3 format is not supported.


To create a BPVC, perform the following steps:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# interface atm 1/0.4 multipoint

Create a multipoint subinterface.

Step 2 

Router(config-subif)# pvc 3/45

Create a PVC.

Step 3 

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# encapsulation aal5snap bridge

Configure the encapsulation type to "aal5snap bridge".


Note Only one bridged PVC is allowed for each ATM subinterface.


How to Configure AToM VCs on the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

This section describes how to configure AToM VCs in the following tasks:

Configuring Layer 2 AToM Virtual Circuits

Configuring AToM VCs

Configuring ATM Shaping on AToM VCs

Configuring Cell-Based Traffic Policing on AToM VCs

Configuring Experimental Mapping

Configuring Layer 2 AToM Virtual Circuits

A virtual circuit (VC) is a point-to-point connection between two ATM devices. A VC is established for each ATM end node with which the router communicates. Permanent virtual circuits (PVCs) configured on the router remain active until the circuit is removed from the configuration. All virtual circuit characteristics apply to PVCs. When a PVC is configured, all configuration options are passed to the 4-Port ATM ISE line card. These PVCs are written to the nonvolatile RAM (NVRAM) as part of the configuration and are used when the Cisco IOS image is reloaded.

A permanent virtual path (PVP) is like a bundle of VCs, transporting all cells with a common VPI, rather than a specific VPI and VCI.

PVCs are created and configured using the pvc command in interface configuration mode. PVPs are created and configured using the atm pvp command in interface configuration mode.

The syntax of the pvc command is as follows:

pvc [name] vpi/vci l2transport

The syntax of the atm pvp command is:

atm pvp vpi l2transport

vpi is the ATM network VPI to use for this virtual circuit, in the range of 0 to 255 for UNI or 0 to 4095 for NNI; vci is the ATM network VCI to use for this virtual circuit, in the range of 0 to 655,535.

The l2transport keyword indicates that the PVP or PVC is a switched PVP/PVC and not terminated. Once you enter this command, you enter l2transport submode.

Troubleshooting Tips

To display information about the connected virtual circuits, use the following commands:

Command
Purpose

Router# show atm pvc

Displays current ATM PVC information.

Router# show atm vc

Displays current ATM VC information.

Configuring AToM VCs

Any Transport over MPLS (AToM) encapsulates Layer 2 frames at the ingress PE and sends them to a corresponding PE at the other end of a pseudowire, which is a connection between the two PE routers. The egress PE removes the encapsulation and sends out the Layer 2 frame.

The successful transmission of the Layer 2 frames between PE routers is due to the configuration of the PE routers. You set up the connection, called a pseudowire, between the routers.

The 4-Port ATM ISE line cards provide a number of configuration options for ATM over MPLS:

AAL5: Encapsulates ATM AAL5 service data units (SDUs) in MPLS packets and forwards them across the MPLS network. Each ATM AAL5 SDU is transported as a single packet.

Configuring ATM AAL5 over MPLS

Cell relay in either VC or VP mode: Allows cells coming into a predefined PVC or PVP on the ATM interface to be transported over the MPLS backbone to a predefined PVC or PVP on the egress ATM interface. You can use cell relay mode to send single cells or packed cells over the MPLS backbone.

Configuring ATM Cell Relay over MPLS on PVCs

Configuring ATM Cell Relay over MPLS on PVPs

Cell relay in port mode: Allows a single cell coming into an ATM interface to be packed into an MPLS packet and transported over the MPLS backbone to an egress ATM interface.

Configuring ATM Cell Relay over MPLS on a Port

Packed cell relay in either VP, VC, or port mode: Allows you to insert multiple concatenated ATM cells in an MPLS packet. The packed cell relay feature is more efficient than single cell relay, because each ATM cell is 52 bytes, and each AToM packet is at least 64 bytes.

Configuring ATM Cell Packing over MPLS on PVCs

Configuring ATM Cell Packing over MPLS on PVPs

Configuring ATM Cell Packing over MPLS on a Port

OAM Emulation: Allows for sending a remote defect indication (RDI) in response to an alarm indication signal (AIS) without passing it along the MPLS network to the egress provider edge (PE). It also allows for sending F5 loopback cells of loopback point (with loopback indication equal to 0) in response to F5 loopback cells of source point (with loopback indication equal to 1) without passing them along the MPLS network to the egress PE. In addition, it drops F5 continuity check cells without passing them along the MPLS network to the egress PE.

Configuring OAM Emulation on AToM VCs

Prerequisites

Before configuring AToM, ensure that the network is configured as follows:

Configure IP routing in the core so that the PE routers can reach each other via IP.

Configure MPLS in the core so that a label switched path (LSP) exists between the PE routers.

Configure a loopback interface for originating and terminating Layer 2 traffic. Make sure the PE routers can access the other router's loopback interface.

Configuring ATM AAL5 over MPLS

ATM AAL5 over MPLS encapsulates ATM AAL5 SDUs in MPLS packets and forwards them across the MPLS network. Each ATM AAL5 SDU is transported as a single packet. Perform this task to enable ATM AAL5 over MPLS.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface atmslot/port

4. pvc vpi/vci l2transport

5. encapsulation aal5

6. xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Specifies an ATM interface.

Step 4 

pvc vpi/vci l2transport

Example:

Router(config-if)# pvc 1/200 l2transport

Assigns a virtual path identifier (VPI) and virtual circuit identifier (VCI). The l2transport keyword indicates that the PVC is a switched PVC and not a terminated PVC.

Step 5 

encapsulation aal5

Example:

Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# encapsulation aal5

Specifies ATM AAL5 encapsulation for the PVC. Make sure you specify the same encapsulation type on the PE and CE routers.

Step 6 

xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation 
mpls
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# xconnect 
13.13.13.13 100 encapsulation mpls

Binds the attachment circuit to a pseudowire VC.

Example

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface atm1/0
Router(config-if)# pvc 1/200 l2transport
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# encapsulation aal5
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# xconnect 13.13.13.13 100 encapsulation mpls

Configuring ATM Cell Relay over MPLS on PVCs

Perform this task to configure ATM Cell Relay on permanent virtual circuits (PVCs).

Restrictions

The cell relay function can only be configured when the ATM VC is configured for AAL0 encapsulation. It has no meaning if the VC is configured with AAL5 encapsulation.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface atmslot/port

4. pvc vpi/vci l2transport

5. encapsulation aal0

6. xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Specifies an ATM interface.

Step 4 

pvc vpi/vci l2transport

Example:

Router(config-if)# pvc 0/100 l2transport

Assigns a VPI and VCI. The l2transport keyword indicates that the PVC is a switched PVC and not a terminated PVC.

Step 5 

encapsulation aal0
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# 
encapsulation aal0

For ATM Cell Relay, this command specifies raw cell encapsulation for the interface. Make sure you specify the same encapsulation type on the PE and CE routers.

Step 6 

xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation 
mpls
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# xconnect 
13.13.13.13 100 encapsulation mpls

Binds the attachment circuit to a pseudowire VC or VP.

Example

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface atm1/0
Router(config-if)# pvc 0/100 l2transport
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# encapsulation aal0
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# xconnect 13.13.13.13 100 encapsulation mpls

Configuring ATM Cell Relay over MPLS on PVPs

Perform this task to configure ATM Cell Relay on permanent virtual paths (PVPs).

Restrictions

The cell relay function can only be configured when the ATM VP is configured for AAL0 encapsulation. It has no meaning if the VP is configured with AAL5 encapsulation.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface atmslot/port

4. atm pvp vpi l2transport

5. xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Specifies an ATM interface.

Step 4 

atm pvp vpi l2transport
Example:
Router(config-if)# atm pvp vpi 1 
l2transport

Specifies that the PVP is dedicated to transporting ATM cells. The l2transport keyword indicates that the PVC is a switched PVC and not a terminated PVC.

Step 5 

xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation 
mpls
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# xconnect 
13.13.13.13 100 encapsulation mpls

Binds the attachment circuit to a pseudowire VC or VP.

Example

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface atm1/0
Router(config-if)# atm pvp vpi 1 l2transport
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# xconnect 13.13.13.13 100 encapsulation mpls

Configuring ATM Cell Relay over MPLS on a Port

Port mode cell relay allows a single cell coming into an ATM interface to be packed into an MPLS packet and transported over the MPLS backbone to an egress ATM interface.

To configure port mode, you issue the xconnect command from an ATM main interface and specify the destination address and the VC ID. The syntax and semantics of the xconnect command are the same as for all other transport types. Each ATM port is associated with one unique pseudowire VC label.

Perform this task to transport ATM over MPLS in port mode:

Restrictions

The cell relay function can only be configured when the ATM interface is configured for AAL0 encapsulation. It has no meaning if the interface is configured with AAL5 encapsulation.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface atmslot/port

4. xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Specifies an ATM interface.

Step 4 

xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls

Router(config-if)# xconnect 10.0.0.1 123 
encapsulation mpls

Binds the attachment circuit to the interface.

Example

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface atm1/0
Router(config-if)# xconnect 10.0.0.1 123 encapsulation mpls

Configuring ATM Cell Packing over MPLS on PVCs

Perform this task to configure ATM cell packing on permanent virtual circuits (PVCs).

Restrictions

The cell packing function can only be configured when the ATM VC is configured for AAL0 encapsulation. It has no meaning if the VC is configured with AAL5 encapsulation.

In cell packing, only cells from the same VC/VP can be packed into one MPLS packet. Cells from different connections cannot be concatenated into the same MPLS packet.

The number of cells that can be packed varies from 2 to 28.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface atmslot/port

4. atm mcpt-timers [timer1-timeout timer2-timeout timer3-timeout]

5. pvc vpi/vci l2transport

6. encapsulation aal0

7. cell-packing cells mcpt-timer timer

8. xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Specifies an ATM interface.

Step 4 

atm mcpt-timers [timer1-timeout timer2-timeout timer3-timeout]

Example:

Router(config-if)# atm mcpt-timers 100 200 1000

Sets up the cell-packing timers, which specify how long the PE router can wait for cells to be packed into an MPLS packet.

You can set up to three timers. For each timer, you specify the maximum cell packing timeout (MCPT). This value gives the cell packing function a limited amount of time to complete. If the timer expires before the maximum number of cells are packed into an AToM packet, the packet is sent anyway. The range of acceptable values is from 2 to 4095.

Step 5 

pvc vpi/vci l2transport

Example:

Router(config-if)# pvc 0/100 l2transport

Assigns a virtual path identifier (VPI) and virtual circuit identifier (VCI). The l2transport keyword indicates that the PVC is a switched PVC and not a terminated PVC.

Step 6 

encapsulation aal0
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# 
encapsulation aal0

For ATM Cell Relay, this command specifies raw cell encapsulation for the interface. Make sure you specify the same encapsulation type on the PE and CE routers.

Step 7 

cell-packing cells mcpt-timer timer
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# 
cell-packing 10 mcpt-timer 1

Enables cell packing and specifies the cell packing parameters.

The cells value represents the maximum number of cells to be packed into an MPLS packet. The range is from 2 to 28.

The timer value allows you to specify which timer to use.

Step 8 

xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation 
mpls
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# xconnect 
13.13.13.13 100 encapsulation mpls

Binds the attachment circuit to a pseudowire VC.

Example

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface atm1/0
Router(config-if)# atm mcpt-timers 100 200 1000
Router(config-if)# pvc 0/100 l2transport
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# encapsulation aal0
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# cell-packing 10 mcpt-timer 1
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# xconnect 13.13.13.13 100 encapsulation mpls

Configuring ATM Cell Packing over MPLS on PVPs

Perform this task to configure ATM cell packing on permanent virtual paths (PVPs).

Restrictions

The cell packing function can only be configured when the ATM VP is configured for AAL0 encapsulation. It has no meaning if the VP is configured with AAL5 encapsulation.

In cell packing, only cells from the same VC/VP can be packed into one MPLS packet. Cells from different connections cannot be concatenated into the same MPLS packet

The number of cells that can be packed varies from 2 to 28.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface atmslot/port

4. atm mcpt-timers [timer1-timeout timer2-timeout timer3-timeout]

5. atm pvp vpi l2transport

6. cell-packing cells mcpt-timer timer

7. xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Specifies an ATM interface.

Step 4 

atm mcpt-timers [timer1-timeout timer2-timeout timer3-timeout]

Example:

Router(config-if)# atm mcpt-timers 100 200 1000

Sets up the cell-packing timers, which specify how long the PE router can wait for cells to be packed into an MPLS packet.

You can set up to three timers. For each timer, you specify the maximum cell packing timeout (MCPT). This value gives the cell packing function a limited amount of time to complete. If the timer expires before the maximum number of cells are packed into an AToM packet, the packet is sent anyway. The range of values is from 2 to 4095.

Step 5 

atm pvp vpi l2transport
Example:
Router(config-if)# atm pvp vpi 1 
l2transport

Specifies that the PVP is dedicated to transporting ATM cells. The l2transport keyword indicates that the PVC is a switched PVC and not a terminated PVC.

Step 6 

cell-packing cells mcpt-timer timer
Example:
Router(cfg-if-atm-l2trans-pvc)# 
cell-packing 10 mcpt-timer 1

Enables cell packing and specifies the cell packing parameters.

The cells value represents the maximum number of cells to be packed into an MPLS packet. The range is from 2 to 28.

The timer value allows you to specify which timer to use.

Step 7 

xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation 
mpls
Example:
Router(cfg-if-atm-l2trans-pvc)# xconnect 
13.13.13.13 100 encapsulation mpls

Binds the attachment circuit to a pseudowire VC or VP.

Example

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface atm1/0
Router(config-if)# atm mcpt-timers 100 200 1000
Router(config-if)# atm pvp vpi 1 l2transport
Router(cfg-if-atm-l2trans-pvc)# cell-packing 10 mcpt-timer 1
Router(cfg-if-atm-l2trans-pvc)# xconnect 13.13.13.13 100 encapsulation mpls

Configuring ATM Cell Packing over MPLS on a Port

Port mode cell packing allows multiple cells coming into an ATM interface to be packed into an MPLS packet and transported over the MPLS backbone to an egress ATM interface.

To configure port mode, you issue the xconnect command from an ATM main interface and specify the destination address and the VC ID. The syntax and semantics of the xconnect command are the same as for all other transport types. Each ATM port is associated with one unique pseudowire VC label.

Perform this task to configure cell packing ATM over MPLS in port mode.

Restrictions

In cell packing, only cells from the same VC/VP can be packed into one MPLS packet. Cells from different connections cannot be concatenated into the same MPLS packet

The number of cells that can be packed varies from 2 to 28.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface atmslot/port

4. no ip address

5. no ip directed-broadcast

6. atm clock internal

7. atm mcpt-timers [timer1-timeout timer2-timeout timer3-timeout]

8. no atm enable-ilmi-trap

9. no atm ilmi-keepalive

10. cell-packing cells mcpt-timer timer

11. xconnect

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Specifies an ATM interface.

Step 4 

no ip address

Disables IP processing.

Step 5 

no ip directed-broadcast

Disables translation of a directed broadcast to physical broadcasts.

Step 6 

atm clock internal

Causes the ATM interface to generate the transmit clock internally.

Step 7 

atm mcpt-timers [timer1-timeout timer2-timeout timer3-timeout]

Example:

Router(config-if)# atm mcpt-timers 100 200 1000

Sets up the cell-packing timers, which specify how long the PE router can wait for cells to be packed into an MPLS packet.

You can set up to three timers. For each timer, you specify the maximum cell packing timeout (MCPT). This value gives the cell packing function a limited amount of time to complete. If the timer expires before the maximum number of cells are packed into an AToM packet, the packet is sent anyway. The range of values is from 2 to 4095.

Step 8 

no atm enable-ilmi-trap

Disables ILMI traps.

Step 9 

no atm ilmi-keepalive

Disables ILMI keepalives.

Step 10 

cell-packing cells mcpt-timer timer
Example:
Router(config-if)# cell-packing 10 mcpt-timer 1

Enables cell packing and specifies the cell packing parameters.

The cells value represents the maximum number of cells to be packed into an MPLS packet. The range is from 2 to 28.

The timer value allows you to specify which timer to use.

Step 11 

xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls
Example:
Router(config-if)# xconnect 13.13.13.13 100 
encapsulation mpls

Binds the attachment circuit to a pseudowire VC or VP.

Example

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface atm1/0
Router(config-if)# no ip address
Router(config-if)# no ip directed-broadcast
Router(config-if)# atm clock internal
Router(config-if)# atm mcpt-timers 100 200 1000
Router(config-if)# no atm enable-ilmi-trap
Router(config-if)# no atm ilmi-keepalive
Router(config-if)# cell-packing 10 mcpt-timer 1

Configuring OAM Emulation on AToM VCs

If Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) Emulation is not configured, the OAM method is set to transparent pass-through on AToM VCs. OAM Emulation provides the ability to send a remote defect indication (RDI) in response to an alarm indication signal (AIS) without passing it along the MPLS network to the egress PE. It also allows for sending F5 loopback cells of loopback point (with loopback indication equal to 0) in response to F5 loopback cells of source point (with loopback indication equal to 1) without passing them along the MPLS network to the egress PE. In addition, it drops F5 continuity check cells without passing them along the MPLS network to the egress PE.

Restrictions

OAM Emulation can be enabled only on an AAL5 VC.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface atmslot/port

4. pvc vpi/vci l2transport

5. encapsulation aal5

6. oam emulation-enable

7. oam-pvc manage [frequency]

8. xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Specifies an ATM interface to configure.

Step 4 

pvc [name] vpi/vci l2transport

Example:

Router(config-if)# pvc 10/50 l2transport

Specifies a PVC with the specified VPI and virtual circuit identifier (VCI) to configure.

Step 5 

encapsulation aal5

Sets encapsulation to be AAL5.

Step 6 

oam emulation-enable

Enables OAM emulation.

Step 7 

oam-pvc manage [frequency]
Example:

Router(config-if-l2trans-pvc)# oam-pvc manage 0

Enables end-to-end F5 OAM loopback cell generation and OAM management for an ATM PVC or VC. Frequency is the time delay (0 to 600 seconds) between transmitting OAM loopback cells.

Step 8 

xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# xconnect 
13.13.13.13 100 encapsulation mpls

Binds the attachment circuit to a pseudowire VC.


Note OAM Emulation should be configured at both ends of the VC.


Example

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface atm1/0
Router(config-if)# pvc 10/50 l2transport
Router(config-if-l2trans-pvc)# encapsulation aal5
Router(config-if-l2trans-pvc)# oam emulation-enable
Router(config-if-l2trans-pvc)# oam-pvc manage 0
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# xconnect 13.13.13.13 100 encapsulation mpls

Troubleshooting Tips

To troubleshoot AToM VCs, use the following commands:

Command
Purpose

Router# show mpls l2transport vc

Displays information about AToM VCs that have been enabled to route Layer 2 packets on the router.

Router# show mpls l2transport vc detail

Displays detailed information about the VCs that have been assigned VC IDs.


Configuring ATM Shaping on AToM VCs

The 4-Port ATM ISE line cards support both VP and VC traffic shaping for AToM. The following ATM shaping options are available:

Constant bit rate (CBR)—Supports real-time applications that request a static amount of bandwidth that is continuously available for the duration of the connection. Use the command cbr pcr.

Real-time variable bit rate (VBR-rt)—Supports real-time applications that have bursty transmission characteristics. Use the command vbr-rt pcr scr.

Non-real time variable bit rate (VBR-nrt)—Supports non-real-time applications with bursty transmission characteristics that tolerate high cell delay, but require low cell loss. Use the command
vbr-nrt pcr scr.

Unspecified bit rate (UBR)—Supports non-real-time applications that tolerate both high cell delay and cell loss on the network. There are no network service-level guarantees for the UBR service category, and therefore it is a best-effort service. Use the command ubr pcr.

The following tasks illustrate how to configure the ATM shaping queue size and traffic shaping for CBR, UBR, VBR-rt and VBR-nrt classes of service on AToM VCs and VP tunnels in various transport modes.

Configuring Cell Relay over MPLS on PVCs

Configuring Cell Relay over MPLS on PVPs

Configuring Cell Packing over MPLS on PVCs

Configuring Cell Packing over MPLS on PVPs

Configuring AAL5 over MPLS on PVCs

Restrictions

When traffic shaping is configured on a VC, the cell delay variation (CDV) is set for the VC. This value will change according to the shaping class defined. The cell delay variation tolerance (CDVT) values are shown in Table 6.

Table 6 CDVT per Traffic Class for Traffic Shaping

Traffic Class
OC-12c/STM-4c Line Card
OC-3c/STM-1 Line Card

CBR

70 msec

70 msec

UBR

185 msec

300 msec

VBR-RT

70 msec

70 msec

VBR-NRT

185 msec

300 msec



Note For VBR connections in which the SCR is not equal to the PCR value, the CDVT is significantly lower.


Configuring Cell Relay over MPLS on PVCs

This task illustrates the configuration of CBR traffic shaping in cell relay over MPLS VC mode.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map policy-map-name

4. class class-default

5. queue-limit number-of-cells cells

6. exit

7. exit

8. interface atmslot/port

9. atm clock internal

10. pvc vpi/vci l2transport

11. encapsulation aal0

12. cbr pcr

13. service-policy output policy-map-name

14. xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map out_cbr

Specifies the name of the service policy to configure with the shaping queue size.

Step 4 

class class-default

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class-default

Specifies to configure the default class.

Step 5 

queue-limit number-of-cells cells

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 200 cells

Specifies or modifies the maximum number of cells the queue can hold for a class policy configured in a policy map.

Step 6 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

Exits class mode.

Step 7 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# exit

Exits policy-map mode.

Step 8 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Specifies an ATM interface or subinterface to configure.

Step 9 

atm clock internal

Example:

Router(config)# atm clock internal

Causes the ATM interface to generate the transmit clock internally.

Step 10 

pvc [name] vpi/vci l2transport
Example:
Router(config-if)# pvc 21/21 l2transport

Specifies a PVC with the specified VPI and virtual circuit identifier (VCI). The l2transport keyword indicates that the PVC is a switched PVC and not a terminated PVC.

Step 11 

encapsulation aal0
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# encapsulation 
aal0

For ATM Cell Relay, this command specifies raw cell encapsulation for the interface. Make sure you specify the same encapsulation type on the PE and CE routers.

Step 12 

cbr pcr 

Router(cfg-if-atm-l2trans-pvc)# cbr 1000

Specifies CBR shaping.

The pcr value indicates the peak cell rate. The range is from 38 to 622,000 Kbps.


Note In place of the cbr command, you can use the ubr, vbr-rt, or vbr-nrt commands to configure UBR, VBR-rt, or VBR-nrt shaping in the same way.


Step 13 

service-policy output policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy output out_cbr

Attaches the queue-limit service policy to the PVC.

Step 14 

xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls
Example:
Router(config-atm-vc)# xconnect 2.2.2.2. 121 
encapsulation mpls

Binds the attachment circuit to a pseudowire VC.

Example

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal

Router(config)# policy-map out_cbr

Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 200 cells
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# exit
Router(config)# interface atm1/0
Router(config)# atm clock internal
Router(config-if)# pvc 21/21 l2transport
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# encapsulation aal0
Router(cfg-if-atm-l2trans-pvc)# cbr 1000
Router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy output out_cbr
Router(config-atm-vc)# xconnect 2.2.2.2. 121 encapsulation mpls

Configuring Cell Relay over MPLS on PVPs

This task illustrates the configuration of UBR traffic shaping in cell relay over MPLS in VP mode.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map policy-map-name

4. class class-default

5. queue-limit number-of-cells cells

6. exit

7. exit

8. interface atmslot/port

9. atm clock internal

10. atm pvp vpi l2transport

11. ubr pcr

12. service-policy output policy-map-name

13. xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map out_ubr

Specifies the name of the service policy to configure with the shaping queue size.

Step 4 

class class-default

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class-default

Specifies to configure the default class.

Step 5 

queue-limit number-of-cells cells

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 100 cells

Specifies or modifies the maximum number of cells the queue can hold for a class policy configured in a policy map.

Step 6 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

Exits class mode.

Step 7 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# exit

Exits policy-map mode.

Step 8 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Specifies an ATM interface or subinterface to configure.

Step 9 

atm clock internal

Example:

Router(config)# atm clock internal

Causes the ATM interface to generate the transmit clock internally.

Step 10 

atm pvp vpi l2transport
Example:
Router(config-if)# atm pvp 100 l2transport

Specifies a PVP with the specified virtual path identifier (VPI). The l2transport keyword indicates that the PVC is a switched PVC and not a terminated PVC.

Step 11 

ubr pcr 
Example:

Router(config-if-vc)# ubr 2000

Specifies UBR shaping.

The pcr value indicates the peak cell rate and its range is from 38 to 622,000 Kbps.


Note In place of the ubr command, you can use the cbr, vbr-rt, or vbr-nrt commands to configure CBR, VBR-rt, or VBR-nrt shaping in the same way.


Step 12 

service-policy output policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy output out_ubr

Attaches the queue-limit service policy to the PVC.

Step 13 

xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls
Example:
Router(config-atm-vc)# xconnect 2.2.2.2. 121 
encapsulation mpls

Binds the attachment circuit to a pseudowire VC.

Example

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# policy-map out_ubr
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 100 cells
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# exit
Router(config)# interface atm1/0
Router(config)# atm clock internal
Router(config-if)# atm pvp 100 l2transport
Router(config-if-vc)# ubr 2000
Router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy output out_ubr
Router(config-atm-vc)# xconnect 2.2.2.2. 121 encapsulation mpls

Configuring Cell Packing over MPLS on PVCs

This task illustrates the configuration of VBR-RT traffic shaping in cell packing over MPLS VC mode.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map policy-map-name

4. class class-default

5. queue-limit number-of-cells cells

6. exit

7. exit

8. interface atmslot/port

9. atm clock internal

10. atm mcpt-timers timer1-timeout timer2-timeout timer3-timeout

11. pvc vpi/vci l2transport

12. encapsulation aal0

13. cell-packing cells mcpt-timer timer

14. vbr-rt pcr scr burst

15. service-policy output policy-map-name

16. xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map out_vbr-rt

Specifies the name of the service policy to configure with the shaping queue size.

Step 4 

class class-default

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class-default

Specifies to configure the default class.

Step 5 

queue-limit number-of-cells cells

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 300 cells

Specifies or modifies the maximum number of cells the queue can hold for a class policy configured in a policy map.

Step 6 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

Exits class mode.

Step 7 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# exit

Exits policy-map mode.

Step 8 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Specifies an ATM interface or subinterface to configure.

Step 9 

atm clock internal

Example:

Router(config)# atm clock internal

Causes the ATM interface to generate the transmit clock internally.

Step 10 

atm mcpt-timers [timer1-timeout timer2-timeout timer3-timeout]

Example:

Router(config-if)# atm mcpt-timers 100 1000 5000

Sets up the cell-packing timers, which specify how long the PE router can wait for cells to be packed into an MPLS packet.

You can set up to three timers. For each timer, you specify the maximum cell packing timeout (MCPT). This value gives the cell packing function a limited amount of time to complete. If the timer expires before the maximum number of cells are packed into an AToM packet, the packet is sent anyway. The range of values is from 2 to 4095.

Step 11 

pvc [name] vpi/vci l2transport
Example:
Router(config-if)# pvc 21/21 l2transport

Specifies a PVC with the specified VPI and virtual circuit identifier (VCI). The l2transport keyword indicates that the PVC is a switched PVC and not a terminated PVC.

Step 12 

encapsulation aal0
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# encapsulation 
aal0

For ATM Cell Relay, this command specifies raw cell encapsulation for the interface. Make sure you specify the same encapsulation type on the PE and CE routers.

Step 13 

cell-packing cells mcpt-timer timer
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# cell-packing 10 
mcpt-timer 1

Enables cell packing and specifies the cell packing parameters.

The cells value represents the maximum number of cells to be packed into an MPLS packet. The range is from 2 to 28.

The timer value allows you to specify which timer to use.

Step 14 

vbr-rt pcr scr burst
Example:

Router(config-if-vc)# vbr-rt 2000 1000 100

Specifies VBR-rt shaping.

The pcr value indicates the peak cell rate, and its range is from 38 to 622000 Kbps. The scr value indicates the sustainable cell rate, and its range is from 38 to pcr Kbps. The burst value indicates the burst size, in number of cells.


Note In place of the vbr-rt command, you can use the ubr, cbr, or vbr-nrt commands to configure UBR, CBR, or VBR-nrt shaping in the same way.


Step 15 

service-policy output policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy output out_vbr-rt

Attaches the queue-limit service policy to the PVC.

Step 16 

xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls
Example:
Router(config-atm-vc)# xconnect 2.2.2.2. 121 
encapsulation mpls

Binds the attachment circuit to a pseudowire VC.

Example

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# policy-map out_vbr-rt
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 300 cells
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# exit

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Router(config)# atm clock internal
Router(config-if)# atm mcpt-timers 100 1000 5000
Router(config-if)# pvc 21/21 l2transport
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# encapsulation aal0
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# cell-packing 10 mcpt-timer 1
Router(config-if-vc)# vbr-rt 2000 1000 100
Router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy output out_vbr-rt
Router(config-atm-vc)# xconnect 2.2.2.2. 121 encapsulation mpls

Configuring Cell Packing over MPLS on PVPs

The following task illustrates the configuration of VBR-NRT traffic shaping in cell packing over MPLS in VP mode:

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map policy-map-name

4. class class-default

5. queue-limit number-of-cells cells

6. exit

7. exit

8. interface atmslot/port

9. atm clock internal

10. atm pvp vpi l2transport

11. cell-packing cells mcpt-timer timer

12. vbr-nrt pcr scr mbs

13. service-policy output policy-map-name

14. xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map out_vbr-nrt

Specifies the name of the service policy to configure with the shaping queue size.

Step 4 

class class-default

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class-default

Specifies to configure the default class.

Step 5 

queue-limit number-of-cells cells

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 400 cells

Specifies or modifies the maximum number of cells the queue can hold for a class policy configured in a policy map.

Step 6 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

Exits class mode.

Step 7 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# exit

Exits policy-map mode.

Step 8 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Specifies an ATM interface or subinterface to configure.

Step 9 

atm clock internal

Example:

Router(config)# atm clock internal

Causes the ATM interface to generate the transmit clock internally.

Step 10 

atm pvp vpi l2transport
Example:
Router(config-if)# atm pvp 100 l2transport

Specifies a PVP with the specified virtual path identifier (VPI). The l2transport keyword indicates that the PVC is a switched PVC and not a terminated PVC.

Step 11 

cell-packing cells mcpt-timer timer
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# cell-packing 10 
mcpt-timer 1

Enables cell packing and specifies the cell packing parameters.

The cells value represents the maximum number of cells to be packed into an MPLS packet. The range is from 2 to 28.

The timer value allows you to specify which timer to use.

Step 12 

vbr-nrt pcr scr mbs
Example:

Router(config-if-vc)# vbr-nrt 3000 2000 200

Specifies VBR-nrt shaping.

The pcr value indicates the peak cell rate, and its range is from 38 to 622000 Kbps. The scr value indicates the sustainable cell rate, and its range is from 38 to pcr Kbps. The mbs value indicates the maximum burst cell size, in number of cells.


Note In place of the vbr-nt command, you can use the cbr, vbr-rt, or ubr commands to configure CBR, VBR-rt, or UBR shaping in the same way.


Step 13 

service-policy output policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy output out_vbr-nrt

Attaches the queue-limit service policy to the PVC.

Step 14 

xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls
Example:
Router(config-atm-vc)# xconnect 2.2.2.2. 121 
encapsulation mpls

Binds the attachment circuit to a pseudowire VC.

Example

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# policy-map out_vbr-nrt
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 400 cells
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# exit
Router(config)# interface atm1/0
Router(config)# atm clock internal
Router(config-if)# atm pvp 100 l2transport
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# cell-packing 10 mcpt-timer 1
Router(config-if-vc)# vbr-nrt 3000 2000 200
Router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy output out_vbr-nrt
Router(config-atm-vc)# xconnect 2.2.2.2. 121 encapsulation mpls

Configuring AAL5 over MPLS on PVCs

This task illustrates the configuration of VBR-RT traffic shaping in AAL5 over MPLS VC mode.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map policy-map-name

4. class class-default

5. queue-limit number-of-cells cells

6. exit

7. exit

8. interface atmslot/port

9. atm clock internal

10. pvc vpi/vci l2transport

11. encapsulation aal5

12. vbr-rt pcr scr burst

13. service-policy output policy-map-name

14. xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map out_vbr-rt

Specifies the name of the service policy to configure with the shaping queue size.

Step 4 

class class-default

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class-default

Specifies to configure the default class.

Step 5 

queue-limit number-of-cells cells

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 500 cells

Specifies or modifies the maximum number of cells the queue can hold for a class policy configured in a policy map.

Step 6 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

Exits class mode.

Step 7 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# exit

Exits policy-map mode.

Step 8 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Specifies an ATM interface or subinterface to configure.

Step 9 

atm clock internal

Example:

Router(config)# atm clock internal

Causes the ATM interface to generate the transmit clock internally.

Step 10 

pvc [name] vpi/vci l2transport
Example:
Router(config-if)# pvc 21/21 l2transport

Specifies a PVC with the specified VPI and virtual circuit identifier (VCI). The l2transport keyword indicates that the PVC is a switched PVC and not a terminated PVC.

Step 11 

encapsulation aal5

Example:

Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# encapsulation aal5

Specifies ATM AAL5 encapsulation for the PVC. Make sure you specify the same encapsulation type on the PE and CE routers.

Step 12 

vbr-rt pcr scr burst
Example:

Router(config-if-vc)# vbr-rt 10000 8000 256

Specifies VBR-rt shaping.

The pcr value indicates the peak cell rate, and its range is from 38 to 622000 Kbps. The scr value indicates the sustainable cell rate, and its range is from 38 to pcr Kbps. The burst value indicates the burst size, in number of cells.


Note In place of the vbr-rt command, you can use the ubr, cbr, or vbr-nrt commands to configure UBR, CBR, or VBR-nrt shaping in the same way.


Step 13 

service-policy output policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy output out_vbr-rt

Attaches the queue-limit service policy to the PVC.

Step 14 

xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls
Example:
Router(config-atm-vc)# xconnect 2.2.2.2. 121 
encapsulation mpls

Binds the attachment circuit to a pseudowire VC.

Example

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# policy-map out_vbr-rt

Troubleshooting Tips

Use the following show commands to display the cell relay and cell packing counters for troubleshooting purposes:

Command
Purpose

Router# show atm pvp

Displays information about configured PVPs.

Router# show atm pvc

Displays information about configured PVCs.

Router# show atm cell-packing

Displays the cell-packing counters.

Router# show interface atmslot/port

Displays ATM error counters for a particular interface.

Router# show mpls l2transport vc detail

Displays the status of any configured VCs. This command can be run on the RP or the line card (by using the exec slot command).

Router# show tag alpha-atom atm port port-no vcid vcid

Verifies the status of the AToM connection. You should use this to debug whether traffic entered a particular connection and was switched by the alpha. The vcid specified here is not the RP VC ID, but rather the line card CONN ID, which you can determine by running the command show controller atm 0 vcc.


See the "Troubleshooting ATM Errors on the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card" section for more information on the output from these commands.

Configuring Cell-Based Traffic Policing on AToM VCs

Traffic policing is configured using the Modular QoS CLI. In order to configure traffic policing, you need to do the following:

Define a traffic class to classify the traffic (See the "Defining a Traffic Class" section for more detailed information.)

Create a traffic policy with QoS features that determine how to treat classified traffic

Attach the traffic policy to a PVC

For Layer 2 traffic, you can configure traffic policies that will guarantee a particular quality of service (QoS) traffic class. This is done using the police rate command in policy-map class configuration mode.

The supported policing configurations are shown in Table 7.

Table 7 Supported Policing Configurations

Conformance Definition
GCRA 1 PCR Flow
Action
GCRA SCR Flow
Action

CBR

CLP(0+1)

Discard

N/A

N/A

VBR.1

CLP(0+1)

Discard

CLP(0+1)

Discard

VBR.2

CLP(0+1)

Discard

CLP(0)

Discard

VBR.3

CLP(0+1)

Discard

CLP(0)

Tagging

UBR.1

CLP(0+1)

Discard

N/A

N/A

1 GCRA=Generic Cell Rate Algorithm


If single-bucket policing is used, there is a single policy definition using the rate and burst tolerance parameters. For a two-bucket policer, the rate and burst tolerance are taken from the parent policy, and the SCR and ATM maximum burst size (MBS) values are taken from the child policy.

This section describes some of the most common tasks that are necessary to configure QoS traffic policing on AToM VCs. For more detailed information regarding MQC, see the "Configuring Modular QoS CLI" section.

Configuring CBR or UBR.1 Policing

Configuring VBR.1 Policing

Configuring VBR.2 Policing

Configuring VBR.3 Policing

Attaching a Service Policy to a PVC

Troubleshooting Tips

Restrictions

The following restrictions apply to policing on the 4-port ATM ISE line card:

The service-policy command must be used in l2transport mode. The EXP bit setting applies uniformly for CLP0 and CLP1 cells.

Policing is supported on the 508 channels that can be used for cell packing or cell relay. The rest of the channels cannot be policed. The FPGA does not police on AAL5 channels or in port mode.

When removing a two-level policy, you must remove the child service-policy before removing the parent service-policy.

For VBR.1 and VBR.2 policies, the correct total number of cells dropped is obtained by summing the statistics collected by the first and second bucket-exceed counters. The statistic of the first bucket-exceed counter sometimes remains zero and cannot be used to represent the result of the first bucket policing. This is due to the design of the policing function in the hardware, where the first and second buckets operate in parallel and not in serial.

UBR.2 is not supported.

The policer is correct to an accuracy of 99 percent.

The range of CDVT on the 4-port ATM ISE line card is 1..1,000,000. The default value is 50,000. It is recommended that you use a minimum CDVT value greater than 50, otherwise policing accuracy will be less than 99 percent.

It is also recommended to use an MBS value of greater than 10 cells, otherwise policing accuracy will be less than 99% for the SCR bucket.

The cell-based policer's burst tolerance on the 4-port ATM ISE line card is 1 second. If you configure a PCR and SCR such that the MBS exceeds the limitation that can be configured on the hardware, the policy will be rejected. You will be notified of the maximum MBS value that can be configured with the given PCR and SCR values.

Configuring CBR or UBR.1 Policing

This task describes how to configure CBR or UBR.1 policing.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map policy-map-name

4. class class-default

5. policy rate pcr cps delay-tolerance cdvt conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map cbr

Specifies the name of the service policy to configure.

Step 4 

class class-default

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class-default

Specifies the name of a predefined class, which was defined with the class-map command, to be included in the service policy. You can include the default class, class-default, in the service policy.

Step 5 

police rate pcr cps delay-tolerance cdvt conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# police rate 100000 cps delay-tolerance 5 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop


Specifies a maximum bandwidth usage by a traffic class through the use of a token bucket algorithm. For a description of the conform-action and exceed-action keywords, see Table 5.

After you configure the policy map, you must attach it to a PVC using the service-policy command as described in the "Attaching a Service Policy to a PVC" section.

Configuring VBR.1 Policing

This task describes how to configure VBR.1 policing.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map child-vbr1

4. class class-default

5. police rate scr cps atm-mbs mbs cells conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

6. exit

7. exit

8. policy-map vbr1

9. class class-default

10. set mpls experimental mpls-exp-value

11. policy rate pcr cps delay-tolerance cdvt conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

12. service-policy child-vbr1

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map child-vbr1

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map child-vbr1

Specifies the name of the child service policy to configure.

Step 4 

class class-default

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class-default

Specifies to configure the default class referred to as class-default.

Step 5 

police rate scr cps atm-mbs mbs cells conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# police rate 200000 cps atm-mbs 1024 cells conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Specifies a maximum bandwidth usage by a traffic class through the use of a token bucket algorithm. For a description of the conform-action and exceed-action keywords, see Table 5.

Step 6 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

Exits class mode.

Step 7 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# exit

Exits policy-map mode.

Step 8 

policy-map vbr1

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map vbr1

Specifies the name of the parent service policy to configure.

Step 9 

class class-default

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class-default

Specifies to configure the default class.

Step 10 

set mpls experimental mpls-exp-value

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# set mpls experimental 4


(Optional) Specifies the value used to set the MPLS EXP bits defined by the policy map. Valid values are numbers from 0 to 7.

Step 11 

police rate pcr cps delay-tolerance cdvt conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# police rate 500000 cps delay-tolerance 1000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Specifies a maximum bandwidth usage by a traffic class through the use of a token bucket algorithm. For a description of the conform-action and exceed-action keywords, see Table 5.

Step 12 

service-policy child-vbr1

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy child-vbr1

Attaches the child service policy to the VBR1 policy map.

After you configure the policy map, you must attach it to a PVC using the service-policy command as described in the "Attaching a Service Policy to a PVC" section.

Configuring VBR.2 Policing

This task describes how to configure VBR.2 policing.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. class-map match-all clp0

4. match not atm clp

5. exit

6. policy-map child-vbr1

7. class clp0

8. police rate scr cps atm-mbs mbs cells conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

9. exit

10. exit

11. policy-map vbr2

12. class class-default

13. set mpls experimental mpls-exp-value

14. policy rate pcr cps delay-tolerance cdvt conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

15. service-policy child-vbr1

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

class-map match-all class-map-name

Example:

Router(config)# class-map match-all cpl0

Specifies the user-defined name of the traffic class. Use match-all to specify a logical AND operator for all matching statements under this traffic class.

Step 4 

match not match-criteria

Example:

Router(config-cmap)# match not atm clp

Specifies that CLP1 is used as an unsuccessful match criterion, meaning that CLP1 cells will pass and CLP0 cells will be discarded.

Step 5 

exit

Example:

Router(config-cmap)# exit

Exits class-map mode.

Step 6 

policy-map child-vbr2

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map child-vbr1

Specifies the name of the child service policy to configure.

Step 7 

class class-map-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class clp0

Specifies to configure the class defined in Step 3.

Step 8 

police rate scr cps atm-mbs mbs cells conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# police rate 100 cps atm-mbs 1024 cells conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Specifies a maximum bandwidth usage by a traffic class through the use of a token bucket algorithm. For a description of the conform-action and exceed-action keywords, see Table 5.

Step 9 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

Exits class mode.

Step 10 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# exit

Exits policy map mode.

Step 11 

policy-map vbr2

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map vbr2

Specifies the name of the parent service policy to configure.

Step 12 

class class-default

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class-default

Specifies to configure the default class.

Step 13 

set mpls experimental mpls-exp-value

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# set mpls experimental 4


(Optional) Specifies the value used to set the MPLS EXP bits defined by the policy map. Valid values are numbers from 0 to 7.

Step 14 

police rate pcr cps delay-tolerance cdvt conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# police rate 2500000 cps delay-tolerance 10 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop


Specifies a maximum bandwidth usage by a traffic class through the use of a token bucket algorithm. For a description of the conform-action and exceed-action keywords, see Table 5.

Step 15 

service-policy child-vbr2

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy child-vbr2

Attaches the child service policy to the VBR1 policy map.

After you configure the policy map, you must attach it to a PVC using the service-policy command as described in the "Attaching a Service Policy to a PVC" section.

Configuring VBR.3 Policing

This task describes how to configure VBR.2 policing.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. class-map match-all clp0

4. match not atm clp

5. exit

6. policy-map child-vbr3

7. class clp0

8. police rate scr cps atm-mbs mbs cells conform-action transmit exceed-action transmit

9. exit

10. exit

11. policy-map vbr3

12. class class-default

13. set mpls experimental mpls-exp-value

14. policy rate pcr cps delay-tolerance cdvt conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

15. service-policy child-vbr3

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

class-map match-all class-map-name

Example:

Router(config)# class-map match-all cpl0

Specifies the user-defined name of the traffic class. Use match-all to specify a logical AND operator for all matching statements under this traffic class.

Step 4 

match not match-criteria

Example:

Router(config-cmap)# match not atm clp

Specifies a single match criterion value to use as an unsuccessful match criterion.

Step 5 

exit

Example:

Router(config-cmap)# exit

Exits class-map mode.

Step 6 

policy-map child-vbr3

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map child-vbr1

Specifies the name of the child service policy to configure.

Step 7 

class class-map-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class clp0

Specifies to configure the class defined in Step 3.

Step 8 

police rate scr cps atm-mbs mbs cells conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# police rate 100000 cps atm-mbs 1024 cells conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Specifies a maximum bandwidth usage by a traffic class through the use of a token bucket algorithm. For a description of the conform-action and exceed-action keywords, see Table 5.

Step 9 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

Exits class mode.

Step 10 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# exit

Exits policy map mode.

Step 11 

policy-map vbr3

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map vbr3

Specifies the name of the parent service policy to configure.

Step 12 

class class-default

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class-default

Specifies to configure the default class.

Step 13 

set mpls experimental mpls-exp-value

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# set mpls experimental 4


(Optional) Specifies the value used to set the MPLS EXP bits defined by the policy map. Valid values are numbers from 0 to 7.

Step 14 

police rate pcr cps delay-tolerance cdvt conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# police rate 250000 cps delay-tolerance 10 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop


Specifies a maximum bandwidth usage by a traffic class through the use of a token bucket algorithm. For a description of the conform-action and exceed-action keywords, see Table 5.

Step 15 

service-policy child-vbr3

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy child-vbr3

Attaches the child service policy to the VBR1 policy map.

After you configure the policy map, you must explicitly attach it to a PVC using the service-policy command as described in the "Attaching a Service Policy to a PVC" section.

Attaching a Service Policy to a PVC

After you define a service policy with the desired QoS configuration, you must attach it to a PVC as described in this task.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface atmslot/port

4. atm clock internal

5. pvc vpi/vci l2transport

6. encapsulation aal0

7. xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls

8. service-policy input policy-map-name

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Specifies an ATM interface to configure.

Step 4 

atm clock internal

Example:

Router(config)# atm clock internal


Causes the ATM interface to generate the transmit clock internally.

Step 5 

pvc vpi/vci l2transport

Example:

Router(config-if)# pvc 1/200 l2transport

Assigns a virtual path identifier (VPI) and virtual circuit identifier (VCI). The l2transport keyword indicates that the PVC is a switched PVC and not a terminated PVC.

Step 6 

encapsulation aal0
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# encapsulation 
aal0

For ATM Cell Relay, this command specifies raw cell encapsulation for the interface. Make sure you specify the same encapsulation type on the PE and CE routers.

Step 7 

xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# xconnect 
13.13.13.13 100 encapsulation mpls

Binds the attachment circuit to a pseudowire VC or VP.

Step 8 

service-policy input policy-map-name
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# service-policy 
input vbr1

Attaches a service policy to a VC and specifies the direction in which the policy should be applied.

Troubleshooting Tips

Use the following show commands to display the counters for conformance and drop cells for VP and VC connections:

Command
Purpose
Router# show policy-map policy-map-name

Displays the user-specified traffic policy.

Router# show policy-map interface atmslot/port vp 
vpi

Displays the packet statistics of all classes that are configured for all service policies on the specified interface.

Router# show policy-map interface atmslot/port vc 
vpi/vci

Displays the packet statistics of all classes that are configured for all service policies on a specific PVC on the interface.

Router# show policy-map interface atmslot/port vc 
vpi/vci [input | output]

Displays the packet statistics of all classes that are configured for all input or output service policies on a specific PVC on the interface.


Configuring Experimental Mapping

You can configure the experimental bits on PVCs, PVPs, and a port. The following tasks describe how to set the experimental bits in various situations:

Configuring Experimental Bits on PVCs

Configuring Experimental Bits on a Port

Configuring Experimental Bits on PVCs

This task describes how to configure the experimental bits in the MPLS header on a PVC.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map policy-map-name

4. class class-map-name

5. set mpls experimental mpls-exp-value

6. exit

7. exit

8. interface atmslot/port

9. pvc vpi l2transport

10. service-policy input policy-map-name

11. xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map atm-policy

Specifies the name of the child service policy to configure.

Step 4 

class class-map-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class atm-class

Specifies to configure the default class referred to as class-default.

Step 5 

set mpls experimental mpls-exp-value

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# set mpls experimental 4


(Optional) Specifies the value used to set the MPLS EXP bits defined by the policy map. Valid values are numbers from 0 to 7.

Step 6 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

Exits class mode.

Step 7 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# exit

Exits policy-map mode.

Step 8 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Specifies an ATM interface to configure.

Step 9 

pvc vpi/vci l2transport

Example:

Router(config-if)# pvc 1/200 l2transport

Assigns a virtual path identifier (VPI) and virtual circuit identifier (VCI). The l2transport keyword indicates that the PVC is a switched PVC and not a terminated PVC.

Step 10 

service-policy input policy-map-name
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# service-policy 
input atm-policy

Attaches a service policy to a VC and specifies the direction in which the policy should be applied.

Step 11 

xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# xconnect 
13.13.13.13 100 encapsulation mpls

Binds the attachment circuit to a pseudowire VC or VP.

Configuring Experimental Bits on a Port

This task describes how to configure the experimental bits in the MPLS header on a port.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map policy-map-name

4. class class-map-name

5. set mpls experimental mpls-exp-value

6. exit

7. exit

8. interface atmslot/port

9. service-policy input policy-map-name

10. xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map atm-policy

Specifies the name of the child service policy to configure.

Step 4 

class class-map-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class atm-class

Specifies to configure the default class referred to as class-default.

Step 5 

set mpls experimental mpls-exp-value

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# set mpls experimental 4


(Optional) Specifies the value used to set the MPLS EXP bits defined by the policy map. Valid values are numbers from 0 to 7.

Step 6 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

Exits class mode.

Step 7 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# exit

Exits policy-map mode.

Step 8 

interface atmslot/port

Example:

Router(config)# interface atm1/0

Specifies an ATM interface to configure.

Step 9 

service-policy input policy-map-name
Example:
Router(config-if)# service-policy input 
atm-policy

Attaches a service policy to a VC and specifies the direction in which the policy should be applied.

Step 10 

xconnect peer-router-id vcid encapsulation mpls
Example:
Router(config-atm-l2trans-pvc)# xconnect 
13.13.13.13 100 encapsulation mpls

Binds the attachment circuit to a pseudowire VC or VP.

Troubleshooting ATM Errors on the 4-Port ATM ISE Line Card

The following sections provide information to help you troubleshoot ATM errors on the 4-port ATM ISE line cards:

Troubleshooting Commands

Obtaining Per-VC Counters

Debugging Unexpected TX Drops on a VC

Upgrading the FPGA Image

Troubleshooting Commands

Use the following commands to troubleshoot ATM errors:

show interfaces atm

show controller traffic

show controller atm

show interfaces atm

The most common symptoms of ATM-level errors are incrementing numbers in one of the error counters (displayed in boldface) in the show interfaces command:

Router# show interfaces atm1/1   
ATM1/1 is up , line protocol is up
Hardware is PM622 OC-12c ATM, address is 0008.200b.b0ab (bia 008.200b.b0ab)
MTU 4470 bytes, sub MTU 4470, BW 622000 Kbit, DLY 80 usec, 
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation ATM, loopback not set
 Encapsulation(s): AAL5, PVC mode
 2047 maximum active VCs, 4 current VCCs
 VC idle disconnect time: 300 seconds
 Last input never, output 00:00:02, output hang never
 Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
 Queueing strategy: fifo
 Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
    0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer
    Received 0 broadcasts (0 IP multicast)
    0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
    0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
    0 packets output, 56 bytes, 0 underruns
    0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
    0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

Each of the error counters is described in Table 8.

Table 8 show interfaces Error Counter Descriptions 

Error Counter
Description

Giants

The number of packet reassemblies that failed because of a packet size greater than the maximum allowed packet size (18,104 bytes).

Input Errors

The total number of packet reassemblies that failed because of errors other than resource exhaustion (not including cells received on nonexisting VC).

CRC

The number of packet reassemblies that failed because of an invalid AAL5 CRC32 trailer.

Ignored

The total number of packet reassemblies that failed because of complete buffer exhaustion on the SAR.

Abort

The number of packet reassemblies that failed because of receiving a trailer length of 0.

Output errors

The total number of packets that were not transmitted because of any error other than resource exhaustion. This includes malformed packets, CRC errors, and so on.


show controller traffic

Any packets received on nonexistence VCs will be displayed in the show atm traffic RP command.

router# show atm traffic
3523 Input packets
3510 Output packets
0 Broadcast packets
0 Packets received on non-existent VC
0 Packets attempted to send on non-existent VC
3507 OAM cells received
F5 InEndloop: 0, F5 InSegloop: 0, F5 InAIS: 0, F5 InRDI: 0
F4 InEndloop: 3507, F4 InSegloop: 0, F4 InAIS: 0, F4 InRDI: 0
3507 OAM cells sent
F5 OutEndloop: 0, F5 OutSegloop: 0,     F5 OutAIS: 0    F5 OutRDI: 0
F4 OutEndloop: 3507, F4 OutSegloop: 0,  F4 OutRDI: 0    F4 OutAIS: 0
0 OAM cell drops

show controller atm

To display the ATM statistics on the line card, use the line card show controller atm privileged EXEC command. The available show controller atm counters are described in Table 9.

Router# exec slot 1 show controller atm 1 traffic 

VCID   InPkts    InBytes     PktsInSW   InOams    OutPkts    OutBytes
   1  78278986   4227058178    0          0       82600440 4460416714
SAR Counters:
  tx_packets            : 82600440  tx_bytes             : 4460416714
  tx_total_resource_errs:        0  tx_total_other_errs  :          0
  tx_wred_thresh_drops  :        0  tx_wred_random_drops :          0
  rx_packets            : 78278986  rx_bytes             : 4227058178
  rx_total_resource_errs:        0  rx_total_other_errs  :          0
  rx_buffer_exhaust_errs:        0  rx_CRC32_errors      :          0  
  rx_packet_abort_errs  :        0  rx_trailer_len_errs  :          0
  rx_mps_errors         :        0  rx_reassembly_timeout:          0

The following are per-SAR counters:
Reassembly SAR:
sys_rx_unopen_vc_cls  :      89169  sys_tx_unopen_vc_cls :          0  
sys_ecc_errors        :          0  sys_ecc_and_addr     :  0xFFFFFFF   
sys_ecc_or_addr         : 0x00000000

Segmentation SAR:
sys_rx_unopen_vc_cls  :          0  sys_tx_unopen_vc_cls:           0
sys_ecc_errors        :          0  sys_ecc_and_addr    :   0xFFFFFFFF
sys_ecc_or_addr       : 0x00000000

Table 9 show controller atm Counters 

Counter
Description
Comments

tx_packets

A 64-bit counter of the number of packets transmitted on this interface, including OAM cells. This should be approximately the total number of packets on all the VCs on this interface. (If traffic stops for a few seconds, these numbers should be exactly equal.)

Packets output in the show interface command should have the same value, excluding OAM cells.

tx_bytes

A 64-bit counter of the bytes transmitted on this interface, including OAM cells and AAL5 header encapsulations (such as AAL5SNAP). This should be approximately the total number of bytes transmitted on each of the VCs.

Output bytes in the show interface command should have the same value, excluding OAM cells.

tx_total_resource_errs

The total number of packets that were not transmitted because of any resource exhaustion error. This does not necessarily imply an error, because this counter includes tx_wred_thresh_drops and tx_wred_random_drops, as well as packet drops due to complete buffer exhaustion on the SAR. This should be equal to the sum of the number of resource errors that occur on all the VCs.

Buffer exhaustion should not occur if you have not oversubscribed the queue thresholds on the interface. See the "Debugging Unexpected TX Drops on a VC" section.

tx_total_other_errs

The total number of packets that were not transmitted because of any error other than resource exhaustion, but not including no-vc drops. This includes malformed packets, CRC errors, and so on. This should be approximately the total number of tx_other_errors that occur on all the VCs on this interface.

 

tx_wred_thresh_drops

The total number of WRED maximum threshold drops on this interface. This counter is included in the tx_total_resource_errs counter.

 

tx_wred_random_drops

The total number of WRED random drops on this interface. This counter is included in the tx_total_resource_errs counter.

 

rx_packets

The total number of packets reassembled on this interface by the SAR, including OAM cells.

 

rx_bytes

The total number of bytes reassembled on this interface by the SAR, including AAL5 encapsulation bytes.

 

rx_total_resource_errs

The total number of packet reassemblies that failed due to resource exhaustion. This error includes rx_buffer_exhaust_errs.

This error is not likely to occur on the 4-port ATM ISE line card RX SAR, because it works in unidirectional mode with 64M buffers available only for reassemblies.

rx_total_other_errs

The total number of packet reassemblies that failed because of errors other than resource exhaustion (not including no-vc cells), including rx_crc32_errors, rx_packet_abort_errs, rx_trailer_len_errs, rx_mps_errors, and rx_reassembly_timeout.

Same value as Input Errors in the show interface command.

rx_buffer_exhast_errs

The total number of packet reassemblies that failed because of complete buffer exhaustion on the SAR. This is included in rx_total_resource_errs.

This error is not likely to occur on the 4-port ATM ISE line card RX SAR, because it works in unidirectional mode with 64M buffers available only for reassemblies.

Same value as Ignored in the show interface command.

rx_packet_abort_errs

The number of packet reassemblies that failed because of receiving a trailer length of 0. This is included in rx_total_other_errs.

Same value as Abort in the show interface command.

rx_mps_errors

The number of packet reassemblies that failed because of a packet size greater than the maximum allowed packet size. This is included in rx_total_other_errs.

Same value as Giants in the show interface command.

rx_crc32_errors

The number of packet reassemblies that failed because of an invalid AAL5 CRC32 trailer. This is included in rx_total_other_errs.

Same value as CRC in the show interface command.

rx_trailer_len_errs

The number of packet reassemblies that failed because of a packet whose AAL5 trailer had an invalid trailer length. This is included in rx_total_other_errs.

 

rx_reassembly_timeout

The number of packet reassemblies that failed because of timing out before receiving the last cell of a packet. This is included in rx_total_other_errs.

 

sys_rx_unopen_vc_cls

Packets received on nonexistent VC.

Also available in the show atm traffic command on the RP.

sys_ecc_errors

Total number of single bit errors detected on the reassembly SAR.

 


Note These counters are only cleared when the line card is reloaded.


Obtaining Per-VC Counters

To display per-VC counters, first you must determine what connection ID is associated with the VC. This procedure differs slightly, depending on the version of Cisco IOS you are running. The following procedure describes how to display the per-VC counters in Cisco IOS release 12.0(27)S or later.


Step 1 Retrieve the VCD by using the show atm pvc command on the RP.

router# show atm pvc

           VCD/                         Peak  Avg/Min  Burst  
Interface  Name VPI  VCI  TYPE Encaps   Kbps   Kbps    Cells  Sts
0/0.1        2   1   100   PVC  SNAP    23000  N/A             UP

In this example, the VCD for the VC whose VCI/VPI are 1/100 is 2.

Step 2 Use the show controller atm command to get the connection ID for VCD 2:

router# exec slot 0 show controller atm 0 traffic
========= Line Card (Slot 0) =========


VCID CONNID InPkts  InBytes   PktsInSW   InOams    OutPkts   OutBytes
 2      1     0       0          0        0          0         0                      

For the example above, the connID for VC 1/100 is 1.

Step 3 Now specify the connID in the show controller atm traffic command and view the VC statistics:

Router# exec slot 0 show controller atm 0 traffic 1 
========= Line Card (Slot 1) ======= 
VCID: 2, CONNID: 1, VPI: 1, VCI: 100 
Rx Total Stats: 
rx_packets : 0 rx_bytes : 0 
rx_resource_err: 0 rx_other_err : 0 
rx_sw_packets : 0 rx_oam_cells : 0 
 
   
Tx Stats: 
COSQ #0 (ChID=010D) 
tx_packets :     0      tx_bytes :                       0 
tx_resource_err: 0      tx_other_err :                   0 
tx_queue_depth : 0      tx_avg_q_depth:             0.0000
tx_random_drop : 0      tx_thresh_drop:                  0
 
   
COSQ #1 (ChID=010E) 
tx_packets :     0      tx_bytes :                       0 
tx_resource_err: 0      tx_other_err :                   0 
tx_queue_depth : 0      tx_avg_q_depth:             0.0000 
tx_random_drop : 0      tx_thresh_drop:                  0

COSQ #7 (ChID=010F) 
tx_packets :     0      tx_bytes :                       0 
tx_resource_err: 0      tx_other_err :                   0 
tx_queue_depth : 0      tx_avg_q_depth:             0.0000 
 
   
Tx Total Stats: 
tx_packets : 0          tx_bytes :                       0 
tx_resource_err: 0      tx_other_err :                   0 

Counters are available per queue opened on the specified VC. Each queue is linked to a class in the policy map attached to this VC. To associate a queue number to a class, use the command show policy interface (for example, show policy interface atm1/1.3).

Descriptions of the counters shown in this command are described in Table 9 and Table 10.

Table 10 show controller atm VC Counter Descriptions

Counter
Description

tx_queue_depth

Current queue depth (in number of cells).

tx_avg_q_depth

Current average queue depth (in number of cells) as calculated by the WRED algorithm.



The following procedure describes how to display the per-VC counters in Cisco IOS releases 12.0(26)S and 12.0(25)S.


Step 1 Retrieve the VCD by using the show atm pvc command on the RP.

router# show atm pvc

           VCD/                         Peak  Avg/Min  Burst  
Interface  Name VPI  VCI  TYPE Encaps   Kbps   Kbps    Cells  Sts
0/0.1        2   1   100   PVC  SNAP    23000  N/A             UP

In this example, the VCD for the VC whose VCI/VPI are 1/100 is 2.

Step 2 Now specify the VCD in the show controller atm traffic command (2 in the following example), and view the VC statistics:

Router# exec slot 0 show controller atm 0 traffic 2 


See the previous procedure for a description of the command output.

Debugging Unexpected TX Drops on a VC

Each interface is served by an egress SAR. All VCs transmitted by this interface share a pool of approximately 950,000 TX cell buffers available in the SAR.

Improper queueing configuration, using the queue-limit or random-detect commands, allows for long queues to build up in the SAR. In this case, if some VCs are oversubscribed, their queues might eventually exhaust the TX cell buffer pool. When no TX cell buffers are available, no VC can enqueue outbound packets, including such VCs that are not oversubscribed; that is, VC isolation is not maintained. This can be confirmed by checking the following counters while tx_resource_err is incrementing:

the tx_queue_depth counter should be zero and

the tx_random_drops and tx_thresh_drops should be constant, not incrementing.

In a properly configured system, the tx_resource_err counter of a VC should only be incrementing when this specific VC is oversubscribed and dropping packets because the queue limit is being exceeded or because of WRED operation. This can be confirmed by checking the following counters while tx_resource_err is incrementing:

If queue limit is configured on the VC, the tx_queue_depth counter should be non-zero, up to the configured queue limit at maximum.

If WRED is configured, then tx_queue_depth should be non-zero, and either tx_random_drops or tx_thresh_drops (or both) will also be incrementing.


Note The above will be observable easily on a VC that is constantly oversubscribed, so that (some of) its queues are never completely drained. However, if the traffic sent to the VC is highly bursty, then the queues might be building up momentarily, but be completely drained by the time the counters are displayed. In this case, tx_resource_err will increment, even though the queue depth might be small (or zero) at the time it is displayed. It is therefore recommended to sample the counters several times before drawing conclusions.


Upgrading the FPGA Image

If the line card does not boot and you receive an error message indicating that there is a problem with the Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) image (or if the line card alphanumeric LED display remains frozen in IOS STRT state), you need to upgrade the FPGA image using the update-fpga option in the diag command.


Note The diag command and the update-fpga option are documented in the Field Diagnostics for the Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router publication.

When the Cisco IOS image boots, it verifies that a compatible FPGA image is running on the router. The major version number of the FPGA image must be the same as that expected by the Cisco IOS image; the minor version number on the FPGA image must be the same as or greater than the minor version number expected by the Cisco IOS image. For example, if the Cisco IOS image expects a minimum FPGA image of 03.02, the software will verify that the actual major version number of the FPGA image in the line card bootflash is 03, and that the minor version number is 02 or above.


Configuring Modular QoS CLI

The Modular QoS CLI (MQC) is a CLI structure that allows users to create traffic policies and attach these policies to interfaces. A traffic policy contains a traffic class and one or more QoS features. A traffic class is used to classify traffic, while the QoS features in the traffic policy determine how to treat the classified traffic.

Modular QoS CLI configuration includes the following three steps:

Defining a Traffic Class

Creating a Traffic Policy

Attaching a Traffic Policy to a PVC

Defining a Traffic Class

The class-map command is used to create a traffic class. To create a traffic class containing match criteria, use the class-map command to specify the traffic class name, then use a match command in class map configuration mode.

The syntax of the class-map command is as follows:

class-map [match-any | match-all] class-name
no class-map [match-any | match-all] class-name

The class-map match-all command is used when all the match criteria in the traffic class must be met for a packet to match the specified traffic class. The class-map match-any command is used when the first possible match criterion from a list of match criteria must be met for a packet to match the specified traffic class. If neither match-all nor match-any is specified, the traffic class will behave in a manner consistent with class-map match-all command.

For additional information on using the match-any and match-all options, see the "Using the class-map match-any and class-map match-all Commands" section.

Command
Purpose
Router(config)# class-map class-map-name 

Specifies the user-defined name of the traffic class.

Router(config)# class-map match-all 
class-map-name 

Specifies a logical AND operator for all matching statements under this traffic class.

Router(config)# class-map match-any 
class-map-name 

Specifies a logical OR operator for all matching statements under this traffic class.

Router(config-cmap)# match access-group 
access-group

Specifies the numbered access list against whose contents packets are checked to determine if they belong to the class.

Router (config-cmap)# match any

Specifies that all packets will be matched.

Router (config-cmap)# match ip dscp number

Specifies up to eight differentiated services code point (DSCP) values used as match criteria. The value of each service code point is between 0 and 63.

Router (config-cmap)# match ip precedence number

Specifies up to eight IP precedence values used as match criteria.

Router(config-cmap)# match mpls experimental mpls-values

Specifies the MPLS values to use as match criteria against which packets are checked to determine if they belong to the class.

Router(config-cmap)# match qos-group 
qos-group-value

Specifies the number of the QoS group index used as a match criterion against which packets are checked to determine if they belong to the class.


Using the class-map match-any and class-map match-all Commands

This section illustrates the difference between the class-map match-any command and the class-map match-all command. The match-any and match-all options determine how packets are evaluated when multiple match criteria exist. Packets must either meet all of the match criteria (match-all) or one of the match criteria (match-any) in order to be considered a member of the traffic class.

The following example shows a traffic class configured with the class-map match-all command:

Router(config)# class-map match-all john
Router(config-cmap)# match qos-group 4 
Router(config-cmap)# match access-group 101

If a packet arrives on a router with traffic class john configured on the interface, the packet is evaluated to see if it matches the IP protocol, QoS group 4, and access group 101. If both of these match criteria are met, the packet matches traffic class john.

The following example shows a traffic class configured with the class-map match-any command:

Router(config)# class-map match-any george 
Router(config-cmap)# match qos-group 4
Router(config-cmap)# match access-group 101

In traffic class george, the match criteria are evaluated consecutively until a successful match criterion is located. The packet is first evaluated to the see whether IP protocol can be used as a match criterion. If IP protocol can be used as a match criterion, the packet is matched to traffic class george. If IP protocol is not a successful match criterion, then QoS group 4 is evaluated as a match criterion. Each matching criterion is evaluated to see if the packet matches that criterion. Once a successful match occurs, the packet is classified as a member of traffic class george. If the packet matches none of the specified criteria, the packet is classified as a member of the default class.

Note that the class-map match-all command requires that all the match criteria must be met in order for the packet to be considered a member of the specified traffic class. However, only one match criterion must be met for the packet in the class-map match-any command to be classified as a member of the traffic class.

Creating a Traffic Policy

To configure a traffic policy, use the policy-map command to specify the traffic policy name, then use the following configuration commands to associate a traffic class, which was configured with the class-map command, with one or more QoS policies. The traffic class is associated with the traffic policy when the class command is used. The class command has to be issued immediately after entering policy map configuration mode. After entering the class command, you are automatically in policy map class configuration mode, which is where the QoS policies for the traffic policy are defined.

The QoS policies that can be applied in the traffic policy in policy map class configuration mode are detailed below.

The syntax of the policy-map command is:

policy-map policy-name
no policy-map policy-name

The syntax of the class command is:

class class-name
no class class-name

In addition to any user-defined classes, a pre-existing class named class-default exists. All packets that do not match any of the user-defined classes belong to class-default.

Commands for Egress Traffic

The following commands can be used to configure a traffic policy for egress traffic:

Command or Action
Purpose

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

policy-map policy-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map policy1

Specifies the name of the traffic policy to configure.

class class-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class1

Router(config-pmap)# class class-default

Specifies the name of a predefined class, which was defined with the class-map command, to be included in the service policy. You can include the default class, class-default, in the traffic policy.

bandwidth {bandwidth-kbps | percent percent}


OR


bandwidth remaining percent percent

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 20


Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining percent 4

Specifies a minimum bandwidth guarantee to a traffic class.

A minimum bandwidth guarantee can be specified in kilobits per second (bandwidth-kbps) or as a percentage of the overall available bandwidth (percent percent). In this case, the bandwidth specified cannot exceed the available bandwidth remaining after the priority class is accounted for.

Alternatively, the minimum bandwidth guarantee can be based on the remaining bandwidth available (remaining percent percent). If there is no available bandwidth, then the class will receive no bandwidth, regardless of the percent specified.

police bps burst-normal burst-max conform-action action exceed-action action

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# police 8000 2000 4000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Specifies a bandwidth usage and conformance policy by a traffic class through the use of a token bucket algorithm. For a description of the conform-action and exceed-action keywords, see Table 5.

priority

Specifies the class as the priority class.

In order to specify the maximum bandwidth allowed by the priority class, use the police command with the exceed-action set to drop. If no maximum bandwidth is specified for the priority class, remaining classes will not have a minimum bandwidth guarantee.

queue-limit cells cells

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 576 cells

Specifies the maximum number of cells queued for a traffic class that has a bandwidth configuration or class default specified.

random-detect

Enables a weighted random early detection (WRED) drop policy for a traffic class that has a bandwidth configuration or class default specified.

random-detect dscp-based

Indicates that WRED is to use the DSCP value when it calculates the drop probability for the packet.

random-detect dscp dscpvalue min-threshold cells max-threshold cells [mark-probability-denominator]

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect dscp 1 300 cells 700 cells 1

Specifies the minimum and maximum cell thresholds and, optionally, the mark-probability denominator for the DSCP value.


Note Use either the random-detect dscp-based command with the random-detect dscp command or use the random-detect precedence command alone. Do not use the random-detect precedence command with either of the DSCP commands.


random-detect precedence precedence min-threshold cells max-threshold cells [mark-prob-denominator

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect precedence 4 500 cells 1100 cells 1

Specifies the minimum and maximum cell thresholds and, optionally, the mark-probability denominator for the precedence value.


Note Use either the random-detect dscp-based command with the random-detect dscp command or use the random-detect precedence command alone. Do not use the random-detect precedence command with either of the DSCP commands.


random-detect exponential-weighting-constant n

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect exponential-weighting-constant 1

Configures a WRED exponential weighting constant on a per COS queue basis.

set atm-clp

Sets the ATM cell loss priority bit to 1.

set ip dscp ip-dscp-value

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# set ip dscp 31

Specifies the IP DSCP of packets within a traffic class. The IP DSCP value can be any value between 0 and 63.

set ip precedence

Specifies the IP precedence of packets within a traffic class. The IP precedence value can be any value between 0 and 7.

set mpls experimental value

Designates the value to which the MPLS bits are set if the packets match the specified policy map.


Note If no limit is set on the bandwidth available for the priority class, no other classes will have a minimum bandwidth guarantee. To limit the bandwidth available for the priority class, use the police command with the exceed-action set to drop.



Note If you configure eight traffic classes for egress MDRR, one class must be explicitly configured as the priority class, and one is, by default, the class class-default.



Note You can configure either per-VC queue limits or random-detect, but not both on the same queue.



Note For any one service-policy, you cannot combine different bandwidth commands.


Commands for Ingress Traffic

The following commands can be used to configure a traffic policy for ingress traffic:

Command or Action
Purpose

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

policy-map policy-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map policy1

Specifies the name of the traffic policy to configure.

class class-name

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class1

Router(config-pmap)# class class-default

Specifies the name of a predefined class, which was defined with the class-map command, to be included in the traffic policy. You can include the default class, class-default, in the traffic policy.

police bps burst-normal burst-max conform-action action exceed-action action

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# police 8000 2000 4000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Specifies a bandwidth usage and conformance policy by a traffic class through the use of a token bucket algorithm. For a description of the conform-action and exceed-action keywords, see Table 5.

police rate bps [burst mbs peak-rate peak] conform-action action exceed-action action violate-action action

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# police rate 64000000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Specifies a maximum bandwidth usage by a traffic class through the use of a token bucket algorithm. For a description of the conform-action and exceed-action keywords, see Table 5.

shape average mean-rate [burst-size [excess-burst-size]

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 2000

Shapes ingress traffic to the indicated bit rate according to the algorithm specified.

queue-limit number-of-packets

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 100

Specifies the maximum number of packets queued for a traffic class.


Note This command is only allowed when the shape command is used.


random-detect

Enables a weighted random early detection (WRED) drop policy for a traffic class.


Note This command is only allowed when the shape command is used.


random-detect dscp-based

Indicates that WRED is to use the DSCP value when it calculates the drop probability for the packet.

random-detect dscp dscpvalue min-threshold cells max-threshold cells [mark-probability-denominator]

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect dscp 1 300 cells 700 cells 1

Specifies the minimum and maximum packet thresholds and, optionally, the mark-probability denominator for the DSCP value.


Note Use either the random-detect dscp-based command with the random-detect dscp command or use the random-detect precedence command alone. Do not use the random-detect precedence command with either of the DSCP commands.


random-detect precedence precedence min-threshold packets max-threshold packets [mark-prob-denominator

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect precedence 4 500 packets 1100 packets 1

Specifies the minimum and maximum cell thresholds and, optionally, the mark-probability denominator for the precedence value.


Note Use either the random-detect dscp-based command with the random-detect dscp command or use the random-detect precedence command alone. Do not use the random-detect precedence command with either of the DSCP commands.


set ip dscp ip-dscp-value

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# set ip dscp 31

Specifies the IP DSCP of packets within a traffic class. The IP DSCP value can be any value between 0 and 63.

set atm-clp

Sets the ATM cell loss priority bit to 1.

set ip precedence value

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# set ip precedence 5

Specifies the IP precedence of packets within a traffic class. The IP precedence value can be any value between 0 and 7.

set mpls experimental [imposition | topmost] value

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# set mpls experimental 4

Designates the value to which the MPLS experimental bits are set if the packets match the specified policy map.

set qos-group value

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# set qos-group 45


Specifies a QoS group value to associate with the packet. The QoS group value can be any value between 0 and 99.

Attaching a Traffic Policy to a PVC

Use the service-policy interface configuration command to attach a traffic policy to a VC and to specify the direction in which the policy should be applied (either on packets coming into the interface or packets leaving the interface).

Use the no form of the command to detach a traffic policy from a VC. The service-policy command syntax is as follows:

service-policy {input | output} policy-map-name
no service-policy {input | output} policy-map-name

Additional References

The following sections provide references related to the 4-port ATM ISE line card.

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Hardware installation

4-Port ATM ISE Line Card Installation and Configuration

New software features

Release Notes for Cisco 12000 Series Routers for Cisco IOS Release 12.0 S

FPGA upgrade

Field Diagnostics for the Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router

Software configuration

Cisco IOS Release 12.0 Wide-Area Networking Configuration Guide

MPLS

Multiprotocol Label Switching on Cisco Routers

MPLS

MPLS Virtual Private Networks

AToM

Any Transport over MPLS

MQC

Modular Quality of Service Command-Line Interface


You can find additional information in the installation and configuration guide for your Cisco 12000 Series Router and in the Cisco IOS Release 12.0 documentation set.

Standards

Standards
Title

I.362, I.363

AAL5 reassembly and segmentation

UNI 3.x, I.610

F4 and F5 flows of OAM cells and OAM management

UNI 3.x

Interim Local Management Interface (ILMI)

ATM 4.0

ATM Forum Traffic Management Specification 4.0


MIBs

In addition to industry-standard Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) and other Management Information Bases (MIBs) supported on the Cisco 12000 Series Router, the 4-Port ATM ISE line card supports the following:

ATM-MIB

CISCO-AAL5-MIB

CISCO-ATM-EXT-MIB

IF-MIB

SONET-MIB

CISCO-IETF-ATM2-PVCTRAP-MIB

MPLS-TE-MIB

CISCO-QUEUE-MIB

CISCO-CLASS-BASED-QOS-MIB

CISCO-CLASS-BASED-QOS-CAPABILITY-MIB

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs

RFCs

RFCs
Title

RFC1483

Multiprotocol Encapsulation with support for LLC/SNAP encapsulation and VC multiplexing, and NLPID encapsulation

RFC1577, RFC1755, RFC1626

Classical IP and ARP over ATM; Client and ARP Server

RFC1626

Default IP MTU for use over ATM AAL5.

RFC1755

ATM Signaling Support for IP over ATM


Technical Assistance

Description
Link

Technical Assistance Center (TAC) home page, containing 30,000 pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content.

http://www.cisco.com/public/support/tac/home.shtml


Command Reference

This section documents modified commands. All other commands used with this feature are documented in the Cisco IOS Release 12.0 command reference publications.

police rate

random-detect dscp

police rate

To configure traffic policing, use the police rate command in policy-map class configuration mode. To remove traffic policing from the configuration, use the no form of this command.

police rate pcr cps delay-tolerance cdvt conform-action action exceed-action action violate-action action

police rate scr cps atm-mbs mbs cells conform-action action exceed-action action violate-action action

no police rate {pcr | scr}

Syntax Description

pcr

Peak cell rate, specified for hierarchical policies. Valid values are 7 to 10,000,000,000.

scr

Sustainable cell rate, specified for single-level ATM 4.0 policies. Valid values are 7 to 10,000,000,000.

cps

Optional. Indicates that the rate value is in cells per second. If this keyword is not used, then bits per second (bps) is assumed.

cells

Indicates that the burst value is in units of cells. This option is only available if the cps keyword is used.

atm-mbs

Indicates that the ATM maximum burst size follows.

mbs

Maximum burst size in numbers of cells. Valid values are 1 to 5,000,000.

delay-tolerance

(Optional) Indicates that the cell delay variation tolerance follows.

cdvt

Cell delay variation tolerance specified as the number of microseconds.

conform-action

Action to take on packets that conform to the rate limit.

exceed-action

Action to take on packets that exceed the rate limit.

violate-action

(Optional) Action to take on packets that violate the normal and maximum burst sizes.

action

Action to take on packets. Specify one of the following keywords:

drop—Drops the packet.

set-clp-transmit value—Sets the ATM Cell Loss Priority (CLP) bit from 0 to 1 on the ATM cell and transmits the packet with the ATM CLP bit set to 1.

set-discard-class-transmit—Sets the discard class attribute of a packet and transmits the packet with the new discard class setting.

set-dscp-transmit value—Sets the IP differentiated services code point (DSCP) value and transmits the packet with the new IP DSCP value setting.

set-frde-transmit value—Sets the Frame Relay Discard Eligibility (DE) bit from 0 to 1 on the frame relay frame and transmits the packet with the DE bit set to 1.

set-mpls-experimental-imposition-transmit value—Sets the Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) experimental (EXP) bits (0 to 7) in the imposed label headers and transmits the packet with the new MPLS EXP bit value setting.

set-mpls-experimental-topmost-transmit value—Sets the MPLS EXP field value in the topmost MPLS label header at the input and/or output interfaces.

set-prec-transmit value—Sets the IP precedence and transmits the packet with the new IP precedence value setting.

set-qos-transmit value—Sets the qos-group value and transmits the packet with the new qos-group value setting.

transmit—Transmits the packet. The packet is not altered.


Defaults

Disabled

Command Modes

Policy-map class configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(27)S

This command was introduced with the rate keyword. This command replaces the police command which was introduced in release 12.0(5)XE.


Usage Guidelines

Use the police command to mark a packet with different quality of service (QoS) values based on conformance to the service-level agreement.

Traffic policing will not be executed for traffic that passes through an interface.

Specifying Multiple Actions

The police command allows you to specify multiple policing actions. When specifying multiple policing actions when configuring the police command, note the following points:

You can specify a maximum of four actions at one time.

You cannot specify contradictory actions such as conform-action transmit and conform-action drop.

Using the Police Command with the Traffic Policing Feature

The police rate command can be used with the Traffic Policing feature. The Traffic Policing feature works with a token bucket algorithm. Two types of token bucket algorithms are in Cisco IOS Release 12.1(5)T: a one-token bucket algorithm and a two-token bucket algorithm. A one-token bucket system is used when the violate-action option is not specified, and a two-token bucket system is used when the violate-action option is specified.

The token bucket algorithm for the police command that was introduced in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(5)XE is different from the token bucket algorithm for the police command introduced in Cisco IOS Release 12.1(5)T. For information on the token bucket algorithm introduced in Release 12.0(5)XE, refer to the Traffic Policing document for Release 12.0(5)XE. This document is available on the New Features for 12.0(5)XE feature documentation index (under Modular QoS CLI-related feature modules) at www.cisco.com.

The following are explanations of how the token bucket algorithms introduced in Cisco IOS Release 12.1(5)T work.

Token Bucket Algorithm with One Token Bucket

The one-token bucket algorithm is used when the violate-action option is not specified in the police rate command command-line interface (CLI).

The conform bucket is initially set to the full size (the full size is the number of bytes specified as the normal burst size).

When a packet of a given size (for example, "B" bytes) arrives at specific time (time "T") the following actions occur:

Tokens are updated in the conform bucket. If the previous arrival of the packet was at T1 and the current time is T, the bucket is updated with (T - T1) worth of bits based on the token arrival rate. The token arrival rate is calculated as follows:

(time between packets <which is equal to T - T1> * policer rate)/8 bytes

If the number of bytes in the conform bucket B is greater than or equal to 0, the packet conforms and the conform action is taken on the packet. If the packet conforms, B bytes are removed from the conform bucket and the conform action is completed for the packet.

If the number of bytes in the conform bucket B is fewer than 0, the exceed action is taken.

Token Bucket Algorithm with Two Token Buckets

The two-token bucket algorithm is used when the violate-action option is specified in the police rate command CLI.

The conform bucket is initially full (the full size is the number of bytes specified as the normal burst size).

The exceed bucket is initially full (the full exceed bucket size is the number of bytes specified in the maximum burst size).

The tokens for both the conform and exceed token buckets are updated based on the token arrival rate, or committed information rate (CIR).

When a packet of given size (for example, "B" bytes) arrives at specific time (time "T") the following actions occur:

Tokens are updated in the conform bucket. If the previous arrival of the packet was at T1 and the current arrival of the packet is at T, the bucket is updated with T -T1 worth of bits based on the token arrival rate. The refill tokens are placed in the conform bucket. If the tokens overflow the conform bucket, the overflow tokens are placed in the exceed bucket.

The token arrival rate is calculated as follows:

(time between packets <which is equal to T-T1> * policer rate)/8 bytes

If the number of bytes in the conform bucket B is greater than or equal to 0, the packet conforms and the conform action is taken on the packet. If the packet conforms, B bytes are removed from the conform bucket and the conform action is taken. The exceed bucket is unaffected in this scenario.

If the number of bytes in the conform bucket B is less than 0, the excess token bucket is checked for bytes by the packet. If the number of bytes in the exceed bucket B is greater than or equal to 0, the exceed action is taken and B bytes are removed from the exceed token bucket. No bytes are removed from the conform bucket.

If the number of bytes in the exceed bucket B is fewer than 0, the packet violates the rate and the violate action is taken. The action is complete for the packet.

Examples

The following example drops traffic that does not conform to the specified rate:

Router(config-pmap-c)# police rate 64000000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Related Commands

Command
Description

policy-map

Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy.

service-policy

Specifies the name of the service policy to be attached to the interface.

show policy-map

Displays the configuration of all classes for a specified service policy map or all classes for all existing policy maps.

show policy-map interface

Displays the configuration of all classes configured for all service policies on the specified interface, or displays the classes for the service policy for a specific PVC on the interface.


random-detect dscp

To change the minimum and maximum cell thresholds for the differentiated services code point (DSCP) value, use the random-detect dscp command in interface configuration mode. To return the minimum and maximum packet thresholds to the default for the DSCP value, use the no form of this command.

random-detect dscp dscpvalue min-threshold cells max-threshold cells [mark-probability-denominator]

no random-detect dscp dscpvalue min-threshold max-threshold [mark-probability-denominator]

Syntax Description

dscpvalue

Specifies the DSCP value. The DSCP value can be a number from 0 to 63, or it can be one of the following keywords: ef, af11, af12, af13, af21, af22, af23, af31, af32, af33, af41, af42, af43, cs1, cs2, cs3, cs4, cs5, or cs7.

min-threshold

Minimum threshold in number of cells. The value range of this argument is from 1 to 262,143. When the average queue length reaches the minimum threshold, Weighted Random Early Detection (WRED) randomly drops some packets with the specified DSCP value.

cells

On the 4-Port ATM ISE line card for the Cisco 12000 Series Router, the min-threshold and max-threshold values must be specified as a count of ATM cells.

max-threshold

Maximum threshold in number of cells. The value range of this argument is from the value of the min-threshold argument to 262143. When the average queue length exceeds the maximum threshold, WRED drops all packets with the specified DSCP value.

mark-probability-denominator

(Optional) Denominator for the fraction of packets dropped when the average queue depth is at the maximum threshold. For example, if the denominator is 512, one out of every 512 packets is dropped when the average queue is at the maximum threshold. The value range is from 1 to 32,768.


Note For the 4-Port ATM ISE line card, the mark probability denominator is rounded to the nearest power of 2.



Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(25)S

The cells keyword was added.

12.1(5)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The random-detect dscp command allows you to specify the DSCP value. The DSCP value can be a number from 0 to 63, or it can be one of the following keywords: ef, af11, af12, af13, af21, af22, af23, af31, af32, af33, af41, af42, af43, cs1, cs2, cs3, cs4, cs5, or cs7.

This command must be used in conjunction with the random-detect (interface) command.

Additionally, the random-detect dscp command is available only if you specified the dscp-based argument when using the random-detect (interface) command.

Examples

The following example enables WRED to use the DSCP value af22. The minimum threshold for DSCP value af22 is 28, the maximum threshold is 40, and the mark probability is 10.

random-detect dscp af22 28 cells 40 cells 10

Related Commands

Command
Description

random-detect (interface)

Enables WRED.

random-detect exponential-weighting-constant

Configures the WRED exponential weight factor for the average queue size calculation.


Glossary

Term
Description

AAL

ATM adaptation layer

AIS

alarm indication signal

AToM

Any Transport over MPLS

BGP

Border Gateway Protocol

BPVC

bridged permanent virtual circuit

CAR

committed access rate

CBR

constant bit rate

CC

continuity check

CDV

cell delay variation

CDVT

cell delay variation tolerance

CLP

cell loss priority

COS

class of service

DSCP

differentiated services code point

FPGA

Field-Programmable Gate Array

GCRA

Generic Cell Rate Algorithm

ILMI

Interim Local Management Interface

Inverse ARP

Inverse Address Resolution

LLQ

low latency queueing

LSP

label switched path

MBS

maximum burst cell size

MCPT

maximum cell packing timeout

MDRR

Modified Deficit Round Robin

MIB

Management Information Base

MPLS

Multiprotocol Label Switching

MQC

Modular Quality of Service CLI

MTU

maximum transmission unit

NNI

network-to-network interface

NVRAM

nonvolatile RAM

OAM

operation, administration, and maintenance

PBR

policy-based routing

PCR

peak cell rate

PE

provider edge

PVC

permanent virtual circuit

PVP

permanent virtual path

QoS

Quality of Service

QPPB

QoS Policy Propagation via Border Gateway Protocol (BGP)

RDI

remote defect indication

RFC

Request For Comments

RED

Random Early Detection

RPR

Route processor redundancy

SCR

sustainable cell rate

SDU

service data unit

SNMP

Simple Network Management Protocol

SSO

Stateful Switchover

SVC

switched virtual circuit

TE

traffic engineering

UBR

unspecified bit rate

UNI

user-network interface

uRPF

unicast reverse path forwarding

VBR-nrt

non-real-time variable bit rate

VBR-rt

real-time variable bit rate

VC

virtual circuit

VC-AIS

virtual circuit-alarm indication signal

VCD

virtual circuit descriptor

VCI

virtual channel identifier

VC-RDI

virtual circuit-remote defect indication

VPI

virtual path identifier

VPN

virtual private network

WRED

Weighted Random Early Detection



Note Refer to Internetworking Terms and Acronyms for terms not included in this glossary.


1 Subject to overall system limitation and configuration.

2 Subject to overall system limitation and configuration.