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QoS: Match on ATM CLP

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QoS: Match on ATM CLP

Table Of Contents

QoS: Match on ATM CLP

Contents

Restrictions for the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature

Information About the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature

Matching Packets on the Basis of the ATM CLP Benefits

Matching Packets Using the MQC

How to Configure the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature

Configuring a Class Map

Creating a Policy Map

Attaching the Policy Map to an Interface or a VC

Restrictions

Verifying the Configuration

Troubleshooting Tips

Configuration Examples for the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature

Configuring the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature: Example

Verifying the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature Configuration: Example

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance

Command Reference

match atm-clp

show policy-map interface


QoS: Match on ATM CLP


First Published: May 7, 2004
Last Updated: February 28, 2006

The QoS: Match on ATM CLP feature allows you to match and classify packets arriving at an interface on the basis of the ATM cell loss priority (CLP) of the packet. With this new match criterion, you can further fine-tune packet classification and apply quality of service (QoS) features to a more select set of packets.

History for the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature

Release
Modification

12.0(28)S

This feature was introduced.

12.2(28)SB

This feature was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(28)SB.


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Contents

Restrictions for the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature

Information About the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature

How to Configure the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature

Configuration Examples for the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature

Additional References

Command Reference

Restrictions for the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature

The following restrictions apply to this feature:

This feature is supported on policy maps attached to ATM main interfaces, ATM subinterfaces, or ATM permanent virtual circuits (PVCs). However, policy maps attached to these types of ATM interfaces can be input policy maps only.

This feature is supported on PA-A3 adapters only.

Information About the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature

To configure the QoS: Match on ATM CLP feature, you should understand the following concepts:

Matching Packets on the Basis of the ATM CLP Benefits

Matching Packets Using the MQC

Matching Packets on the Basis of the ATM CLP Benefits

Provides Additional Match Criterion

This feature allows you to match packets on the basis of the ATM CLP, and then apply the desired QoS functionality and actions (for example, traffic policing) to those packets. With this new match criterion, you can further fine-tune packet classification and apply QoS features to a more select set of packets.

This new criterion is in addition to the other match criteria currently available through the various QoS match commands. For more information about the match commands, refer to the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Command Reference, Release 12.3T.

Matching Packets Using the MQC

To configure the QoS: Match on ATM CLP feature, you must define a traffic class, configure a policy map, and then attach that policy map to the appropriate interface. These three tasks can be accomplished by using the Modular Quality of Service (QoS) Command-Line Interface (CLI) (MQC).

The MQC is a command-line interface that allows you to define traffic classes, create and configure traffic policies (policy maps), and then attach these traffic policies to interfaces.

In the MQC, the class-map command is used to define a traffic class (which is then associated with a traffic policy). The purpose of a traffic class is to classify traffic.

The MQC consists of the following three processes:

Defining a traffic class with the class-map command.

Creating a traffic policy by associating the traffic class with one or more QoS features (using the policy-map command).

Attaching the traffic policy to the interface with the service-policy command.

A traffic class contains three major elements: a name, a series of match commands, and, if more than one match command exists in the traffic class, an instruction on how to evaluate these match commands (that is, match-all or match-any). The traffic class is named in the class-map command line; for example, if you enter the class-map cisco command while configuring the traffic class in the CLI, the traffic class would be named "cisco".

The match commands are used to specify various criteria for classifying packets. Packets are checked to determine whether they match the criteria specified in the match commands. If a packet matches the specified criteria, that packet is considered a member of the class and is forwarded according to the QoS specifications set in the traffic policy. Packets that fail to meet any of the matching criteria are classified as members of the default traffic class.

How to Configure the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature

This section contains the following procedures.

Configuring a Class Map (required)

Creating a Policy Map (required)

Attaching the Policy Map to an Interface or a VC (required)

Verifying the Configuration (optional)

Configuring a Class Map

To configure a class map to match packets on the basis of the ATM CLP, perform the following steps.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. class-map class-map-name [match-all | match-any]

4. match atm clp

5. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

class-map class-map-name [match-all | match-any]

Example:

Router(config)# class-map class-c1

Specifies the name of the class map to be created and enters class-map configuration mode.

Enter class map name.

Note If the match-all or match-any keyword is not specified, traffic must match all the match criteria to be classified as part of the traffic class.

Step 4 

match atm clp

Example:

Router(config-cmap)# match atm clp

Enables packet matching on the basis of the ATM CLP.

Step 5 

exit

Example:

Router(config-cmap)# exit

(Optional) Exits class-map configuration mode.

Creating a Policy Map

To create a policy map, perform the following steps.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. policy-map policy-map-name

4. class {class-name | class-default}

5. police bps [burst-normal] [burst-max] conform-action action exceed-action action [violate-action  action]

6. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

policy-map policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config)# policy-map policy1

Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy. Enters policy-map configuration mode.

Enter the policy map name.

Step 4 

class {class-name | class-default}

Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class class1

Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change or specifies the default class (commonly known as the class-default class) before you configure its policy. Also enters policy-map class configuration mode.

Enter the class name or enter the class-default keyword.

Step 5 

police bps [burst-normal] [burst-max] conform-action action exceed-action action [violate-action action]

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# police 8000 1000 1000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Configures traffic policing on the basis of the bits per second (bps) specified and the actions specified.

Enter the bps, any optional burst sizes, and the desired conform and exceed actions.

Note This is an example of one QoS feature you can configure at this step. Other QoS features include Weighted Random Early Detection (WRED), Weighted Fair Queueing (WFQ), and traffic shaping. Enter the command for the specific QoS feature you want to configure. For more information about QoS features, refer to the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

Step 6 

exit

Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

(Optional) Exits policy-map class configuration mode.

Attaching the Policy Map to an Interface or a VC

To attach the policy map to an interface or a virtual circuit (VC), perform the following steps.

Restrictions

Policy maps can be attached to ATM main interfaces, ATM subinterfaces, or ATM permanent virtual circuits (PVC). However, with this feature, policy maps attached to these types of ATM interfaces can be input policy maps only.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. interface type number [name-tag]

4. pvc [name] vpi/vci [ilmi | qsaal | smds]

5. service-policy {input | output} policy-map-name

6. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

interface type number [name-tag]

Example:

Router(config)# interface FastEthernet1/0.1

Configures the interface type specified and enters interface configuration mode.

Enter interface type.

Step 4 

pvc [name] vpi/vci [ilmi | qsaal | smds]

Example:

Router(config-if)# pvc cisco 0/16 ilmi

Creates or assigns a name to an ATM PVC, specifies the encapsulation type on an ATM PVC, and enters ATM virtual circuit configuration mode.

Step 5 

service-policy {input | output} policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config-if)# service-policy input policy1


Specifies the name of the policy map to be attached to the input or output direction of the interface.

Note Policy maps can be configured on ingress or egress routers. They can also be attached in the input or output direction of an interface. The direction (input or output) and the router (ingress or egress) to which the policy map should be attached varies according your network configuration. For this feature, only the input direction is supported.

Enter the input keyword followed by the policy map name.

Step 6 

exit

Example:

Router(config-if)# exit

(Optional) Exits interface configuration mode.

Verifying the Configuration

To verify that the packets are being matched as intended, and to display the number of packets matched, complete the following steps.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. show policy-map interface interface-name

3. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

show policy-map interface interface-name

Example:

Router# show policy-map interface serial4/0

Displays the packet statistics of all classes that are configured for all service policies either on the specified interface or subinterface or on a specific PVC on the interface.

Enter the interface name.

Step 3 

exit

Example:

Router# exit

(Optional) Exits privileged EXEC mode.

Troubleshooting Tips

The commands in the "Verifying the Configuration" section allow you to verify that you achieved the intended configuration and that the feature is functioning correctly.

If, after using the show commands listed above, you find that the configuration is not correct or the feature is not functioning as expected, perform these steps:

1. Use the show running-config command and analyze the output of the command.

2. If the policy map does not appear in the output of the show running-config command, enable the logging console command.

3. Attach the policy map to the interface again.

Configuration Examples for the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature

This section provides the following configuration examples:

Configuring the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature: Example

Verifying the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature Configuration: Example

Configuring the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature: Example

This section contains a sample configuration. There are three processes to configuring this feature; creating a class-map, configuring a policy-map, and attaching the policy-map to an interface. There is an example for each process.

In this example, a class called "class-c1" has been created using the class-map command, and the match atm clp command has been configured inside that class. Therefore, packets will be matched on the basis of the ATM CLP and placed into this class.

Router> enable

Router# configure terminal

Router(config)# class-map class-c1

Router(config-cmap)# match atm clp

Router(config-cmap)# end


In this section, a policy map called policy1 is created using the policy-map command. Policy maps are used to apply one or more QoS feature to the packets in your network. In this example, traffic policing is configured by using the police command and specifying the appropriate burst sizes and policing actions.

Router> enable

Router# configure terminal

Router(config)# policy-map policy1

Router(config-pmap)# class class-c1

Router(config-pmap-c)# police 8000 1000 1000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

Router(config-pmap-c)# end


In this section, the policy map called policy1 is attached to an ATM subinterface by using the service-policy command. For the QoS: Match on ATM CLP feature, policy maps can be attached to an interface in the input direction only. Therefore, the input keyword is specified when the service-policy command is configured.

Router> enable

Router# configure terminal

Router(config)# interface ATM2/0.1

Router(config-if)# pvc cisco 0/16 ilmi

Router(config-if)# service-policy input policy1

Router(config-if)# end

Verifying the QoS: Match on ATM CLP Feature Configuration: Example

This section contains sample output from the show policy-map interface command. The output from this command can be used to verify and monitor the feature configuration on your network.

In this example, the "Match: atm clp" statement indicates that packets are matched on the basis of the ATM CLP.

Router# show policy-map interface

 ATM2/1/0

  Service-policy input:p1 

    Class-map:clp-c1 (match-all) 
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match:atm clp
      QoS Set
        ip dscp 10
          Packets marked 0

    Class-map:class-default (match-any) 
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match:any 
        0 packets, 0 bytes
        5 minute rate 0 bps

Additional References

The following sections provide references related to the QoS: Match on ATM CLP feature.

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

QoS commands: complete command syntax, command modes, command history, defaults, usage guidelines, and examples

Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Command Reference, Release 12.3T

MQC

Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide, Release 12.3


Standards

Standards
Title

None


MIBs

MIBs
MIBs Link

None

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs


RFCs

RFCs
Title

None


Technical Assistance

Description
Link

The Cisco Technical Support website contains thousands of pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content.

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport


Command Reference

This section documents new and modified commands. All other commands used with this feature are documented in the Cisco IOS Release 12.3 command reference publications.

New Commands

match atm-clp

Modified Commands

show policy-map interface

match atm-clp

To enable packet matching on the basis of the ATM cell loss priority (CLP), use the match atm-clp command in class-map configuration mode. To disable packet matching on the basis of the ATM CLP, use the no form of this command.

match atm-clp

no match atm-clp

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

No default behavior or values

Command Modes

Class-map configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(28)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(28)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(28)SB.


Usage Guidelines

This command is supported on policy maps attached to ATM main interfaces, ATM subinterfaces, or ATM permanent virtual circuits (PVCs). However, policy maps (containing the match atm-clp command) attached to these types of ATM interfaces can be input policy maps only.

This command is supported on the PA-A3 adaptor only.

Examples

In this example, a class called "class-c1" has been created using the class-map command, and the match atm clp command has been configured inside that class. Therefore, packets match on the basis of the ATM CLP and are placed into this class.

Router> enable

Router# configure terminal

Router(config)# class-map class-c1

Router(config-cmap)# match atm clp

Router(config-cmap)# end

Related Commands

Command
Description

class-map

Creates a class map to be used for matching packets to a specified class.

show atm pvc

Displays all ATM PVCs and traffic information.

show policy-map interface

Displays the packet statistics of all classes that are configured for all service policies either on the specified interface or subinterface or on a specific PVC on the interface.


show policy-map interface

To display the packet statistics of all classes that are configured for all service policies either on the specified interface or subinterface or on a specific permanent virtual circuit (PVC) on the interface, use the show policy-map interface command in privileged EXEC mode.

show policy-map interface [type access-control] interface-name [vc [vpi/] vci] [dlci dlci]
[
input | output]

ATM Shared Port Adapter

show policy-map interface atm slot/subslot/port[.subinterface]

Syntax Description

type access-control

(Optional) Displays class maps configured to determine the exact pattern to look for in the protocol stack of interest.

interface-name

Name of the interface or subinterface whose policy configuration is to be displayed.

vc

(Optional) For ATM interfaces only, shows the policy configuration for a specified PVC. The name can be up to 16 characters long.

vpi/

(Optional) ATM network virtual path identifier (VPI) for this PVC. On the Cisco 7200 and 7500 series routers, this value ranges from 0 to 255.

The vpi and vci arguments cannot both be set to 0; if one is 0, the other cannot be 0.

vci

(Optional) ATM network virtual channel identifier (VCI) for this PVC. This value ranges from 0 to 1 less than the maximum value set for this interface by the atm vc-per-vp command. Typically, the lower values 0 to 31 are reserved for specific traffic (F4 Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM), switched virtual circuit (SVC) signaling, Integrated Local Management Interface (ILMI), and so on) and should not be used.

The VCI is a 16-bit field in the header of the ATM cell. The VCI value is unique only on a single link, not throughout the ATM network, because it has local significance only.

The vpi and vci arguments cannot both be set to 0; if one is 0, the other cannot be 0.

dlci

(Optional) Indicates that a specific PVC for which policy configuration will be displayed.

dlci

(Optional) A specific data-link connection identifier (DLCI) number used on the interface. Policy configuration for the corresponding PVC will be displayed when a DLCI is specified.

input

(Optional) Indicates that the statistics for the attached input policy will be displayed.

output

(Optional) Indicates that the statistics for the attached output policy will be displayed.

slot

(ATM Shared Port Adapter only) Chassis slot number. Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for slot information. For SIPs, refer to the platform-specific SPA hardware installation guide or the corresponding "Identifying Slots and Subslots for SIPs and SPAs" topic in the platform-specific SPA software configuration guide.

/subslot

(ATM Shared Port Adapter only) Secondary slot number on a SPA interface processor (SIP) where a SPA is installed. Refer to the platform-specific SPA hardware installation guide and the corresponding "Specifying the Interface Address on a SPA" topic in the platform-specific SPA software configuration guide for subslot information.

/port

(ATM Shared Port Adapter only) Port or interface number. Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for port information. For SPAs, refer to the corresponding "Specifying the Interface Address" topics in the platform-specific SPA software configuration guide.

.subinterface

(ATM Shared Port Adapter onlyOptional) Subinterface number. The number that precedes the period must match the number to which this subinterface belongs. The range is 1 to 4,294,967,293.


Defaults

The absence of both the forward slash (/) and a vpi value defaults the vpi value to 0. If this value is omitted, information for all virtual circuits (VCs) on the specified ATM interface or subinterface is displayed.

ATM Shared Port Adapter

When used with the ATM shared port adapter, this command has no default behavior or values.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

ATM Shared Port Adapter

When used with the ATM shared port adapter, EXEC or privileged EXEC.

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)T

This command was introduced.

12.0(5)XE

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(5)XE.

12.0(7)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(7)S.

12.1(1)E

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.1(1)E.

12.1(2)T

This command was modified to display information about the policy for all Frame Relay PVCs on the interface, or, if a DLCI is specified, the policy for that specific PVC. This command was also modified to display the total number of packets marked by the quality of service (QoS) set action.

12.1(3)T

This command was modified to display per-class accounting statistics.

12.2(4)T

This command was modified for two-rate traffic policing. It now can display burst parameters and associated actions.

12.2(8)T

The command was modified for the Policer Enhancement — Multiple Actions feature and the WRED — Explicit Congestion Notification (ECN) feature.

For the Policer Enhancement — Multiple Actions feature, the command was modified to display the multiple actions configured for packets conforming to, exceeding, or violating a specific rate.

For the WRED — Explicit Congestion Notification (ECN) feature, the command displays ECN marking information

12.2(13)T

The following modifications were made:

This command was modified for the Percentage-Based Policing and Shaping feature.

This command was modified for the Class-Based RTP and TCP Header Compression feature.

This command was modified as part of the Modular QoS CLI (MQC) Unconditional Packet Discard feature. Traffic classes in policy maps can now be configured to discard packets belonging to a specified class.

This command was modified to display the Frame Relay DLCI number as a criterion for matching traffic inside a class map.

This command was modified to display Layer 3 packet length as a criterion for matching traffic inside a class map.

This command was modified for the Enhanced Packet Marking feature. A mapping table (table map) can now be used to convert and propagate packet-marking values.

12.2(15)T

This command was modified to display Frame Relay voice-adaptive traffic-shaping information.

12.0(28)S

This command was modified for the QoS: Percentage-Based Policing feature to include milliseconds when calculating the committed (conform) burst (bc) and excess (peak) burst (be) sizes.

12.3(14)T

This command was modified to display bandwidth estimation parameters.

12.2(18)SXE

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXE. This command was modified to display aggregate WRED statistics for the ATM shared port adapter. Note that changes were made to the syntax, defaults, and command modes. These changes are labelled "ATM Shared Port Adapter."

12.4(4)T

The type access-control keywords were added to support flexible packet matching.

12.2(28)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(28)SB and its output was modified to display either legacy (nondistributed processing) QoS or hierarchical queueing framework (HQF) parameters on FR interfaces or PVCs.


Usage Guidelines

The show policy-map interface command displays the packet statistics for classes on the specified interface or the specified PVC only if a service policy has been attached to the interface or the PVC.

You can use the interface-name argument to display output for a PVC only for enhanced ATM port adapters (PA-A3) that support per-VC queueing.

The counters displayed after the show policy-map interface command is entered are updated only if congestion is present on the interface.

The show policy-map interface command displays policy information about Frame Relay PVCs only if Frame Relay Traffic Shaping (FRTS) is enabled on the interface.

The show policy-map interface command displays ECN marking information only if ECN is enabled on the interface.

To determine if shaping is active with HQF, check the queue depth field of the "(queue depth/total drops/no-buffer drops)" line in the show policy-map interface command output.

Examples

This section provides sample output from typical show policy-map interface commands. Depending upon the interface in use and the options enabled, the output you see may vary slightly from the ones shown below.

Example of Weighted Fair Queueing (WFQ) on Serial Interface

The following sample output of the show policy-map interface command displays the statistics for the serial 3/1 interface, to which a service policy called mypolicy (configured as shown below) is attached. Weighted fair queueing (WFQ) has been enabled on this interface. See Table 1 for an explanation of the significant fields that commonly appear in the command output.

policy-map mypolicy
  class voice
    priority 128
  class gold
   bandwidth 100
  class silver
   bandwidth 80
   random-detect

Router# show policy-map interface serial3/1 output

 Serial3/1 

  Service-policy output: mypolicy

    Class-map: voice (match-all)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: ip precedence 5 
      Weighted Fair Queueing
        Strict Priority
        Output Queue: Conversation 264 
        Bandwidth 128 (kbps) Burst 3200 (Bytes)
        (pkts matched/bytes matched) 0/0
        (total drops/bytes drops) 0/0

    Class-map: gold (match-all)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: ip precedence 2 
      Weighted Fair Queueing
        Output Queue: Conversation 265 
        Bandwidth 100 (kbps) Max Threshold 64 (packets)
        (pkts matched/bytes matched) 0/0
        (depth/total drops/no-buffer drops) 0/0/0

    Class-map: silver (match-all)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: ip precedence 1 
      Weighted Fair Queueing
        Output Queue: Conversation 266 
        Bandwidth 80 (kbps)
        (pkts matched/bytes matched) 0/0
        (depth/total drops/no-buffer drops) 0/0/0
         exponential weight: 9
         mean queue depth: 0

class     Transmitted       Random drop      Tail drop    Minimum Maximum  Mark
          pkts/bytes        pkts/bytes       pkts/bytes    thresh  thresh  prob
0             0/0               0/0              0/0           20      40  1/10
1             0/0               0/0              0/0           22      40  1/10
2             0/0               0/0              0/0           24      40  1/10
3             0/0               0/0              0/0           26      40  1/10
4             0/0               0/0              0/0           28      40  1/10
5             0/0               0/0              0/0           30      40  1/10
6             0/0               0/0              0/0           32      40  1/10
7             0/0               0/0              0/0           34      40  1/10
rsvp          0/0               0/0              0/0           36      40  1/10

Class-map: class-default (match-any)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: any 

Example of Traffic Shaping on Serial Interface

The following sample output from the show policy-map interface command displays the statistics for the serial 3/2 interface, to which a service policy called p1 (configured as shown below) is attached. Traffic shaping has been enabled on this interface. See Table 1 for an explanation of the significant fields that commonly appear in the command output.

policy-map p1
  class c1
   shape average 320000

Router# show policy-map interface serial3/2 output

 Serial3/2 

  Service-policy output: p1

    Class-map: c1 (match-all)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: ip precedence 0 
      Traffic Shaping
        Target    Byte   Sustain   Excess    Interval  Increment Adapt
        Rate      Limit  bits/int  bits/int  (ms)      (bytes)   Active
        320000    2000   8000      8000      25        1000      -

        Queue     Packets   Bytes     Packets   Bytes     Shaping
        Depth                         Delayed   Delayed   Active
        0         0         0         0         0         no

    Class-map: class-default (match-any)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: any 

Table 1 describes significant fields commonly shown in the displays. The fields in the table are grouped according to the relevant QoS feature.

Table 1 show policy-map interface Field Descriptions 1  

Field
Description
Fields Associated with Classes or Service Policies

Service-policy output

Name of the output service policy applied to the specified interface or VC.

Class-map

Class of traffic being displayed. Output is displayed for each configured class in the policy. The choice for implementing class matches (for example, match-all or match-any) can also appear next to the traffic class.

packets and bytes

Number of packets (also shown in bytes) identified as belonging to the class of traffic being displayed.

offered rate

Rate, in kbps, of packets coming in to the class.

Note If the packets are compressed over an outgoing interface, the improved packet rate achieved by packet compression is not reflected in the offered rate. Also, if the packets are classified before they enter a combination of tunnels (for example, a generic routing encapsulation (GRE) tunnel and an IP Security (IPSec) tunnel), the offered rate does not include all the extra overhead associated with tunnel encapsulation in general. Depending on the configuration, the offered rate may include no overhead, may include the overhead for only one tunnel encapsulation, or may include the overhead for all tunnel encapsulations. In most of the GRE and IPSec tunnel configurations, the offered rate includes the overhead for GRE tunnel encapsulation only.

drop rate

Rate, in kbps, at which packets are dropped from the class. The drop rate is calculated by subtracting the number of successfully transmitted packets from the offered rate.

Note In distributed architecture platforms (such as the C7500), the value of the transfer rate, calculated as the difference between the offered rate and the drop rate counters, can sporadically deviate from the average by up to 20 percent or more. This can occur while no corresponding burst is registered by independent traffic analyser equipment.

Match

Match criteria specified for the class of traffic. Choices include criteria such as IP precedence, IP differentiated services code point (DSCP) value, Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) experimental (EXP) value, access groups, and QoS groups. For more information about the variety of match criteria options available, refer to the chapter "Configuring the Modular Quality of Service Command-Line Interface" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

Fields Associated with Queueing (If Enabled)

Output Queue

The weighted fair queueing (WFQ) conversation to which this class of traffic is allocated.

Bandwidth

Bandwidth, in either kbps or percentage, configured for this class and the burst size.

pkts matched/bytes matched

Number of packets (also shown in bytes) matching this class that were placed in the queue. This number reflects the total number of matching packets queued at any time. Packets matching this class are queued only when congestion exists. If packets match the class but are never queued because the network was not congested, those packets are not included in this total. However, if process switching is in use, the number of packets is always incremented even if the network is not congested.

depth/total drops/no-buffer drops

Number of packets discarded for this class. No-buffer indicates that no memory buffer exists to service the packet.

Fields Associated with Weighted Random Early Detection (WRED) (If Enabled)

exponential weight

Exponent used in the average queue size calculation for a WRED parameter group.

mean queue depth

Average queue depth based on the actual queue depth on the interface and the exponential weighting constant. It is a fluctuating average. The minimum and maximum thresholds are compared against this value to determine drop decisions.

class

IP precedence level.

Transmitted pkts/bytes

Number of packets (also shown in bytes) passed through WRED and not dropped by WRED.

Note If there is insufficient memory in the buffer to accommodate the packet, the packet can be dropped after the packet passes through WRED. Packets dropped because of insufficient memory in the buffer (sometimes referred to as "no-buffer drops") are not taken into account by the WRED packet counter.

Random drop pkts/bytes

Number of packets (also shown in bytes) randomly dropped when the mean queue depth is between the minimum threshold value and the maximum threshold value for the specified IP precedence level.

Tail drop pkts/bytes

Number of packets dropped when the mean queue depth is greater than the maximum threshold value for the specified IP precedence level.

Minimum thresh

Minimum threshold. Minimum WRED threshold in number of packets.

Maximum thresh

Maximum threshold. Maximum WRED threshold in number of packets.

Mark prob

Mark probability. Fraction of packets dropped when the average queue depth is at the maximum threshold.

Fields Associated with Traffic Shaping (If Enabled)

Target Rate

Rate used for shaping traffic.

Byte Limit

Maximum number of bytes that can be transmitted per interval. Calculated as follows:

((Bc+Be) /8) x 1

Sustain bits/int

Committed burst (Bc) rate.

Excess bits/int

Excess burst (Be) rate.

Interval (ms)

Time interval value in milliseconds (ms).

Increment (bytes)

Number of credits (in bytes) received in the token bucket of the traffic shaper during each time interval.

Queue Depth

Current queue depth of the traffic shaper.

Packets

Total number of packets that have entered the traffic shaper system.

Bytes

Total number of bytes that have entered the traffic shaper system.

Packets Delayed

Total number of packets delayed in the queue of the traffic shaper before being transmitted.

Bytes Delayed

Total number of bytes delayed in the queue of the traffic shaper before being transmitted.

Shaping Active

Indicates whether the traffic shaper is active. For example, if a traffic shaper is active, and the traffic being sent exceeds the traffic shaping rate, a "yes" appears in this field.

1 A number in parentheses may appear next to the service-policy output name, class-map name, and match criteria information. The number is for Cisco internal use only and can be disregarded.


Example of Precedence-Based Aggregate WRED on ATM Shared Port Adapter

The following sample output of the show policy-map interface command displays the statistics for the ATM shared port adapter interface 4/1/0.10, to which a service policy called prec-aggr-wred (configured as shown below) is attached. Because aggregate WRED has been enabled on this interface, the class through Mark Prob statistics are aggregated by subclasses. See Table 2 for an explanation of the significant fields that commonly appear in the command output.

Router(config)# policy-map prec-aggr-wred
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect aggregate
Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect precedence values 0 1 2 3 minimum thresh 10 
maximum-thresh 100 mark-prob 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect precedence values 4 5 minimum-thresh 40 
maximum-thresh 400 mark-prob 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect precedence values 6 minimum-thresh 60 maximum-thresh 
600 mark-prob 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect precedence values 7 minimum-thresh 70 maximum-thresh 
700 mark-prob 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# interface ATM4/1/0.10 point-to-point
Router(config-subif)# ip address 10.0.0.2 255.255.255.0
Router(config-subif)# pvc 10/110

Router(config-subif)# service-policy output prec-aggr-wred



Router# show policy-map interface a4/1/0.10

 ATM4/1/0.10: VC 10/110 -

  Service-policy output: prec-aggr-wred

    Class-map: class-default (match-any)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: any 
        Exp-weight-constant: 9 (1/512)
        Mean queue depth: 0
        class       Transmitted     Random drop      Tail drop     Minimum   Maximum  Mark
	pkts/bytes	pkts/bytes	pkts/bytes	thresh	thresh	prob
        
        0  1  2  3       0/0               0/0              0/0           10     100  1/10
        4  5             0/0               0/0              0/0           40     400  1/10
        6                0/0               0/0              0/0           60     600  1/10
        7                0/0               0/0              0/0           70     700  1/10

Example of DSCP-Based Aggregate WRED on ATM Shared Port Adapter

The following sample output of the show policy-map interface command displays the statistics for the ATM shared port adapter interface 4/1/0.11, to which a service policy called dscp-aggr-wred (configured as shown below) is attached. Because aggregate WRED has been enabled on this interface, the class through Mark Prob statistics are aggregated by subclasses. See Table 2 for an explanation of the significant fields that commonly appear in the command output.

Router(config)# policy-map dscp-aggr-wred
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect dscp-based aggregate minimum-thresh 1 maximum-thresh 
10 mark-prob 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect dscp values 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 minimum-thresh 10 
maximum-thresh 20 mark-prob 10
Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect dscp values 8 9 10 11 minimum-thresh 10 
maximum-thresh 40 mark-prob 10
Router(config)# interface ATM4/1/0.11 point-to-point
Router(config-subif)# ip address 10.0.0.2 255.255.255.0
Router(config-subif)# pvc 11/101

Router(config-subif)# service-policy output dscp-aggr-wred

Router# show policy-map interface a4/1/0.11

 ATM4/1/0.11: VC 11/101 -

  Service-policy output: dscp-aggr-wred

    Class-map: class-default (match-any)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: any 
        Exp-weight-constant: 0 (1/1)
        Mean queue depth: 0
        class       Transmitted     Random drop      Tail drop     Minimum   Maximum  Mark
                  	pkts/bytes	pkts/bytes	pkts/bytes	thresh	thresh	prob
        default          0/0               0/0              0/0            1      10  1/10
        0  1  2  3 
        4  5  6  7       0/0               0/0              0/0           10      20  1/10
        8  9  10 11      0/0               0/0              0/0           10      40  1/10

Table 2 describes the significant fields shown in the display when aggregate WRED is configured for an ATM shared port adapter.

Table 2 show policy-map interface Field Descriptions—Configured for Aggregate WRED on ATM Shared Port Adapter

Field
Description

exponential weight

Exponent used in the average queue size calculation for a Weighted Random Early Detection (WRED) parameter group.

mean queue depth

Average queue depth based on the actual queue depth on the interface and the exponential weighting constant. It is a fluctuating average. The minimum and maximum thresholds are compared against this value to determine drop decisions.

Note When Aggregate Weighted Random Early Detection (WRED) is enabled, the following WRED statistics will be aggregated based on their subclass (either their IP precedence or differentiated services code point (DSCP) value).

class

IP precedence level or differentiated services code point (DSCP) value.

Transmitted pkts/bytes

Number of packets (also shown in bytes) passed through WRED and not dropped by WRED.

Note If there is insufficient memory in the buffer to accommodate the packet, the packet can be dropped after the packet passes through WRED. Packets dropped because of insufficient memory in the buffer (sometimes referred to as "no-buffer drops") are not taken into account by the WRED packet counter.

Random drop pkts/bytes

Number of packets (also shown in bytes) randomly dropped when the mean queue depth is between the minimum threshold value and the maximum threshold value for the specified IP precedence level or DSCP value.

Tail drop pkts/bytes

Number of packets dropped when the mean queue depth is greater than the maximum threshold value for the specified IP precedence level or DSCP value.

Minimum thresh

Minimum threshold. Minimum WRED threshold in number of packets.

Maximum thresh

Maximum threshold. Maximum WRED threshold in number of packets.

Mark prob

Mark probability. Fraction of packets dropped when the average queue depth is at the maximum threshold.


Frame Relay Voice-Adaptive Traffic-Shaping show policy interface Command Example

The following sample output shows that Frame Relay voice-adaptive traffic shaping is currently active and has 29 seconds left on the deactivation timer. With traffic shaping active and the deactivation time set, this means that the current sending rate on DLCI 201 is minCIR, but if no voice packets are detected for 29 seconds, the sending rate will increase to CIR.

Router# show policy interface Serial3/1.1

 Serial3/1.1:DLCI 201 -

  Service-policy output:MQC-SHAPE-LLQ1
    
    Class-map:class-default (match-any)
      1434 packets, 148751 bytes
      30 second offered rate 14000 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match:any
      Traffic Shaping
           Target/Average   Byte   Sustain   Excess    Interval  Increment
             Rate           Limit  bits/int  bits/int  (ms)      (bytes)
            63000/63000     1890   7560      7560      120       945
    
        Adapt  Queue     Packets   Bytes     Packets   Bytes     Shaping
        Active Depth                         Delayed   Delayed   Active
        BECN   0         1434      162991    26        2704      yes
        Voice Adaptive Shaping active, time left 29 secs 

Table 3 describes the significant fields shown in the display. Significant fields that are not described in Table 3 are described in Table 1, "show policy-map interface Field Descriptions."

Table 3 show policy-map interface Field Descriptions—Configured for Frame Relay Voice-Adaptive Traffic Shaping

Field
Description

Voice Adaptive Shaping active/inactive

Indicates whether Frame Relay voice-adaptive traffic shaping is active or inactive.

time left

Number of seconds left on the Frame Relay voice-adaptive traffic shaping deactivation timer.


Two-Rate Traffic Policing show policy-map interface Command Example

The following is sample output from the show policy-map interface command when two-rate traffic policing has been configured. In the example below, 1.25 Mbps of traffic is sent ("offered") to a policer class.

Router# show policy-map interface serial3/0 

 Serial3/0

  Service-policy output: policy1

   Class-map: police (match all)
    148803 packets, 36605538 bytes
    30 second offered rate 1249000 bps, drop rate 249000 bps
    Match: access-group 101
    police:
     cir 500000 bps, conform-burst 10000, pir 1000000, peak-burst 100000
     conformed 59538 packets, 14646348 bytes; action: transmit
     exceeded 59538 packets, 14646348 bytes; action: set-prec-transmit 2
     violated 29731 packets, 7313826 bytes; action: drop
     conformed 499000 bps, exceed 500000 bps violate 249000 bps
   Class-map: class-default (match-any)
    19 packets, 1990 bytes
    30 seconds offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
    Match: any

The two-rate traffic policer marks 500 kbps of traffic as conforming, 500 kbps of traffic as exceeding, and 250 kbps of traffic as violating the specified rate. Packets marked as conforming will be sent as is, and packets marked as exceeding will be marked with IP Precedence 2 and then sent. Packets marked as violating the specified rate are dropped.

Table 4 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 4 show policy-map interface Field Descriptions—Configured for Two-Rate Traffic Policing 

Field
Description

police

Indicates that the police command has been configured to enable traffic policing. Also, displays the specified CIR, conform burst size, peak information rate (PIR), and peak burst size used for marking packets.

conformed

Displays the action to be taken on packets conforming to a specified rate. Displays the number of packets and bytes on which the action was taken.

exceeded

Displays the action to be taken on packets exceeding a specified rate. Displays the number of packets and bytes on which the action was taken.

violated

Displays the action to be taken on packets violating a specified rate. Displays the number of packets and bytes on which the action was taken.


Multiple Traffic Policing Actions show policy-map interface Command Example

The following is sample output from the show policy-map command when the Policer Enhancement — Multiple Actions feature has been configured. The sample output from the show policy-map interface command displays the statistics for the serial 3/2 interface, to which a service policy called "police" (configured as shown below) is attached.

policy-map police
  class class-default
   police cir 1000000 pir 2000000
     conform-action transmit 
     exceed-action set-prec-transmit 4
     exceed-action set-frde-transmit 
     violate-action set-prec-transmit 2
     violate-action set-frde-transmit 

Router# show policy-map interface serial3/2

Serial3/2: DLCI 100 -

Service-policy output: police

    Class-map: class-default (match-any)
      172984 packets, 42553700 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 960000 bps, drop rate 277000 bps
      Match: any 
     police:
         cir 1000000 bps, bc 31250 bytes, pir 2000000 bps, be 31250 bytes
       conformed 59679 packets, 14680670 bytes; actions:
         transmit 
exceeded 59549 packets, 14649054 bytes; actions:
         set-prec-transmit 4
         set-frde-transmit 
       violated 53758 packets, 13224468 bytes; actions: 
         set-prec-transmit 2
         set-frde-transmit 
       conformed 340000 bps, exceed 341000 bps, violate 314000 bps

The sample output from show policy-map interface command shows the following:

59679 packets were marked as conforming packets (that is, packets conforming to the CIR) and were transmitted unaltered.

59549 packets were marked as exceeding packets (that is, packets exceeding the CIR but not exceeding the PIR). Therefore, the IP Precedence value of these packets was changed to an IP Precedence level of 4, the discard eligibility (DE) bit was set to 1, and the packets were transmitted with these changes.

53758 packets were marked as violating packets (that is, exceeding the PIR). Therefore, the IP Precedence value of these packets was changed to an IP Precedence level of 2, the DE bit was set to 1, and the packets were transmitted with these changes.


Note Actions are specified by using the action argument of the police command. For more information about the available actions, see the police command reference page.


Table 5 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 5 show policy-map interface Field Descriptions—Configured for Multiple Traffic Policing Actions

Field
Description

police

Indicates that the police command has been configured to enable traffic policing. Also, displays the specified CIR, conform burst size (BC), PIR, and peak burst size (BE) used for marking packets.

conformed, packets, bytes, actions

Displays the number of packets (also shown in bytes) marked as conforming to a specified rate and the actions taken on the packet. If there are multiple actions, each action is listed separately.

exceeded, packets, bytes, actions

Displays the number of packets (also shown in bytes) marked as exceeding a specified rate and the actions taken on the packet. If there are multiple actions, each action is listed separately.

violated, packets, bytes, actions

Displays the number of packets (also shown in bytes) marked as violating a specified rate and the actions taken on the packet. If there are multiple actions, each action is listed separately.


Explicit Congestion Notification show policy-map interface Command Example

The following is sample output from the show policy-map interface command when the WRED — Explicit Congestion Notification (ECN) feature has been configured. The words "explicit congestion notification" included in the output indicate that ECN has been enabled.

Router# show policy-map interface Serial4/1

 Serial4/1

  Service-policy output:policy_ecn
        Class-map:prec1 (match-all)
          1000 packets, 125000 bytes
          30 second offered rate 14000 bps, drop rate 5000 bps
          Match:ip precedence 1
          Weighted Fair Queueing
            Output Queue:Conversation 42
            Bandwidth 20 (%)
            Bandwidth 100 (kbps)
            (pkts matched/bytes matched) 989/123625
        (depth/total drops/no-buffer drops) 0/455/0
             exponential weight:9
             explicit congestion notification
             mean queue depth:0

     class   Transmitted  Random drop  Tail drop   Minimum     Maximum     Mark
             pkts/bytes   pkts/bytes    pkts/bytes threshold   threshold   probability
       0       0/0          0/0          0/0          20          40        1/10
       1     545/68125      0/0          0/0          22          40        1/10
       2       0/0          0/0          0/0          24          40        1/10
       3       0/0          0/0          0/0          26          40        1/10
       4       0/0          0/0          0/0          28          40        1/10
       5       0/0          0/0          0/0          30          40        1/10
       6       0/0          0/0          0/0          32          40        1/10
       7       0/0          0/0          0/0          34          40        1/10
     rsvp      0/0          0/0          0/0          36          40        1/10
     class   ECN Mark 
            pkts/bytes
       0     0/0
       1    43/5375
       2     0/0
       3     0/0
       4     0/0
       5     0/0
       6     0/0
       7     0/0
     rsvp    0/0

Table 6 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 6 show policy-map interface Field Descriptions—Configured for ECN 

Field
Description

explicit congestion notification

Indication that Explicit Congestion Notification is enabled.

mean queue depth

Average queue depth based on the actual queue depth on the interface and the exponential weighting constant. It is a moving average. The minimum and maximum thresholds are compared against this value to determine drop decisions.

class

IP precedence value.

Transmitted pkts/bytes

Number of packets (also shown in bytes) passed through WRED and not dropped by WRED.

Note If there is insufficient memory in the buffer to accommodate the packet, the packet can be dropped after the packet passes through WRED. Packets dropped because of insufficient memory in the buffer (sometimes referred to as "no-buffer drops") are not taken into account by the WRED packet counter.

Random drop pkts/bytes

Number of packets (also shown in bytes) randomly dropped when the mean queue depth is between the minimum threshold value and the maximum threshold value for the specified IP precedence value.

Tail drop pkts/bytes

Number of packets dropped when the mean queue depth is greater than the maximum threshold value for the specified IP precedence value.

Minimum threshold

Minimum WRED threshold in number of packets.

Maximum threshold

Maximum WRED threshold in number of packets.

Mark probability

Fraction of packets dropped when the average queue depth is at the maximum threshold.

ECN Mark pkts/bytes

Number of packets (also shown in bytes) marked by ECN.


Class-Based RTP and TCP Header Compression show policy-map interface Command Example

The following sample output from the show policy-map interface command shows the RTP header compression has been configured for a class called "prec2" in the policy map called "p1".

The show policy-map interface command output displays the type of header compression configured (RTP), the interface to which the policy map called "p1" is attached (Serial 4/1), the total number of packets, the number of packets compressed, the number of packets saved, the number of packets sent, and the rate at which the packets were compressed (in bits per second (bps)).

In this example, User Datagram Protocol (UDP)/RTP header compressions have been configured, and the compression statistics are included at the end of the display.

Router# show policy-map interface Serial4/1

Serial4/1

Service-policy output:p1

    Class-map:class-default (match-any)
      1005 packets, 64320 bytes
      30 second offered rate 16000 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match:any
compress:
          header ip rtp
          UDP/RTP Compression:
          Sent:1000 total, 999 compressed,
                41957 bytes saved, 17983 bytes sent
                3.33 efficiency improvement factor
                99% hit ratio, five minute miss rate 0 misses/sec, 0 max
                 rate 5000 bps

Table 7 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 7 show policy-map interface Field Descriptions—Configured for Class-Based RTP and TCP Header Compression1  

Field
Description

Service-policy output

Name of the output service policy applied to the specified interface or VC.

Class-map

Class of traffic being displayed. Output is displayed for each configured class in the policy. The choice for implementing class matches (for example, match-all or match-any) can also appear next to the traffic class.

packets, bytes

Number of packets (also shown in bytes) identified as belonging to the class of traffic being displayed.

offered rate

Rate, in kbps, of packets coming in to the class.

Note If the packets are compressed over an outgoing interface, the improved packet rate achieved by packet compression is not reflected in the offered rate. Also, if the packets are classified before they enter a combination of tunnels (for example, a generic routing encapsulation (GRE) tunnel and an IP Security (IPSec) tunnel), the offered rate does not include all the extra overhead associated with tunnel encapsulation in general. Depending on the configuration, the offered rate may include no overhead, may include the overhead for only one tunnel encapsulation, or may include the overhead for all tunnel encapsulations. In most of the GRE and IPSec tunnel configurations, the offered rate includes the overhead for GRE tunnel encapsulation only.

UDP/RTP Compression

Indicates that RTP header compression has been configured for the class.

Sent total

Count of every packet sent, both compressed packets and full-header packets.

Sent compressed

Count of number of compressed packets sent.

bytes saved

Total number of bytes saved (that is, bytes not needing to be sent).

bytes sent

Total number of bytes sent for both compressed and full-header packets.

efficiency improvement factor

The percentage of increased bandwidth efficiency as a result of header compression. For example, with RTP streams, the efficiency improvement factor can be as much as 2.9 (or 290 percent).

hit ratio

Used mainly for troubleshooting purposes, this is the percentage of packets found in the context database. In most instances, this percentage should be high.

five minute miss rate

The number of new traffic flows found in the last five minutes.

misses/sec
max

The average number of new traffic flows found per second, and the highest rate of new traffic flows to date.

rate

The actual traffic rate (in bits per second) after the packets are compressed.

1 A number in parentheses may appear next to the service-policy output name and the class-map name. The number is for Cisco internal use only and can be disregarded.


Modular QoS CLI (MQC) Unconditional Packet Discard show policy-map interface Command Example

The following sample output from the show policy-map interface command displays the statistics for the Serial2/0 interface, to which a policy map called "policy1" is attached. The discarding action has been specified for all the packets belonging to a class called "c1." In this example, 32000 bps of traffic is sent ("offered") to the class and all of them are dropped. Therefore, the drop rate shows 32000 bps.


Router# show policy-map interface Serial2/0

 Serial2/0 

  Service-policy output: policy1

    Class-map: c1 (match-all)
       10184 packets, 1056436 bytes
       5 minute offered rate 32000 bps, drop rate 32000 bps
       Match: ip precedence 0
       drop

Table 8 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 8 show policy-map interface Field Descriptions—Configured for MQC Unconditional Packet Discard1  

Field
Description

Service-policy output

Name of the output service policy applied to the specified interface or VC.

Class-map

Class of traffic being displayed. Output is displayed for each configured class in the policy. The choice for implementing class matches (for example, match-all or match-any) can also appear next to the traffic class.

packets, bytes

Number of packets (also shown in bytes) identified as belonging to the class of traffic being displayed.

offered rate

Rate, in kbps, of packets coming in to the class.

Note If the packets are compressed over an outgoing interface, the improved packet rate achieved by packet compression is not reflected in the offered rate. Also, if the packets are classified before they enter a combination of tunnels (for example, a generic routing encapsulation (GRE) tunnel and an IP Security (IPSec) tunnel), the offered rate does not include all the extra overhead associated with tunnel encapsulation in general. Depending on the configuration, the offered rate may include no overhead, may include the overhead for only one tunnel encapsulation, or may include the overhead for all tunnel encapsulations. In most of the GRE and IPSec tunnel configurations, the offered rate includes the overhead for GRE tunnel encapsulation only.

drop rate

Rate, in kbps, at which packets are dropped from the class. The drop rate is calculated by subtracting the number of successfully transmitted packets from the offered rate.

Note In distributed architecture platforms (such as the C7500), the value of the tranfer rate, calculated as the difference between the offered rate and the drop rate counters, can sporadically diviate from the average by up to 20 percent or more. This can occur while no corresponding burst is registered by independent traffic analyser equipment

Match

Match criteria specified for the class of traffic. Choices include criteria such as the Layer 3 packet length, IP precedence, IP DSCP value, MPLS experimental value, access groups, and QoS groups. For more information about the variety of match criteria options available, refer to the chapter "Configuring the Modular Quality of Service Command-Line Interface" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

drop

Indicates that the packet discarding action for all the packets belonging to the specified class has been configured.

1 A number in parentheses may appear next to the service-policy output name and the class-map name. The number is for Cisco internal use only and can be disregarded.


Percentage-Based Policing and Shaping show policy-map interface Command Example

The following sample output from the show policy-map interface command shows traffic policing configured using a CIR based on a bandwidth of 20 percent. The CIR and committed burst (Bc) in milliseconds (ms) are included in the display.

Router# show policy-map interface Serial3/1

 Serial3/1 

  Service-policy output: mypolicy

    Class-map: gold (match-any)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: any
      police:
          cir 20 % bc 10 ms
          cir 2000000 bps, bc 2500 bytes
          pir 40 % be 20 ms
          pir 4000000 bps, be 10000 bytes
     conformed 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions: 
      transmit 
     exceeded 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions: 
       drop
      violated 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:
       drop
      conformed 0 bps, exceed 0 bps, violate 0 bps

Table 9 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 9 show policy-map interface Field Descriptions—Configured for Percentage-Based Policing and Shaping1

Field
Description

Service-policy output

Name of the output service policy applied to the specified interface or VC.

Class-map

Class of traffic being displayed. Output is displayed for each configured class in the policy. The choice for implementing class matches (for example, match-all or match-any) can also appear next to the traffic class.

packets, bytes

Number of packets (also shown in bytes) identified as belonging to the class of traffic being displayed.

offered rate

Rate, in kbps, of packets coming in to the class.

Note If the packets are compressed over an outgoing interface, the improved packet rate achieved by packet compression is not reflected in the offered rate. Also, if the packets are classified before they enter a combination of tunnels (for example, a generic routing encapsulation (GRE) tunnel and an IP Security (IPSec) tunnel), the offered rate does not include all the extra overhead associated with tunnel encapsulation in general. Depending on the configuration, the offered rate may include no overhead, may include the overhead for only one tunnel encapsulation, or may include the overhead for all tunnel encapsulations. In most of the GRE and IPSec tunnel configurations, the offered rate includes the overhead for GRE tunnel encapsulation only.

police

Indicates that traffic policing based on a percentage of bandwidth has been enabled. Also, displays the bandwidth percentage, the CIR, and the committed burst (Bc) size in ms.

conformed, actions

Displays the number of packets and bytes marked as conforming to the specified rates, and the action to be taken on those packets.

exceeded, actions

Displays the number of packets and bytes marked as exceeding the specified rates, and the action to be taken on those packets.

1 A number in parentheses may appear next to the service-policy output name and the class-map name. The number is for Cisco internal use only and can be disregarded.


Traffic Shaping show policy-map interface Command Example

The following sample output from the show policy-map interface command (shown below) displays the statistics for the serial 3/2 interface. Traffic shaping has been enabled on this interface, and an average rate of 20 percent of the bandwidth has been specified.

Router# show policy-map interface Serial3/2

Serial3/2 

  Service-policy output: p1

    Class-map: c1 (match-all)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: any
      Traffic Shaping
        Target/Average      Byte   Sustain    Excess      Interval  Increment  Adapt
        Rate              Limit  bits/int  bits/int    (ms)     (bytes)   Active 
         20 %                       10 (ms)    20 (ms)
        201500/201500       1952   7808       7808        38         976       -

        Queue     Packets   Bytes     Packets   Bytes     Shaping
        Depth                         Delayed   Delayed   Active
        0         0         0         0         0         no

Table 10 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 10 show policy-map interface Field Descriptions—Configured for Percentage-Based Policing and Shaping (with Traffic Shaping Enabled)1  

Field
Description

Service-policy output

Name of the output service policy applied to the specified interface or VC.

Class-map

Class of traffic being displayed. Output is displayed for each configured class in the policy. The choice for implementing class matches (for example, match-all or match-any) can also appear next to the traffic class.

packets, bytes

Number of packets (also shown in bytes) identified as belonging to the class of traffic being displayed.

offered rate

Rate, in kbps, of packets coming in to the class.

Note If the packets are compressed over an outgoing interface, the improved packet rate achieved by packet compression is not reflected in the offered rate. Also, if the packets are classified before they enter a combination of tunnels (for example, a generic routing encapsulation (GRE) tunnel and an IP Security (IPSec) tunnel), the offered rate does not include all the extra overhead associated with tunnel encapsulation in general. Depending on the configuration, the offered rate may include no overhead, may include the overhead for only one tunnel encapsulation, or may include the overhead for all tunnel encapsulations. In most of the GRE and IPSec tunnel configurations, the offered rate includes the overhead for GRE tunnel encapsulation only.

drop rate

Rate, in kbps, at which packets are dropped from the class. The drop rate is calculated by subtracting the number of successfully transmitted packets from the offered rate.

Match

Match criteria specified for the class of traffic. Choices include criteria such as the Layer 3 packet length, IP precedence, IP DSCP value, MPLS experimental value, access groups, and quality of service (QoS) groups. For more information about the variety of match criteria options that are available, refer to the chapter "Configuring the Modular Quality of Service Command-Line Interface" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide, Release 12.2.

Traffic Shaping

Indicates that traffic shaping based on a percentage of bandwidth has been enabled.

Target /Average Rate

Rate (percentage) used for shaping traffic and the number of packets meeting that rate.

Byte Limit

Maximum number of bytes that can be transmitted per interval. Calculated as follows:

((Bc+Be) /8 ) x 1

Sustain bits/int

Committed burst (Bc) rate.

Excess bits/int

Excess burst (Be) rate.

Interval (ms)

Time interval value in milliseconds (ms).

Increment (bytes)

Number of credits (in bytes) received in the token bucket of the traffic shaper during each time interval.

Adapt Active

Indicates whether adaptive shaping is enabled.

Queue Depth

Current queue depth of the traffic shaper.

Packets

Total number of packets that have entered the traffic shaper system.

Bytes

Total number of bytes that have entered the traffic shaper system.

Packets Delayed

Total number of packets delayed in the queue of the traffic shaper before being transmitted.

Bytes Delayed

Total number of bytes delayed in the queue of the traffic shaper before being transmitted.

Shaping Active

Indicates whether the traffic shaper is active. For example, if a traffic shaper is active, and the traffic being sent exceeds the traffic shaping rate, a "yes" appears in this field.

1 A number in parentheses may appear next to the service-policy output name, class-map name, and match criteria information. The number is for Cisco internal use only and can be disregarded.


Packet Classification Based on Layer 3 Packet Length show policy-map interface Command Example

The following sample output from the show policy-map interface command displays the packet statistics for the Ethernet4/1 interface, to which a service policy called "mypolicy" is attached. The Layer 3 packet length has been specified as a match criterion for the traffic in the class called "class1".


Router# show policy-map interface Ethernet4/1

 Ethernet4/1 

  Service-policy input: mypolicy

    Class-map: class1 (match-all)
       500 packets, 125000 bytes
       5 minute offered rate 4000 bps, drop rate 0 bps
       Match: packet length min 100 max 300
       QoS Set
         qos-group 20
           Packets marked 500

Table 11 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 11 show policy-map interface Field Descriptions—Configured for Packet Classification Based on Layer 3 Packet Length1  

Field
Description

Service-policy input

Name of the input service policy applied to the specified interface or VC.

Class-map

Class of traffic being displayed. Output is displayed for each configured class in the policy. The choice for implementing class matches (for example, match-all or match-any) can also appear next to the traffic class.

packets, bytes

Number of packets (also shown in bytes) identified as belonging to the class of traffic being displayed.

offered rate

Rate, in kbps, of packets coming in to the class.

Note If the packets are compressed over an outgoing interface, the improved packet rate achieved by packet compression is not reflected in the offered rate. Also, if the packets are classified before they enter a combination of tunnels (for example, a generic routing encapsulation (GRE) tunnel and an IP Security (IPSec) tunnel), the offered rate does not include all the extra overhead associated with tunnel encapsulation in general. Depending on the configuration, the offered rate may include no overhead, may include the overhead for only one tunnel encapsulation, or may include the overhead for all tunnel encapsulations. In most of the GRE and IPSec tunnel configurations, the offered rate includes the overhead for GRE tunnel encapsulation only.

drop rate

Rate, in kbps, at which packets are dropped from the class. The drop rate is calculated by subtracting the number of successfully transmitted packets from the offered rate.

Match

Match criteria specified for the class of traffic. Choices include criteria such as the Layer 3 packet length, IP precedence, IP DSCP value, MPLS experimental value, access groups, and QoS groups.

QoS Set, qos-group, Packets marked

Indicates that class-based packet marking based on the QoS group has been configured. Includes the qos-group number and the number of packets marked.

1 A number in parentheses may appear next to the service-policy input name, class-map name, and match criteria information. The number is for Cisco internal use only and can be disregarded.


Enhanced Packet Marking show policy-map interface Command Example

The following sample output of the show policy-map interface command shows the service policies attached to a FastEthernet subinterface. In this example, a service policy called "policy1" has been attached. In "policy1", a table map called "table-map1" has been configured. The values in "table-map1" will be used to map the precedence values to the corresponding class of service (CoS) values.

Router# show policy-map interface

 FastEthernet1/0.1 

  Service-policy input: policy1

    Class-map: class-default (match-any)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: any 
      QoS Set
        precedence cos table table-map1
          Packets marked 0

Table 12 describes the fields shown in the display.

Table 12 show policy-map interface Field Descriptions—Configured for Enhanced Packet Marking 1

Field
Description

Service-policy input

Name of the input service policy applied to the specified interface or VC.

Class-map

Class of traffic being displayed. Output is displayed for each configured class in the policy. The choice for implementing class matches (for example, match-all or match-any) can also appear next to the traffic class.

packets, bytes

Number of the packets (also shown in bytes) identified as belonging to the class of traffic being displayed.

offered rate

Rate, in kbps, of the packets coming into the class.

Match

Match criteria specified for the class of traffic. Choices include criteria such as Precedence, IP differentiated services code point (DSCP) value, Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) experimental value, access groups, and quality of service (QoS) group (set). For more information about the variety of match criteria options that are available, refer to the "Configuring the Modular Quality of Service Command-Line Interface" section in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

QoS Set

Indicates that QoS group (set) has been configured for the particular class.

precedence cos table table-map1

Indicates that a table map (called "table-map1") has been used to determine the precedence value. The precedence value will be set according to the CoS value defined in the table map.

Packets marked

Total number of packets marked for the particular class.

1 A number in parentheses may appear next to the service-policy input name and the class-map name. The number is for Cisco internal use only and can be disregarded.


Traffic Policing show policy-map interface Command Example

The following is sample output from the show policy-map interface command. This sample displays the statistics for the serial 2/0 interface on which traffic policing has been enabled. The committed (conform) burst (bc) and excess (peak) burst (be) are specified in milliseconds (ms).

Router# show policy-map interface serial2/0

 Serial2/0 

  Service-policy output: policy1 (1050)

    Class-map: class1 (match-all) (1051/1)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: ip precedence 0  (1052)
      police:
          cir 20 % bc 300 ms
          cir 409500 bps, bc 15360 bytes
          pir 40 % be 400 ms
          pir 819000 bps, be 40960 bytes
        conformed 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:
          transmit 
        exceeded 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:
          drop 
        violated 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:
          drop 
        conformed 0 bps, exceed 0 bps, violate 0 bps

    Class-map: class-default (match-any) (1054/0)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: any  (1055)
        0 packets, 0 bytes
        5 minute rate 0 bps

In this example, the CIR and PIR are displayed in bps, and both the committed burst (bc) and excess burst (be) are displayed in bits.

The CIR, PIR bc, and be are calculated on the basis of the formulas described below.

Formula for Calculating the CIR

When calculating the CIR, the following formula is used:

CIR percentage specified (as shown in the output from the show policy-map command) * bandwidth (BW) of the interface (as shown in the output from the show interfaces command) = total bits per second

According to the output from the show interfaces command for the serial 2/0 interface, the interface has a bandwidth (BW) of 2048 kbps.

Router # show interfaces serial2/0

Serial2/0 is administratively down, line protocol is down 
  Hardware is M4T 
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 2048 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255 

The following values are used for calculating the CIR:

20 % * 2048 kbps = 409600 bps

Formula for Calculating the PIR

When calculating the PIR, the following formula is used:

PIR percentage specified (as shown in the output from the show policy-map command) * bandwidth (BW) of the interface (as shown in the output from the show interfaces command) = total bits per second

According to the output from the show interfaces command for the serial 2/0 interface, the interface has a bandwidth (BW) of 2048 kbps.

Router # show interfaces serial2/0

Serial2/0 is administratively down, line protocol is down  
  Hardware is M4T 
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 2048 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255 

The following values are used for calculating the PIR:

40 % * 2048 kbps = 819200 bps


Note Discrepancies between this total and the total shown in the output from the show policy-map interface command can be attributed to a rounding calculation or to differences associated with the specific interface configuration.


Formula for Calculating the Committed Burst (bc)

When calculating the bc, the following formula is used:

The bc in milliseconds (as shown in the show policy-map command) * the CIR in bits per seconds = total number bytes

The following values are used for calculating the bc:

300 ms * 409600 bps = 15360 bytes

Formula for Calculating the Excess Burst (be)

When calculating the bc and the be, the following formula is used:

The be in milliseconds (as shown in the show policy-map command) * the PIR in bits per seconds = total number bytes

The following values are used for calculating the be:

400 ms * 819200 bps = 40960 bytes

Table 13 describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 13 show policy-map interface Field Descriptions 

Field
Description

Service-policy output

Name of the output service policy applied to the specified interface or VC.

Class-map

Class of traffic being displayed. Output is displayed for each configured class in the policy. The choice for implementing class matches (for example, match-all or match-any) can also appear next to the traffic class.

packets and bytes

Number of packets (also shown in bytes) identified as belonging to the class of traffic being displayed.

offered rate

Rate, in kbps, of packets coming in to the class.

drop rate

Rate, in kbps, at which packets are dropped from the class. The drop rate is calculated by subtracting the number of successfully transmitted packets from the offered rate.

Match

Match criteria specified for the class of traffic. Choices include criteria such as the Layer 3 packet length, IP precedence, IP differentiated services code point (DSCP) value, Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) experimental value, access groups, and quality of service (QoS) groups. For more information about the variety of match criteria options that are available, refer to the "Configuring the Modular Quality of Service Command-Line Interface" chapter of the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

police

Indicates that traffic policing has been enabled. Display includes the CIR, PIR (in both a percentage of bandwidth and in bps) and the bc and be in bytes and milliseconds. Also displays the optional conform, exceed, and violate actions, if any, and the statistics associated with these optional actions.


Bandwidth Estimation show policy-map interface Command Example

The following sample output from the show policy-map interface command displays statistics for the FastEthernet 0/1 interface on which bandwidth estimates for quality of service (QoS) targets have been generated.

The Bandwidth Estimation section indicates that bandwidth estimates for QoS targets have been defined. These targets include the packet loss rate, the packet delay rate, and the timeframe in milliseconds. Confidence refers to the drop-one-in value (as a percentage) of the targets. Corvil Bandwidth means the bandwidth estimate in kilobits per second.

When no drop or delay targets are specified, "none specified, falling back to drop no more than one packet in 500" appears in the output.

Router# show policy-map interface FastEthernet0/1

 FastEthernet0/1

  Service-policy output: my-policy

    Class-map: icmp (match-all)
      199 packets, 22686 bytes
      30 second offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: access-group 101
      Bandwidth Estimation:
        Quality-of-Service targets:
          drop no more than one packet in 1000 (Packet loss < 0.10%)
          delay no more than one packet in 100 by 40 (or more) milliseconds
            (Confidence: 99.0000%)
        Corvil Bandwidth: 1 kbits/sec

    Class-map: class-default (match-any)
      112 packets, 14227 bytes
      30 second offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: any
      Bandwidth Estimation:
        Quality-of-Service targets:
          <none specified, falling back to drop no more than one packet in 500
        Corvil Bandwidth: 1 kbits/sec

Shaping with HQF Enabled show policy-map interface Command Example

The following sample output from the show policy-map interface command shows that shaping is active (as seen in the queue depth field) with HQF enabled on the serial 4/3 interface. All traffic is classified to the class-default queue.

Router# show policy-map interface serial4/3

 Serial4/3

  Service-policy output: shape

    Class-map: class-default (match-any)
      2203 packets, 404709 bytes
      30 second offered rate 74000 bps, drop rate 14000 bps
      Match: any
      Queueing
      queue limit 64 packets
      (queue depth/total drops/no-buffer drops) 64/354/0
      (pkts output/bytes output) 1836/337280
      shape (average) cir 128000, bc 1000, be 1000
      target shape rate 128000
        lower bound cir 0,  adapt to fecn 0

      Service-policy : LLQ

        queue stats for all priority classes:
         
          queue limit 64 packets
          (queue depth/total drops/no-buffer drops) 0/0/0
          (pkts output/bytes output) 0/0

        Class-map: c1 (match-all)
          0 packets, 0 bytes
          30 second offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
          Match: ip precedence 1
          Priority: 32 kbps, burst bytes 1500, b/w exceed drops: 0

        Class-map: class-default (match-any)
          2190 packets, 404540 bytes
          30 second offered rate 74000 bps, drop rate 14000 bps
          Match: any

          queue limit 64 packets
          (queue depth/total drops/no-buffer drops) 63/417/0
          (pkts output/bytes output) 2094/386300

Related Commands

Command
Description

compression header ip

Configures RTP or TCP IP header compression for a specific class.

drop

Configures a traffic class to discard packets belonging to a specific class.

match fr-dlci

Specifies the Frame Relay DLCI number as a match criterion in a class map.

match packet length (class-map)

Specifies the length of the Layer 3 packet in the IP header as a match criterion in a class map.

police

Configures traffic policing.

police (percent)

Configures traffic policing on the basis of a percentage of bandwidth available on an interface.

police (two rates)

Configures traffic policing using two rates, the CIR and the PIR.

policy-map

Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy.

random-detect ecn

Enables ECN.

shape (percent)

Specifies average or peak rate traffic shaping on the basis of a percentage of bandwidth available on an interface.

show frame-relay pvc

Displays statistics about PVCs for Frame Relay interfaces.

show interfaces

Displays statistics for all interfaces configured on a router or access server.

show policy-map

Displays the configuration of all classes for a specified service policy map or all classes for all existing policy maps.

show policy-map class

Displays the configuration for the specified class of the specified policy map.

show table-map

Displays the configuration of a specified table map or of all table maps.

table-map (value mapping)

Creates and configures a mapping table for mapping and converting one packet-marking value to another.