QoS: Policing and Shaping Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS XE Release 3S
Port-Shaper and LLQ in the Presence of EFPs
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Port-Shaper and LLQ in the Presence of EFPs

Port-Shaper and LLQ in the Presence of EFPs

The Port-Shaper and LLQ in the Presence of EFPs feature allows network designers to configure port and class policies on ports that contain Ethernet Flow Points (EFPs). These policies support Low Latency Queueing (LLQ) and traffic prioritization across the EFPs.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Restrictions for Port-Shaper and LLQ in the Presence of EFPs

  • If you configure a class-based policy on the port, then you cannot configure service-policies on Ethernet Flow Points (EFPs).

  • Class of service (CoS)-based classification is not supported.

Information About Port-Shaper and LLQ in the Presence of EFPs

Ethernet Flow Points and LLQ

An Ethernet Flow Point (EFP) is a forwarding decision point in the provider edge (PE) router, which gives network designers flexibility to make many Layer 2 flow decisions within the interface. Many EFPs can be configured on a single physical port. (The number varies from one device to another.) EFPs are the logical demarcation points of an Ethernet virtual connection (EVC) on an interface. An EVC that uses two or more User-Network Interfaces (UNIs) requires an EFP on the associated ingress and egress interfaces of every device that the EVC passes through.

The Egress HQoS with Port Level Shaping feature allows network designers to configure port and class policies on ports that contain EFPs. These policies support Low Latency Queueing (LLQ) and traffic prioritization across the EFPs.

For information on how to configure LLQ, see the QoS Congestion Management Configuration Guide.

How to Configure Port-Shaper and LLQ in the Presence of EFPs

To configure the Port-Shaper and LLQ in the Presence of EFPs feature, you first create either a hierarchical or flat policy map that supports Low Latency Queueing (LLQ), which you then attach to an EFP interface.

Configuring Hierarchical Policy Maps

To configure hierarchical policy maps, you create child policies which you then attach to a parent policy. The parent policy is then attached to an interface.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    enable

    2.    configure terminal

    3.    policy-map policy-map-name

    4.    class class-map-name

    5.    set cos value

    6.    bandwidth percent percent

    7.    exit

    8.    class class-map-name

    9.    bandwidth percent percent

    10.    exit

    11.    policy-map policy-map-name

    12.    class class-default

    13.    service-policy policy-map-name


DETAILED STEPS
     Command or ActionPurpose
    Step 1 enable


    Example:
    Device> enable
     

    Enables privileged EXEC mode.

    • Enter your password if prompted.

     
    Step 2 configure terminal


    Example:
    Device# configure terminal
     

    Enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 3 policy-map policy-map-name


    Example:
    Device(config)# policy-map child-llq
     

    Creates or modifies the child policy and enters QoS policy-map configuration mode.

    • child-llq is the name of the child policy map.

     
    Step 4 class class-map-name


    Example:
    Device(config-pmap)# class precedenc-1
     

    Assigns the traffic class you specify to the policy map and enters QoS policy-map class configuration mode.

    • precedenc-1 is the name of a previously configured class map and is the traffic class for which you want to define QoS actions.

     
    Step 5set cos value


    Example:
    Device(config-pmap-c)# set cos 5
     

    (Optional) Sets the Layer 2 class of service (CoS) value of an outgoing packet.

    • The value is a specific IEEE 802.1Q CoS value from 0 to 7.

     
    Step 6 bandwidth percent percent


    Example:
    Device(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 20
     

    (Optional) Specifies a bandwidth percent for class-level queues to be used during congestion to determine the amount of excess bandwidth (unused by priority traffic) to allocate to nonpriority queues.

     
    Step 7 exit


    Example:
    Device(config-pmap-c)# exit
     

    Exits QoS policy-map class configuration mode.

     
    Step 8 class class-map-name


    Example:
    Device(config-pmap)# class precedenc-2
     

    Assigns the traffic class you specify to the policy map and enters QoS policy-map class configuration mode.

    • precedenc-2 is the name of a previously configured class map and is the traffic class for which you want to define QoS actions.

     
    Step 9 bandwidth percent percent


    Example:
    Device(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 80
     

    (Optional) Specifies a bandwidth percent for class-level queues to be used during congestion to determine the amount of excess bandwidth (unused by priority traffic) to allocate to nonpriority queues.

     
    Step 10 exit


    Example:
    Device(config-pmap-c)# exit
     

    Exits QoS policy-map class configuration mode.

     
    Step 11 policy-map policy-map-name


    Example:
    Device(config-pmap)# policy-map parent-llq
     

    Creates or modifies the parent policy.

    • parent-llq is the name of the parent policy map.

     
    Step 12 class class-default


    Example:
    Device(config-pmap)# class class-default
     

    Configures or modifies the parent class-default class and enters QoS policy-map class configuration mode.

    • You can configure only the class-default class in a parent policy. Do not configure any other traffic class.

     
    Step 13 service-policy policy-map-name


    Example:
    Device(config-pmap-c)# service-policy child-llq
     

    Applies the child policy to the parent class-default class.

    • child-llq is the name of the child policy map configured in step 1.

     

    Configuring an LLQ Policy Map

    SUMMARY STEPS

      1.    enable

      2.    configure terminal

      3.    policy-map policy-map-name

      4.    class class-map-name

      5.    priority

      6.    exit

      7.    class class-map-name

      8.    shape average value

      9.    exit

      10.    class class-map-name

      11.    bandwidth percent

      12.    exit


    DETAILED STEPS
       Command or ActionPurpose
      Step 1 enable


      Example:
      Device> enable
       

      Enables privileged EXEC mode.

      • Enter your password if prompted.

       
      Step 2 configure terminal


      Example:
      Device# configure terminal
       

      Enters global configuration mode.

       
      Step 3 policy-map policy-map-name


      Example:
      Device(config)# policy-map llq-flat
       

      Creates a policy and enters QoS policy-map configuration mode.

       
      Step 4 class class-map-name


      Example:
      Device(config-pmap)# class dscp-af1
       

      Assigns the traffic class you specify to the policy map and enters policy-map class configuration mode.

       
      Step 5priority


      Example:
      Device(config-pmap-c)# priority
       

      Configures LLQ, providing strict priority queueing (PQ) for class-based weighted fair queueing (CBWFQ).

       
      Step 6 exit


      Example:
      Device(config-pmap-c)# exit
       

      Exits QoS policy-map class configuration mode.

       
      Step 7 class class-map-name


      Example:
      Device(config-pmap)# class dscp-af2
       

      Assigns the traffic class you specify to the policy map and enters QoS policy-map class configuration mode.

       
      Step 8shape average value


      Example:
      Device(config-pmap-c)# shape average 200000000
       

      Configures a shape entity with a Comitted Information Rate of 200 Mb/s.

       
      Step 9 exit


      Example:
      Device(config-pmap-c)# exit
       

      Exits QoS policy-map class configuration mode.

       
      Step 10 class class-map-name


      Example:
      Device(config-pmap)# class dscp-af3
       

      Assigns the traffic class you specify to the policy map and enters QoS policy-map class configuration mode.

       
      Step 11 bandwidth percent


      Example:
      Device(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth 4000000
       

      (Optional) Specifies a bandwidth percent for class-level queues to be used during congestion to determine the amount of excess bandwidth (unused by priority traffic) to allocate to non-priority queues.

       
      Step 12 exit


      Example:
      Device(config-pmap-c)# exit
       

      Exits QoS policy-map class configuration mode.

       

      Configuring Port Level Shaping on the Main Interface with Ethernet Flow Points

      To configure port level shaping on the main interface with EFPS, first you enable the autonegotiation protocol on the interface, then you attach a policy map to the interface and finally you configure the Ethernet service instance.

      SUMMARY STEPS

        1.    enable

        2.    configure terminal

        3.    interface type number

        4.    no ip address

        5.    negotiation auto

        6.    service-policy output policy-map-name

        7.    service instance id ethernet

        8.    encapsulation dot1q vlan-id

        9.    bridge-domain bridge-domain-id

        10.    exit

        11.    service instance id ethernet

        12.    encapsulation dot1q vlan-id

        13.    bridge-domain bridge-domain-id

        14.    exit

        15.    end


      DETAILED STEPS
         Command or ActionPurpose
        Step 1 enable


        Example:
        Device> enable
         

        Enables privileged EXEC mode.

        • Enter your password if prompted.

         
        Step 2 configure terminal


        Example:
        Device# configure terminal
         

        Enters global configuration mode.

         
        Step 3 interface type number


        Example:
        Device(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/1 
         

        Configures an interface type and enters interface configuration mode.

        • Enter the interface type number.

         
        Step 4 no ip address


        Example:
        Device(config-if)# no ip address
         

        Disables IP routing on the interface.

         
        Step 5 negotiation auto


        Example:
        Device(config-if)# negotiation auto
         

        Enables the autonegotiation protocol to configure the speed, duplex, and automatic flow control of the Gigabit Ethernet interface.

         
        Step 6 service-policy output policy-map-name


        Example:
        Device(config-if)# service-policy output parent-llq
         

        Specifies the name of the policy map to be attached to the input or output direction of the interface.

        • You can enter the name of a hierarchical or a flat policy map.

         
        Step 7 service instance id ethernet


        Example:
        Device(config-if)# service instance 1 ethernet
         

        Configures an Ethernet service instance on an interface and enters service instance configuration mode.

         
        Step 8 encapsulation dot1q vlan-id


        Example:
        Device(config-if-srv)# encapsulation dot1q 100
        
         

        Defines the matching criteria to map 802.1Q frames' ingress on an interface to the service instance.

         
        Step 9 bridge-domain bridge-domain-id


        Example:
        Device(config-if-srv)# bridge-domain 100
        
         

        Binds the bridge domain to the service instance.

         
        Step 10 exit


        Example:
        Device(config-if-serv)# exit
         

        Exits service instance configuration mode.

         
        Step 11 service instance id ethernet


        Example:
        Device(config-if)# service instance 2 ethernet
         

        Configures an Ethernet service instance on an interface and enters service instance configuration mode.

         
        Step 12 encapsulation dot1q vlan-id


        Example:
        Device(config-if-srv)# encapsulation dot1q 101
        
         

        Defines the matching criteria to map 802.1Q frames' ingress on an interface to the service instance.

         
        Step 13 bridge-domain bridge-domain-id


        Example:
        Device(config-if-srv)# bridge-domain 101
        
         

        Binds the bridge domain to the service instance.

         
        Step 14 exit


        Example:
        Device(config-if-srv)# exit
         

        Exits QoS policy-map class configuration mode.

         
        Step 15 end


        Example:
        Device(config-if)# end
         

        (Optional) Exits interface configuration mode.

         

        Configuration Examples for Port-Shaper and LLQ in the Presence of EFPs

        Example: Configuring Hierarchical QoS Port Level Shaping on the Main Interface with EFPs

        The following example shows how to configure hierarchical QoS port level shaping on a main physical interface to support traffic prioritization and Low Level Queueing across all EFPs configured on the interface:

        policy-map parent-llq
         class class-default
           service-policy child-llq
         
        policy-map child-llq
         class precedenc-1
          set cos 5
          bandwidth percent 20
         class precedenc-2
          bandwidth percent 80
        
        interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/1
         no ip address
         negotiation auto
         service-policy output parent-llq
         service instance 1 ethernet
          encapsulation dot1q 100
          bridge-domain 100
         !
         service instance 2 ethernet
          encapsulation dot1q 101
          bridge-domain 101
        
              

        Example: Configuring Port Level Shaping on the Main Interface with EFPs

        The following example shows how to configure port level shaping on a main physical interface to support traffic prioritization and Low Level Queueing across all Ethernet Flow Points (EFPs) configured on the interface:

        policy-map llq_flat 
         class dscp-af1
          priority 
          class dscp-af2
           shape average 200000000
          class dscp-af3
           bandwidth 400000 
        
        interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/1
         no ip address
         negotiation auto
         service-policy output class_policy_cla
         service instance 1 ethernet
          encapsulation dot1q 100
          bridge-domain 100
         !
         service instance 2 ethernet
          encapsulation dot1q 101
          bridge-domain 101
              

        Additional References

        Related Documents

        Related Topic

        Document Title

        Cisco IOS commands

        Cisco IOS Master Commands List, All Releases

        QoS commands: complete command syntax, command modes, command history, defaults, usage guidelines, and examples

        Cisco IOS QoS Command Reference

        Policing and shaping

        "Policing and Shaping Overview" module

        Class maps

        "Applying QoS Features Using the MQC" module

        Policy maps

        "Applying QoS Features Using the MQC" module

        Low Latency Queueing

        QoS Congestion Management Configuration Guide

        Standards and RFCs

        Standard

        Title

        No new or modified standards are supported, and support for existing standards has not been modified.

        --

        MIBs

        MIB

        MIBs Link

        No new or modified MIBs are supported, and support for existing MIBs has not been modified.

        To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS XE software releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

        http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​go/​mibs

        Technical Assistance

        Description

        Link

        The Cisco Support and Documentation website provides online resources to download documentation, software, and tools. Use these resources to install and configure the software and to troubleshoot and resolve technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. Access to most tools on the Cisco Support and Documentation website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

        http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​cisco/​web/​support/​index.html

        Feature Information for Port-Shaper and LLQ in the Presence of EFPs

        The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

        Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

        Table 1 Feature Information for Port-Shaper and LLQ in the Presence of EFPs

        Feature Name

        Releases

        Feature Information

        Port-Shaper and LLQ in the Presence of EFPs

        Cisco IOS Release XE 3.6S

        The Port-Shaper and LLQ in the Presence of EFPs feature provides support for LLQ and traffic prioritization across all EFPs on a port.

        In Cisco IOS XE Release 3.6S, support was added for the Cisco ASR 903 router.