QoS: Classification Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS XE Release 3S(Cisco ASR 1000)
QoS Tunnel Marking for GRE tunnels
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QoS Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels

QoS Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels

Last Updated: November 20, 2012

The QoS Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels feature introduces the capability to define and control the quality of service (QoS) for both incoming and outgoing customer traffic on the provider edge (PE) router in a service provider network.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Prerequisites for QoS Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels

  • You must determine the topology and interfaces that need to be configured to mark incoming and outgoing traffic.

Restrictions for QoS Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels

  • GRE tunnel marking is not supported on the following paths:
    • IPsec tunnels
    • Multiprotocol Label Switching over generic routing encapsulation (MPLSoGRE)
    • Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP)

Information About QoS Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels

GRE Definition

Generic routing encapsulation (GRE) is a tunneling protocol developed by Cisco that can encapsulate a wide variety of protocol packet types inside IP tunnels, creating a virtual point-to-point link to Cisco routers at remote points over an IP internetwork.

GRE Tunnel Marking Overview

The QoS Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels feature allows you to define and control QoS for incoming and outgoing customer traffic on the PE router in a service provider (SP) network. This feature lets you set (mark) either the IP precedence value or the differentiated services code point (DSCP) value in the header of an GRE tunneled packet. GRE tunnel marking can be implemented by a QoS marking command, such as set ip { dscp | precedence} [ tunnel], and it can also be implemented in QoS traffic policing. This feature reduces administrative overhead previously required to control customer bandwidth by allowing you to mark the GRE tunnel header on the tunnel interface on the PE routers.

Note


The set ip {dscp | precedence} [tunnel] command is equivalent to the set {dscp | precedence} [tunnel] command.

The figure below shows traffic being received from the CE1 router through the incoming interface on the PE1 router on which tunnel marking occurs. The traffic is encapsulated (tunneled), and the tunnel header is marked on the PE1 router. The marked packets travel (tunnel) through the core and are decapsulated automatically on the exit interface of the PE2 router. This feature is designed to simplify classifying customer edge (CE) traffic and is configured only in the service provider network. This process is transparent to the customer sites. The CE1 and CE2 routers exist as a single network.

Figure 1 Tunnel Marking


GRE Tunnel Marking and the MQC

Before you can configure tunnel marking for GRE tunnels, you must first configure a class map and a policy map and then attach that policy map to the appropriate interface. These three tasks can be accomplished by using the MQC.

For information on using the MQC, see the "Applying QoS Features Using the MQC" module.

GRE Tunnel Marking and DSCP or IP Precedence Values

GRE tunnel marking is configured with the set ip precedence tunnel or set ip dscp tunnel command on PE routers that carry incoming traffic from customer sites. GRE tunnel marking allows you to mark the header of a GRE tunnel by setting a DSCP value from 0 to 63 or an IP precedence value from 0 to 7 to control GRE tunnel traffic bandwidth and priority.

GRE traffic can also be marked under traffic policing with the set-dscp-tunnel-transmit and the set-prec-tunnel-transmit actions (or keywords) of the police command. The tunnel marking value is from 0 to 63 for the set-dscp-tunnel-transmit actions and from 0 to 7 for the set-prec-tunnel-transmit command. Under traffic policing, tunnel marking can be applied with conform, exceed, and violate action statements, allowing you to automatically apply a different value for traffic that does not conform to the expected traffic rate.

After the tunnel header is marked, GRE traffic is carried through the tunnel and across the service provider network. This traffic is decapsulated on the interface of the PE router that carries the outgoing traffic to the other customer site. The configuration of GRE tunnel marking is transparent to customer sites. All internal configuration is preserved.

There is a different between the set ip precedence and set ip dscp commands and the set ip precedence tunnel and set ip dscp tunnel commands:

  • The set ip precedence and set ip dscp commands are used to set the IP precedence value or DSCP value in the header of an IP packet.
  • The set ip precedence tunnel and set ip dscp tunnel commands are used to set (mark) the IP precedence value or DSCP value in the tunnel header that encapsulates the GRE traffic.
  • The set ip precedence tunnel and set ip dscp tunnel commands have no effect on egress traffic that is not encapsulated in a GRE tunnel.

Benefits of GRE Tunnel Marking

GRE tunnel marking provides a simple mechanism to control the bandwidth of customer GRE traffic. The QoS Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels feature is configured entirely within the service provider network and on interfaces that carry incoming and outgoing traffic on the PE routers.

GRE Tunnel Marking and Traffic Policing

Traffic policing allows you to control the maximum rate of traffic sent or received on an interface and to partition a network into multiple priority levels or class of service (CoS). If you use traffic policing in your network, you can also implement the GRE tunnel marking feature with the set-dscp-tunnel-transmit or set-prec-tunnel-transmit action (or keyword) of the police command in policy-map class configuration mode. Under traffic policing, tunnel marking can be applied with conform, exceed, and violate action statements, allowing you to apply a different value automatically for traffic that does not conform to the expected traffic rate.

GRE Tunnel Marking Values

The range of the tunnel marking values for the set ip dscp tunnel and set-dscp-tunnel-transmit commands is from 0 to 63, and the range of values for the set ip precedence tunnel and set-prec-tunnel-transmit commands is from 0 to 7.

How to Configure Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels

Configuring a Class Map

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    class-map [match-all | match-any] class-map-name

4.    match ip precedence precedence-value

5.    exit

6.    class-map [match-all | match-any] class-map-name

7.    match ip dscp dscp-value

8.    end


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
class-map [match-all | match-any] class-map-name


Example:

Router(config)# class-map match-any MATCH_PREC

 

Specifies the name of the class map to be created and enters QoS class map configuration mode.

  • The class map defines the criteria to use to differentiate the traffic. For example, you can use the class map to differentiate voice traffic from data traffic, based on a series of match criteria defined using the match command.
Note    If the match-all or match-any keyword is not specified, traffic must match all the match criteria to be classified as part of the traffic class.
 
Step 4
match ip precedence precedence-value


Example:

Router(config-cmap)# match ip precedence 0

 

Enables packet matching on the basis of the IP precedence values you specify.

Note    You can enter up to four matching criteria, as number abbreviation (0 to 7) or criteria names (critical, flash, and so on), in a single match statement.
 
Step 5
exit


Example:

Router(config-cmap)# exit

 

Returns to global configuration mode.

 
Step 6
class-map [match-all | match-any] class-map-name


Example:

Router(config)# class-map match-any MATCH_DSCP

 

Specifies the name of the class map to be created and enters QoS class map configuration mode.

 
Step 7
match ip dscp dscp-value


Example:

Router(config-cmap)# match ip dscp 0

 

Enables packet matching on the basis of the DSCP values you specify.

  • This command is used by the class map to identify a specific DSCP value marking on a packet.
  • The treatment of these marked packets is defined by the user through the setting of QoS policies in policy-map class configuration mode.
 
Step 8
end


Example:

Router(config-cmap)# end

 

(Optional) Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Creating a Policy Map

Perform this task to create a tunnel marking policy marp and apply the map to a specific interface.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    policy-map policy-map-name

4.    class {class-name | class-default}

5.    set ip precedence tunnel precedence-value

6.    exit

7.    class {class-name | class-default}

8.    set ip dscp tunnel dscp-value

9.    end


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
policy-map policy-map-name


Example:

Router(config)# policy-map TUNNEL_MARKING

 

Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy, and enters QoS policy-map configuration mode.

 
Step 4
class {class-name | class-default}


Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class MATCH_PREC

 

Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change or specifies the default class (commonly known as the class-default class) before you configure its policy.

  • Enters policy-map class configuration mode.
 
Step 5
set ip precedence tunnel precedence-value


Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# set ip precedence tunnel 3

 

Sets the IP precedence value in the tunnel header of a GRE-tunneled packet on the ingress interface. The tunnel marking value is a number from 0 to 7 when IP precedence is configured.

 
Step 6
exit


Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

 

Returns to QoS policy-map configuration mode.

 
Step 7
class {class-name | class-default}


Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class MATCH_DSCP

 

Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change or specifies the default class (commonly known as the class-default class) before you configure its policy.

  • Enters policy-map class configuration mode.
 
Step 8
set ip dscp tunnel dscp-value


Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# set ip dscp tunnel 3

 

Sets the differentiated services code point (DSCP) value in the tunnel header of a GRE-tunneled packet on the ingress interface. The tunnel marking value is a number from 0 to 63 when DSCP is configured.

 
Step 9
end


Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# end

 

(Optional) Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Attaching the Policy Map to an Interface or a VC

Policy maps can be attached to main interfaces, subinterfaces, or ATM permanent virtual circuits (PVCs). Policy maps are attached to interfaces by using the service-policy command and specifying either the input or output keyword to indicate the direction of the interface.

Note


Tunnel marking policy can be applied on Ingress or Egress direction. A tunnel marking policy can be applied as an ingress policy on the ingress physical interface of a Service Provider Edge (SPE) router or as an egress policy on a tunnel interface.
SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    interface type number

4.    service-policy {input | output} policy-map-name

5.    end


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
interface type number


Example:

Router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/1

 

Configures an interface type and enters interface configuration mode.

 
Step 4
service-policy {input | output} policy-map-name

Example:

Router(config-if)# service-policy input TUNNEL_MARKING

 

Specifies the name of the policy map to be attached to the input or output direction of the interface.

  • Policy maps can be configured on ingress or egress routers. They can also be attached in the input or output direction of an interface. The direction (input or output) and the router (ingress or egress) to which the policy map should be attached vary according your network configuration.
 
Step 5
end


Example:

Router(config-if)# end

 

(Optional) Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Verifying the Configuration of Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels

Use the show commands in this procedure to view the GRE tunnel marking configuration settings. The show commands are optional and can be entered in any order.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    show policy-map interface interface-name

3.    show policy-map policy-map

4.    exit


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
show policy-map interface interface-name


Example:

Router# show policy-map interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1

 

(Optional) Displays the packet statistics of all classes that are configured for all service policies either on the specified interface or subinterface.

 
Step 3
show policy-map policy-map


Example:

Router# show policy-map TUNNEL_MARKING

 

(Optional) Displays the configuration of all classes for a specified service policy map or all classes for all existing policy maps.

 
Step 4
exit


Example:

Router# exit

 

(Optional) Returns to user EXEC mode.

 

Troubleshooting Tips

If you find that the configuration is not functioning as expected, perform these operations to troubleshoot the configuration:

  • Use the show running-config command and analyze the output of the command.
  • If the policy map does not appear in the output of the show running-config command, enable the logging console command.
  • Attach the policy map to the interface again.

Configuration Examples for QoS Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels

Example: Configuring Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels

The following is an example of a GRE tunnel marking configuration. In this example, a class map called "MATCH_PREC" has been configured to match traffic based on the DSCP value.

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# class-map MATCH_DSCP 
Router(config-cmap)# match ip dscp 0
Router(config-cmap)# end

In the following part of the example configuration, a policy map called "TUNNEL_MARKING" has been created and the set ip dscp tunnel command has been configured in the policy map. You could use the set ip precedence tunnel command instead of the set ip dscp tunnel command if you do not use DSCP in your network.

Router(config)# policy-map TUNNEL_MARKING
Router(config-pmap)# class MATCH_DSCP
Router(config-pmap-c)# set ip dscp tunnel 3
Router(config-pmap-c)# end

Note


The following part of the example configuration is not required to configure this feature if you use the set ip dscp tunnel or set ip precedence tunnel commands to enable GRE tunnel marking. This example shows how GRE tunnel marking can be enabled under traffic policing.

In the following part of the example configuration, the policy map called "TUNNEL_MARKING" has been created and traffic policing has also been configured by using the police command and specifying the appropriate policing actions. The set-dscp-tunnel-transmit command can be used instead of the set-prec-tunnel-transmit command if you use DSCP in your network.

Router(config)# policy-map TUNNEL_MARKING
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# police 8000 conform-action set-prec-tunnel-transmit 4 exceed-action set-prec-tunnel-transmit 0
Router(config-pmap-c)# end

In the following part of the example configuration, the policy map is attached to GigabitEthernet interface 0/0/1 in the inbound (input) direction by specifying the input keyword of the service-policy command:

Router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/1
Router(config-if)# service-policy input TUNNEL_MARKING 
Router(config-if)# end

In the final part of the example configuration, the policy map is attached to tunnel interface 0 in the outbound (output) direction using the output keyword of the service-policy command:

Router(config)# interface Tunnel 0
Router(config-if)# service-policy output TUNNEL_MARKING 
Router(config-if)# end

Example: Verifying the Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels Configuration

This section contains sample output from the show policy-map interface and the show policy-map commands. The output from these commands can be used to verify and monitor the feature configuration in your network.

The following is sample output from the show policy-map interface command. In this sample output:
  • The character string "ip dscp tunnel 3" indicates that GRE tunnel marking has been configured to set the DSCP value in the header of a GRE-tunneled packet.
  • The character string "ip precedence tunnel 3" indicates that GRE tunnel marking has been configured to set the precedence value in the header of a GRE-tunneled packet.
Router# show policy-map interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1 
 Service-policy input: TUNNEL_MARKING

    Class-map: MATCH_PREC (match-any)
      22 packets, 7722 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps
      Match: ip precedence 0
      QoS Set
        ip precedence tunnel 3
          Marker statistics: Disabled

    Class-map: MATCH_DSCP (match-any)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps
      Match: ip dscp default (0)
      QoS Set
        ip dscp tunnel 3
          Marker statistics: Disabled

    Class-map: class-default (match-any)
      107 packets, 8658 bytes
      5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps
      Match: any

The following is sample output from the show policy-map command. In this sample output, the character string "ip precedence tunnel 3" indicates that the GRE tunnel marking feature has been configured to set the IP precedence value in the header of an GRE-tunneled packet.

Router# show policy-map

Policy Map TUNNEL_MARKING
    Class MATCH_PREC
      set ip precedence tunnel 3
    Class MATCH_DSCP
      set ip dscp tunnel 3

Additional References

Related Documents

Related Topic

Document Title

Cisco IOS commands

Cisco IOS Master Commands List, All Releases

QoS commands: complete command syntax, command modes, command history, defaults, usage guidelines, and examples

Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Command Reference

MQC

"Applying QoS Features Using the MQC" module

Tunnel marking for Layer 2 Tunnel Protocol Version 3 (L2TPv3) tunnels

"QoS: Tunnel Marking for L2TPv3 Tunnels" module

DSCP

"Overview of DiffServ for Quality of Service" module

Standards

Standard

Title

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature.

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MIBs

MIB

MIBs Link

No new or modified MIBs are supported by this feature, and support for existing MIBs has not been modified by this feature.

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs

RFCs

RFC

Title

No new or modified RFCs are supported by this feature, and support for existing RFCs has not been modified by this feature.

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Technical Assistance

Description

Link

The Cisco Support and Documentation website provides online resources to download documentation, software, and tools. Use these resources to install and configure the software and to troubleshoot and resolve technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. Access to most tools on the Cisco Support and Documentation website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

http://www.cisco.com/cisco/web/support/index.html

Feature Information for QoS Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels

The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Table 1 Feature Information for QoS Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels

Feature Name

Releases

Feature Information

QoS Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels

Cisco IOS XE Release 3.5S

The QoS Tunnel Marking for GRE Tunnels feature introduces the capability to define and control the QoS for incoming customer traffic on the PE router in a service provider network.

The following commands were introduced or modified: match atm-clp, match cos, match fr-de, police, police (two rates), set ip dscp tunnel, set ip precedence tunnel, show policy-map, show policy-map interface.

Cisco and the Cisco logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cisco and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. To view a list of Cisco trademarks, go to this URL: www.cisco.com/go/trademarks. Third-party trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company. (1110R)

Any Internet Protocol (IP) addresses and phone numbers used in this document are not intended to be actual addresses and phone numbers. Any examples, command display output, network topology diagrams, and other figures included in the document are shown for illustrative purposes only. Any use of actual IP addresses or phone numbers in illustrative content is unintentional and coincidental.

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