Performance Routing v3 Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS XE Release 3S (ASR 1000)
Quick Start Guide: Performance Routing v3 Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS XE Release 3S (ASR 1000)
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Performance Routing v3

Contents

Performance Routing v3

Performance Routing v3 (PfRv3) delivers a set of solutions on automatic prefix and Service Level Agreement (SLA) discovery through an intelligent framework. It provides easier application performance management controls including path optimization, managing over-subscription intelligently in the network for P2P, multi-site deployments, optimizing network infrastructure usage, policy distribution and enforcement and network based bandwidth management.

PfRv3 is an intelligent path control for improving application delivery and WAN efficiency. PfRv3 protects critical application and increases bandwidth utilization and servers as an integral part of the overall Cisco Intelligent WAN (IWAN) solution.

In a dynamic network with varying traffic conditions, static policy configurations are not sufficient to cater to the changing demands on the network. The enterprise network must constantly monitor the application performance and take corrective actions as a result of the feedback from the network. IT managers in an enterprise are constantly challenged to provide a guaranteed user experience for critical applications while maintaining application SLA. The enterprise border node via endpoint signaling or DHCP marking may recognize applications and apply the intelligence to appropriately throttle the traffic for specified flows originating in the enterprise network.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Restrictions for Configuring Performance Routing v3

  • Only one domain is supported.
  • Asymmetric routing is not supported for application based policy.
  • PfRv3 do not supports High Availability (HA) for both master and border routers; ESP switchover could trigger temporary unreachable event for one to two seconds.
  • IPv6 is not supported.
  • Network Address Translation (NAT) is not supported.
  • Only one to one peering is supported for domain path color and WAN interfaces; dual hub is not supported.
  • Remarking DSCP for traffic flows on WAN interface is not supported.
  • PfRv3 configuration requires Data / AppX licensing.
  • PfRv3 support is available on ASR1000 platforms from Cisco IOS XE release 3.13S only.
  • PfRv3 support is available on the 892FSP, 1900, 2900, 3900, and 3900E series of routers.

Information About PfRv3

Performance Routing v3 Overview

Performance Routing Version 3 (PfRv3) is the evolution of Performance Routing (PfR). It is a one-touch provisioning and multi-site coordination solution that simplifies network provisioning. PfRv3 is an application-based policy driven framework that provides a multi-site aware bandwidth and path control optimization for WAN and cloud-based applications. It is tightly integrated with existing AVC components such as Performance Monitoring, QoS, and NBAR2. PfRv3 is extremely useful for enterprise and managed service providers looking for ways to increase WAN reliability and availability while saving cost.

PfRv3 is the first client for the Enterprise Domain framework. An Enterprise Domain is a proposal to deliver a set of solutions on automatic prefix and SLA discovery through an intelligent framework, providing easier application performance management controls including path optimization, managing over-subscription intelligently in the network for P2P and multi-site deployments, optimizing network infrastructure usage, policy distribution and enforcement and network based bandwidth management.

PfRv3 also provides enhancements to the deployment issues seen in the current PfR and tightly integrates with the Application Visibility and Control (AVC) initiative.

PfRv3 Deployment Topology

Each site has a Master Controller (MC) which collects information about flows handled by the Border Routers (BR). The information is exported to the MC periodically using the PMI exporter. One of the MCs (typically the headquarters) is designated as a Hub MC. The policies are created for the network in the Hub MC. Policies dictate the desired treatment for a set of specified DSCPs or AppIDs (such as Telepresence, Webex etc) in the network. The policies are percolated to all the MCs on the network via Service Advertisement Framework (SAF.) The policies can be modified by the Hub MC and the modifications are again sent over the SAF framework so that all the nodes in the network are in sync with the Hub MC.

The local MCs are given the flow information by the BR. MCs apply the policies that are received from the Hub MC on the flows that they learn from the BR. MCs then apply the appropriate controls on the BR per flow, after it ascertains that a flow is operating within the policy limits or Out-of-policy (OOP). The MC to BR communication is done via a TCP connection. This connection is used for tasks such as sending configuration and control information from MC to BR and flow information from BR to MCs.

BR is the enforcer, which classifies and measure metrics and sends them to the master controller. BR is also responsible for Path enforcement.

MC is the decision maker, gets the metrics from the border router and selects the right exit based on the policy. Every branch has a local master controller. MC can be either co-located with BR or a separate router.

Figure 1. PfRv3 Topology

Hub Branch Architecture

Hub controls centralized provisioning. You can configure the hub to perform the role of a Master Controller (MC) and Border Routers (BR).

A domain can be configured on the central location (Hub) and branches. PfRv3 allows only one domain configuration. Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF) and roles are defined on a domain.

Policies are created for the domain network in the hub MC. PfRv3 has simplified policies with pre-existing template to choose from. The policy configuration is in central location (Hub Master Controller or Hub MC) and is distributed to all sites in the same domain via peering. This simplifies provisioning and also makes it consistent across the entire network.

External interfaces definition and path naming are configured on the border routers. Then all hub border routers register to the MC with their external WAN interface and the path name mapping.

All master controllers on the branch sites register with the central MC on the hub in their domain. All hub border routers on the branch sites register to their local MC. You must configure both master and border on the same domain. Border devices establishes connection with MC only if both are in the same domain.

In a scenario where master and border configurations are on different domain, peering rejects all messages from different peers. Border devices is automatically shut down for five minutes. The connection is established only when the domain conflict is resolved.

PfRv3 Workflow

PfRv3 is an integrated solution and helps in tracking the sites and their capability to define policies for a huge number of applications running in the network. PfRv3 is the first client for the Enterprise Domain framework. It provides enhancements to the deployment issues seen in the current PfR and also tightly integrates with the Application Visibility and Control (AVC) initiative.

The following steps describes the workflow of the PfRv3:

  1. Service Advertisement Framework - The branch offices discover each other. PfRv3 uses EIGRP SAF for peering. SAF provides ability to subscribe and publish messages per VRF. Policies defined on the hub master controller is distributed using SAF.
  2. Customer Edge - A peering network is formed.
  3. QoS - The service provider SLAs are discovered as per the DSCP.
  4. AVC - All the applications are discovered.
  5. AVC - A peer exchange performance feedback is established with each other.
  6. PfRv3 - All applications are optimized based on the performance feedback.
  7. Flexible NetFlow (FNF) - Structured data is sent to management system of the enterprise using IPFIX.

PfRv3 Configuration Components

There are two parts to PfRv3 configuration:

  • Device Setup and Role: Identifies devices in the network where PfRv3 should be configured and in what role.
  • Policy Configuration: Identifies the traffic in the network and determine what policy to apply.

Device Setup and Role

There are four different roles a device can play in PfRv3 configuration:

  • Hub Master Controller (MC) - The master controller at the hub-site, which can be either a data center or a head quarter. All policies are configured on hub MC. It acts as master controller for the site and makes optimization decision.
  • Hub Border Router - The border controller at the hub-site. WAN interface terminates in the hub border routers. PfRv3 is enabled on these interfaces. You can configure more than one WAN interface on the same device. You can have multiple hub border devices.
  • Branch Master Controller - The branch master controller is the master controller at the branch-site. There is no policy configuration on this device. It receives policy from the Hub MC. This device acts as master controller for that site for making optimization decision.
  • Branch Border Router - The border device at the branch-site. There is no configuration other than enabling of PfRv3 border MC on the device. The WAN interface that terminates on the device is detected automatically.

Policy Configuration

Policy is configuration on the hub MC and then distributed to all MC peers. Configuring policies for PfRv3 involves two instances:

  • Identify the traffic based on either application or DSCP that you want to optimize.
  • Determine the priority and the threshold value for network parameters delay, loss and/or jitter. You can either use pre-defined sets of priorities and threshold or customize as per the requirement.

Performance Routing v3 Versus Performance Routing

Performance Routing (PfR) allows network administrators to minimize bandwidth costs, enable intelligent load distribution, improve application performance, and deploy dynamic failure detection at the WAN access edge. Whereas other routing mechanisms can provide both load sharing and failure mitigation, PfR makes real-time routing adjustments based on criteria other than static routing metrics such as response time, packet loss, jitter, path availability, traffic load distribution, and cost minimization.

PfRv3 is the evolution of Performance Routing (PfR). It is a one-touch provisioning and multisite coordination solution that simplifies network provisioning. PfRv3 is an application-based policy driven framework that provides a multi-site aware bandwidth and path control optimization for WAN and cloud-based applications. It is tightly integrated with existing Application Visibility and Control (AVC) components such as Performance Monitoring, QoS, and NBAR2. This is useful for enterprise and managed service providers who are looking for ways to increase WAN reliability and availability while saving cost.

PfRv3 improvements include:

  • Centralized provisioning - Policy is defined on the hub MC and then distributed to all the branches. Hence per site provisioning is not required for PfRv3.
  • High scalability - Smart probing and enhanced passive metrics helps to attain scale up to 2000 branches.
  • VRF awareness - You can configure different polices for different VRFs.
  • Application and DSCP based policies - Provisioning policies based on application. It provides visibility into application by integrating with Metric Mediation Agent. Application visibility includes bandwidth, performance, and correlation to Quality of Service (QoS) queues.
  • Automatic discovery - PfRv3 sites are discovered using peering. Each site peers with the hub site. Every other site discovers the new site using peering. The WAN interfaces are automatically discovered on the branch sites.

How to Configure PfRv3

Configuring Hub Master Controller

The hub Master Controller (MC) is the master controller at the hub-site, which can be a data center or a head quarter. This is the device where all policies are configured. It also acts as master controller for that site and makes optimization decision. You can configure hub with both master controller and border router configurations.

Configuring Master Controller (MC) for hub includes the following:

  • Domain name definition
  • Policy definition globally for the entire domain
You can use the global routing table (default VRF) or define specific VRFs for hub MC.

Note


If default VRF (Global Routing Table) is used, then specific VRF definition can be omitted.


Procedure
     Command or ActionPurpose
    Step 1 enable


    Example:
    Device> enable
     

    Enables privileged EXEC mode.

    • Enter your password if prompted.
     
    Step 2 configure terminal


    Example:
    Device# configure terminal
     

    Enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 3 domain {domain-name | default}


    Example:
    Device(config)# domain default
     

    Enters domain configuration mode.

    Note   

    You can either configure a default domain or define a specific domain for MC configuration. If you are defining a specific domain, for example "domain-cisco", you must configure the same domain for all devices for PfRv3 configuration.

     
    Step 4 vrf {vrf-name | default}


    Example:
    Device(config-domain)# vrf default
     

    Configures default Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF) for the default or specific domain.

    Note   

    You can configure specific VRF definition also for hub MC configuration.

     
    Step 5 master hub


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf)# master hub
     

    Enters master controller configuration mode and configures the master type as hub.

     
    Step 6 source-interface loopback interface-number


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# source-interface Loopback0
     

    Configures the loopback used as a source for peering with other sites or master controller.

    Note   

    The source-interface loopback also serves as a site ID of a particular site (hub or branch) on the master controller.

     
    Step 7 site-prefixes prefix-list site list


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# site-prefixes prefix-list hub_site_prefixes
     

    Configures the prefix-list containing list of site prefixes.

     
    Step 8 password hidden-password


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# password cisco123
     

    Specifies a hidden password for secure connection.

     
    Step 9 monitor-interval seconds dscp ef


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# monitor-interval 1 dscp ef
     

    Configures interval time that defines monitoring interval on ingress monitors.

     
    Step 10 route-control


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# route-control
     
    Disables route-control from the domain.
    Note   

    Route-control is only in monitoring mode.

     
    Step 11 load-balance


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# load-balance
     

    Configures load balancing.

     
    Step 12 enterprise-prefix prefix-list site-targets


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# enterprise-prefix prefix-list site_prefixes
     
    Configures an enterprise prefix-list with static site targets.
    Note   

    An enterprise prefix-list defines the boundary for an enterprise.

     
    Step 13 advanced


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# advanced
     

    (optional) Enters advanced configuration mode.

    Note   

    All configuration parameters available under advanced mode is optional. By default, parameters are pre-defined and you can use advanced mode to configure user-specific parameters.

     
    Step 14 minimum-mask-length value


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc-advanced)# minimum-mask-length 28
     

    (optional) Configures minimum mask length value to be applied on egress flows.

    Note   

    Minimum mask value is applied on IP addresses to generate a prefix to be used on egress flows.

     
    Step 15 mitigation-mode aggressive


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc-advanced)# mitigation-mode aggressive
     

    (optional) Configures aggressive brownout as mitigation mode.

    Note   

    Brownout mode is enabled to get TCA. Brownout allows you to configure threshold that is considered when moving traffic flows with respect to jitter, loss, and one-way-delay.

     
    Step 16 threshold-variance tolerance-percentage


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc-advanced)# threshold-variance 20
     

    (optional) Specifies the percentage of tolerance.

    Note   

    The threshold with respect to jitter, loss, and one-way-delay that can be tolerated across two links.

     
    Step 17 smart-probes source-port port-number


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc-advanced)# smart-probes source-port 18000
     

    (optional) Specifies the smart-probe source-port number.

     
    Step 18 smart-probes destination-port port-number


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc-advanced)# smart-probes destination-port 19000
     

    (optional) Specifies the smart-probe destination-port number.

     
    Step 19 exit


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc-advanced)# exit
     

    Exits advanced configuration mode and enters master controller configuration mode.

     
    Step 20 collector ip-address


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# collector 10.10.10.10
     

    Configures IP address of the Network Management System (NMS) or external v9 collector.

     
    Step 21 class domain-name sequence number


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# class policy sequence 100
     

    Enters the policy class configuration mode.

     
    Step 22 match dscp ef policy voice


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc-class)# match dscp ef policy voice
     

    Configures policy on per DSCP basis.

    Note   
    You can either select an existing template as domain type for policy or a custom mode. The available templates for domain policy types are listed below:
    • best-effort
    • bulk-data
    • low-latency-data
    • real-time-video
    • scavenger
    • voice
    • custom - Defines customized user-defined policy values.
     
    Step 23 exit


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc-class)# exit
     

    Exits class configuration mode and enters master controller configuration mode.

     
    Step 24 class domain-name sequence number


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# class policy_custom sequence 200
     

    Enters the policy class configuration mode.

     
    Step 25 match dscp default policy custom


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc-class)# match dscp default policy custom
     

    Configures custom policies to configure user-defined thresholds.

     
    Step 26 priority number one-way-delay threshold threshold-value


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc-class)# priority 1 one-way-delay threshold 150
     

    Configures the user-defined threshold value for one-way-delay.

    Note   

    You can configure multiple priorities for custom polices.

     
    Step 27 priority number jitter threshold threshold-value


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc-class)# priority 2 jitter threshold 200
     

    Configures the user-defined threshold value for jitter.

     
    Step 28 priority number loss threshold threshold-value


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc-class)# priority 3 loss threshold 250
     

    Configures the user-defined threshold value for loss.

     
    Step 29 exit


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc-class)# exit
     

    Exits class configuration mode and enters master controller configuration mode.

     
    Step 30 class http sequence number


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# class http sequence 200
     

    Enters the policy class configuration mode.

     
    Step 31 match application http policy low-latency-data


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc-class)# match application http policy low-latency-data
     

    Configures application based policies.

    Note   

    You can either configure DSCP or application based policies under a class. A combination of DSCP and application based policies under the same class is not possible.

     
    Step 32 path-preference name fallback fallback-name


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc-class)# path-preference ISP2 fallback ISP1
     

    Configures the path preferences.

    Note   

    You can configure up to five primary path preferences and four fallback preferences. Group policies sharing the same purpose can be defined under the same class path preference. You cannot configure different path preference under the same class.

     
    Step 33 end


    Example:
    Device(config-domain-vrf-mc-class)# end
     

    Exits configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

     

    Configuring Hub Border

    Configuring border routers for central hub includes the following:

    • External interfaces defined on the Border Routers on the central site only
    • IP address of the MC

    The border routers on the central site register to the central MC with their external interface definition together with their path names. You can use the global routing table (default VRF) or define specific VRFs for hub border routers.

    Procedure
       Command or ActionPurpose
      Step 1 enable


      Example:
      Device> enable
       

      Enables privileged EXEC mode.

      • Enter your password if prompted.
       
      Step 2 configure


      Example:
      terminal
      Device# configure terminal
       

      Enters global configuration mode.

       
      Step 3 domain {domain-name | default}


      Example:
      Device(config)# domain default
       

      Enters domain configuration mode.

       
      Step 4 vrf {vrf-name | default}


      Example:
      Device(config-domain)# vrf default
       

      Configures Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF) for the default domain.

      Note   

      You can also configure specific VRF definition also for hub border configuration.

       
      Step 5 border


      Example:
      Device(config-domain-vrf)# border
       

      Enters border configuration mode.

       
      Step 6 source-interface loopback interface-number


      Example:
      Device(config-domain-vrf-br)# source-interface Loopback0
       

      Configures the loopback used as a source for peering with other sites or master controller.

       
      Step 7 master ip-address


      Example:
      Device(config-domain-vrf-br)# master 10.1.1.1
       

      Configures the IP address of the hub master controller.

       
      Step 8 password hidden-password


      Example:
      Device(config-domain-vrf-br)# password cisco123
       

      Specifies a hidden password.

       
      Step 9 exit


      Example:
      Device(config-domain-vrf-br)# exit
       

      Exits border configuration mode and enters VRF configuration mode.

       
      Step 10 exit


      Example:
      Device(config-domain-vrf)# exit
       

      Exits VRF configuration mode and enters domain configuration mode.

       
      Step 11 exit


      Example:
      Device(config-domain)# exit
       

      Exits domain configuration mode and enters global configuration mode.

       
      Step 12 interface tunnel-name


      Example:
      Device(config)# interface Tunnel100
       

      Enters interface configuration mode.

       
      Step 13 domain path ISP-name


      Example:
      Device(config-if)# domain path ISP1 
       

      Configures the Internet Service Provider (ISP).

      Note   

      You can configure multiple ISPs. If you are defining specific domain name for example, domain_cisco, you must specify the same domain name for configuring ISP paths.

       
      Step 14 interface tunnel-name


      Example:
      Device(config)# interface Tunnel200
       

      Enters interface configuration mode.

       
      Step 15 domain path ISP-name internet-bound


      Example:
      Device(config-if)# domain path SP2 internet-bound
       

      Configures an interface connected to the internet directly.

       
      Step 16 end


      Example:
      Device(config-if)# end
       

      Exits interface configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

       

      Configuring Branch Master Controller

      You must configure the IP address of the Hub MC for setting up the branch MC. You can use the global routing table (default VRF) or define specific VRFs for branch MC.

      Note


      If default VRF (Global Routing Table) is used, then VRF definition can be omitted.


      Procedure
         Command or ActionPurpose
        Step 1 enable


        Example:
        Router> enable
         

        Enables privileged EXEC mode.

        • Enter your password if prompted.
         
        Step 2 configure terminal


        Example:
        Router# configure terminal
         

        Enters global configuration mode.

         
        Step 3 domain {domain-name | default}


        Example:
        Device(config)# domain default
         

        Enters domain configuration mode.

        Note   

        You can either configure a default domain or define a specific domain for MC configuration. If you are defining the specific domain, for example "domain_cisco", you must configure the same domain for all devices for PfRv3 configuration.

         
        Step 4 vrf {vrf-name | default}


        Example:
        Device(config-domain)# vrf default
         

        Configures Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF) for the default domain.

        Note   

        You can also configure specific VRF definition also for branch border configuration.

         
        Step 5 master branch


        Example:
        Device(config-domain-vrf)# master branch
         

        Configures the master type of the device as branch.

         
        Step 6 source-interface loopback interface-number


        Example:
        Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# source-interface Loopback0
         

        Configures the loopback used as a source for peering with other sites or master controller.

         
        Step 7 hub ip-address


        Example:
        Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# hub 10.1.1.1
         

        Configures the IP address of the hub master controller.

         
        Step 8 end


        Example:
        Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# end
         

        Exits master controller domain configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

         

        Configuring Branch Border

        A Border Router (BR) on a branch site must register to the local Master Controller. You need not provision any external interfaces for border routers on branch. Interfaces are learnt during the discovery process together with the path names (colors). You can use the global routing table (default VRF) or define specific VRFs for border routers.

        Procedure
           Command or ActionPurpose
          Step 1 enable


          Example:
          Router> enable
           

          Enables privileged EXEC mode.

          • Enter your password if prompted.
           
          Step 2 configure terminal


          Example:
          Router# configure terminal
           

          Enters global configuration mode.

           
          Step 3 domain {domain-name | default}


          Example:
          Device(config)# domain default
           

          Enters domain configuration mode.

           
          Step 4 vrf {vrf-name | default}


          Example:
          Device(config-domain)# vrf default
           

          Configures Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF) for the default domain.

          Note   

          You can also configure specific VRF definition also for branch border configuration.

           
          Step 5 border


          Example:
          Device(config-domain-vrf)# border
           

          Enters border configuration mode.

           
          Step 6 source-interface loopback interface-number


          Example:
          Device(config-domain-vrf-br)# source-interface Loopback0
           

          Configures the loopback used as a source for peering with other sites or master controller.

           
          Step 7 master ip-adress


          Example:
          Device(config-domain-vrf-br)# master 10.1.1.1
           

          Configures the IP address of the device as branch MC.

           
          Step 8 end


          Example:
          Device(config-domain-vrf-br)# end
           

          Exits border configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

           

          Configuring Branch Master Controller and Border

          A branch device can be configured to perform the role of Master Controller (MC) and Border Router (BR).

          Procedure
             Command or ActionPurpose
            Step 1 enable


            Example:
            Device> enable
             

            Enables privileged EXEC mode.

            • Enter your password if prompted.
             
            Step 2 configure terminal


            Example:
            Device# configure terminal
             

            Enters global configuration mode.

             
            Step 3 domain {domain-name | default}


            Example:
            Device(config)# domain default
             

            Enters domain configuration mode.

             
            Step 4 vrf {vrf-name | default}


            Example:
            Device(config-domain)# vrf default
             

            Configures Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF) for the default domain.

             
            Step 5 border


            Example:
            Device(config-domain-vrf)# border
             

            Enters border configuration mode.

             
            Step 6 source-interface loopback interface-number


            Example:
            Device(config-domain-vrf-br)# source-interface Loopback0
             

            Configures the loopback used as a source for peering with other sites or master controller.

             
            Step 7 master local


            Example:
            Device(config-domain-vrf-br)# master local
             

            Configures the local IP address of the device as branch MC.

             
            Step 8 master branch


            Example:
            Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# master branch
             

            Configures the master type of the device as branch.

             
            Step 9 source-interface loopback interface-number


            Example:
            Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# source-interface Loopback0
             

            Configures the loopback used as a source for peering with other sites or master controller.

             
            Step 10 hub ip-address


            Example:
            Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# hub 10.1.1.1
             

            Configures the IP address of the hub master controller.

             
            Step 11 exit


            Example:
            Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# exit
             

            Exits master controller domain configuration mode and enters VRF configuration mode.

             
            Step 12 exit


            Example:
            Device(config-domain-vrf)# exit
             

            Exits VRF configuration mode and enters domain configuration mode.

             
            Step 13 vrfvrf-name


            Example:
            Device(config-domain)# vrf vrf100
             

            Configures Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF) for the default domain.

             
            Step 14 border


            Example:
            Device(config-domain-vrf)# border
             

            Enters border configuration mode.

             
            Step 15 source-interface loopback interface-number


            Example:
            Device(config-domain-vrf-br)# source-interface Loopback100
             

            Configures the loopback used as a source for peering with other sites or master controller.

             
            Step 16 master local


            Example:
            Device(config-domain-vrf-br)# master local
             

            Configures the local IP address of the device as branch MC.

             
            Step 17 master branch


            Example:
            Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# master branch
             

            Configures the master type of the device as branch.

             
            Step 18 source-interface loopback interface-number


            Example:
            Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# source-interface Loopback100
             

            Configures the loopback used as a source for peering with other sites or master controller.

             
            Step 19 hub ip-address


            Example:
            Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# hub 10.1.1.1
             

            Configures the IP address of the hub.

             
            Step 20 end


            Example:
            Device(config-domain-vrf-mc)# end
             

            Exits the configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

             

            Verifying the Hub Master Controller Status

            Use the following steps to verify the status of the hub MC.

            Procedure
               Command or ActionPurpose
              Step 1 enable


              Example:
              Device> enable
               

              Enables privileged EXEC mode.

              • Enter your password if prompted.
               
              Step 2 show domain default master status


              Example:
              Device# show domain default master status
               

              Displays the status of the hub MC.

               

              Troubleshooting Tips

              • If the operational status is down, check the shutdown configuration on hub MC.
              • If the configuration status is down, check the source-interface configuration on hub MC.
              • If border devices are not displayed in the output, check the domain configuration on border device and IP connectivity with MC.

              Verifying the Hub Border Status

              Use the following steps to verify the status of the hub borders.

              Procedure
                 Command or ActionPurpose
                Step 1 enable


                Example:
                Device> enable
                 

                Enables privileged EXEC mode.

                • Enter your password if prompted.
                 
                Step 2 show domain default border status


                Example:
                Device# show domain default border status
                 

                Displays the status of the hub border devices.

                 

                Troubleshooting Tips

                • If the connection status is down, check the IP connectivity with MC and verify the MC IP address.
                • If the minimum requirement is not met, check the peering and monitor specification received from the hub MC.
                • If external WAN interfaces are not discovered, check the domain configuration under interface.

                Verifying the Branch Master Controller Status

                Use the following steps to verify the status of the branch MC.

                Procedure
                   Command or ActionPurpose
                  Step 1 enable


                  Example:
                  Device> enable
                   

                  Enables privileged EXEC mode.

                  • Enter your password if prompted.
                   
                  Step 2 show domain default master status


                  Example:
                  Device# show domain default master status
                   

                  Displays the status of the branch MC.

                   

                  Troubleshooting Tips

                  • If the operational status is down, check the shutdown configuration on MC.
                  • If the configuration status is down, check the source-interface configuration and hub MC IP address configuration.
                  • If the minimum requirement is not met, check the peering and policies received from the hub MC.

                  Verifying the Branch Border Status

                  Use the following steps to verify the status of the branch borders.

                  Procedure
                     Command or ActionPurpose
                    Step 1 enable


                    Example:
                    Device> enable
                     

                    Enables privileged EXEC mode.

                    • Enter your password if prompted.
                     
                    Step 2 show domain default border status


                    Example:
                    Device# show domain default border status
                     

                    Displays the status of the branch border devices.

                     

                    Troubleshooting Tips

                    • If external WAN interfaces are not discovered:
                      • check the IP connectivity between branch MC and hub MC
                      • verify if the branch site is discovered at the hub MC
                      • check whether a channel is created for this site on hub border device
                      • Verify next hop on channels are correct.

                    Configuration Examples for PfRv3

                    Example: Configuring Hub Master Controller

                    The following example shows how to configure hub master controller on a default domain:

                    
                    domain default
                     vrf default
                      master hub
                       source-interface Loopback0
                       site-prefixes prefix-list hub_site_prefixes
                       password cisco123
                       monitor-interval 1 dscp ef
                       route-control
                       load-balance
                       enterprise-prefix  prefix-list site_prefixes
                    advanced 																																							
                        minimum-mask-length 28
                        mitigation-mode aggressive
                        threshold-variance 20
                        smart-probes source-port 18000
                        smart-probes destination-port 19000    				
                       !																																										
                       collector 10.10.10.10
                       class policy sequence 100
                        match dscp ef policy voice
                       class policy_custom sequence 200
                        match dscp default policy custom
                    				priority 1 one-way-delay threshold 150
                    				priority 2 jitter threshold 200
                    				priority 3 loss threshold 250
                    		class http sequence 200
                    				match application http policy low-latency-data
                        path-preference SP2 fallback SP1
                        
                    !
                    
                    

                    The following example shows how to configure hub master controller on a specific domain:

                    
                    domain domain-cisco																												
                     vrf default
                      master hub
                       source-interface Loopback0
                       site-prefixes prefix-list hub_site_prefixes
                       password cisco123
                       monitor-interval 1 dscp ef
                       route-control
                       load-balance
                       enterprise-prefix  prefix-list site_prefixes
                    																																									
                       collector 10.10.10.10
                       class policy sequence 100
                        match dscp ef policy voice
                       class policy_custom sequence 200
                        match dscp default policy custom
                    				priority 1 one-way-delay threshold 150
                    				priority 2 jitter threshold 200
                    				priority 3 loss threshold 250
                    		class http sequence 200
                    				match application http policy low-latency-data
                        path-preference SP2 fallback SP1
                        
                    !
                    
                    

                    Example: Configuring Hub Border

                    
                    domain default
                     vrf default
                      border
                       source-interface Loopback0
                       master 10.1.1.1
                       password cisco123
                    !
                    interface Tunnel100
                     domain path SP1
                    !
                    interface Tunnel200
                     domain path SP2 internet-bound
                    !
                    
                    

                    Example: Configuring Branch Master Controller

                    
                    domain default
                     vrf default
                      master branch
                       source-interface Loopback0
                       hub 10.1.1.1
                    
                    

                    Example: Configuring Branch Border

                    
                    domain default
                     vrf default
                      border
                       source-interface Loopback0
                       master 10.1.1.1
                      
                    

                    Example: Configuring Branch Master Controller and Border

                    
                    domain default
                     vrf default
                      border
                       source-interface Loopback0
                       master local
                      master branch
                       source-interface Loopback0
                       hub 10.1.1.1
                     !
                    	vrf vrf100
                       border
                       source-interface Loopback100
                       master local
                      master branch
                       source-interface Loopback100
                       hub 10.1.1.1
                    !
                    
                    

                    Example: Verifying Hub Master Controller

                    The following is an example output from the show domain default master status command. The output from this command can be used to verify the status of the hub MC.

                    Device#show domain default master status
                    
                        *** Domain MC Status ***
                    
                    Master VRF: Global
                    
                      Instance Type:    Hub
                      Instance id:      0
                      Operational status:  Up
                      Configured status:  Up
                      Loopback IP Address: 1.1.1.1
                      Load Balancing:
                       Admin Status: Enabled
                       Operational Status: Up
                       Enterprise top level prefixes configured: 5
                       Max Calculated Utilization Variance: 0%
                       Last load balance attempt: 2d21h ago
                       Last Reason:  Variance less than 20%
                       Total unbalanced bandwidth:
                             External links: 0 Kbps  Internet links: 0 Kpbs
                      Route Control: Enabled
                      Mitigation mode Aggressive: Enabled
                      Policy threshold variance: 20
                      Minimum Mask Length: 24
                      Sampling: off
                    
                      Borders:
                        IP address: 10.2.2.2
                        Connection status: CONNECTED (Last Updated 00:00:02 ago )
                        Interfaces configured:
                          Name: Tunnel100 | type: external | Service Provider: SP1 | Status: UP
                              Number of default Channels: 0
                    
                        Tunnel if: Tunnel0
                    
                        IP address: 10.3.3.3
                        Connection status: CONNECTED (Last Updated 00:00:01 ago )
                        Interfaces configured:
                          Name: Tunnel200 | type: external | Service Provider: SP2 | Status: UP
                              Number of default Channels: 0
                    
                        Tunnel if: Tunnel0
                    
                    

                    The following is an example output from the show domain default master exits command. The output from this command can be used to verify the egress capacity of the hub MC.

                    Device#show domain default master exits
                    
                       BR address: 10.2.2.2 | Name: Tunnel100 | type: external | Path: SP1 |
                          Egress capacity: 1000 Kbps | Egress BW: 0 Kbps | Ideal:0 Kbps | under: 0 Kbps | Egress Utilization: 0 %
                    
                      BR address: 10.3.3.3 | Name: Tunnel200 | type: external | Path: SP2 |
                          Egress capacity: 1000 Kbps | Egress BW: 0 Kbps | Ideal:0 Kbps | under: 0 Kbps | Egress Utilization: 0 %
                    
                    

                    Example: Verifying Hub Border

                    The following is an example output from the show domain default border status command. The output from this command can be used to verify the status of the hub border devices.

                      Device#show domain default border status
                    
                    ****Border Status****
                    
                    Instance Status: UP
                    Present status last updated: 3w5d ago
                    Loopback: Configured Loopback1 UP (10.204.1.4)
                    Master: 10.202.1.2
                    Connection Status with Master: UP
                    MC connection info: CONNECTION SUCCESSFUL
                    Connected for: 00:57:22
                    Route-Control: Enabled
                    Minimum Mask length: 28
                    Sampling: off
                    Minimum Requirement: Met
                    External Wan interfaces: 
                    Name: Tunnel10 Interface Index: 16 SNMP Index: 13 SP:ISP1 Status: UP
                    
                    Auto Tunnel information:
                    
                       Name:Tunnel1 if_index: 19
                       Borders reachable via this tunnel:  10.203.1.3

                    Example: Verifying Branch Master Controller

                    The following is an example output from the show domain default master status command. The output from this command can be used to verify the status of the branch MC.

                    Device#show domain default master status
                    *** MC Status ***
                     Master VRF: Global
                      Instance Type:    Branch
                      Instance id:      0
                      Operational status:  Up
                      Configured status:  Up
                      Loopback IP Address: 10.202.1.2
                    Load Balancing: 
                       Operational Status: UP
                      …
                     Minimum Requirement: Met
                    
                      …
                    
                    

                    Example: Verifying Branch Border

                    The following is an example output from the show domain default border status command. The output from this command can be used to verify the status of the branch border devices.

                      Device#show domain default border status
                    
                    ****Border Status****
                    
                    Instance Status: UP
                    Present status last updated: 3w5d ago
                    Loopback: Configured Loopback1 UP (10.204.1.4)
                    Master: 10.202.1.2
                    Connection Status with Master: UP
                    MC connection info: CONNECTION SUCCESSFUL
                    Connected for: 00:57:22
                    Route-Control: Enabled
                    Minimum Mask length: 28
                    Minimum Requirement: Met
                    External Wan interfaces:
                    Name: Tunnel10 Interface Index: 16 SNMP Index: 13 SP:ISP1 Status: UP
                    
                    External Wan interfaces: 
                    Name: Tunnel200 Interface Index: 11 SNMP Index: 8 SP:sprint Status: UP
                    

                    Additional References for PfRv3

                    Related Documents

                    Related Topic

                    Document Title

                    Cisco IOS commands

                    Cisco IOS Master Command List, All Releases

                    Cisco PfRv3 commands: complete command syntax, command mode, command history, defaults, usage guidelines and examples

                    Cisco IOS Performance Routing Command Reference

                    Technical Assistance

                    Description

                    Link

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                    To receive security and technical information about your products, you can subscribe to various services, such as the Product Alert Tool (accessed from Field Notices), the Cisco Technical Services Newsletter, and Really Simple Syndication (RSS) Feeds.

                    Access to most tools on the Cisco Support website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

                    http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​cisco/​web/​support/​index.html

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                    Feature Information for PfRv3

                    The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

                    Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

                    Table 1 Feature Information for Configuring PfRv3

                    Feature Name

                    Releases

                    Feature Information

                    PfRv3

                    Cisco IOS XE 3.13S

                    PfRv3 is the first client for the Enterprise Domain framework. It provides enhancements to the deployment issues seen in the current PfR and also tightly integrates with the Application Visibility and Control (AVC) initiative.

                    The following commands were modified by this feature: domain default, vrf default, master, source-interface, site-prefixes, password, monitor-interval, route-control, load-balance, enterprise-prefix, advanced, minimum-mask-length, mitigation-mode, threshold-variance, smart-probes, collector, class, match, priority, path-preference, border, domain-path.