MPLS Traffic Engineering Path Calculation and Setup Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS XE Release 3S
MPLS Traffic Engineering – Bundled Interface Support
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MPLS Traffic Engineering – Bundled Interface Support

MPLS Traffic Engineering – Bundled Interface Support

The MPLS Traffic Engineering - Bundled Interface Support feature enables Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) traffic engineering (TE) tunnels over the bundled interfaces—EtherChannel and Gigabit EtherChannel (GEC).

The Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) notifies TE about bandwidth changes that occur when member links are added or deleted, or when links become active or inactive. TE notifies other nodes in the network via Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) flooding. By default, the bandwidth available to TE Label-Switched Paths (LSPs) is 75 percent of the interface bandwidth. You can change the percentage of the global bandwidth available for TE LSPs by using an RSVP command on the bundled interface. Bandwidth reservation and preemption are supported.

The Fast Reroute (FRR) feature is supported on bundled interfaces. FRR is activated when a bundled interface goes down; for example, if you enter the shutdown command to shut down the interface or fewer than the required minimum number of links are operational.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Prerequisites for MPLS TE – Bundled Interface Support

  • Configure Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) traffic engineering (TE) tunnels.
  • Enable Cisco Express Forwarding in global configuration mode.
  • Enable Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) feature.
  • Configure EtherChannel.
  • Configure Gigabit EtherChannel.

Restrictions for MPLS TE – Bundled Interface Support

  • Traffic engineering over switch virtual interfaces (SVIs) is not supported unless the SVI consists of a bundle of links that represent a single point-to-point interface.
  • There must be a valid IP address configuration on the bundled interface and there must not be an IP address configuration on the member links.

Information About MPLS TE – Bundled Interface Support

Cisco EtherChannel Overview

Cisco EtherChannel technology builds upon standards-based 802.3 full-duplex Fast Ethernet to provide network managers with a reliable, high-speed solution for the campus network backbone. EtherChannel technology provides bandwidth scalability within the campus by providing up to 800 Mbps, 8 Gbps, or 80 Gbps of aggregate bandwidth for a Fast EtherChannel, Gigabit EtherChannel, or 10 Gigabit EtherChannel connection, respectively. Each of these connection speeds can vary in amounts equal to the speed of the links used (100 Mbps, 1 Gbps, or 10 Gbps). Even in the most bandwidth-demanding situations, EtherChannel technology helps to aggregate traffic, keeps oversubscription to a minimum, and provides effective link-resiliency mechanisms.

Cisco EtherChannel Benefits

Cisco EtherChannel technology allows network managers to provide higher bandwidth among servers, routers, and switches than a single-link Ethernet technology can provide.

Cisco EtherChannel technology provides incremental scalable bandwidth and the following benefits:

  • Standards-based—Cisco EtherChannel technology builds upon IEEE 802.3-compliant Ethernet by grouping multiple, full-duplex point-to-point links. EtherChannel technology uses IEEE 802.3 mechanisms for full-duplex autonegotiation and autosensing, when applicable.
  • Flexible incremental bandwidth—Cisco EtherChannel technology provides bandwidth aggregation in multiples of 100 Mbps, 1 Gbps, or 10 Gbps, depending on the speed of the aggregated links. For example, network managers can deploy EtherChannel technology that consists of pairs of full-duplex Fast Ethernet links to provide more than 400 Mbps between the wiring closet and the data center. In the data center, bandwidths of up to 800 Mbps can be provided between servers and the network backbone to provide large amounts of scalable incremental bandwidth.
  • Load balancing—Cisco EtherChannel technology comprises several Fast Ethernet links and is capable of load balancing traffic across those links. Unicast, broadcast, and multicast traffic is evenly distributed across the links, providing improved performance and redundant parallel paths. When a link fails, traffic is redirected to the remaining links within the channel without user intervention and with minimal packet loss.
  • Resiliency and fast convergence—When a link fails, Cisco EtherChannel technology provides automatic recovery by redistributing the load across the remaining links. When a link fails, Cisco EtherChannel technology redirects traffic from the failed link to the remaining links in less than one second. This convergence is transparent to the end user—no host protocol timers expire and no sessions are dropped.

Cisco Gigabit EtherChannel Overview

Cisco Gigabit EtherChannel (GEC) is a high-performance Ethernet technology that provides transmission rates in Gigabit per second (Gbps). A Gigabit EtherChannel bundles individual ethernet links (Gigabit Ethernet and 10 Gigabit Ethernet) into a single logical link that provides the aggregate bandwidth up to four physical links. All LAN ports in each EtherChannel must be of the same speed and must be configured as either Layer 2 or Layer 3 LAN ports. Inbound broadcast and multicast packets on one link in an EtherChannel are blocked from returning on any other link in the EtherChannel.

Load Balancing and Min-Links in EtherChannel

Load balancing affects the actual and practical bandwidth that can be used for TE. Multilink load balancing uses a per-packet load balancing method. All of the bundle interface bandwidth is available. EtherChannel load balancing has various load balancing methods, depending on the traffic pattern and the load balancing configuration. The total bandwidth available for TE may be limited to the bandwidth of a single member link.

On EtherChannel, min-links is supported only in the Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP). For other EtherChannel protocols, the minimum is one link, by default, and it is not configurable. To configure min-links for EtherChannel, use the port-channel min-links command.

How to Configure MPLS TE – Bundled Interface Support

Configuring MPLS TE on an EtherChannel Interface

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    enable

    2.    configure terminal

    3.    interface type number [name-tag]

    4.    ip address ip-address mask [secondary]

    5.    mpls traffic-eng tunnels

    6.    mpls traffic-eng backup-path tunnel

    7.    port-channel min-links min-num

    8.    ip rsvp bandwidth [interface-kbps] [single-flow-kbps]

    9.    end


DETAILED STEPS
     Command or ActionPurpose
    Step 1 enable


    Example:
    Device> enable
     

    Enables privileged EXEC mode.

    • Enter your password if prompted.
     
    Step 2 configure terminal


    Example:
    Device# configure terminal
     

    Enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 3 interface type number [name-tag]


    Example:
    Device(config)# interface port-channel 1
     

    Creates an EtherChannel bundle, assigns a group number to the bundle, and enters interface configuration mode.

     
    Step 4 ip address ip-address mask [secondary]


    Example:
    Device(config-if)# ip address 10.0.0.4 255.255.255.0
     

    Specifies an IP address for the EtherChannel group.

     
    Step 5 mpls traffic-eng tunnels


    Example:
    Device(config-if)# mpls traffic-eng tunnels 
     

    Enables MPLS TE tunnel signaling on an interface.

    • MPLS TE tunnel should be enabled on the device before enabling the signaling.
     
    Step 6 mpls traffic-eng backup-path tunnel


    Example:
    Device(config-if)# mpls traffic-eng backup-path Tunnel120 
     

    (Optional) Configures the physical interface to use a backup tunnel in the event of a detected failure on that interface.

     
    Step 7 port-channel min-links min-num


    Example:
    Device(config-if)# port-channel min-links 2 
     

    Specifies that a minimum number of bundled ports in an EtherChannel is required before the channel can be active.

     
    Step 8 ip rsvp bandwidth [interface-kbps] [single-flow-kbps]


    Example:
    Device(config-if)# ip rsvp bandwidth 100 
     

    Enables RSVP for IP on an interface and specifies a percentage of the total interface bandwidth as available in the RSVP bandwidth pool.

     
    Step 9 end


    Example:
    Device(config-if)# end 
     

    Exits interface configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

     

    Configuration Examples for MPLS TE Bundled Interface Support

    Example: Configuring MPLS TE on an EtherChannel Interface

    Device> enable
    Device# configure terminal
    Device(config)# interface port-channel 1
    Device(config-if)# ip address 10.0.0.4 255.255.255.0
    Device(config-if)# mpls traffic-eng tunnels
    Device(config-if)# mpls traffic-eng backup-path Tunnel 120
    Device(config-if)# port-channel min-links 2
    Device(config-if)# ip rsvp bandwidth 100
    Device(config-if)# end
    

    Example: Configuring MPLS TE - Bundled Interface Support over Gigabit Etherchannel

    The following example shows how to enable MPLS TE – bundled interface support over GEC on Cisco devices:

    Device> enable
    Device# configure terminal
    
    ! Enable global MPLS TE on routers 
    Device(config)# router ospf 100
    Device(config-router)# network 10.0.0.1 0.0.0.255 area 0
    Device(config-router)# mpls traffic-eng area 0
    Device(config-router)# mpls traffic-eng router-id Loopback 0
    Device(config-router)# exit
    
    ! Configure  GEC  interface and enable MPLS TE and RSVP on interface  
    Device(config)# interface Port-channel 1
    Device(config-if)# ip address 10.0.0.1 255.255.255.0
    Device(config-if)# mpls traffic-eng tunnels 
    Device(config-if)# ip rsvp bandwidth
    Device(config-if)# exit
    
    ! Define explicit path
    Device(config)# ip explicit-path name primary enable
    Device(cfg-ip-expl-path)# next-address 172.12.1.2
    Device(cfg-ip-expl-path)# next-address 172.23.1.2
    Device(cfg-ip-expl-path)# next-address 172.34.1.2
    Device(cfg-ip-expl-path)# next-address 10.4.4.4
    Device(cfg-ip-expl-path)# exit
    
    ! Configure primary tunnel on head-end device
    Device(config)# interface Tunnel 14
    Device(config-if)# ip unnumbered Loopback 0
    Device(config-if)# tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng
    Device(config-if)# tunnel destination 10.10.10.0
    Device(config-if)# tunnel mpls traffic-eng autoroute announce
    Device(config-if)# tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-option 10 explicit name primary
    Device(config-if)# tunnel mpls traffic-eng fast-reroute 
    Device(config-if)# exit 
    
    ! Configure backup tunnel on head-end or mid-point device
    Device(config)# interface Tunnel 23
    Device(config-if)# ip unnumbered Looback 0
    Device(config-if)# tunnel mode mpls traffic-eng
    Device(config-if)# tunnel destination 10.20.10.0
    Device(config-if)# tunnel mpls traffic-eng path-option 10 explicit name backup
    Device(config-if)# exit
    
    ! Configure backup tunnel on protected GEC interface
    Device(config)# interface Port-channel 1
    Device(config-if)# ip address 10.0.0.1 255.255.255.0             
    Device(config-if)# mpls traffic-eng tunnels                            
    Device(config-if)# mpls traffic-eng backup-path Tunnel 23     
    Device(config-if)# ip rsvp bandwidth percent 20    
    Device(config-if)# lacp min-bundle 2
    Device(config-if)# exit
    
    ! Configure GEC interface
    Device(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/1
    Device(config-if)# no ip address
    Device(config-if)# channel-group 1 mode active
    Device(config-if)# exit
    
    ! Configure GEC interface
    Device(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/2
    Device(config-if)# no ip address
    Device(config-if)# channel-group 1 mode active
    Device(config-if)# exit
    
    

    The show mpls traffic-eng tunnels command output displays information about a tunnel or one–line information about all tunnels configured on the device:

    Device# show mpls traffic-eng tunnels tunnel 14 
     
    Name: ASR1013_t14                         (Tunnel10) Destination: 10.4.4.4
      Status:
        Admin: up         Oper: up     Path: valid       Signalling: connected
        path option 1, type explicit toR4overR3R3 (Basis for Setup, path weight 3)
     
      Config Parameters:
        Bandwidth: 0        kbps (Global)  Priority: 7  7   Affinity: 0x0/0xFFFF
        Metric Type: TE (default)
        AutoRoute: enabled  LockDown: disabled Loadshare: 0 [0] bw-based
        auto-bw: disabled
      Active Path Option Parameters:
        State: explicit path option 1 is active
        BandwidthOverride: disabled  LockDown: disabled  Verbatim: disabled
     
     
          InLabel  :  -
      OutLabel : Port-channel1, 1608
      Next Hop : 172.16.1.2
      FRR OutLabel : Tunnel23, 4868
      RSVP Signalling Info:
           Src 10.1.1.1, Dst 10.4.4.4, Tun_Id 14, Tun_Instance 35
        RSVP Path Info:
          My Address: 172.12.1.1
          Explicit Route: 172.12.1.2 172.23.1.1 172.23.1.2 172.34.1.1
                          172.34.1.2 10.4.4.4
    
      History:
        Tunnel:
          Time since created: 17 hours
          Time since path change: 18 minutes, 22 seconds
          Number of LSP IDs (Tun_Instances) used: 35
        Current LSP: [ID: 35]
          Uptime: 18 minutes, 22 seconds
          Selection: reoptimization
        Prior LSP: [ID: 32]
          ID: path option unknown
          Removal Trigger: signalling shutdown
    

    Device# show mpls traffic-eng tunnels brief		
    	
    show mpls traffic-eng tunnels brief
    Signalling Summary:
        LSP Tunnels Process:            running
        Passive LSP Listener:           running
        RSVP Process:                   running
        Forwarding:                     enabled
        Periodic reoptimization:        every 3600 seconds, next in 3299 seconds
        Periodic FRR Promotion:         Not Running
        Periodic auto-bw collection:    every 300 seconds, next in 299 seconds
    
    P2P TUNNELS/LSPs:
    TUNNEL NAME                      DESTINATION      UP IF     DOWN IF   STATE/PROT^M
    ASR1013_t14                      10.4.1.1                       -         Po12      up/up
    On Mid Router:
    P2P TUNNELS/LSPs:
    TUNNEL NAME                      DESTINATION      UP IF     DOWN IF   STATE/PROT
    ASR1013_t14                       10.4.1.1                   Po12       Po23       up/up
    ASR1002F_t23                      10.2.1.1                   Po25        -         up/up
    

    The show mpls traffic-eng fast-reroute command output displays information about FRR-protected MPLS TE tunnels originating, transmitting, or terminating on this device.

    Device# show mpls traffic-eng fast-reroute database 
    
    P2P Headend FRR information: 
    Protected tunnel               In-label Out intf/label   FRR intf/label   Status 
    ---------------------------    -------- --------------   --------------   ------ 
     
    P2P LSP midpoint frr information: 
    LSP identifier                 In-label Out intf/label   FRR intf/label   Status 
    ---------------------------    -------- --------------   --------------   ------ 
    10.1.1.1 1 [2]                 16        Po23:16          Tu23:16          active 
    

    Additional References for MPLS TE - Bundled Interface Support

    Related Documents

    Related Topic

    Document Title

    Cisco IOS commands

    Cisco IOS Master Command List, All Releases

    MPLS traffic engineering commands

    Cisco IOS Multiprotocol Label Switching Command Reference

    IPv6 commands

    Cisco IOS IPv6 Command Reference

    Technical Assistance

    Description

    Link

    The Cisco Support and Documentation website provides online resources to download documentation, software, and tools. Use these resources to install and configure the software and to troubleshoot and resolve technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. Access to most tools on the Cisco Support and Documentation website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

    http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​cisco/​web/​support/​index.html

    Feature Information for MPLS TE - Bundled Interface Support

    The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

    Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

    Table 1 Feature Information for MPLS TE - Bundled Interface Support

    Feature Name

    Releases

    Feature Information

    MPLS TE - Bundled Interface Support

    Cisco IOS XE Release 3.6S

    Cisco IOS XE Release 3.8S

    Cisco IOS XE Release 3.12S

    The MPLS TE - Bundled Interface Support feature enables MPLS traffic engineering (TE) tunnels over the bundled interfaces EtherChannel and Gigabit EtherChannel (GEC).

    In Cisco IOS XE Release 3.6S, support was added for the Cisco ASR 903 Series Routers.

    In Cisco IOS XE Release 3.8S, support was added for the Cisco ISR 4400 Series Routers.

    In Cisco IOS XE Release 3.12S, support was added for the Cisco ASR 1000 Series Routers.

    Glossary

    bundled interface—Generic terms to represent port-channel, multilink, and VLAN interfaces.

    Cisco express forwarding —A means for accelerating the forwarding of packets within a router, by storing route lookup information in several data structures instead of in a route cache.

    CLNS —Connectionless Network Service. The Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) network layer service that does not require a circuit to be established before data is transmitted. CLNS routes messages to their destination independently of any other messages.

    CSPF —Constrained Shortest Path First. A routing protocol that calculates the shortest path based on a set of constraints, such as a minimum bandwidth requirement, maximum number of nodes, or nodes to include or exclude.

    enterprise network —A large and diverse network connecting most major points in a company or other organization.

    FRR—Fast ReRoute.

    headend —The endpoint of a broadband network. All stations send toward the headend; the headend then sends toward the destination stations.

    IGP —Interior Gateway Protocol. An Internet protocol used to exchange routing information within an autonomous system. Examples of common Internet IGPs include Interior Gateway Routing protocol (IGRP), Open Shortest Path First (OSPF), and Routing Information Protocol (RIP).

    interface —A network connection.

    IS-IS —Intermediate System to Intermediate System. OSI link-state hierarchical routing protocol based on DECnet Phase V routing, where ISs (routers) exchange routing information based on a single metric, to determine the network topology.

    LDN— Link Down Notification.

    LSP —Label-Switched Path. A sequence of hops (R0...Rn) in which a packet travels from R0 to Rn through label switching mechanisms. A label-switched path can be chosen dynamically, based on normal routing mechanisms, or through configuration.

    member links—Individual interfaces that are grouped into a bundled interface.

    message-pacing —The former name of the rate limiting feature.

    MPLS —Formerly known as tag switching, Multiprotocol Label Switching is a method for directing packets primarily through Layer 2 switching rather than Layer 3 routing. In MPLS, packets are assigned short fixed-length labels at the ingress to an MPLS cloud by using the concept of forwarding equivalence classes. Within the MPLS domain, the labels are used to make forwarding decisions mostly without recourse to the original packet headers.

    OSPF —Open Shortest Path First. A link-state, hierarchical Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) routing protocol. derived from the Intermediate System-Intermediate System (IS-IS) protocol. OSPF features are least-cost routing, multipath routing, and load balancing.

    router —A network layer device that uses one or more metrics to determine the optimal path along which network traffic should be forwarded. Routers forward packets from one network to another based on network layer information.

    RSVP —Resource Reservation Protocol. A protocol that supports the reservation of resources across an IP network.

    scalability —An indicator showing how quickly some measure of resource usage increases as a network gets larger.

    TLV —type, length, value. TLV objects are used in data communication to provide optional information. The type field indicates the type of items in the value field. The length field indicates the length of the value field. The value field is the data portion of the packet.

    topology —The physical arrangement of network nodes and media within an enterprise networking structure.

    TE (traffic engineering) —Techniques and processes that cause routed traffic to travel through the network on a path other than the one that would have been chosen if standard routing methods were used.

    traffic engineering tunnel —A label-switched tunnel that is used for traffic engineering. Such a tunnel is set up through means other than normal Layer 3 routing; it is used to direct traffic over a path different from the one that Layer 3 routing would cause the tunnel to take.