Media Monitoring Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS XE Release 3S (Cisco ASR 1000)
Configuring Cisco Mediatrace
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Configuring Cisco Mediatrace

Configuring Cisco Mediatrace

Last Updated: December 12, 2012

This chapter contains information about and instructions for configuring Cisco Mediatrace.

Cisco Mediatrace enables you to isolate and troubleshoot network degradation problems for data streams. Although it can be used to monitor any type of flow, it is primary used with video flows. It can also be used for non-flow related monitoring along a media flow path.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Information About Configuring Cisco Mediatrace

Overview of Cisco Mediatrace

Cisco Mediatrace helps to isolate and troubleshoot network degradation problems by enabling a network administrator to discover an IP flow's path, dynamically enable monitoring capabilities on the nodes along the path, and collect information on a hop-by-hop basis. This information includes, among other things, flow statistics, and utilization information for incoming and outgoing interfaces, CPUs, and memory, as well as any changes to IP routes or the Cisco Mediatrace monitoring state.

This information can be retrieved in either of two ways:

  • By issuing an exec command to perform an on-demand collection of statistics from the hops along a media flow. During this one-shot operation, the hops along the media flow are discovered and shown to you, along with a set of other specified information.
  • By configuring Cisco Mediatrace to start a recurring monitoring session at a specific time and on specific days. The session can be configured to specify which metrics to collect, and how frequently they are collected. The hops along the path are automatically discovered as part of the operation.

After collecting the metrics you specified, you can view a report on the metrics.

Cisco Mediatrace is part of the Cisco Medianet family of products. For more information about the design, configuration, and troubleshooting of Mediatrace when used in conjunction with other Cisco products, including a Quick Start Guide and Deployment Guide, see the Cisco Medianet Knowledge Base Portal, located at http://www.cisco.com/web/solutions/medianet/knowledgebase/index.html.

Metrics That You Can Collect Using Cisco Mediatrace

You can collect the following categories of metrics using Mediatrace:

  • Common Metrics for Each Responder
  • System Metrics: TCP Profile
  • System Metrics: RTP Profile
  • System Metrics: INTF Profile
  • System Metrics: CPU Profile
  • System Metrics: MEMORY Profile
  • App-Health Metrics: MEDIATRACE-HEALTH Profile
  • Metrics for the Mediatrace Request Summary from Initiator

The individual metrics under each of these categories are listed the appropriate section below.

Metics for Mediatrace Request Summary from Initiator
  • Request Timestamp
  • Request Status
  • Number of Hops Responded
  • Number of Hops with Valid Data
  • Number of Hops with Error
  • Number of hops with no data record
  • Last Route Change Timestamp
  • Route Index
Common Metrics for Each Responder
  • Metrics Collection Status
  • Reachability address
  • Ingress Interface
  • Egress Interface
  • Mediatrace IP TTL
  • Hostname
  • Mediatrace Hop Count
Perf-Monitor Metrics: TCP Profile
  • Flow Sampling Start Timestamp
  • Loss of measurement confidence
  • Media Stop Event Occurred
  • IP Packet Drop Count
  • IP Byte Count
  • IP Packet Count
  • IP Byte Rate
  • IP DSCP
  • IP TTL
  • IP Protocol
  • Media Byte Count
  • TCP Connect Round Trip Delay
  • TCP Lost Event Count
Perf-Monitor Metrics: RTP Profile
  • Flow Sampling Start Timestamp
  • Loss of measurement confidence
  • Media Stop Event Occurred
  • IP Packet Drop Count
  • IP Byte Count
  • IP Packet Count
  • IP Byte Rate
  • Packet Drop Reason
  • IP DSCP
  • IP TTL
  • IP Protocol
  • Media Byte Rate Average
  • Media Byte Count
  • Media Packet Count
  • RTP Interarrival Jitter Average
  • RTP Packets Lost
  • RTP Packets Expected (pkts):
  • RTP Packet Lost Event Count:
  • RTP Loss Percent
System Metrics: INTF Profile
  • Collection timestamp
  • Octet input at Ingress
  • Octet output at Egress
  • Packets received with errors at Ingress
  • Packets with errors at Egress
  • Packets discarded at Ingress
  • Packets discarded at Egress
  • Ingress interface speed
  • Egress interface speed
System Metrics: CPU Profile
  • CPU Utilization (1min)
  • CPU Utilization (5min)
  • Collection timestamp
System Metrics: MEMORY Profile
  • Processor memory utilization %
  • Collection timestamp
App-Health Metrics: MEDIATRACE-HEALTH Profile
  • Requests Received
  • Time Last Request Received
  • Initiator of Last Request
  • Requests Dropped
  • Max Concurrent Sessions supported
  • Sessions currently active
  • Sessions Teared down
  • Sessions Timed out
  • Hop Info Requests Received
  • Performance Monitor Requests Received
  • Performance Monitor Requests failed
  • Static Policy Requests Received
  • Static Policy Requests Failed
  • System Data Requests Received
  • System Data Requests Failed
  • Application Health Requests Received
  • Local route change events
  • Time of last route change event
  • Number of unknown requests received

Overview of Configuring Cisco Mediatrace

Information can be retrieved from Mediatrace by using in either:

  • A pre-scheduled, recurring monitoring session.
  • An one-shot, on-demand collection of statistics, known as a Mediatrace poll.

Before you can implement a Mediatrace session or poll, you enable Mediatrace on each network node that you want to collect flow information from. You must enable the Mediatrace Initiator on the network node that you will use to configure, initiate, and control the Mediatrace sessions or polls. On each of the network nodes that you want top collect information from, you must enable the Mediatrace Responder.

To configure a Cisco Mediatrace session, you can set session parameters by associating either of two types of pre-packaged profiles with the session:

  • video-monitoring profiles
  • system-data profiles

You can also configure your own parameters for a Cisco Mediatrace session by configuring the following types of profiles and associating them with the session:

  • Path-specifier profile
  • Flow-specifier profile
  • Sessions-parameters profile

Therefore, the next section describes how to perform the following tasks in order to configure a Cisco Mediatrace session:

  1. Enable mediatrace
  2. Setup a video-monitoring profile
  3. Setup a system-data profile
  4. Setup a path-specifier profile
  5. Setup a flow-specifier profile
  6. Setup a sessions-params profile
  7. Associate profiles with a mediatrace session
  8. Schedule a mediatrace session

The next section also describes how to execute a mediatrace poll, which is an on-demand fetch of data from the hops on a specific path.

In addition, the next section describes how to manage mediatrace sessions by performing the following tasks:

  • Clear incomplete Cisco Mediatrace sessions
  • Troubleshoot a Cisco Mediatrace session

Limitations

Mediatrace does not support IPv6.

How to Configure Cisco Mediatrace

How to Enable Cisco Mediatrace

For each node you want to monitor using Cisco Mediatrace, you must enable at least the Cisco Mediatrace Responder. You must also enable the Cisco Mediatrace Initiator for all nodes that you want to initiate Mediatrace sessions or polls.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    mediatrace initiator {source-ip ip-address | source-interface interface-name} [force] [max-sessions number ]

4.    mediatrace responder [max-sessions number ]

5.    end


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
mediatrace initiator {source-ip ip-address | source-interface interface-name} [force] [max-sessions number ]


Example:

Router(config)# mediatrace initiator source-ip 10.10.1.1 max-sessions 4

 

Enables the Cisco Mediatrace or initiator. You can also use the following keywords:

  • ip-address --Any reachable IP address.
  • interface-name --Any local interface that connects to the initiator.
  • max-sessions --Sets the number of Cisco Mediatrace sessions.
 
Step 4
mediatrace responder [max-sessions number ]


Example:

Router(config)# mediatrace responder max-sessions 4

 

Enables the Cisco Mediatrace responder. You can also use the following keywords:

  • max-sessions --Sets the number of Cisco Mediatrace sessions.
 
Step 5
end


Example:

Router(config)# end

 

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Troubleshooting Tips

Use the show mediatrace responder app-healthcommand to verify whether the responder is collecting events, requests, and other Cisco Mediatrace related statistics properly.

For more information about this command, see the How to Troubleshoot and Monitor a Cisco Mediatrace Session.

How to Configure a Cisco Mediatrace Video Profile on the Mediatrace Initiator

Cisco Mediatrace provides pre-packaged video-monitoring profiles that contain all of the parameter settings you need to start a video media monitoring session. You can also configure your own video-monitoring profiles on the Mediatrace Initiator.

To initiate a new video media monitoring session, you can associate one of these profiles with a Cisco Mediatrace session when you configure it.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    mediatrace profile perf-monitor name

4.    admin-params

5.    monitor-interval seconds

6.    exit

7.    metric-list {tcp | rtp}

8.    clock-rate {type-number | type-name} rate

9.    max-dropout number

10.    max-reorder number

11.    min-sequential number

12.    end


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
mediatrace profile perf-monitor name


Example:

Router(config)# mediatrace profile perf-monitor vprofile-2

 

Enters perf-prof configuration mode so that you can configure parameters for a Cisco Mediatrace pre-packaged video-monitoring profile.

 
Step 4
admin-params

Example:

Router(config-mt-prof-perf)# admin-params

 

Enters admin parameters configuration mode so that you can configure video-monitoring admin parameters.

 
Step 5
monitor-interval seconds


Example:

Router(config-mt-prof-perf-params)# monitor-interval 40

 

Specifies the interval, in seconds, between samples taken of video-monitoring metrics.

 
Step 6
exit


Example:

Router(config-mt-prof-perf-params)# exit

 

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to perf-prof configuration mode.

 
Step 7
metric-list {tcp | rtp}


Example:

Router(config-mt-prof-perf)# metric-list rtp

 

Specifies whether the metrics being monitored are for TCP or RTP.

 
Step 8
clock-rate {type-number | type-name} rate


Example:

Router(config-mt-prof-perf-rtp-params)# clock-rate 64

 

(Optional) Specifies the clock rate used to sample RTP video-monitoring metrics. Each payload type has a specific clock rate associated with it and is can specified with either a type number or type name. For the available values of the payload type name, see the Cisco Media Monitoring Command Reference .

 
Step 9
max-dropout number


Example:

Router(config-mt-prof-perf-rtp-params)# max-dropout 2

 

(Optional) Specifies the maximum number of dropouts allowed when sampling RTP video-monitoring metrics. Dropouts are the number of packets to ignore ahead the current packet in terms of sequence number.

 
Step 10
max-reorder number


Example:

Router(config-mt-prof-perf-rtp-params)# max-reorder 4

 

(Optional) Specifies the maximum number of reorders allowed when sampling RTP video-monitoring metrics. Reorders are the number of packets to ignore behind the current packet in terms of sequence number.

 
Step 11
min-sequential number


Example:

Router(config-mt-prof-perf-rtp-params)# min-sequential 2

 

(Optional) Specifies the minimum number of packets in a sequence used to classify a RTP flow .

 
Step 12
end


Example:

Router(config-mt-prof-perf-rtp-params)# end

 

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Troubleshooting Tips

Use the show mediatrace profile perf-monitor command to verify that the parameter values for your pre-packaged video-monitoring profiles are set correctly.

For more information about this command, see the How to Troubleshoot and Monitor a Cisco Mediatrace Session.

How to Configure a Cisco Mediatrace System Profile

Cisco Mediatrace provides pre-packaged system-data monitoring profiles that contain all of the parameter settings you need to start a system-data monitoring session. You can also configure your own system-data monitoring profiles. To initiate a new system-data monitoring session, you can associate one of these profiles with a Cisco Mediatrace session when you configure it.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    mediatrace profile system name

4.    metric-list {intf | cpu | memory}

5.    end


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
mediatrace profile system name


Example:

Router(config)# mediatrace profile system system-2

 

Enters system profile configuration mode so that you can configure parameters for a Cisco Mediatrace system profile.

 
Step 4
metric-list {intf | cpu | memory}


Example:

Router(config-sys)# metric-list memory

 

Specifies whether the metrics being monitored are for interfaces, the CPU, or the memory.

 
Step 5
end


Example:

Router(config-sys)# end

 

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Troubleshooting Tips

Use the show mediatrace profile systemcommandto verify that the parameter values for your pre-packaged system-data profiles are set correctly.

For more information about this command, see the How to Troubleshoot and Monitor a Cisco Mediatrace Session.

How to Configure a Cisco Mediatrace Path-Specifier Profile

A Cisco Mediatrace session configuration requires a path-specifier profile which defines the parameters that are used to discover the network hops that will be monitored for troubleshooting. The RSVP transport protocol, specified by optional disc-proto keyword, is used to do this hop discovery. The parameter values for the flow-specifier should match the values for the media flow that will be traced.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    mediatrace path-specifier name [disc-proto rsvp] {gsid gsid | destination ip ip-address port nnnn }

4.    source ip ip-address port nnnn

5.    l2-params gateway ip-address vlan vlan-id

6.    gsid gsid

7.    end


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
mediatrace path-specifier name [disc-proto rsvp] {gsid gsid | destination ip ip-address port nnnn }


Example:

Router(config)# mediatrace path-specifier path-4 disc-proto rsvp destination ip 10.1.1.1 port 400

 

Enters path-specifier configuration mode so that you can configure parameters for a Cisco Mediatrace path-specifier profile. This command requires the name, destination address, and port of the path.

 
Step 4
source ip ip-address port nnnn


Example:

Router(config-mt-path)# source ip 10.1.1.2 port 600

 

Specifies the IP address of the source of the metrics being monitored.

 
Step 5
l2-params gateway ip-address vlan vlan-id


Example:

Router(config-mt-path)# l2-params gateway 10.10.10.4 vlan 22

 

Specifies the IP address and ID of the virtual LAN of the level-2 gateway.

Note    This command is available only on Catalyst platforms.
 
Step 6
gsid gsid


Example:

Router(config-mt-path)# gsid 60606060

 

Specifies the metadata global session ID of the flow being monitored.

 
Step 7
end


Example:

Router(config-mt-path)# end

 

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Troubleshooting Tips

Use the show mediatrace path-specifier command to verify that the parameter values for your path-specifier profiles are set correctly.

For more information about this command, see the How to Troubleshoot and Monitor a Cisco Mediatrace Session.

How to Configure a Cisco Mediatrace Flow-Specifier Profile

A Cisco Mediatrace session configuration requires a flow-specifier profile which defines the source IP address, destination IP address, source port, destination port, and protocol that identifies a flow. You can associate a profile with an actual Cisco Mediatrace session later when you configure it

For RTP media flows, select UDP as protocol.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    mediatrace flow-specifier name

4.    source-ip ip-address [source-port port ]

5.    dest-ip ip-address [dest-port port ]

6.    gsid gsid

7.    ip-protocol {tcp | udp}

8.    end


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
mediatrace flow-specifier name


Example:

Router(config)# mediatrace flow-specifier flow-6

 

Enters flow-specifier configuration mode so that you can configure parameters for a Cisco Mediatrace flow-specifier profile.

 
Step 4
source-ip ip-address [source-port port ]


Example:

Router(config-mt-flowspec)# source-ip 10.1.1.2 source-port 600

 

(Optional) Specifies the IP address of the source of the metrics being monitored.

 
Step 5
dest-ip ip-address [dest-port port ]


Example:

Router(config-mt-flowspec)# dest-ip 10.1.1.2 dest-port 600

 

Specifies the IP address of the destination of the metrics being monitored.

 
Step 6
gsid gsid


Example:

Router(config-mt-flowspec)# gsid 60606060

 

Specifies the metadata global session ID of the flow being monitored.

 
Step 7
ip-protocol {tcp | udp}


Example:

Router(config-mt-flowspec)# ip-protocol tcp

 

Specifies whether the metrics being monitored are for TCP or UDP.

 
Step 8
end


Example:

Router(config-mt-flowspec)# end

 

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Troubleshooting Tips

Use the show mediatrace flow-specifier command to verify that the parameter values for your flow-specifier profiles are set correctly.

For more information about this command, see the How to Troubleshoot and Monitor a Cisco Mediatrace Session.

How to Configure a Cisco Mediatrace Session Parameters Profile

A Cisco Mediatrace session configuration requires a session-params profile, which defines the characteristics of a Cisco Mediatrace session and help it to operate smoothly. You can associate a profile with an actual Cisco Mediatrace session later when you configure it

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    mediatrace session-params name

4.    response-timeout seconds

5.    frequency {frequency | on-demand} inactivity-timeout seconds

6.    history buckets

7.    route-change reaction-time seconds

8.    end


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
mediatrace session-params name


Example:

Router(config-mt-sesparam)# mediatrace session-params qos-2

 

Enters session-params configuration mode so that you can configure parameters for a Cisco Mediatrace session-params profile.

 
Step 4
response-timeout seconds


Example:

Router(config-mt-sesparam)# response-timeout 8

 

Specifies the amount of time, in seconds, the initiator will wait for a response from the responder.

 
Step 5
frequency {frequency | on-demand} inactivity-timeout seconds


Example:

Router(config-mt-sesparam)# frequency 4 inactivity-timeout 2

 

Specifies the interval, in seconds, between samples taken of session-params metrics and the amount of time, in seconds, the initiator will remain active without any activity from the responder.

 
Step 6
history buckets


Example:

Router(config-mt-sesparam)# history 2

 

Specifies the number of historical data sets kept, up to a maximum of ten.

 
Step 7
route-change reaction-time seconds


Example:

Router(config-mt-sesparam)# route-change reaction-time 8

 

Specifies the amount of time, in seconds, the initiator will wait for the responder to react to its additional route changes. The range is seconds.

 
Step 8
end


Example:

Router(config-mt-sesparam)# end

 

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Troubleshooting Tips

Use the show mediatrace session-paramcommand to verify that the parameter values for your session-parameters profiles are set correctly.

For more information about this command, see the How to Troubleshoot and Monitor a Cisco Mediatrace Session.

How to Configure a Cisco Mediatrace Session

The Cisco Mediatrace session configuration links the various profiles to a session. Only one of each type of profile can be associated with a Cisco Mediatrace session.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    mediatrace session-number

4.    trace-route

5.    path-specifier name

6.    session-params name

7.    profile system name

8.    profile perf-monitor name flow-specifier name

9.    end


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
mediatrace session-number


Example:

Router(config)# mediatrace 8

 

Enters session configuration mode.

 
Step 4
trace-route


Example:

Router(config-mt-session)# trace-route

 

Enables the running of trace route for the Cisco Mediatrace session. By default trace route is enabled. To stop running trace route, use the no form of this command.

 
Step 5
path-specifier name


Example:

Router(config-mt-session)# path-specifier path-4

 

Associates a path-specifier profile with the Cisco Mediatrace session.

 
Step 6
session-params name


Example:

Router(config-mt-session)# session-params session-6

 

Associates a session-parameters profile with the Cisco Mediatrace session.

 
Step 7
profile system name


Example:

Router(config-mt-session)# profile system sys-2

 

Associates a system profile with the Cisco Mediatrace session.

 
Step 8
profile perf-monitor name flow-specifier name


Example:

Router(config-mt-session)# profile perf-monitor monitor-6 flow-specifier flow-4

 

Associates a perf-monitor profile and flow-specifier with the Cisco Mediatrace session.

 
Step 9
end


Example:

Router(config-mt-session)# end

 

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Troubleshooting Tips

Use the show mediatrace sessioncommand to display the parameter settings for a specific session or all sessions.

Use the show mediatrace responder app-health command and the show mediatrace responder sessionscommand to determine the status of the nodes being monitored.

If Cisco Mediatrace is not collecting all of the data that you want, use the debug mediatracecommand.

For more information about these commands, see the How to Troubleshoot and Monitor a Cisco Mediatrace Session.

How to Schedule a Cisco Mediatrace Session

Once you have configured a Cisco Mediatrace session, you can schedule it to begin when you want to start collecting the data. If the Cisco Mediatrace session is designed to collect performance monitoring metrics, it goes out to enable the Performance Monitor when the session begins.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    mediatrace schedule session ID [life {forever | secs}] [start-time {hh:mm:[:ss][month day| day month] | pending | now | after hh:mm:ss}] [ageout secs] [recurring]

4.    end


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
mediatrace schedule session ID [life {forever | secs}] [start-time {hh:mm:[:ss][month day| day month] | pending | now | after hh:mm:ss}] [ageout secs] [recurring]


Example:

Router(config)# mediatrace schedule 22 life 40 start-time 10:00:00 AUG 20 recurring

 

Specifcies when the session will occur. Use these settings:

  • session ID --Which session to run.
  • life --Amount of time the session lasts, either the number of seconds or forever.
  • start-time --When the session starts, whether it is at a specified time and date, pending an event, immediately, or after a specified time and date.
  • ageout --Timeout before removing the session configuration on the initiator.
  • recurring --Session reoccurs at the specified time.
 
Step 4
end


Example:

Router(config-mt-sched)# end

 

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Troubleshooting Tips

Use the show mediatrace sessioncommand to verify that the intended values are set for the parameters for a specific session or all sessions.

Use the show mediatrace responder app-health command and the show mediatrace responder sessionscommand to determine the status of the nodes being monitored.

If Cisco Mediatrace is not collecting all of the data that you want, use the debug mediatracecommand.

For more information about these commands, see the How to Troubleshoot and Monitor a Cisco Mediatrace Session.

How to Clear a Cisco Mediatrace Session

You can clear incomplete mediatrace sessions on the Initiator by using the clear mediatrace incomplete-sessionscommand as described below. This coammand also cleans up all Performance Monitor settings that were configured by Cisco Mediatrace. For sessions created by the config commands, use the no mediatrace schedulecommand. The cleanup triggers a "session teardown" message to RSVP followed by a cleanup of the local mediatrace sessions database.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    clear mediatrace incomplete-sessions

3.    end


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
clear mediatrace incomplete-sessions


Example:

Router# clear mediatrace incomplete-sessions

 

Clears incomplete mediatrace sessions.

 
Step 3
end


Example:

Router# end

 

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Troubleshooting Tips

To check the status of your Cisco Mediatrace session, use the show mediatrace responder sessionscommand.

For more information about these commands, see the How to Troubleshoot and Monitor a Cisco Mediatrace Session.

How to Execute a Cisco Mediatrace Poll

Cisco Mediatrace polls are used to perform an on-demand fetch of data from the hops on a specific path. Some examples of how it can be used are:

  • To retrieve data using a pre-configured session. In this case, no other parameters have to be specified inline. The pre-configured session must be have the frequency type set to on-demand.
  • To retrieve the system data, hop or video monitoring information from hops along the specified path. You can specify the path as a pre-configured path-specifier or an inline path specification, in case you do not have config mode privileges. Note that by default, Cisco Mediatrace tries to configure nodes along the path to report passive monitoring metrics, and then waits for a configurable amount of time before going out again to collect the data.
  • The configless keyword can be used to fetch data from the nodes along a media path, which already have Performance Monitor policies configured using the Performance Monitor commands. Some key things to keep in mind when fetching data using this method are that:
    • The default perf-monitor profile or associated perf-monitor profile will have a sampling interval. If the sampling interval of the static policy does not match the one in the associated perf-monitor profile, no data is returned.
    • If there is no Performance Monitor policy configured on a Responder node, the Cisco Mediatrace responder does not try to configure Performance Monitor and simply reports error to the initiator.
SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    mediatrace poll {no-traceroute | session number | [timeout value] path-specifier{name path-name | gsid gsid | {[disc-proto rsvp] destination ip ip-address [port nnnnn] | source ip ip-address [port nnnnn] destination ip ip-address [port nnnn] [ip-protocol{tcp | udp}]} {app-health | hops | l2-params gateway ip-address | system [profile system-profile-name] | [configless] perf-monitor [profile profile-name]} {flow-specifier name | source-ip ipaddress [source-port nnnnn] dest-ip ipaddress [dest-port nnnnn] ip-protocol {tcp | udp}}}}

3.    end


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
mediatrace poll {no-traceroute | session number | [timeout value] path-specifier{name path-name | gsid gsid | {[disc-proto rsvp] destination ip ip-address [port nnnnn] | source ip ip-address [port nnnnn] destination ip ip-address [port nnnn] [ip-protocol{tcp | udp}]} {app-health | hops | l2-params gateway ip-address | system [profile system-profile-name] | [configless] perf-monitor [profile profile-name]} {flow-specifier name | source-ip ipaddress [source-port nnnnn] dest-ip ipaddress [dest-port nnnnn] ip-protocol {tcp | udp}}}}


Example:

Example:

Router# mediatrace poll session 22

 

Performs an on-demand fetch of data from the hops on a specific path. You can specify the hops using one of the following types of information:

  • A session definition or its constituent parameters
  • A system profile definition or its constituent parameters
  • A combination of a path-specifier profile definition and a perf-monitor profile definition or their constituent parameters
Note    The l2-params gateway keyword is available only on Catalyst platforms.
 
Step 3
end


Example:

Router# end

 

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Troubleshooting Tips

If Cisco Mediatrace is not collecting all of the data that you want:

  • Use the show mediatrace sessioncommand to verify that the intended values are set for the parameters for a specific session or all sessions.
  • Use the show mediatrace responder app-health command and the show mediatrace responder sessionscommand to determine the status of the nodes being monitored.
  • Use the debug mediatracecommand to view error messages.

Examples


Tip


For examples of poll output, see Configuration Examples for Cisco Mediatrace.


The following example shows how to fetch the default system metrics when the source IP address, source port, and destination port are not known. Cisco Mediatrace uses the best local IP address as source IP address to find which hops are using RSVP.

mediatrace poll path dest ip-address system

The following example shows how to fetch the default system metrics when the source and destination port numbers are not known. RSVP finds the hop between the specified source and destination.

mediatrace poll path source ip-address dest ip-address system

The following example shows how to fetch the default system metrics when the source and destination port numbers are known. RSVP finds the hop using this information.

mediatrace poll path source-ip ip-address source - port nnnn dest-ip ip-address dest - port nnnn ip-protocol udp system

The following example shows how to fetch the default set of RTP metrics when the source and destination port numbers are not known. Cisco Mediatrace uses the path source and destination IP addresses to find the hops as well as filter the Performance Monitor data.

mediatrace poll path source ip-address dest ip-address perf-monitor

The following example shows how to fetch the default set of RTP metrics. Cisco Mediatrace uses the path parameters to discover hops and uses the inline flow specifier profile as a filter for Performance Monitor data.

mediatrace poll path source ip-address dest ip-address perf-monitor source-ip ip-address source - port nnnn dest-ip ip-address dest - port nnnn ip-protocol udp

The following example shows how to fetch the default set of TCP metrics. Cisco Mediatrace uses the path parameters to discover hops and uses the inline flow-specifier profile as a filter for Performance Monitor data.

mediatrace poll path source ip-address dest ip-address perf-monitor source-ip ip-address source - port nnnn dest-ip ip-address dest - port nnnn ip-protocol tcp

The following example shows how to fetch the default set of RTP metrics. Cisco Mediatrace uses the best local IP address as source IP address for finding hops on the path and uses the inline flow specifier profile as a filter for Performance Monitor data.

mediatrace poll path dest ip-address perf-monitor source-ip ip-address source - port nnnn dest-ip ip-address dest - port nnnn ip-protocol udp

The following example shows how to fetch the default set of TCP metrics. Cisco Mediatrace uses the best local IP address as source IP address for finding hops on the path and uses the inline flow-specifier profile as a filter for Performance Monitor data.

mediatrace poll path dest ip-address perf-monitor source-ip ip-address source - port nnnn dest-ip ip-address dest - port nnnn ip-protocol tcp

The following example shows how to fetch the default set of RTP metrics from the static policy that is already configured on the hops. The command does not configure the Performance Monitor. Cisco Mediatrace uses the path parameters to discover hops and use the inline flow specifier profile as a filter for Performance Monitor data.

mediatrace poll path source ip-address dest ip-address configless perf-monitor flow-specifier source ip-address port nnnn dest ip-address port nnnn ip-protocol udp

Poll Output Example

This example shows the output is produced by the following hops poll command:

mediatrace poll path-specifier source 10.10.130.2 destination 10.10.132.2 hops
Started the data fetch operation.
Waiting for data from hops.
This may take several seconds to complete...
Data received for hop 1
Data received for hop 2
Data fetch complete.
Results:
Data Collection Summary:
  Request Timestamp: 22:47:56.788 PST Fri Oct 29 2010
  Request Status: Completed
  Number of hops responded (includes success/error/no-record): 2
  Number of hops with valid data report: 2
  Number of hops with error report: 0
  Number of hops with no data record: 0
Detailed Report of collected data:
    Number of Mediatrace hops in the path: 2
    Mediatrace Hop Number: 1 (host=responder1, ttl=254)
      Reachability Address: 10.10.12.3
      Ingress Interface: Gi0/1
      Egress Interface: Gi0/2
    Mediatrace Hop Number: 2 (host=responder2, ttl=253)
      Reachability Address: 10.10.34.3
      Ingress Interface: Gi0/1
      Egress Interface: Gi0/2

How to Troubleshoot and Monitor a Cisco Mediatrace Session

Use the show commands described in this section to troubleshoot to monitor a Cisco Mediatrace session.


Tip


For sample outputs, see the Examples section, in this chapter.


SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    show mediatrace profile perf-monitor [name]

4.    show mediatrace profile system [name]

5.    show mediatrace flow-specifier [name]

6.    show mediatrace path-specifier [name]

7.    show mediatrace initiator

8.    show mediatrace session-params [name]

9.    show mediatrace session [config| data| stats| hops] [brief| ID]

10.    show mediatrace responder app-health

11.    show mediatrace responder sessions [ global-session-id | brief | details]

12.    debug mediatrace {event | trace | error} [initiator | responder| session-id]

13.    end


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
show mediatrace profile perf-monitor [name]


Example:

Router(config)# show mediatrace profile perf-monitor vprofile-4

 

Displays the parameters configured for all pre-packaged video-monitoring profiles or the specified profile.

 
Step 4
show mediatrace profile system [name]


Example:

Router(config)# show mediatrace profile system system-8

 

Displays the parameters configured for all pre-packaged system-data monitoring profiles or the specified profile.

 
Step 5
show mediatrace flow-specifier [name]


Example:

Router(config)# show mediatrace flow-specifier flow-2

 

Displays the parameters configured for all flow-specifier profiles or the specified flow-specifier profile.

 
Step 6
show mediatrace path-specifier [name]


Example:

Router(config)# show mediatrace path-specifier path-6

 

Displays the parameters configured for all path-specifier profiles or the specified path-specifier profile.

 
Step 7
show mediatrace initiator


Example:

Router(config)# show mediatrace initiator

 

Displays the parameters configured for the initiator profile.

 
Step 8
show mediatrace session-params [name]


Example:

Router(config)# show mediatrace session-params sysparams-2

 

Displays the monitoring parameters for the session like frequency, response timeout, ands so on.

the parameters configured for all pre-packaged system-data monitoring profiles or the specified profile.

 
Step 9
show mediatrace session [config| data| stats| hops] [brief| ID]


Example:

Router(config)# show mediatrace session data 1002

 

Displays the parameters configured for all session profiles or the specified session profile. Use the following keywords to display the corresponding information:

  • config --Configuration of the session.
  • data --All data records collected and still cached at the Initiator.
  • stats --Statistics for this service path or session.
  • hops --Prior service paths (if available) and current service paths discovered. Also shows where and when the last route change happened.
  • brief -- Only a list of sessions with ID, destination/source address/port, and their role association as Initiator or Responder.
  • ID -- Session ID and some state information.
 
Step 10
show mediatrace responder app-health


Example:

Router(config)# show mediatrace responder app-health

 

Displays the current status of the responder.

 
Step 11
show mediatrace responder sessions [ global-session-id | brief | details]


Example:

Router(config)# show mediatrace responder sessions

 

Displays the information about all or specific active sessions on local responder. Use the following keywords to display the corresponding information

  • global-session-id -- ID of the session for which information is displayed.
  • brief --Displays only the destination and source address/port of the path, their role as either Initiator or Responder, and some state information.
  • details --Displays all information.
 
Step 12
debug mediatrace {event | trace | error} [initiator | responder| session-id]


Example:

Router(config)# debug mediatrace event 24

 

Enables debugging for a particular path, or a particular session, or for all Initiator and Responder functions. You can use the following options:

  • event -- Displays only event information.
  • trace -- Displays only trace information.
  • error -- Displays only errors.
  • initiator -- Displays information for only the initiator.
  • responder -- Displays information for only the responder.
  • session-id -- Displays information for only the session.
 
Step 13
end


Example:

Router(config)# end

 

Exits the current configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Examples


Note


For a complete description of the output for the following show commands, see the Cisco Media Monitoring Command Reference.


The following example displays video-monitoring profiles:

Router# show mediatrace profile perf-monitor 
Perf-monitor Profile: vprof-4
Metric List: rtp
RTP Admin Parameter:
  Max Dropout: 5
  Max Reorder: 5
  Min Sequential: 5
Admin Parameter:
  Sampling Interval (sec): 30

The following example displays system-data profiles:

Router# show mediatrace profile 
system
 
System Profile: sys-1
Metric List: intf

The following example displays flow-specifier profiles:

Router# show mediatrace
 flow-specifier flow-1 
Flow Specifier: flow-1
    Source address/port:
    Destination address/port:
    Protocol: udp

The following example displays path-specifier profiles:

Router# show mediatrace
 path-specifier flow-1 
Path Configuration: ps1
    Destination address/port: 10.10.10.1
    Source address/port: 10.10.10.4
    Gateway address/vlan:
    Discovery protocol: rsvp

The following example displays the initiator profile:

Router# show mediatrace
 initiator
Version: Mediatrace 1.0
Mediatrace Initiator status: enabled
Source IP: 1.1.1.1
Number of Maximum Allowed Active Session: 127
Number of Configured Session: 1
Number of Active Session    : 0
Number of Pending Session   : 0
Number of Inactive Session  : 1
Note: the number of active session may be higher than max active session
      because the max active session count was changed recently.

The following example displays session profiles:

Router# show mediatrace session-params
Session Parameters: s-1
    Response timeout (sec): 60
    Frequency: On Demand
    Inactivity timeout (sec): 300
    History statistics:
       Number of history buckets kept: 3
    Route change:
       Reaction time (sec): 5

The following example displays Mediatrace session statistics:

Router# show mediatrace session stats 2
Session Index: 2
Global Session Id: 86197709
Session Operation State: Active
Operation time to live: Forever
Data Collection Summary:
  Request Timestamp: 23:55:04.228 PST Fri Oct 29 2010
  Request Status: Completed
  Number of hops responded (includes success/error/no-record): 2
  Number of Non Mediatrace hops responded: 0
  Number of hops with valid data report: 2
  Number of hops with error report: 0
  Number of hops with no data record: 0
Detailed Report of collected data:
  Last Route Change Timestamp: 
  Route Index: 0
    Number of Mediatrace hops in the path: 2
    Mediatrace Hop Number: 1 (host=responder1, ttl=254)
      Metrics Collection Status: Success
      Reachability Address: 10.10.12.3
      Ingress Interface: Gi0/1
      Egress Interface: Gi0/2
	     Traceroute data:
	       Address List: 1.2.2.3
        Round Trip Time List (msec): 12 msec

Note


The rest of the data for hop 1 is similar to the data for hop 2, as shown below.
Mediatrace Hop Number: 2 (host=responder2, ttl=253)
      Metrics Collection Status: Success
      Reachability Address: 10.10.34.3
      Ingress Interface: Gi0/1
      Egress Interface: Gi0/2
      Metrics Collected:
        Collection timestamp: 23:55:04.237 PST Fri Oct 29 2010
        Octet input at Ingress (KB): 929381.572                 
        Octet output at Egress (MB): 1541.008502                
        Pkts rcvd with err at Ingress (pkts): 0                 
        Pkts errored at Egress (pkts): 0                        
        Pkts discarded at Ingress (pkts): 0                     
        Pkts discarded at Egress (pkts): 0                      
        Ingress i/f speed (mbps): 1000.000000                   
        Egress i/f speed (mbps): 1000.000000      

The following example displays Mediatrace session configuration information:

Router# show mediatrace session config 2 
Global Session Id: 93642270
---------------------------
Session Details:
    Path-Specifier: ps1
    Session Params: sp1
    Collectable Metrics Profile: intf1
    Flow Specifier: 
Schedule:
   Operation frequency (seconds): 30  (not considered if randomly scheduled)
   Next Scheduled Start Time: Start Time already passed
   Group Scheduled : FALSE
   Randomly Scheduled : FALSE
   Life (seconds): Forever
   Entry Ageout (seconds): never
   Recurring (Starting Everyday): FALSE
   Status of entry (SNMP RowStatus): Active
History Statistics:
   Number of history Buckets kept: 10

The following example displays Mediatrace session hops:

show mediatrace session hops 2 
Session Index: 2
Global Session Id: 93642270
Session Operation State: Active
Data Collection Summary:
  Request Timestamp: 13:40:32.515 PST Fri Jun 18 2010
  Request Status: Completed
  Number of hops responded (includes success/error/no-record): 3
  Number of hops with valid data report: 3
  Number of hops with error report: 0
  Number of hops with no data record: 0
Detailed Report of collected data:
  Last Route Change Timestamp: 
  Route Index: 0
    Number of Mediatrace hops in the path: 3
    Mediatrace Hop Number: 1 (host=responder1, ttl=254)
      Ingress Interface: Gi0/1
      Egress Interface: Gi1/0
    Mediatrace Hop Number: 2 (host=responder2, ttl=253)
      Ingress Interface: Gi0/1
      Egress Interface: Gi1/0
    Mediatrace Hop Number: 3 (host=responder3, ttl=252)
      Ingress Interface: Gi0/1
      Egress Interface: Gi0/2

The following example displays Mediatrace session data:

Router# show mediatrace session data 2
Session Index: 2
Global Session Id: 35325453
Session Operation State: Active
Bucket index: 1
Data Collection Summary:
  Request Timestamp: 13:02:47.969 PST Fri Jun 18 2010
  Request Status: Completed
  Number of hops responded (includes success/error/no-record): 3
  Number of hops with valid data report: 3
  Number of hops with error report: 0
  Number of hops with no data record: 0
Detailed Report of collected data:
  Last Route Change Timestamp: 
  Route Index: 0
    Number of Mediatrace hops in the path: 3
    Mediatrace Hop Number: 1 (host=responder1, ttl=254)
      Metrics Collection Status: Success
      Ingress Interface: Gi0/1
      Egress Interface: Gi1/0
      Metrics Collected:
        Collection timestamp: 13:04:57.781 PST Fri Jun 18 2010
        Octet input at Ingress (KB): 10982.720                  
        Octet output at Egress (KB): 11189.176
		  Pkts rcvd with err at Ingress (pkts): 0                 
        Pkts errored at Egress (pkts): 0                        
        Pkts discarded at Ingress (pkts): 0                     
        Pkts discarded at Egress (pkts): 0                      
        Ingress i/f speed (mbps): 1000.000000                   
        Egress i/f speed (mbps): 1000.000000                    
    Mediatrace Hop Number: 2 (host=responder2, ttl=253)
      Metrics Collection Status: Success
      Ingress Interface: Gi0/1
      Egress Interface: Gi1/0
      Metrics Collected:
        Collection timestamp: 13:04:57.792 PST Fri Jun 18 2010
        Octet input at Ingress (MB): 1805.552836                
        Octet output at Egress (MB): 1788.468650                
        Pkts rcvd with err at Ingress (pkts): 0                 
        Pkts errored at Egress (pkts): 0                        
        Pkts discarded at Ingress (pkts): 0                     
        Pkts discarded at Egress (pkts): 0                  
        Ingress i/f speed (mbps): 1000.000000                   
        Egress i/f speed (mbps): 1000.000000 

The following example displays application health information for the Mediatrace responder:

Router# show mediatrace responder app-health
Mediatrace App-Health Stats: 
   Number of all requests received: 0
   Time of the last request received: 
   Initiator ID of the last request received:  0
   Requests dropped due to queue full: 0
   Responder current max sessions: 45
   Responder current active sessions: 0
   Session down or tear down requests received: 0
   Session timed out and removed: 0
   HOPS requests received: 0
   VM dynamic polling requests received: 0
   VM dynamic polling failed: 0
   VM configless polling requests received: 0
   VM configless polling failed: 0
   SYSTEM data polling requests received: 0
   SYSTEM data polling requests failed: 0
   APP-HEALTH polling requests received: 0
   Route Change or Interface Change notices received: 0
   Last time Route Change or Interface Change:
   Unknown requests received: 0

The following example displays brief session information for the Mediatrace responder:

Router# show mediatrace responder sessions brief 
Local Responder configured session list: 
Current configured max sessions: 45
Current number of active sessions: 0
session-id initiator-name       src-ip          src-port   dst-ip          dst-port det-l
  2			host-18					10.10.10.2					200			10.10.10.8					200

Configuration Examples for Cisco Mediatrace

Example Basic Mediatrace Configuration

The topology for this example includes:

  • One Mediatrace initiator (10.10.12.2)
  • Two Mediatrace responders between:
    • A media source (10.10.130.2)
    • A destination (10.10.132.2)

In this example, there is an RTP traffic stream from the source (address=10.10.130.2, port=1000, to the destination (address=10.10.132.2, port=2000).

The basic configuration of the Mediatrace responder is as follows:

mediatrace responder
snmp-server community public RO

The basic configuration of the Mediatrace initiator is as follows:

mediatrace initiator source-ip 10.10.12.2
mediatrace profile system intf1
mediatrace profile perf-monitor rtp1
mediatrace path-specifier path1 destination ip 10.10.132.2 port 2000
 source ip 10.10.130.2 port 1000
mediatrace flow-specifier flow1
 source-ip 10.10.130.2 source-port 1000
 dest-ip 10.10.132.2 dest-port 2000
mediatrace session-params sp1
 response-timeout 10
 frequency 60 inactivity-timeout 180
mediatrace 1
 path-specifier path1
 session-params sp1
 profile perf-monitor rtp1 flow-specifier flow1
mediatrace schedule 1 life forever start-time now
mediatrace 2
 path-specifier path1
 session-params sp1
 profile system intf1
mediatrace schedule 2 life forever start-time now

Where to Go Next

For more information about configuring the products in the Medianet product family, see the other chapter in this guide or see the Cisco Media Monitoring Configuration Guide.

Additional References

Related Documents

Related Topic

Document Title

Design, configuration, and troubleshooting resources for Cisco Mediatrace and other Cisco Medianet products, including a Quick Start Guide and Deployment Guide.

See the Cisco Medianet Knowledge Base Portal, located at http://www.cisco.com/web/solutions/medianet/knowledgebase/index.html.

IP addressing commands: complete command syntax, command mode, command history, defaults, usage guidelines, and examples

Cisco Media Montoring Command Reference

Standards

Standard

Title

No new or modified standards are supported, and support for existing standards has not been modified

--

MIBs

MIB

MIBs Link

No new or modified MIBs are supported, and support for existing MIBs has not been modified

--

RFCs

RFC1

Title

RFC 2205

RSVP: Resource ReSerVation Protocol

http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2205.txt

1 These references are only a sample of the many RFCs available on subjects related to IP addressing and IP routing. Refer to the IETF RFC site at http://www.ietf.org/rfc.html for a full list of RFCs.

Technical Assistance

Description

Link

The Cisco Support website provides extensive online resources, including documentation and tools for troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with Cisco products and technologies.

To receive security and technical information about your products, you can subscribe to various services, such as the Product Alert Tool (accessed from Field Notices), the Cisco Technical Services Newsletter, and Really Simple Syndication (RSS) Feeds.

Access to most tools on the Cisco Support website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport

Feature Information for Cisco Mediatrace

The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Table 1 Feature Information for Cisco Mediatrace

Feature Name

Releases

Feature Information

Cisco Mediatrace 1.0

15.1(3)T

12.2(58)SE

15.1(4)M1

15.0(1)SY

15.1(1)SG

Cisco IOS XE Release 3.3 SG

This feature enables you to isolate and troubleshoot network degradation problems for data streams.

The following commands were introduced or modified by this feature: admin-params, clear mediatrace, incomplete-sessions, clock-rate (RTP parameters), dest-ip (flow), frequency (session parameters), history (session parameters), ip-protocol (flow), max-dropout, max-reorder, mediatrace, mediatrace initiator, mediatrace responder, mediatrace path-specifier, mediatrace poll, mediatrace profile perf-monitor, mediatrace profile system, mediatrace schedule, mediatrace session-params, metric-list (monitoring profile), metric-list (system profile), min-sequential, path-specifier, profile perf-monitor, profile system, response-timeout (session parameters), route-change reaction-time, sampling-interval, session-params, show mediatrace flow-specifier, show mediatrace initiator, show mediatrace path-specifier, show mediatrace profile system, show mediatrace profile perf-monitor, show mediatrace responder app-health, show mediatrace responder sessions, show mediatrace session, show mediatrace session-params, source-ip (flow), and source ip (path).

Cisco and the Cisco logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cisco and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. To view a list of Cisco trademarks, go to this URL: www.cisco.com/go/trademarks. Third-party trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company. (1110R)

Any Internet Protocol (IP) addresses and phone numbers used in this document are not intended to be actual addresses and phone numbers. Any examples, command display output, network topology diagrams, and other figures included in the document are shown for illustrative purposes only. Any use of actual IP addresses or phone numbers in illustrative content is unintentional and coincidental.

© 2012 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.