IP Routing: RIP Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS XE Release 3SE (Catalyst 3850 Switches)
IPv6 Routing: RIP for IPv6
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IPv6 Routing: RIP for IPv6

IPv6 Routing: RIP for IPv6

Last Updated: January 29, 2013

IPv6 RIP functions the same and offers the same benefits as RIP in IPv4. RIP enhancements for IPv6, detailed in RFC 2080, include support for IPv6 addresses and prefixes, and the use of the all-RIP-devices multicast group address FF02::9 as the destination address for RIP update messages.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Information About RIP for IPv6

RIP for IPv6

IPv6 RIP functions the same and offers the same benefits as RIP in IPv4. RIP enhancements for IPv6, detailed in RFC 2080, include support for IPv6 addresses and prefixes, and the use of the all-RIP-devices multicast group address FF02::9 as the destination address for RIP update messages.

In the Cisco software implementation of IPv6 RIP, each IPv6 RIP process maintains a local routing table, referred to as a Routing Information Database (RIB). The IPv6 RIP RIB contains a set of best-cost IPv6 RIP routes learned from all its neighboring networking devices. If IPv6 RIP learns the same route from two different neighbors, but with different costs, it will store only the lowest cost route in the local RIB. The RIB also stores any expired routes that the RIP process is advertising to its neighbors running RIP. IPv6 RIP will try to insert every non-expired route from its local RIB into the master IPv6 RIB. If the same route has been learned from a different routing protocol with a better administrative distance than IPv6 RIP, the RIP route will not be added to the IPv6 RIB but the RIP route will still exist in the IPv6 RIP RIB.

Nonstop Forwarding for IPv6 RIP

Cisco nonstop forwarding (NSF) continues forwarding packets while routing protocols converge, therefore avoiding a route flap on switchover. When an RP failover occurs, the Forwarding Information Base (FIB) marks installed paths as stale by setting a new epoch. Subsequently, the routing protocols reconverge and populate the RIB and FIB. Once all NSF routing protocols converge, any stale routes held in the FIB are removed. A failsafe timer is required to delete stale routes, in case of routing protocol failure to repopulate the RIB and FIB.

RIP registers as an IPv6 NSF client. Doing so has the benefit of using RIP routes installed in the Cisco Express Forwarding table until RIP has converged on the standby.

How to Configure RIP for IPv6

Enabling IPv6 RIP

Before You Begin

Before configuring the router to run IPv6 RIP, globally enable IPv6 using the ipv6 unicast-routing command in global configuration mode, and enable IPv6 on any interfaces on which IPv6 RIP is to be enabled.

If you want to set or change a global value, follow steps 1 and 2, and then use the optional ipv6 router ripcommand in global configuration mode.


SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    ipv6 unicast-routing

4.    interface type number

5.    ipv6 rip name enable


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
ipv6 unicast-routing


Example:

Router(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing

 

Enables the forwarding of IPv6 unicast datagrams.

 
Step 4
interface type number


Example:

Router(config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/0/0

 

Specifies the interface type and number, and enters interface configuration mode.

 
Step 5
ipv6 rip name enable


Example:

Router(config-if)# ipv6 rip process1 enable

 

Enables the specified IPv6 RIP routing process on an interface.

 

Customizing IPv6 RIP

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    ipv6 router rip word

4.    maximum-paths number-paths

5.    exit

6.    interface type number

7.    ipv6 rip name default-information {only | originate} [metric metric-value]


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
ipv6 router rip word


Example:

Router(config)# ipv6 router rip process1

 

Configures an IPv6 RIP routing process and enters router configuration mode for the IPv6 RIP routing process.

  • Use the wordargument to identify a specific IPv6 RIP routing process.
 
Step 4
maximum-paths number-paths


Example:

Router(config-router)# maximum-paths 1

 

(Optional) Defines the maximum number of equal-cost routes that IPv6 RIP can support.

  • The number-paths argument is an integer from 1 to 64. The default for RIP is four paths.
 
Step 5
exit


Example:

Router(config-if)# exit

 

Exits interface configuration mode and enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 6
interface type number


Example:

Router(config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/0/0

 

Specifies the interface type and number, and enters interface configuration mode.

 
Step 7
ipv6 rip name default-information {only | originate} [metric metric-value]


Example:

Router(config-if)# ipv6 rip process1 default-information originate

 

(Optional) Originates the IPv6 default route (::/0) into the specified RIP routing process updates sent out of the specified interface.

Note    To avoid routing loops after the IPv6 default route (::/0) is originated out of any interface, the routing process ignores all default routes received on any interface.
  • Specifying the only keyword originates the default route (::/0) but suppresses all other routes in the updates sent on this interface.
  • Specifying the originate keyword originates the default route (::/0) in addition to all other routes in the updates sent on this interface.
 

Verifying IPv6 RIP Configuration and Operation

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    show ipv6 rip [name][database| next-hops]

2.    show ipv6 route [ipv6-address| ipv6-prefix/prefix-length| protocol | interface-type interface-number]

3.    enable

4.    debug ipv6 rip [interface-type interface-number]


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
show ipv6 rip [name][database| next-hops]


Example:

Device> show ipv6 rip process1 database

 

(Optional) Displays information about current IPv6 RIP processes.

  • In this example, IPv6 RIP process database information is displayed for the specified IPv6 RIP process.
 
Step 2
show ipv6 route [ipv6-address| ipv6-prefix/prefix-length| protocol | interface-type interface-number]


Example:

Device> show ipv6 route rip

 

(Optional) Displays the current contents of the IPv6 routing table.

  • In this example, only IPv6 RIP routes are displayed.
 
Step 3
enable


Example:

Device> enable

 

Enables higher privilege levels, such as privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 4
debug ipv6 rip [interface-type interface-number]


Example:

Device# debug ipv6 rip

 

(Optional) Displays debugging messages for IPv6 RIP routing transactions.

 

Configuration Examples for RIP for IPv6

Example: Enabling the RIP for IPv6 Process

In the following example, the IPv6 RIP process named process1 is enabled on the router and on Gigabit Ethernet interface 0/0/0. The IPv6 default route (::/0) is advertised in addition to all other routes in router updates sent on Gigabit Ethernet interface 0/0/0. Additionally, BGP routes are redistributed into the RIP process named process1 according to a route map where routes that match a prefix list are also tagged. The number of parallel paths is set to one to allow the route tagging, and the IPv6 RIP timers are adjusted. A prefix list named eth0/0-in-flt filters inbound routing updates on Gigabit Ethernet interface 0/0/0.

ipv6 router rip process1
 maximum-paths 1
 redistribute bgp 65001 route-map bgp-to-rip
 distribute-list prefix-list eth0/0-in-flt in Gigabitethernet0/0/0
!
interface Gigabitethernet0/0/0
 ipv6 address 2001:DB8::/64 eui-64
 ipv6 rip process1 enable
 ipv6 rip process1 default-information originate
!
ipv6 prefix-list bgp-to-rip-flt seq 10 deny 2001:DB8:3::/16 le 128
ipv6 prefix-list bgp-to-rip-flt seq 20 permit 2001:DB8:1::/8 le 128
!
ipv6 prefix-list eth0/0-in-flt seq 10 deny ::/0
ipv6 prefix-list eth0/0-in-flt seq 15 permit ::/0 le 128
!
route-map bgp-to-rip permit 10
 match ipv6 address prefix-list bgp-to-rip-flt
 set tag 4

In the following example, output information about all current IPv6 RIP processes is displayed using the show ipv6 rip command:

Device> show ipv6 rip

RIP process "process1", port 521, multicast-group FF02::9, pid 62
     Administrative distance is 120. Maximum paths is 1
     Updates every 5 seconds, expire after 15
     Holddown lasts 10 seconds, garbage collect after 30
     Split horizon is on; poison reverse is off
     Default routes are generated
     Periodic updates 223, trigger updates 1
  Interfaces:
    Gigabitethernet0/0/0
  Redistribution:
    Redistributing protocol bgp 65001 route-map bgp-to-rip

In the following example, output information about a specified IPv6 RIP process database is displayed using the show ipv6 rip command with the name argument and the database keyword. In the following output for the IPv6 RIP process named process1, timer information is displayed, and route 2001:DB8::16/64 has a route tag set:

Device> show ipv6 rip process1 database

RIP process "process1", local RIB
 2001:DB8::/64, metric 2
     Gigabitethernet0/0/0/FE80::A8BB:CCFF:FE00:B00, expires in 13 secs
 2001:DB8::/16, metric 2 tag 4, installed
     Gigabitethernet0/0/0/FE80::A8BB:CCFF:FE00:B00, expires in 13 secs
 2001:DB8:1::/16, metric 2 tag 4, installed
     Gigabitethernet0/0/0/FE80::A8BB:CCFF:FE00:B00, expires in 13 secs
 2001:DB8:2::/16, metric 2 tag 4, installed
     Gigabitethernet0/0/0/FE80::A8BB:CCFF:FE00:B00, expires in 13 secs
 ::/0, metric 2, installed
     Gigabitethernet0/0/0FE80::A8BB:CCFF:FE00:B00, expires in 13 secs

In the following example, output information for a specified IPv6 RIP process is displayed using the show ipv6 rip command with the name argument and the next-hops keyword:

Device> show ipv6 rip process1 next-hops

RIP process "process1", Next Hops
  FE80::A8BB:CCFF:FE00:A00/Gigabitethernet0/0/0 [4 paths]

Additional References

Related Documents

Related Topic Document Title

IPv6 addressing and connectivity

IPv6 Configuration Guide

Configuring Routing Information Protocol

Cisco IOS XE IP Routing: RIP Configuration Guide

Cisco IOS commands

Cisco IOS Master Commands List, All Releases

IPv6 commands

Cisco IOS IPv6 Command Reference

Cisco IOS IPv6 features

Cisco IOS IPv6 Feature Mapping

Standards and RFCs

Standard/RFC Title

RFCs for IPv6

IPv6 RFCs

MIBs

MIB

MIBs Link

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs

Technical Assistance

Description Link

The Cisco Support and Documentation website provides online resources to download documentation, software, and tools. Use these resources to install and configure the software and to troubleshoot and resolve technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. Access to most tools on the Cisco Support and Documentation website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

http://www.cisco.com/cisco/web/support/index.html

Feature Information for RIP for IPv6

The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Table 1 Feature Information for RIP for IPv6
Feature Name Releases Feature Information

IPv6 Routing: RIP for IPv6 (RIPng)

12.2(2)T

12.2(17a)SX1

12.2(25)SEA

12.2(25)SG

12.2(33)SRA

12.3

15.0(2)SG

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.1

Cisco IOS XE Release 3.2.0SG

RIP enhancements for IPv6 include support for IPv6 addresses and prefixes, and the use of the all-RIP-devices multicast group address FF02::9 as the destination address for RIP update messages.

The following commands were introduced or modified: debug ipv6 rip, ipv6 rip default-information, ipv6 rip enable, ipv6 router rip, ipv6 unicast-routing, maximum-paths, show ipv6 rip, show ipv6 route.

IPv6: RIPng Nonstop Forwarding

12.2(33)SRE

15.0(1)S

15.0(1)SY

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.1

The IPv6 RIPng nonstop forwarding feature is supported.

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Any Internet Protocol (IP) addresses and phone numbers used in this document are not intended to be actual addresses and phone numbers. Any examples, command display output, network topology diagrams, and other figures included in the document are shown for illustrative purposes only. Any use of actual IP addresses or phone numbers in illustrative content is unintentional and coincidental.

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