IP Routing: RIP Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS Release 15S
IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support
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IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support

IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support

The IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support feature uses separate routing tables for every provider edge-customer edge (PE-CE) scenario, thus allowing improved route protection, modularity, and a potential reduction in the size of the routing table.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Information About IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support

IPv6 Routing: RIP for IPv6

IPv6 Routing Information Protocol (RIP) functions the same and offers the same benefits as IPv4 RIP. RIP enhancements for IPv6, detailed in RFC 2080, include support for IPv6 addresses and prefixes and the use of the all-RIP-devices multicast group address, FF02::9, as the destination address for RIP update messages.

IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support

When not in Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF) mode, every IPv6 Routing Information Protocol (RIP)—also know as RIP Next Generation (RIPng)—process and the configuration associated with it, keeps all the routes in the same routing table. In other routing protocols, it is often required to keep the protocol-related routes stored in separate routing tables.

The IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support feature enables isolation, modularity, and potential performance improvement by reducing the number of routes stored in a single routing table. It also allows a network administrator to create different RIP routing tables and share the same protocol configuration stored in a single RIP protocol configuration block.

How to Configure IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support

Configuring IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    enable

    2.    configure terminal

    3.    ipv6 unicast-routing

    4.    vrf definition vrf-name

    5.    address-family ipv6

    6.    exit

    7.    exit

    8.    ipv6 rip vrf-mode enable

    9.    ipv6 router rip rip-process-name

    10.    exit

    11.    interface type number

    12.    vrf forwarding vrf-name

    13.    ipv6 enable

    14.    ipv6 rip rip-process-name enable

    15.    end

    16.    debug ipv6 rip vrf vrf-name

    17.    show ipv6 rip vrf vrf-name next-hops

    18.    show ipv6 rip vrf vrf-name database


DETAILED STEPS
     Command or ActionPurpose
    Step 1 enable


    Example:
    Device> enable
     

    Enables privileged EXEC mode.

    • Enter your password if prompted.
     
    Step 2 configure terminal


    Example:
    Device # configure terminal
     

    Enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 3ipv6 unicast-routing


    Example:
    Device (config)# ipv6 unicast-routing
     

    Enables the forwarding of IPv6 unicast datagrams.

     
    Step 4vrf definition vrf-name


    Example:
    Device(config)# vrf definition vrf1
     

    Configures a virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) routing table instance and enters VRF configuration mode.

     
    Step 5address-family ipv6


    Example:
    Device(config-vrf)# address-family ipv6
     

    Enters VRF address family configuration mode and enables IPv6 address prefixes.

     
    Step 6exit


    Example:
    Device(config-vrf-af)# exit
     

    Exits VRF address family configuration mode and returns to VRF configuration mode.

     
    Step 7exit


    Example:
    Device(config-vrf)# exit
     

    Exits VRF configuration mode and returns to global configuration mode.

     
    Step 8 ipv6 rip vrf-mode enable


    Example:
    Device (config)# ipv6 rip vrf-mode enable
     

    Enables VRF support for IPv6 RIP routing and enters RTR entry configuration mode.

     
    Step 9 ipv6 router rip rip-process-name


    Example:
    Device (config)# ipv6 router rip myrip
     

    Creates an IPv6 Routing Information Protocol (RIP) routing process instance.

     
    Step 10 exit


    Example:
    Device (config-rtr)# exit
     

    Exits RTR entry configuration mode and returns to global configuration mode.

     
    Step 11 interface type number


    Example:
    Device (config)# interface Ethernet 0/0
     

    Specifies the interface type and number and enters interface configuration mode.

     
    Step 12vrf forwarding vrf-name


    Example:
    Device(config-if)# vrf forwarding vrf1
     

    Binds the interface to the specified VRF routing instance table and removes all the Layer 3 interface configuration that is available when the command is entered.

     
    Step 13ipv6 enable


    Example:
    Device(config-if)# ipv6 enable
     

    Enables IPv6 on the interface.

     
    Step 14ipv6 rip rip-process-name enable


    Example:
    Device(config-if)# ipv6 rip myrip enable
     

    Enables an IPv6 RIP routing process on the interface.

     
    Step 15end


    Example:
    Device (config-if)# end
     

    Exits interface configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

     
    Step 16debug ipv6 rip vrf vrf-name


    Example:
    Device# debug ipv6 rip vrf vrf1
     

    Displays debugging information related to VRF support for the specified IPv6 RIP VRF routing table instance.

     
    Step 17show ipv6 rip vrf vrf-name next-hops


    Example:
    Device# show ipv6 rip vrf vrf1 next-hops
     

    Displays the next hops in the specified VRF RIPng routing table.

     
    Step 18show ipv6 rip vrf vrf-name database


    Example:
    Device# show ipv6 rip vrf vrf1 database
     

    Displays the associated RIP local routing information base (RIB).

     

    Configuration Examples for IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support

    Example: Configuring IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support

    Device> enable
    Device# configure terminal 
    Device(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing
    Device(config)# vrf definition vrf1 
    Device(config-vrf)# address-family ipv6
    Device(config-vrf-af)# exit
    Device(config-vrf)# exit
    Device(config)# ipv6 rip vrf-mode enable 
    Device(config)# ipv6 router rip myrip
    Device(config-rtr)# exit
    Device(config)# interface Ethernet 0/0
    Device(config-if)# vrf forwarding vrf1
    Device(config-if)# ipv6 enable
    Device(config-if)# ipv6 rip myrip enable 
    Device(config-if)# end
    
    

    Example: Verifying IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support

    Device> debug ipv6 rip vrf vrf1
    
    RIP Routing Protocol debugging is on for vrf vrf1
    Sending:
    *Mar 15 11:23:08.508: RIPng: Sending multicast update on Ethernet0/0 for vrf for vrf vrf1
    *Mar 15 11:23:08.508: src=2001:DB8:0:1:FFFF:1234::5
    *Mar 15 11:23:08.508: dst=2001:DB8:0:1::1 (Ethernet0/0)
    *Mar 15 11:23:08.508: sport=521, dport=521, length=52
    *Mar 15 11:23:08.508: command=2, version=1, mbz=0, #rte=2
    *Mar 15 11:23:08.508: tag=0, metric=1, prefix=6000::/64
    *Mar 15 11:23:08.508: tag=0, metric=1, prefix=2000::/64
    *Mar 15 11:23:08.508: RIPng: Packet waiting
    *Mar 15 11:23:08.508: RIPng: Process vrf received own response on Loopback1
    Receiving
    *Mar 15 11:23:20.316: RIPng: Packet waiting
    *Mar 15 11:23:20.316: RIPng: response received from FE80::A8BB:CCFF:FE00:7C00 on Ethernet0/0
    for vrf
    *Mar 15 11:23:20.316: src=2001:DB8:0:1:FFFF:1234::4 (Ethernet0/0)
    *Mar 15 11:23:20.316: dst=2001:DB8::1
    *Mar 15 11:23:20.316: sport=521, dport=521, length=32
    *Mar 15 11:23:20.316: command=2, version=1, mbz=0, #rte=1
    *Mar 15 11:23:20.316: tag=0, metric=1, prefix=AAAA::/64
    

    Device> show ipv6 rip vrf vrf1	database
    
    RIP VRF "vrf1", local RIB
    FE80::A8BB:CCFF:FE00:7C00/Ethernet0/0 [1 paths]
    
    

    Device> show ipv6 rip vrf vrf1 next-hops
    
    RIP VRF "vrf1", Next Hops
     AAAA::/64, metric 2, installed
    Ethernet0/0/FE80::A8BB:CCFF:FE00:7C00, expires in 177 secs
    

    Additional References for IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support

    Related Documents

    Related Topic Document Title

    Cisco IOS Commands

    Cisco IOS Master Command List, All Releases

    IP Routing: RIP commands

    Cisco IOS IP Routing: RIP Command Reference

    IPv6 Routing: RIP for IPv6

    Cisco IOS IP Routing: RIP Configuration Guide

    Standards and RFCs

    Standard/RFC Title

    RFC 2080

    RIPng for IPv6

    Technical Assistance

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    Feature Information for IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support

    The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

    Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

    Table 1 IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support

    Feature Name

    Releases

    Feature Information

    IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support

    15.3(3)M

    When not virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) aware, IPv6 Routing Information Protocol (RIP), also known as RIP Next Generation (RIPng), works only with routes that are available in the default global routing table. When operating in VRF mode, RIPng, creates a separate routing table for each VRF instance. The IPv6: RIPng VRF-Aware Support feature enables the availability of separate routing tables for every provider edge-customer edge (PE-CE) scenario, thus allowing improved route protection, modularity, and a potential reduction in the size of the routing table.

    The following commands were introduced or modified: clear ipv6 rip,debug ipv6 rip , ipv6 rip vrf-mode enable, and show ipv6 rip.