Interface and Hardware Component Command Reference, Cisco IOS XE Release 3SE (Catalyst 3850 Switches)
show hw-module slot tech-support through show interfaces vg-anylan
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show hw-module slot tech-support through show interfaces vg-anylan

show hw-module slot tech-support through show interfaces vg-anylan

show interfaces

To display statistics for all interfaces configured on the router or access server, use the show interfaces command in privileged EXEC mode.

Cisco 2500 Series, Cisco 2600 Series, Cisco 4700 Series, and Cisco 7000 Series

show interfaces [ type number ] [first] [last] [accounting]

Catalyst 6500 Series, Cisco 7200 Series and Cisco 7500 Series with a Packet over SONET Interface Processor

show interfaces [ type slot/port ] [ accounting | counters protocol status | crb | dampening | description | dot1ad | etherchannel [ module number ] | fair-queue | irb | mac-accounting | mpls-exp | precedence | random-detect | rate-limit | stats | summary | switching | utilization { type number } ]

Cisco 7500 Series with Ports on VIPs

show interfaces [ type slot/port-adapter/port ]

Cisco 7600 Series

show interfaces [ type number | null interface-number | vlan vlan-id ]

Channelized T3 Shared Port Adapters

show interfaces serial [ slot/subslot/port/t1-num : channel-group ]

Shared Port Adapters

show interfaces type [ slot/subslot/port [ /sub-int ] ]

Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Interface type. Allowed values for type can be atm, async,

auto-template, bvi, bri0, ctunnel, container, dialer, e1, esconPhy, ethernet, fastethernet, fcpa, fddi, filter, filtergroup, gigabitethernet, ge-wan, hssi, longreachethernet, loopback, mfr, multilink, module,null, posport-channel,

, port-group, pos-channel, sbc, sdcc, serial, sysclock, t1, tengigabitethernet, token, tokenring, tunnel, vif, vmi, virtual-access, virtual-ppp, virtual-template, virtual-tokenring. voaBypassIn, voaBypassOut, voaFilterIn, voaFilterOut, voaIn, voaOut.

Note   

The type of interfaces available is based on the type of router used.

number

(Optional) Port number on the selected interface.

first last

(Optional) For Cisco 2500 series routers, ISDN Basic Rate Interfae (BRI) only. The first argument can be either 1 or 2. The last argument can only be 2, indicating B channels 1 and 2.

D-channel information is obtained by using the command without the optional arguments.

accounting

(Optional) Displays the number of packets of each protocol type that have been sent through the interface.

counters protocol status

(Optional) Displays the current status of the protocol counters enabled.

crb

(Optional) Displays interface routing or bridging information.

dampening

(Optional) Displays interface dampening information.

description

(Optional) Displays the interface description.

etherchannel [modulenumber]

(Optional) Displays interface Ether Channel information.

  • module --The module keyword limits the display to interfaces available on the module.

fair-queue

(Optional) Displays interface Weighted Fair Queueing (WFQ) information.

irb

(Optional) Displays interface routing or bridging information.

mac-accounting

(Optional) Displays interface MAC accounting information.

mpls-exp

(Optional) Displays interface Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) experimental accounting information.

precedence

(Optional) Displays interface precedence accounting information.

random-detect

(Optional) Displays interface Weighted Random Early Detection (WRED) information.

rate-limit

(Optional) Displays interface rate-limit information.

stats

(Optional) Displays interface packets and octets, in and out, by using switching path.

summary

(Optional) Displays an interface summary.

switching

(Optional) Displays interface switching.

null interface-number

(Optional) Specifies the null interface, that is 0.

slot

(Optional) Slot number.

Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for slot information.

/ port

(Optional) Port number.

Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for port information.

/ port-adapter

(Optional) Port adapter number. Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for information about port adapter compatibility.

slot / subslot / port / t1-num : channel-group

(Optional) Channelized T3 Shared Port Adapters

Number of the chassis slot that contains the channelized T3 Shared Port Adapters (SPA) (for example, 5/0/0:23), where:

  • slot --(Optional) Chassis slot number.

For SPA interface processors (SIPs), refer to the platform-specific SPA hardware installation guide or the corresponding “Identifying Slots and Subslots for SIPs and SPAs” topic in the platform-specific SPA software configuration guide.

  • / subslot-- (Optional) Secondary slot number on a SIP where a SPA is installed.

Refer to the platform-specific SPA hardware installation guide and the corresponding “Specifying the Interface Address on a SPA” topic in the platform-specific SPA software configuration guide for subslot information.

  • / port --(Optional) Port or interface number.

For SPAs, refer to the corresponding “Specifying the Interface Address on a SPA” topic in the platform-specific SPA software configuration guide.

  • / t1-num-- (Optional) T1 time slot in the T3 line. The value can be from 1 to 28.
  • : channel-group-- (Optional) Number 0-23 of the DS0 link on the T1 channel.

[slot/subslot/port/sub-int]]

(Optional) Shared Port Adapters

Number of the chassis slot that contains the SPA interface (for example, 4/3/0), where:

  • slot --(Optional) Chassis slot number.

For SIPs, refer to the platform-specific SPA hardware installation guide or the corresponding “Identifying Slots and Subslots for SIPs and SPAs” topic in the platform-specific SPA software configuration guide.

  • / subslot-- (Optional)Secondary slot number on a SIP where a SAP is installed.

Refer to the platform-specific SPA hardware installation guide and the corresponding “Specifying the Interface Address on a SPA” topic in the platform-specific SPA software configuration guide for subslot information.

  • / port --(Optional) Port or interface number.

For SPAs, refer to the corresponding “Specifying the Interface Address on a SPA” topics in the platform-specific SPA software configuration guide.

  • / sub-int -- (Optional) Subinterface number (for those SPAs that support subinterface configuration).

vlan vlan-id

(Optional) Specifies the VLAN ID; valid values are from 1 to 4094.

Command Modes

User EXEC (>)

Privileged EXEC (#)

Command History

Release

Modification

10.0

This command was introduced.

12.0(3)T

This command was modified to include support for flow-based WRED .

12.0(4)T

This command was modified to include enhanced display information for dialer bound interfaces.

12.0(7)T

This command was modified to include dialer as an interface type and to reflect the default behavior.

12.2(14)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(14)S.

12.2(20)S2

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(20)S2 and introduced a new address format and output for SPA interfaces on the Cisco 7304 router. The subslot argument was introduced.

12.2(25)S3

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)S3.

12.2(14)SX

This command was modified. Support for this command was added for the Supervisor Engine 720.

12.2(17d)SXB

This command was modified. Support for this command on the Supervisor Engine 2 was extended to Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX. The uplink dual-mode port information was updated.

12.2(18)SXE

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXE to support SPAs on the Cisco 7600 series routers and Catalyst 6500 series switches.

2.2(33)SXJ01

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXJ01.

12.0(31)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(31)S to support SPAs on the Cisco 12000 series routers, and the tengigabitethernet interface type was added. 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces were introduced with the release of the 1-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet SPA.

12.2(18)SXF

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXF.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SRB1

This command was updated to display operational status for Gigabit Ethernet interfaces that are configured as primary and backup interfaces (Cisco 7600 series routers).

12.2(31)SB

This command was integrated in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB.

12.2(33)SB

This command was modified. The default value of the command was modified on the Cisco 10000 series router for the PRE3 and PRE4.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.5

This command was implemented on Cisco ASR 1000 Series Aggregation Services Routers.

12.2(50)SY

This command was integrated in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(50)SY and the dot1ad keyword was added.

15.1(01)SY

This command was integrated in Cisco IOS Release 15.1(50)SY.

Usage Guidelines

Display Interpretation

The show interfaces command displays statistics for the network interfaces. The resulting output varies, depending on the network for which an interface has been configured. The resulting display on the Cisco 7200 series routers shows the interface processors in slot order. If you add interface processors after booting the system, they will appear at the end of the list, in the order in which they were inserted.

Information About Specific Interfaces

The number argument designates the module and port number. If you use the show interfaces command on the Cisco 7200 series routers without the slot/port arguments, information for all interface types will be shown. For example, if you type show interfaces you will receive information for all Ethernet, serial, Token Ring, and FDDI interfaces. Only by adding the type slot/port argument you can specify a particular interface.

Cisco 7600 Series Routers

Valid values for the number argument depend on the specified interface type and the chassis and module that are used. For example, if you specify a Gigabit Ethernet interface and have a 48-port 10/100BASE-T Ethernet module that is installed in a 13-slot chassis, valid values for the module number are from 1 to 13 and valid values for the port number are from 1 to 48.

The port channels from 257 to 282 are internally allocated and are supported on the Content Switching Module (CSM) and the Firewall Services Module (FWSM) only.

Statistics are collected on a per-VLAN basis for Layer 2-switched packets and Layer 3-switched packets. Statistics are available for both unicast and multicast traffic. The Layer 3-switched packet counts are available for both ingress and egress directions. The per-VLAN statistics are updated every 5 seconds.

In some cases, you might see a difference in the duplex mode that is displayed between the show interfaces command and the show running-configcommands. In this case, the duplex mode that is displayed in the show interfaces command is the actual duplex mode that the interface is running. The show interfaces command shows the operating mode for an interface, and the show running-config command shows the configured mode for an interface.

If you do not enter any keywords, all counters for all modules are displayed.

Command Variations

You will use the show interfaces command frequently while configuring and monitoring devices. The various forms of the show interfaces commands are described in detail in the sections that follow.

Dialer Interfaces Configured for Binding

If you use the show interfaces command on dialer interfaces configured for binding, the display will report statistics on each physical interface bound to the dialer interface; see the following examples for more information.

Removed Interfaces

If you enter a show interfaces command for an interface type that has been removed from the router or access server, interface statistics will be displayed accompanied by the following text: “Hardware has been removed.”

Weighted Fair Queueing Information

If you use the show interfaces command on a router or access server for which interfaces are configured to use weighted fair queueing through the fair-queue interface command, additional information is displayed. This information consists of the current and high-water mark number of flows.

Cisco 10000 Series Router

In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SB, when a multilink PPP (MLP) interface is down/down, its default bandwidth rate is the sum of the serial interface bandwidths associated with the MLP interface.

In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB, the default bandwidth rate is 64 Kbps.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show interfaces command. Because your display will depend on the type and number of interface cards in your router or access server, only a portion of the display is shown.


Note


If an asterisk (*) appears after the throttles counter value, it means that the interface was throttled at the time the command was run.


Router# show interfaces
Ethernet 0 is up, line protocol is up
  Hardware is MCI Ethernet, address is 0000.0c00.750c (bia 0000.0c00.750c)
  Internet address is 10.108.28.8, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000 Kbit, DLY 100000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
  Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec)
  ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 4:00:00
  Last input 0:00:00, output 0:00:00, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters 0:00:00
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
  Five minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  Five minute output rate 2000 bits/sec, 4 packets/sec
     1127576 packets input, 447251251 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 354125 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 57186* throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     5332142 packets output, 496316039 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 432 collisions, 0 interface resets, 0 restarts
.
.
.

Examples

The following example shows partial sample output when custom output queueing is enabled:

Router# show interfaces
Last clearing of “show interface” counters 0:00:06
Input queue: 0/75/0 (size/max/drops); Total output drops: 21
Output queues: (queue #: size/max/drops)
     0: 14/20/14  1: 0/20/6  2: 0/20/0 3: 0/20/0 4: 0/20/0 5: 0/20/0 
     6: 0/20/0 7: 0/20/0  8: 0/20/0  9: 0/20/0  10: 0/20/0  
.
.
.

When custom queueing is enabled, the drops accounted for in the output queues result from bandwidth limitation for the associated traffic and lead to queue length overflow. Total output drops include drops on all custom queues and the system queue. Fields are described with the weighted fair queueing output in the table below.

Examples

For each interface on the router or access server configured to use weighted fair queueing, the show interfaces command displays the information beginning with Inputqueue: in the following display:

Router# show interfaces
Ethernet 0 is up, line protocol is up
  Hardware is MCI Ethernet, address is 0000.0c00.750c (bia 0000.0c00.750c)
  Internet address is 10.108.28.8, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000 Kbit, DLY 100000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
  Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec)
  ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 4:00:00
  Last input 0:00:00, output 0:00:00, output hang never
  Last clearing of “show interface” counters 0:00:00
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
  Five minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  Five minute output rate 2000 bits/sec, 4 packets/sec
     1127576 packets input, 447251251 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 354125 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 57186* throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     5332142 packets output, 496316039 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 432 collisions, 0 interface resets, 0 restarts
Input queue: 0/75/0 (size/max/drops); Total output drops: 0
Output queue: 7/64/0 (size/threshold/drops)
				     Conversations 2/9 (active/max active)

The table below describes the input queue and output queue fields shown in the preceding two displays.

Table 1 Weighted-Fair-Queueing Output Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Input Queue

size

Current size of the input queue.

max

Maximum size of the queue.

drops

Number of messages discarded in this interval.

Total output drops

Total number of messages discarded in this session.

Output Queue

size

Current size of the output queue.

threshold

Congestive-discard threshold. Number of messages in the queue after which new messages for high-bandwidth conversations are dropped.

drops

Number of dropped messages.

Conversations: active

Number of currently active conversations.

Conversations: max active

Maximum number of concurrent conversations allowed.

Examples

To display the number of packets of each protocol type that have been sent through all configured interfaces, use the show interfaces accounting command. When you use the accounting option, only the accounting statistics are displayed.


Note


Except for protocols that are encapsulated inside other protocols, such as IP over X.25, the accounting option also shows the total bytes sent and received, including the MAC header. For example, it totals the size of the Ethernet packet or the size of a packet that includes High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC) encapsulation.


Per-packet accounting information is kept for the following protocols:

  • AppleTalk
  • Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) (for IP, Frame Relay, Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS))
  • Connectionless Network Service (CLNS)
  • Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) Maintenance Operations Protocol (MOP)

The routers use MOP packets to advertise their existence to Digital Equipment Corporation machines that use the MOP. A router periodically broadcasts MOP packets to identify itself as a MOP host. This results in MOP packets being counted, even when DECnet is not being actively used.

  • DECnet
  • HP Probe
  • IP
  • LAN Manager (LAN Network Manager and IBM Network Manager)
  • Novell
  • Serial Tunnel Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC)
  • Spanning Tree
  • SR Bridge
  • Transparent Bridge

Examples

The following is sample output from the show interfaces command when distributed WRED (DWRED) is enabled on an interface. Notice that the packet drop strategy is listed as “VIP-based weighted RED.”

Router# show interfaces hssi 0/0/0
Hssi0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up
  Hardware is cyBus HSSI
  Description: 45Mbps to R1
Internet address is 10.200.14.250/30
MTU 4470 bytes, BW 45045 Kbit, DLY 200 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec)
Last input 00:00:02, output 00:00:03, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
Queueing strategy: fifo
Packet Drop strategy: VIP-based weighted RED
Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
1976 packets input, 131263 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 1577 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants
0 parity
4 input errors, 4 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
1939 packets output, 130910 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 applique, 3 interface resets
0 output buffers copied, 0 interrupts, 0 failures

Examples

The following is sample output from the show interfaces command for serial interface 2 when Airline Control (ALC) Protocol is enabled:

Router# show interfaces serial 2
Serial2 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is CD2430
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 115 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
Encapsulation ALC, loopback not set
Full-duplex enabled.
     ascus in UP state: 42, 46
     ascus in DOWN state: 
     ascus DISABLED: 
Last input never, output never, output hang never
Last clearing of “show interface” counters never
Queueing strategy: fifo
Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants
0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 3 interface resets
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
DCD=down  DSR=down  DTR=down  RTS=down  CTS=down

Examples

The following is sample output from the show interfaces command for an SDLC primary interface supporting the SDLC function:

Router# show interfaces
Serial 0 is up, line protocol is up
 Hardware is MCI Serial
 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
 Encapsulation SDLC-PRIMARY, loopback not set
      Timers (msec): poll pause 100 fair poll 500. Poll limit 1
      [T1 3000, N1 12016, N2 20, K 7] timer: 56608 Last polled device: none
      SDLLC [ma: 0000.0C01.14--, ring: 7 bridge: 1, target ring: 10
             largest token ring frame 2052]
SDLC addr C1 state is CONNECT
       VS 6, VR 3, RCNT 0, Remote VR 6, Current retransmit count 0
       Hold queue: 0/12 IFRAMEs 77/22 RNRs 0/0 SNRMs 1/0 DISCs 0/0
       Poll: clear, Poll count: 0, chain: p: C1 n: C1
       SDLLC [largest SDLC frame: 265, XID: disabled]
  Last input 00:00:02, output 00:00:01, output hang never
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
  Five minute input rate 517 bits/sec, 30 packets/sec
  Five minute output rate 672 bits/sec, 20 packets/sec
       357 packets input, 28382 bytes, 0 no buffer
       Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants
       0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
       926 packets output, 77274 bytes, 0 underruns
       0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets, 0 restarts
       2 carrier transitions

The table below shows the fields relevant to all SDLC connections.

Table 2  show interfaces Field Descriptions When SDLC Is Enabled

Field

Description

Timers (msec)

List of timers in milliseconds.

poll pause, fair poll, Poll limit

Current values of these timers.

T1, N1, N2, K

Current values for these variables.

The table below shows other data given for each SDLC secondary interface configured to be attached to this interface.

Table 3 SDLC Field Descriptions

Field

Description

addr

Address of this secondary interface.

State

Current state of this connection. The possible values follow:

  • BOTHBUSY--Both sides have told each other that they are temporarily unable to receive any more information frames.
  • CONNECT--A normal connect state exists between this router and this secondary.
  • DISCONNECT--No communication is being attempted to this secondary.
  • DISCSENT--This router has sent a disconnect request to this secondary and is awaiting its response.
  • ERROR--This router has detected an error, and is waiting for a response from the secondary acknowledging this.
  • SNRMSENT--This router has sent a connect request (SNRM) to this secondary and is awaiting its response.
  • THEMBUSY--This secondary has told this router that it is temporarily unable to receive any more information frames.
  • USBUSY--This router has told this secondary that it is temporarily unable to receive any more information frames.

VS

Sequence number of the next information frame this station sends.

VR

Sequence number of the next information frame from this secondary that this station expects to receive.

RCNT

Number of correctly sequenced I-frames received when the Cisco IOS software was in a state in which it is acceptable to receive I-frames.

Remote VR

Last frame transmitted by this station that has been acknowledged by the other station.

Current retransmit count

Number of times the current I-frame or sequence of I-frames has been retransmitted.

Hold queue

Number of frames in hold queue/Maximum size of hold queue.

IFRAMEs, RNRs, SNRMs, DISCs

Sent and received count for these frames.

Poll

“Set” if this router has a poll outstanding to the secondary; “clear” if it does not.

Poll count

Number of polls, in a row, given to this secondary at this time.

chain

Shows the previous (p) and next (n) secondary address on this interface in the round-robin loop of polled devices.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show interfaces accounting command:

Router# show interfaces accounting
Interface TokenRing0 is disabled
Ethernet0
                Protocol    Pkts In   Chars In   Pkts Out  Chars Out
                      IP     873171  735923409      34624    9644258
                  Novell     163849   12361626      57143    4272468
                 DEC MOP          0          0          1         77
                     ARP      69618    4177080       1529      91740
Interface Serial0 is disabled
Ethernet1
                Protocol    Pkts In   Chars In   Pkts Out  Chars Out
                      IP          0          0         37      11845
                  Novell          0          0       4591     275460
                 DEC MOP          0          0          1         77
                     ARP          0          0          7        420
Interface Serial1 is disabled
Interface Ethernet2 is disabled
Interface Serial2 is disabled
Interface Ethernet3 is disabled
Interface Serial3 is disabled
Interface Ethernet4 is disabled
Interface Ethernet5 is disabled
Interface Ethernet6 is disabled
Interface Ethernet7 is disabled
Interface Ethernet8 is disabled
Interface Ethernet9 is disabled
Fddi0
                Protocol    Pkts In   Chars In   Pkts Out  Chars Out
                  Novell          0          0        183      11163
                     ARP          1         49          0          0

When the output indicates that an interface is “ disabled,” the router has received excessive errors (over 5000 in a keepalive period).

Examples

The following is sample output from the show interfaces command issued for the serial interface 1 for which flow-based WRED is enabled. The output shows that there are 8 active flow-based WRED flows, that the maximum number of flows active at any time is 9, and that the maximum number of possible flows configured for the interface is 16:

Router# show interfaces serial 1
Serial1 is up, line protocol is up 
  Hardware is HD64570
  Internet address is 10.1.2.1/24
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec,
Reliability 255/255, txload 237/255, rxload 1/255
  Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set
  Keepalive not set
  Last input 00:00:22, output 00:00:00, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:17:58
  Input queue: 0/75/0 (size/max/drops); Total output drops: 2479
Queueing strategy: random early detection(RED)
    flows (active/max active/max): 8/9/16
    mean queue depth: 27
    drops: class  random   tail     min-th   max-th   mark-prob 
           0      946      0        20       40       1/10
           1      488      0        22       40       1/10
           2      429      0        24       40       1/10
           3      341      0        26       40       1/10
           4      235      0        28       40       1/10
           5      40       0        31       40       1/10
           6      0        0        33       40       1/10
           7      0        0        35       40       1/10
           rsvp   0        0        37       40       1/10
  30 second input rate 1000 bits/sec, 2 packets/sec
  30 second output rate 119000 bits/sec, 126 packets/sec
     1346 packets input, 83808 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 12 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     84543 packets output, 9977642 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 6 interface resets
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
     0 carrier transitions
     DCD=up  DSR=up  DTR=up  RTS=up  CTS=up

Examples

The following is sample output from the show interfaces command when distributed weighted fair queueing (DWFQ) is enabled on an interface. Notice that the queueing strategy is listed as “VIP-based fair queueing.”

Router# show interfaces fastethernet 1/1/0
Fast Ethernet 1/1/0 is up, line protocol is up
  Hardware is cyBus Fast Ethernet Interface, address is 0007.f618.4448 (bia 00e0)
  Description: pkt input i/f for WRL tests (to pagent)
  Internet address is 10.0.2.70/24
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 100000 Kbit, DLY 100 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
  Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive not set, fdx, 100BaseTX/FX
  ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
  Last input never, output 01:11:01, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters 01:12:31
  Queueing strategy: VIP-based fair queueing
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
  30 second input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  30 second output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     0 watchdog, 0 multicast
     0 input packets with dribble condition detected
     1 packets output, 60 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
     0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
     0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier
     0 output buffers copied, 0 interrupts, 0 failures

Examples

When the show interfaces command is issued on an unbound dialer interface, the output looks as follows:

Router# show interfaces dialer 0  
Dialer0 is up (spoofing), line protocol is up (spoofing)
  Hardware is Unknown
  Internet address is 10.1.1.2/8
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 64 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 3/255
  Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set
  DTR is pulsed for 1 seconds on reset
  Last input 00:00:34, output never, output hang never
  Last clearing of “show interface” counters 00:05:09
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 1000 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     18 packets input, 2579 bytes
     14 packets output, 5328 bytes

But when the show interfaces command is issued on a bound dialer interface, you will get an additional report that indicates the binding relationship. The output is shown here:

Router# show interfaces dialer 0
Dialer0 is up, line protocol is up 
  Hardware is Unknown
  Internet address is 10.1.1.2/8
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 64 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
  Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set
  DTR is pulsed for 1 seconds on reset
  Interface is bound to BRI0:1
  Last input 00:00:38, output never, output hang never
  Last clearing of “show interface” counters 00:05:36
Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     38 packets input, 4659 bytes
     34 packets output, 9952 bytes
Bound to:
BRI0:1 is up, line protocol is up 
  Hardware is BRI
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 64 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
  Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set, keepalive not set
  Interface is bound to Dialer0 (Encapsulation PPP)
  LCP Open, multilink Open
  Last input 00:00:39, output 00:00:11, output hang never
  Last clearing of “show interface” counters never
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     78 packets input, 9317 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 65 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     93 packets output, 9864 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 7 interface resets
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
     4 carrier transitions

At the end of the Dialer0 output, the show interfaces command is executed on each physical interface bound to it.

The following is sample output from the show interfaces dialer stats command:

Router# show interfaces dialer 0 stats
Dialer0 
  Switching path    Pkts In   Chars In   Pkts Out  Chars Out
       Processor          0          0          6       1694
       Route cache  2522229  610372530     720458  174343542
             Total  2522229  610372530     720464  174345236

Examples

In this example, the physical interface is the B1 channel of the BRI0 link. This example also illustrates that the output under the B channel keeps all hardware counts that are not displayed under any logical or virtual access interface. The line in the report that states “Interface is bound to Dialer0 (Encapsulation LAPB)” indicates that the B interface is bound to Dialer0 and the encapsulation running over this connection is Link Access Procedure, Balanced (LAPB), not PPP, which is the encapsulation configured on the D interface and inherited by the B channel.

Router# show interfaces bri0:1
BRI0:1 is up, line protocol is up 
  Hardware is BRI
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 64 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
  Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set, keepalive not set
  
Interface is bound to Dialer0 (Encapsulation LAPB)
  LCP Open, multilink Open
  Last input 00:00:31, output 00:00:03, output hang never
  Last clearing of “show interface” counters never
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 1 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 1 packets/sec
     110 packets input, 13994 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 91 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     135 packets output, 14175 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 12 interface resets
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
     8 carrier transitions

Any protocol configuration and states should be displayed from the Dialer0 interface.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show interfaces fastethernet command for the second interface (port 1) in a 4-Port 10/100 Fast Ethernet SPA located in the bottom subslot (1) of the Modular Service Cards (MSC) that is installed in slot 2 on a Cisco 7304 router:

Router# show interfaces fastethernet 2/1/1
FastEthernet2/1/1 is up, line protocol is up 
  Hardware is SPA-4FE-7304, address is 00b0.64ff.5d80 (bia 00b0.64ff.5d80)
  Internet address is 192.168.50.1/24
  MTU 9216 bytes, BW 100000 Kbit, DLY 100 usec, 
     reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
  Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set
  Keepalive set (10 sec)
  Full-duplex, 100Mb/s, 100BaseTX/FX
ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
  Last input 00:00:22, output 00:00:02, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
  Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     5 packets input, 320 bytes
     Received 1 broadcasts (0 IP multicast)
     0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
     0 watchdog
     0 input packets with dribble condition detected
     8 packets output, 529 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets
     0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
     2 lost carrier, 0 no carrier
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

Examples

Router# show interfaces e4/0
Ethernet4/0 is up, line protocol is up
  Hardware is AmdP2, address is 000b.bf30.f470 (bia 000b.bf30.f470)
  Internet address is 10.1.1.9/24
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000 Kbit, RxBW 5000 Kbit, DLY 1000 usec,
     reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 254/255 
  Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set
  Keepalive set (10 sec)
  ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
  Last input 00:00:00, output 00:00:01, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:03:36
  Input queue: 34/75/0/819 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
  30 second input rate 7138000 bits/sec, 14870 packets/sec
  30 second output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     3109298 packets input, 186557880 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 217 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
     0 input packets with dribble condition detected
     22 packets output, 1320 bytes, 0 underruns
     11 output errors, 26 collisions, 0 interface resets
     0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
     0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

The table below describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 4 show interfaces fastethernet Field Descriptions--Fast Ethernet SPA

Field

Description

Fast Ethernet...is up ...is administratively down

Indicates whether the interface hardware is currently active and if it has been taken down by an administrator.

line protocol is

Indicates whether the software processes that handle the line protocol consider the line usable or if it has been taken down by an administrator.

Hardware

Hardware type (for example, SPA-4FE-7304) and MAC address.

Description

Alphanumeric string identifying the interface. This appears only if the description interface configuration command has been configured on the interface.

Internet address

Internet address followed by subnet mask.

MTU

Maximum transmission unit of the interface. The default is 1500 bytes for the 4-Port 10/100 Fast Ethernet SPA.

BW

Bandwidth of the interface in kilobits per second.

RxBW

Receiver bandwidth of the interface, in kilobits per second. This value is displayed only when an interface has asymmetric receiver and transmitter rates.

DLY

Delay of the interface in microseconds.

reliability

Reliability of the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is 100 percent reliability), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

txload, rxload

Load on the interface (in the transmit “tx” and receive “rx” directions) as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is completely saturated), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

Encapsulation

Encapsulation method assigned to the interface.

loopback

Indicates whether loopback is set.

Keepalive

Indicates whether keepalives are set, and the time interval.

Half-duplex, Full-duplex

Indicates the duplex mode for the interface.

100Mb/s, 10Mb/s

Speed of the interface in megabits per second.

100BaseTX/FX

Media protocol standard.

ARP type:

Type of ARP assigned and the timeout period.

Last input

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds since the last packet was successfully received by an interface and processed locally on the router. Useful for knowing when a dead interface failed.

This field is not updated by fast-switched traffic.

output

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds since the last packet was successfully transmitted by the interface. Useful for knowing when a dead interface failed.

output hang

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds (or never) since the interface was last reset because of a transmission that took too long. When the number of hours in any of the “last” fields exceeds 24 hours, the number of days and hours is displayed. If that field overflows, asterisks are printed.

Note   

This field does not apply to SPA interfaces.

Last clearing

Time at which the counters that measure cumulative statistics (such as number of bytes transmitted and received) shown in this report were last reset to zero. Note that variables that might affect routing (for example, load and reliability) are not cleared when the counters are cleared.

A series of asterisks (***) indicates the elapsed time is too large to be displayed.

0:00:00 indicates the counters were cleared more than 231 ms (and less than 232 ms) ago.

Input queue (size/max/drops/flushes)

Packet statistics on the input queue reported as:

  • Size--Number of packets in the input queue.
  • Max--Maximum size of the queue.
  • Drops--Number of packets dropped because of a full input queue.
  • Flushes--Number of packets dropped as part of selective packet discard (SPD). SPD implements a selective packet drop policy on the router’s IP process queue. Therefore, it applies only to process-switched traffic.

Total output drops

Total number of packets dropped because of a full output queue.

Queueing strategy

Type of Layer 3 queueing active on this interface. The default is first-in, first-out (FIFO).

Output queue (size/max)

Number of packets in the output queue (size), and the maximum size of the queue (max).

5 minute input rate, 5 minute output rate

Average number of bits and packets transmitted per second in the last 5 minutes. If the interface is not in promiscuous mode, it senses network traffic it sends and receives (rather than all network traffic).

The 5-minute input and output rates should be used only as an approximation of traffic per second during a given 5-minute period. These rates are exponentially weighted averages with a time constant of 5 minutes. A period of four time constants must pass before the average will be within two percent of the instantaneous rate of a uniform stream of traffic over that period.

packets input

Total number of error-free packets received by the system.

bytes

Total number of bytes, including data and MAC encapsulation, in the error-free packets received by the system.

Received...broadcasts

Total number of broadcast or multicast packets received by the interface.

runts

Number of packets that are discarded because they are smaller than the minimum packet size of the medium. For instance, any Ethernet packet that is smaller than 64 bytes is considered a runt.

giants

Number of packets that are discarded because they exceed the maximum packet size of the medium. For example, any Ethernet packet that is larger than 1536 bytes is considered a giant.

Note   

For the 4-Port 10/100 Fast Ethernet SPA, the default is that a giant is any packet greater than 1536 bytes. However, if you modify the maximum transmission unit (MTU) for the interface, this counter increments when you exceed the specified MTU for the interface.

throttles

Number of times the receiver on the port was disabled, possibly because of buffer or processor overload.

input errors

Includes runts, giants, no buffer, cyclic redundancy check (CRC), frame, overrun, and ignored counts. Other input-related errors can also cause the input errors count to be increased, and some datagrams may have more than one error; therefore, this sum may not balance with the sum of enumerated input error counts.

CRC

Cyclic redundancy check generated by the originating LAN station or far-end device does not match the checksum calculated from the data received. On a LAN, this usually indicates noise or transmission problems on the LAN interface or the LAN bus itself. A high number of CRCs is usually the result of collisions or a station transmitting bad data.

frame

Number of packets received incorrectly having a CRC error and a noninteger number of octets. On a LAN, this is usually the result of collisions or a malfunctioning Ethernet device.

overrun

Number of times the receiver hardware was unable to hand received data to a hardware buffer because the input rate exceeded the receiver’s ability to handle the data.

ignored

Number of received packets ignored by the interface because the interface hardware ran low on internal buffers. These buffers are different than the system buffers. Broadcast storms and bursts of noise can cause the ignored count to be increased.

watchdog

Number of times the watchdog receive timer expired. Expiration happens when receiving a packet with a length greater than 2048 bytes.

input packets with dribble condition detected

Dribble bit error indicates that a frame is slightly too long. This frame error counter is incremented for informational purposes only; the router accepts the frame.

packets output

Total number of messages transmitted by the system.

bytes

Total number of bytes, including data and MAC encapsulation, transmitted by the system.

underruns

Number of times that the transmitter has been running faster than the router can handle.

output errors

Sum of all errors that prevented the final transmission of datagrams out of the interface being examined. Note that this may not balance with the sum of the enumerated output errors, because some datagrams may have more than one error and others may have errors that do not fall into any of the specifically tabulated categories.

collisions

Number of messages retransmitted because of an Ethernet collision. This is usually the result of an overextended LAN (Ethernet or transceiver cable too long, more than two repeaters between stations, or too many cascaded multiport transceivers). A packet that collides is counted only once in output packets.

interface resets

Number of times an interface has been completely reset. This can happen if packets queued for transmission were not sent within several seconds. Interface resets can occur when an interface is looped back or shut down.

babbles

Transmit jabber timer expired.

late collision

Number of late collisions. Late collision happens when a collision occurs after transmitting the preamble.

deferred

Number of times that the interface had to defer while ready to transmit a frame because the carrier was asserted.

lost carrier

Number of times the carrier was lost during transmission.

no carrier

Number of times the carrier was not present during the transmission.

Note   

This field does not apply to SPA interfaces.

output buffer failures, output buffers swapped out

These counters are not used by the 4-Port 10/100 Fast Ethernet SPA on the Cisco 7304 router.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show interfaces gigabitethernet command for the first interface (port 0) in a 2-Port 10/100/1000 Gigabit Ethernet SPA located in the top subslot (0) of the MSC that is installed in slot 4 on a Cisco 7304 router:

Router# show interfaces gigabitethernet 4/0/0
 
GigabitEthernet4/0/0 is up, line protocol is down
  Hardware is SPA-2GE-7304, address is 00b0.64ff.5a80 (bia 00b0.64ff.5a80)
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1000000 Kbit, DLY 10 usec,
     reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
  Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set
  Keepalive set (10 sec)
  Half-duplex, 1000Mb/s, link type is auto, media type is RJ45
  output flow-control is unsupported, input flow-control is unsupported
  ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
  Last input never, output 00:00:09, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
  Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 0 broadcasts (0 IP multicast)
     0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
     0 watchdog, 0 multicast, 0 pause input
     109 packets output, 6540 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets
     0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
     1 lost carrier, 0 no carrier, 0 PAUSE output
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

Examples

The following examples show the additional lines included in the display when the command is issued on two Gigabit Ethernet interfaces that are configured as a primary interface (gi3/0/0) and as a backup interface (gi3/0/11) for the primary:

Router# show interfaces gigabitEthernet 3/0/0
 
GigabitEthernet3/0/0 is up, line protocol is up (connected)
  Hardware is GigEther SPA, address is 0005.dc57.8800 (bia 0005.dc57.8800)
  Backup interface GigabitEthernet3/0/11, failure delay 0 sec, secondary disable delay 0 sec, 
  .
  .
  .
Router# show interfaces gigabitEthernet 3/0/11
 
GigabitEthernet3/0/11 is standby mode, line protocol is down (disabled)
  .
  .
  .

The table below describes the fields shown in the display for Gigabit Ethernet SPA interfaces.

Table 5 show interfaces gigabitethernet Field Descriptions--Gigabit Ethernet SPA

Field

Description

GigabitEthernet...is up ...is administratively down

Indicates whether the interface hardware is currently active and if it has been taken down by an administrator.

line protocol is

Indicates whether the software processes that handle the line protocol consider the line usable or if it has been taken down by an administrator.

Hardware

Hardware type (for example, SPA-2GE-7304) and MAC address.

Backup interface

Identifies the backup interface that exists for this, the primary interface.

Failure and secondary delay

The period of time (in seconds) to delay bringing up the backup interface when the primary goes down, and bringing down the backup after the primary becomes active again. On the Cisco 7600 router, the delay must be 0 (the default) to ensure that there is no delay between when the primary goes down and the backup comes up, and vice versa.

Standby mode

Indicates that this is a backup interface and that it is currently operating in standby mode.

Description

Alphanumeric string identifying the interface. This appears only if the description interface configuration command has been configured on the interface.

Internet address

Internet address followed by subnet mask.

MTU

Maximum transmission unit of the interface. The default is 1500 bytes for the 2-Port 10/100/1000 Gigabit Ethernet SPA.

BW

Bandwidth of the interface in kilobits per second.

DLY

Delay of the interface in microseconds.

reliability

Reliability of the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is 100 percent reliability), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

txload, rxload

Load on the interface (in the transmit “tx” and receive “rx” directions) as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is completely saturated), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

Encapsulation

Encapsulation method assigned to the interface.

loopback

Indicates whether loopback is set.

Keepalive

Indicates whether keepalives are set, and the time interval.

Half-duplex, Full-duplex

Indicates the duplex mode for the interface.

1000Mb/s, 100Mb/s, 10Mb/s

Speed of the interface in megabits per second.

link type

Specifies whether autonegotiation is being used on the link.

media type

Interface port media type: RJ45, SX, LX, or ZX.

100BaseTX/FX

Media protocol standard.

ARP type:

Type of ARP assigned and the timeout period.

Last input

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds since the last packet was successfully received by an interface and processed locally on the router. Useful for knowing when a dead interface failed.

This field is not updated by fast-switched traffic.

output

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds since the last packet was successfully transmitted by the interface. Useful for knowing when a dead interface failed.

output hang

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds (or never) since the interface was last reset because of a transmission that took too long. When the number of hours in any of the “last” fields exceeds 24 hours, the number of days and hours is displayed. If that field overflows, asterisks are printed.

Note   

This field does not apply to SPA interfaces.

Last clearing

Time at which the counters that measure cumulative statistics (such as number of bytes transmitted and received) shown in this report were last reset to zero. Note that variables that might affect routing (for example, load and reliability) are not cleared when the counters are cleared.

A series of asterisks (***) indicates the elapsed time is too large to be displayed.

0:00:00 indicates the counters were cleared more than 231 ms (and less than 232 ms) ago.

Input queue (size/max/drops/flushes)

Packet statistics on the input queue reported as:

  • Size--Number of packets in the input queue.
  • Max--Maximum size of the queue.
  • Drops--Number of packets dropped because of a full input queue.
  • Flushes--Number of packets dropped as part of SPD. SPD implements a selective packet drop policy on the router’s IP process queue. Therefore, it applies only to process-switched traffic.

Total output drops

Total number of packets dropped because of a full output queue.

Queueing strategy

Type of Layer 3 queueing active on this interface. The default is FIFO.

Output queue (size/max)

Number of packets in the output queue (size), and the maximum size of the queue (max).

5 minute input rate, 5 minute output rate

Average number of bits and packets transmitted per second in the last 5 minutes. If the interface is not in promiscuous mode, it senses network traffic it sends and receives (rather than all network traffic).

The 5-minute input and output rates should be used only as an approximation of traffic per second during a given 5-minute period. These rates are exponentially weighted averages with a time constant of 5 minutes. A period of four time constants must pass before the average will be within two percent of the instantaneous rate of a uniform stream of traffic over that period.

packets input

Total number of error-free packets received by the system.

bytes

Total number of bytes, including data and MAC encapsulation, in the error-free packets received by the system.

Received...broadcasts

Total number of broadcast or multicast packets received by the interface.

runts

Number of packets that are discarded because they are smaller than the minimum packet size of the medium. For instance, any Ethernet packet that is smaller than 64 bytes is considered a runt.

giants

Number of packets that are discarded because they exceed the maximum packet size of the medium. For example, any Ethernet packet that is larger than 1536 bytes is considered a giant.

Note   

For the 2-Port 10/100/1000 Gigabit Ethernet SPA, the default is that a giant is any packet greater than 1536 bytes. However, if you modify the MTU for the interface, this counter increments when you exceed the specified MTU for the interface.

throttles

Number of times the receiver on the port was disabled, possibly because of buffer or processor overload.

input errors

Includes runts, giants, no buffer, CRC, frame, overrun, and ignored counts. Other input-related errors can also cause the input errors count to be increased, and some datagrams may have more than one error; therefore, this sum may not balance with the sum of enumerated input error counts.

CRC

Cyclic redundancy check generated by the originating LAN station or far-end device does not match the checksum calculated from the data received. On a LAN, this usually indicates noise or transmission problems on the LAN interface or the LAN bus itself. A high number of CRCs is usually the result of collisions or a station transmitting bad data.

frame

Number of packets received incorrectly having a CRC error and a noninteger number of octets. On a LAN, this is usually the result of collisions or a malfunctioning Ethernet device.

overrun

Number of times the receiver hardware was unable to hand received data to a hardware buffer because the input rate exceeded the receiver’s ability to handle the data.

ignored

Number of received packets ignored by the interface because the interface hardware ran low on internal buffers. These buffers are different than the system buffers. Broadcast storms and bursts of noise can cause the ignored count to be increased.

watchdog

Number of times the watchdog receive timer expired. Expiration happens when receiving a packet with a length greater than 2048 bytes.

input packets with dribble condition detected

Dribble bit error indicates that a frame is slightly too long. This frame error counter is incremented for informational purposes only; the router accepts the frame.

packets output

Total number of messages transmitted by the system.

bytes

Total number of bytes, including data and MAC encapsulation, transmitted by the system.

underruns

Number of times that the transmitter has been running faster than the router can handle.

output errors

Sum of all errors that prevented the final transmission of datagrams out of the interface being examined. Note that this may not balance with the sum of the enumerated output errors, because some datagrams may have more than one error and others may have errors that do not fall into any of the specifically tabulated categories.

collisions

Number of messages retransmitted because of an Ethernet collision. This is usually the result of an overextended LAN (Ethernet or transceiver cable too long, more than two repeaters between stations, or too many cascaded multiport transceivers). A packet that collides is counted only once in output packets.

interface resets

Number of times an interface has been completely reset. This can happen if packets queued for transmission were not sent within several seconds. Interface resets can occur when an interface is looped back or shut down.

babbles

Transmit jabber timer expired.

late collision

Number of late collisions. Late collision happens when a collision occurs after transmitting the preamble.

deferred

Number of times that the interface had to defer while ready to transmit a frame because the carrier was asserted.

lost carrier

Number of times the carrier was lost during transmission.

no carrier

Number of times the carrier was not present during the transmission.

Note   

This field does not apply to SPA interfaces.

output buffer failures, output buffers swapped out

These counters are not used by the 2-Port 10/100/1000 Gigabit Ethernet SPA on the Cisco 7304 router.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show interfaces pos command on a Cisco 7600 series router or Catalyst 6500 series switch for POS interface 4/3/0 (which is the interface for port 0 of the SPA in subslot 3 of the SIP in chassis slot 4):

Router# show interfaces pos 4/3/0
 
POS4/3/0 is up, line protocol is up  (APS working - active)
  Hardware is Packet over SONET
  Internet address is 10.0.0.1/8
  MTU 4470 bytes, BW 622000 Kbit, DLY 100 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
  Encapsulation HDLC, crc 16, loopback not set
  Keepalive not set
  Scramble disabled
  Last input 00:00:34, output 04:09:06, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
  Queueing strategy:fifo
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
        Available Bandwidth 622000 kilobits/sec
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     782 packets input, 226563 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 0 broadcasts, 1 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
              0 parity
     1 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     271 packets output, 28140 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 applique, 2 interface resets
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
     2 carrier transitions
 

The table below describes the significant fields shown in this display.

Table 6  show interfaces pos Field Descriptions--POS SPA

Field

Description

POS4/3/0 is up, line protocol is up

Indicates whether the interface hardware is currently active and can transmit and receive or whether it has been taken down by an administrator.

Hardware is. . .

Hardware type:

  • For POSIP--cyBus Packet over SONET
  • For POS SPAs--Packet over SONET

Internet address is

Internet address and subnet mask.

MTU

Maximum transmission unit of the interface.

BW

Bandwidth of the interface, in kilobits per second.

DLY

Delay of the interface, in microseconds.

rely

Reliability of the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is 100 percent reliability), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

load

Load on the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is completely saturated), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes. The calculation uses the value from the bandwidth interface configuration command.

Encapsulation

Encapsulation method assigned to the interface.

Loopback

Indicates whether loopbacks are set.

Keepalive

Indicates whether keepalives are set.

Scramble

Indicates whether SONET payload scrambling is enabled. SONET scrambling is disabled by default. For the POS SPAs on the Cisco 12000 series routers, scrambling is enabled by default.

Last input

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds since the last packet was successfully received by an interface and processed locally on the router. Useful for knowing when a dead interface failed. This counter is updated only when packets are process-switched, not when packets are fast-switched.

(Last) output

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds since the last packet was successfully transmitted by an interface. This counter is updated only when packets are process-switched, not when packets are fast-switched.

(Last) output hang

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds (or never) since the interface was last reset because of a transmission that took too long. When the number of hours in any of the “last” fields exceeds 24 hours, the number of days and hours is printed. If that field overflows, asterisks are printed.

Last clearing

Time at which the counters that measure cumulative statistics (such as number of bytes transmitted and received) shown in this report were last reset to zero. Note that variables that might affect routing (for example, load and reliability) are not cleared when the counters are cleared.

*** indicates the elapsed time is too large to be displayed.

0:00:00 indicates the counters were cleared more than 2231 ms (and less than 232 ms) ago.

Queueing strategy

FIFO queueing strategy (other queueing strategies you might see are priority-list, custom-list, and weighted fair).

Output queue, drops input queue, drops

Number of packets in output and input queues. Each number is followed by a slash, the maximum size of the queue, and the number of packets dropped because a queue was full.

5 minute input rate 5 minute output rate

Average number of bits and packets received or transmitted per second in the last 5 minutes.

packets input

Total number of error-free packets received by the system.

bytes (input)

Total number of bytes, including data and MAC encapsulation, in the error-free packets received by the system.

no buffer

Number of received packets discarded because there was no buffer space in the main system. Compare with number of packets ignored. Broadcast storms on Ethernets and bursts of noise on serial lines are often responsible for no input buffer events.

broadcasts

Total number of broadcast or multicast packets received by the interface.

runts

Number of packets that are discarded because they are smaller than the minimum packet size of the medium.

giants

Number of packets that are discarded because they exceed the maximum packet size of the medium.

throttles

Not supported for POS interfaces.

parity

Report of the parity errors on the interface.

input errors

Total number of no buffer, runts, giants, CRCs, frame, overrun, ignored, and abort counts. Other input-related errors can also increment the count, so that this sum might not balance with the other counts.

CRC

Cyclic redundancy checksum generated by the originating LAN station or far-end device does not match the checksum calculated from the data received. On a LAN, this usually indicates noise or transmission problems on the LAN interface or the LAN bus itself. A high number of CRCs is usually the result of collisions or a station transmitting bad data. On a serial link, CRCs usually indicate noise, gain hits, or other transmission problems on the data link.

frame

Number of packets received incorrectly having a CRC error and a noninteger number of octets. On a serial line, this is usually the result of noise or other transmission problems.

overrun

Number of times the serial receiver hardware was unable to hand received data to a hardware buffer because the input rate exceeded the receiver’s ability to handle the data.

ignored

Number of received packets ignored by the interface because the interface hardware ran low on internal buffers. These buffers are different than the system buffers mentioned previously in the buffer description. Broadcast storms and bursts of noise can cause the ignored count to be incremented.

abort

Illegal sequence of one bits on the interface.

packets output

Total number of messages transmitted by the system.

bytes (output)

Total number of bytes, including data and MAC encapsulation, transmitted by the system.

underruns

Number of times that the far-end transmitter has been running faster than the near-end router’s receiver can handle.

output errors

Sum of all errors that prevented the final transmission of datagrams out of the interface being examined. Note that this might not balance with the sum of the enumerated output errors, because some datagrams can have more than one error, and others can have errors that do not fall into any of the specifically tabulated categories.

applique

Indicates an unrecoverable error has occurred on the POSIP applique. The system then invokes an interface reset.

interface resets

Number of times an interface has been completely reset. This can happen if packets queued for transmission were not sent within a certain interval. If the system notices that the carrier detect line of an interface is up, but the line protocol is down, it periodically resets the interface in an effort to restart it. Interface resets can also occur when an unrecoverable interface processor error occurred, or when an interface is looped back or shut down.

output buffer failures

Not supported for POS interfaces.

output buffers swapped out

Not supported for POS interfaces.

carrier transitions

Number of times the carrier detect signal of the interface has changed state.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show interfaces pos command on a Cisco 12000 series router for POS interface 1/1/0 (which is the interface for port 0 of the SPA in subslot 1 of the SIP in chassis slot 1):

Router# show interfaces pos 1/1/0
 
POS1/1/0 is up, line protocol is up
  Hardware is Packet over SONET
  Internet address is 10.41.41.2/24
  MTU 4470 bytes, BW 9952000 Kbit, DLY 100 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
  Encapsulation HDLC, crc 32, loopback not set
  Keepalive not set
  Scramble enabled
  Last input 00:00:59, output 00:00:11, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:14
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
        Available Bandwidth 9582482 kilobits/sec
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
              0 parity
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     1 packets output, 314 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 applique, 0 interface resets
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
     0 carrier transitions

Examples

The following is sample output from the show interfaces sdcccommand on a Cisco 12000 series router for POS interface 1/1/0 (which is the interface for port 0 of the SPA in subslot 1 of the SIP in chassis slot 1):

Router# show interfaces sdcc 1/1/0
 
SDCC1/1/0 is administratively down, line protocol is down
  Hardware is SDCC
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 192 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
  Encapsulation HDLC, crc 32, loopback not set
  Keepalive set (10 sec)
  Last input never, output never, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:01:55
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
     0 carrier transitions

The table below describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 7  show interfaces sdcc Field Descriptions--POS SPA

Field

Description

SDCC1/1/0 is administratively down, line protocol is down

Indicates whether the interface hardware is currently active and can transmit and receive or whether it has been taken down by an administrator.

Hardware is. . .

Hardware type is SDCC--Section Data Communications Channel.

Internet address is

Internet address and subnet mask.

MTU

Maximum transmission unit of the interface.

BW

Bandwidth of the interface, in kilobits per second.

DLY

Delay of the interface, in microseconds.

rely

Reliability of the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is 100 percent reliability), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

load

Load on the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is completely saturated), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes. The calculation uses the value from the bandwidth interface configuration command.

Encapsulation

Encapsulation method assigned to the interface.

crc

Cyclic redundancy check size (16 or 32 bits).

Loopback

Indicates whether loopback is set.

Keepalive

Indicates whether keepalives are set.

Last input

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds since the last packet was successfully received by an interface and processed locally on the router. Useful for knowing when a dead interface failed. This counter is updated only when packets are process-switched, not when packets are fast-switched.

(Last) output

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds since the last packet was successfully transmitted by an interface. This counter is updated only when packets are process-switched, not when packets are fast-switched.

(Last) output hang

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds (or never) since the interface was last reset because of a transmission that took too long. When the number of hours in any of the “last” fields exceeds 24 hours, the number of days and hours is printed. If that field overflows, asterisks are printed.

Last clearing

Time at which the counters that measure cumulative statistics (such as number of bytes transmitted and received) shown in this report were last reset to zero. Note that variables that might affect routing (for example, load and reliability) are not cleared when the counters are cleared.

*** indicates the elapsed time is too large to be displayed.

0:00:00 indicates the counters were cleared more than 2231 ms (and less than 232 ms) ago.

Queueing strategy

FIFO queueing strategy (other queueing strategies you might see are priority-list, custom-list, and weighted fair).

Output queue, drops input queue, drops

Number of packets in output and input queues. Each number is followed by a slash, the maximum size of the queue, and the number of packets dropped because a queue was full.

5 minute input rate 5 minute output rate

Average number of bits and packets received or transmitted per second in the last 5 minutes.

packets input

Total number of error-free packets received by the system.

bytes (input)

Total number of bytes, including data and MAC encapsulation, in the error-free packets received by the system.

no buffer

Number of received packets discarded because there was no buffer space in the main system. Compare with number of packets ignored. Broadcast storms on Ethernets and bursts of noise on serial lines are often responsible for no input buffer events.

broadcasts

Total number of broadcast or multicast packets received by the interface.

runts

Number of packets that are discarded because they are smaller than the minimum packet size of the medium.

giants

Number of packets that are discarded because they exceed the maximum packet size of the medium.

throttles

Not supported for POS interfaces.

parity

Report of the parity errors on the interface.

input errors

Total number of no buffer, runts, giants, CRCs, frame, overrun, ignored, and abort counts. Other input-related errors can also increment the count, so that this sum might not balance with the other counts.

CRC

Cyclic redundancy checksum generated by the originating LAN station or far-end device does not match the checksum calculated from the data received. On a LAN, this usually indicates noise or transmission problems on the LAN interface or the LAN bus itself. A high number of CRCs is usually the result of collisions or a station transmitting bad data. On a serial link, CRCs usually indicate noise, gain hits, or other transmission problems on the data link.

frame

Number of packets received incorrectly having a CRC error and a noninteger number of octets. On a serial line, this is usually the result of noise or other transmission problems.

overrun

Number of times the serial receiver hardware was unable to hand received data to a hardware buffer because the input rate exceeded the receiver’s ability to handle the data.

ignored

Number of received packets ignored by the interface because the interface hardware ran low on internal buffers. These buffers are different than the system buffers mentioned previously in the buffer description. Broadcast storms and bursts of noise can cause the ignored count to be incremented.

abort

Illegal sequence of one bits on the interface.

packets output

Total number of messages transmitted by the system.

bytes (output)

Total number of bytes, including data and MAC encapsulation, transmitted by the system.

underruns

Number of times that the far-end transmitter has been running faster than the near-end router’s receiver can handle.

output errors

Sum of all errors that prevented the final transmission of datagrams out of the interface being examined. Note that this might not balance with the sum of the enumerated output errors, because some datagrams can have more than one error, and others can have errors that do not fall into any of the specifically tabulated categories.

collisions

Not supported for POS interfaces.

interface resets

Number of times an interface has been completely reset. This can happen if packets queued for transmission were not sent within a certain interval. If the system notices that the carrier detect line of an interface is up, but the line protocol is down, it periodically resets the interface in an effort to restart it. Interface resets can also occur when an unrecoverable interface processor error occurred, or when an interface is looped back or shut down.

output buffer failures

Not supported for POS interfaces.

output buffers swapped out

Not supported for POS interfaces.

carrier transitions

Number of times the carrier detect signal of the interface has changed state.

Examples

The following example shows the interface serial statistics on the first port of a T3/E3 SPA installed in subslot 0 of the SIP located in chassis slot 5:

Router# show interfaces serial 5/0/0
Serial5/0/0 is up, line protocol is up 
  Hardware is SPA-4T3E3
  Internet address is 10.1.1.2/24
  MTU 4470 bytes, BW 44210 Kbit, DLY 200 usec, 
     reliability 255/255, txload 234/255, rxload 234/255
  Encapsulation HDLC, crc 16, loopback not set
  Keepalive set (10 sec)
  Last input 00:00:05, output 00:00:00, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
  Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
  5 minute input rate 40685000 bits/sec, 115624 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 40685000 bits/sec, 115627 packets/sec
     4653081241 packets input, 204735493724 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 4044 broadcasts (0 IP multicast)
     0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
              0 parity
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     4652915555 packets output, 204728203520 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 applique, 4 interface resets
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
	2 carrier transitions

The table below describes the fields shown in the show interfaces serial output for a T3/E3 SPA.


Note


The fields appearing in the ouput will vary depending on card type, interface configuration, and the status of the interface.


Table 8 show interfaces serial Field Descriptions--T3/E3 SPA

Field

Description

Serial

Name of the serial interface.

line protocol is

If the line protocol is up, the local router has received keepalive packets from the remote router. If the line protocol is down, the local router has not received keepalive packets form the remote router.

Hardware is

Designates the specific hardware type of the interface.

Internet address is

The IP address of the interface.

MTU

The maximum packet size set for the interface.

BW

Bandwidth in kilobits per second.

DLY

Interface delay in microseconds.

reliability

Reliability of the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is 100 percent reliability), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

txload

Transmit load on the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is completely saturated), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

rxload

Receive load on the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is completely saturated), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

Encapsulation

Encapsulation method.

crc

CRC size in bits.

loopback

Indicates whether loopback is set.

keepalive

Indicates whether keepalives are set.

Last input

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds since the last packet was successfully received by an interface and processed locally on the router. Useful for knowing when a dead interface failed. This counter is updated only when packets are process-switched, not when packets are fast-switched.

Last output

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds since the last packet was successfully transmitted by an interface. Useful for knowing when a dead interface failed. This counter is updated only when packets are process-switched, not when packets are fast-switched.

output hang

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds (or never) since the interface was last reset because of a transmission that took too long. When the number of hours in any of the “last” fields exceeds 24 hours, the number of days and hours is printed. If that field overflows, asterisks are printed.

Last clearing of show interface counters

Time at which the counters that measure cumulative statistics (such as number of bytes transmitted and received) shown in this report were last reset to zero. Note that variables that might affect routing (for example, load and reliability) are not cleared when the counters are cleared.

*** indicates the elapsed time is too large to be displayed.

0:00:00 indicates the counters were cleared more than 231 milliseconds (and less than 232 ms) ago.

Input queue

Packet statistics on the input queue reported as:

  • Size--Current size of the input queue.
  • Max--Maximum size of the input queue.
  • Drops--Packets dropped because the queue was full.
  • Flushes--Number of times that data on queue has been discarded.

Total output drops

Total number of dropped packets.

Queueing strategy

FIFO queueing strategy (other queueing strategies you might see are priority-list, custom-list, and weighted fair).

Output queue

Number of packets in the output queue (size), and the maximum size of the queue (max).

5-minute input rate

Average number of bits and packets received per second in the last 5 minutes. If the interface is not in promiscuous mode, it senses network traffic it sends and receives (rather than all network traffic).

The 5-minute input and output rates should be used only as an approximation of traffic per second during a given 5-minute period. These rates are exponentially weighted averages with a time constant of 5 minutes. A period of four time constants must pass before the average will be within two percent of the instantaneous rate of a uniform stream of traffic over that period.

5-minute output rate

Average number of bits and packets transmitted per second in the last 5 minutes. If the interface is not in promiscuous mode, it senses network traffic it sends and receives (rather than all network traffic).

The 5-minute input and output rates should be used only as an approximation of traffic per second during a given 5-minute period. These rates are exponentially weighted averages with a time constant of 5 minutes. A period of four time constants must pass before the average will be within two percent of the instantaneous rate of a uniform stream of traffic over that period.

Examples

The following is sample output from the show interfaces tengigabitethernet command for the only interface (port 0) in a 1-Port 10 Gigabit Ethernet SPA located in the top subslot (0) of the carrier card that is installed in slot 7 on a Cisco 12000 series router:

Router# show interfaces tengigabitethernet 7/0/0
TenGigabitEthernet7/0/0 is up, line protocol is up (connected)
  Hardware is TenGigEther SPA, address is 0000.0c00.0102 (bia 000f.342f.c340)
  Internet address is 10.1.1.2/24
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000000 Kbit, DLY 10 usec, 
     reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
  Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set
  Keepalive not supported
  Full-duplex, 10Gb/s
  input flow-control is on, output flow-control is on 
ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
  Last input never, output 00:00:10, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters 20:24:30
  Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  L2 Switched: ucast: 0 pkt, 0 bytes - mcast: 0 pkt, 0 bytes
  L3 in Switched: ucast: 0 pkt, 0 bytes - mcast: 0 pkt, 0 bytes mcast
  L3 out Switched: ucast: 0 pkt, 0 bytes mcast: 0 pkt, 0 bytes
     237450882 packets input, 15340005588 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 25 broadcasts (0 IP multicasts)
     0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
     0 watchdog, 0 multicast, 0 pause input
     0 input packets with dribble condition detected
     1676 packets output, 198290 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 4 interface resets
     0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
     0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier, 0 PAUSE output
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

The table below describes the significant fields shown in the display.

Table 9 show interfaces tengigabitethernet Field Descriptions--10-Gigabit Ethernet SPA

Field

Description

TenGigabitEthernet...is up ...is administratively down

Indicates whether the interface hardware is currently active and if it has been taken down by an administrator.

line protocol is

Indicates whether the software processes that handle the line protocol consider the line usable or if it has been taken down by an administrator.

Hardware

Hardware type and MAC address.

Description

Alphanumeric string identifying the interface. This appears only if the description interface configuration command has been configured on the interface.

Internet address

Internet address followed by subnet mask.

MTU

Maximum transmission unit of the interface.

BW

Bandwidth of the interface in kilobits per second.

DLY

Delay of the interface in microseconds.

reliability

Reliability of the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is 100 percent reliability), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

txload, rxload

Load on the interface (in the transmit “tx” and receive “rx” directions) as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is completely saturated), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

Encapsulation

Encapsulation method assigned to the interface.

loopback

Indicates whether loopback is set.

Keepalive

Indicates whether keepalives are set, and the time interval.

Half-duplex, Full-duplex

Indicates the duplex mode for the interface.

10Gb/s

Speed of the interface in Gigabits per second.

input flow control ...

Specifies if input flow control is on or off.

ARP type:

Type of ARP assigned and the timeout period.

Last input

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds since the last packet was successfully received by an interface and processed locally on the router. Useful for knowing when a dead interface failed.

This field is not updated by fast-switched traffic.

output

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds since the last packet was successfully transmitted by the interface. Useful for knowing when a dead interface failed.

output hang

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds (or never) since the interface was last reset because of a transmission that took too long. When the number of hours in any of the “last” fields exceeds 24 hours, the number of days and hours is displayed. If that field overflows, asterisks are printed.

Last clearing

Time at which the counters that measure cumulative statistics (such as number of bytes transmitted and received) shown in this report were last reset to zero. Note that variables that might affect routing (for example, load and reliability) are not cleared when the counters are cleared.

A series of asterisks (***) indicates the elapsed time is too large to be displayed.

0:00:00 indicates the counters were cleared more than 231 ms (and less than 232 ms) ago.

Input queue (size/max/drops/flushes)

Packet statistics on the input queue reported as:

  • Size--Number of packets in the input queue.
  • Max--Maximum size of the queue.
  • Drops--Number of packets dropped because of a full input queue.
  • Flushes--Number of packets dropped as part of SPD. SPD implements a selective packet drop policy on the router’s IP process queue. Therefore, it applies only to process-switched traffic.

Total output drops

Total number of packets dropped because of a full output queue.

Queueing strategy

Type of Layer 3 queueing active on this interface. The default is FIFO.

Output queue (size/max)

Number of packets in the output queue (size), and the maximum size of the queue (max).

5 minute input rate, 5 minute output rate

Average number of bits and packets transmitted per second in the last 5 minutes. If the interface is not in promiscuous mode, it senses network traffic it sends and receives (rather than all network traffic).

The 5-minute input and output rates should be used only as an approximation of traffic per second during a given 5-minute period. These rates are exponentially weighted averages with a time constant of 5 minutes. A period of four time constants must pass before the average will be within two percent of the instantaneous rate of a uniform stream of traffic over that period.

L2 Switched

Provides statistics about Layer 2 switched traffic, including unicast and multicast traffic.

L3 in Switched

Provides statistics about received Layer 3 traffic.

L3 out Switched

Provides statistics about sent Layer 3 traffic.

packets input

Total number of error-free packets received by the system.

bytes

Total number of bytes, including data and MAC encapsulation, in the error-free packets received by the system.

Received...broadcasts

Total number of broadcast or multicast packets received by the interface.

runts

Number of packets that are discarded because they are smaller than the minimum packet size of the medium.

giants

Number of packets that are discarded because they exceed the maximum packet size of the medium.

throttles

Number of times the receiver on the port was disabled, possibly because of buffer or processor overload.

input errors

Includes runts, giants, no buffer, CRC, frame, overrun, and ignored counts. Other input-related errors can also cause the input errors count to be increased, and some datagrams may have more than one error; therefore, this sum may not balance with the sum of enumerated input error counts.

CRC

Cyclic redundancy check generated by the originating LAN station or far-end device does not match the checksum calculated from the data received. On a LAN, this usually indicates noise or transmission problems on the LAN interface or the LAN bus itself. A high number of CRCs is usually the result of collisions or a station transmitting bad data.

frame

Number of packets received incorrectly having a CRC error and a noninteger number of octets. On a LAN, this is usually the result of collisions or a malfunctioning Ethernet device.

overrun

Number of times the receiver hardware was unable to hand received data to a hardware buffer because the input rate exceeded the receiver’s ability to handle the data.

ignored

Number of received packets ignored by the interface because the interface hardware ran low on internal buffers. These buffers are different than the system buffers. Broadcast storms and bursts of noise can cause the ignored count to be increased.

watchdog

Number of times the watchdog receive timer expired.

multicast

Number of multicast packets.

pause input

Number of pause packets received.

input packets with dribble condition detected

Dribble bit error indicates that a frame is slightly too long. This frame error counter is incremented for informational purposes only; the router accepts the frame.

packets output

Total number of messages transmitted by the system.

bytes

Total number of bytes, including data and MAC encapsulation, transmitted by the system.

underruns

Number of times that the transmitter has been running faster than the router can handle.

output errors

Sum of all errors that prevented the final transmission of datagrams out of the interface being examined. Note that this may not balance with the sum of the enumerated output errors, because some datagrams may have more than one error and others may have errors that do not fall into any of the specifically tabulated categories.

collisions

Number of messages retransmitted because of an Ethernet collision. This is usually the result of an overextended LAN (Ethernet or transceiver cable too long, more than two repeaters between stations, or too many cascaded multiport transceivers). A packet that collides is counted only once in output packets.

interface resets

Number of times an interface has been completely reset. This can happen if packets queued for transmission were not sent within several seconds. Interface resets can occur when an interface is looped back or shut down.

babbles

Transmit jabber timer expired.

late collision

Number of late collisions. Late collision happens when a collision occurs after transmitting the preamble.

deferred

Number of times that the interface had to defer while ready to transmit a frame because the carrier was asserted.

lost carrier

Number of times the carrier was lost during transmission.

no carrier

Number of times the carrier was not present during the transmission.

pause output

Number of pause packets transmitted.

output buffer failures, output buffers swapped out

Number of output butters failures and output buffers swapped out.

Examples

This example shows how to display traffic for a specific interface:

Router# show interfaces GigabitEthernet1/1
 
GigabitEthernet0/1 is up, line protocol is up
  Hardware is BCM1125 Internal MAC, address is 0016.9de5.d9d1 (bia 0016.9de5.d9d1)
  Internet address is 172.16.165.40/27
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 100000 Kbit/sec, DLY 100 usec,
     reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
  Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set
  Keepalive set (10 sec)
  Full-duplex, 100Mb/s, media type is RJ45
  output flow-control is XON, input flow-control is XON
  ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
  Last input 00:00:11, output 00:00:08, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
  Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     10 packets input, 2537 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 10 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
     0 watchdog, 46 multicast, 0 pause input
     0 input packets with dribble condition detected
     18 packets output, 3412 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 1 interface resets
     7 unknown protocol drops
     0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
     2 lost carrier, 0 no carrier, 0 pause output
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

Note


The unknown protocol drops field displayed in the above example refers to the total number of packets dropped due to unknown or unsupported types of protocol. This field occurs on several platforms such as the Cisco 3725, 3745, 3825, and 7507 series routers.


This example shows how to display traffic for a FlexWAN module:

Router# show interfaces pos 6/1/0.1
 
POS6/1/0.1 is up, line protocol is up 
  Hardware is Packet over Sonet
  Internet address is 10.1.2.2/24
  MTU 4470 bytes, BW 155000 Kbit, DLY 100 usec, 
     reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
  Encapsulation FRAME-RELAY <<<+++ no packets info after this line
Arches#sh mod 6            
Mod Ports Card Type                              Model              Serial No.
--- ----- -------------------------------------- ------------------ -----------
  6    0  2 port adapter FlexWAN                 WS-X6182-2PA       SAD04340JY3
Mod MAC addresses                       Hw    Fw           Sw           Status
--- ---------------------------------- ------ ------------ ------------ -------
  6  0001.6412.a234 to 0001.6412.a273   1.3   12.2(2004022 12.2(2004022 Ok
Mod Online Diag Status 
--- -------------------
  6 Pass
Router#

Related Commands

Command

Description

fair-queue

Enables WFQ.

interface

Configures an interface type and enters interface configuration mode.

show controllers fastethernet

Displays Fast Ethernet interface information, transmission statistics and errors, and applicable MAC destination address and VLAN filtering tables.

show controllers gigabitethernet

Displays Gigabit Ethernet interface information, transmission statistics and errors, and applicable MAC destination address and VLAN filtering tables.

show controllers pos

Displays information about the POS controllers.

show controllers serial

Displays controller statistics.

show interfaces port-channel

To display the information about the Fast EtherChannel on Cisco 7000 series routers with the RSP7000 and RSP7000CI, Cisco 7200 series routers, and Cisco 7500 series routers, use the showinterfacesport-channel command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

show interfaces port-channel commandshow interfaces port-channel [channel-number]

Syntax Description

channel-number

(Optional) Port channel number. Range is from 1 to 4.

Command Modes

User EXEC Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release

Modification

11.1 CA

This command was introduced.

12.1(5)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.1(5)T.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.

15.2(02)SA

This command was implemented on the Cisco ME 2600X Series Ethernet Access Switches.

Examples

The following is sample output from the showinterfacesport-channel command:


Note


By default the hardware type is set to Fast EtherChannel.The default MTU is set to 1500 bytes. The maximum MTU size that can be configured on the native Gigabit Ethernet ports on the Cisco 7200 series router is 9216. The range of configurable MTU value is from 1500 to 9216.


Router# show interfaces port-channel 1
Port-channel1 is up, line protocol is up
  Hardware is FEChannel, address is 0000.0ca8.6220 (bia 0000.0000.0000)
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 400000 Kbit, DLY 100 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
  Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive not set, fdx
  ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
    No. of active members in this channel: 4
        Member 0 : Fast Ethernet1/0/0
        Member 1 : Fast Ethernet1/1/0
        Member 2 : Fast Ethernet4/0/0
        Member 3 : Fast Ethernet4/1/0
  Last input 01:22:13, output never, output hang never
  Last clearing of “show interface” counters never
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     223 packets input, 11462 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 1 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     0 watchdog, 0 multicast
     0 input packets with dribble condition detected
     192 packets output, 13232 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
     0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
     0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

The following sample output from the showinterfacesport-channel shows Gigabit EtherChannel as hardware type and the MTU value as 9216:

Router# show interface port-channel 1
Port-channel1 is up, line protocol is up 
  Hardware is GEChannel
, address is 0001.c929.c41b (bia 0001.c929.c41b)
  MTU 9216 bytes
, BW 1000000 Kbit, DLY 10 usec,
     reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
  Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set
  Keepalive set (10 sec)
  Unknown duplex, Unknown Speed, media type is unknown media type
  output flow-control is unsupported, input flow-control is unsupported
  ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
    No. of active members in this channel: 1
        Member 0 : GigabitEthernet0/1 , Full-duplex, 1000Mb/s
    No. of Non-active members in this channel: 0 
  Last input 00:00:04, output never, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
  Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
  Queueing strategy: fifo
  Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     95 packets input, 34383 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
     0 watchdog, 0 multicast, 0 pause input
     0 input packets with dribble condition detected
     1 packets output, 77 bytes, 0 underruns
     2 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
     0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
     0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier, 0 pause output
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

The table below describes significant fields shown in the display.

Table 10  show interfaces port-channel Field Descriptions

Field

Description

Port-channel1 is up, line protocol is up

Indicates if the interface hardware is currently active and can transmit and receive or if it has been taken down by an administrator.

Hardware is

Hardware type (Fast EtherChannel).

address is

Address being used by the interface.

MTU

Maximum transmission unit of the interface.

BW

Bandwidth of the interface, in kilobits per second.

DLY

Delay of the interface, in microseconds.

rely

Reliability of the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is 100 percent reliability), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

load

Load on the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is completely saturated), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes. The calculation uses the value from the bandwidth interface configuration command.

Encapsulation

Encapsulation method assigned to the interface.

loopback

Indicates if loopbacks are set.

keepalive

Indicates if keepalives are set.

fdx

Indicates the interface is operating in full-duplex mode.

ARA type

ARP type on the interface.

ARP timeout

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds an ARP cache entry will stay in the cache.

No. of active members in this channel: 4

Number of Fast Ethernet interfaces that are currently active (not down) and part of the Fast EtherChannel group.

Member 0: Fast Ethernet1/0/0

Specific Fast Ethernet interface that is part of the Fast EtherChannel group.

Last input

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds since the last packet was successfully received by an interface and processed locally on the router. Useful for knowing when a dead interface failed. This counter is updated only when packets are process-switched, not when packets are fast-switched.

output

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds since the last packet was successfully transmitted by an interface. This counter is updated only when packets are process-switched, not when packets are fast-switched.

output hang

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds (or never) since the interface was last reset because of a transmission that took too long. When the number of hours in any of the “last” fields exceeds 24 hours, the number of days and hours is printed. If that field overflows, asterisks are printed.

last clearing

Time at which the counters that measure cumulative statistics (such as number of bytes transmitted and received) shown in this report were last reset to zero. Variables that might affect routing (for example, load and reliability) are not cleared when the counters are cleared.

*** indicates the elapsed time is too large to be displayed.

0:00:00 indicates the counters were cleared more than 231 ms (and less than 232 ms)) ago.

Queueing strategy

First-in, first-out queueing strategy (other queueing strategies you might see are priority-list, custom-list, and weighted fair).

Output queue, drops input queue, drops

Number of packets in output and input queues. Each number is followed by a slash, the maximum size of the queue, and the number of packets dropped because a queue was full.

5 minute input rate 5 minute output rate

Average number of bits and packets received or transmitted per second in the last 5 minutes.

packets input

Total number of error-free packets received by the system.

bytes (input)

Total number of bytes, including data and MAC encapsulation, in the error-free packets received by the system.

no buffer

Number of received packets discarded because there was no buffer space in the main system. Compare with ignored count. Broadcast storms on Ethernets and bursts of noise on serial lines are often responsible for no input buffer events.

broadcasts

Total number of broadcast or multicast packets received by the interface.

runts

Number of packets that are discarded because they are smaller than the minimum packet size of the medium.

giants

Number of packets that are discarded because they exceed the maximum packet size of the medium.

input errors

Total number of no buffer, runts, giants, CRCs, frame, overrun, ignored, and abort counts. Other input-related errors can also increment the count, so that this sum might not balance with the other counts.

CRC

Cyclic redundancy checksum generated by the originating LAN station or far-end device does not match the checksum calculated from the data received. On a LAN, this usually indicates noise or transmission problems on the LAN interface or the LAN bus itself. A high number of CRCs is usually the result of collisions or a station transmitting bad data. On a serial link, CRCs usually indicate noise, gain hits or other transmission problems on the data link.

frame

Number of packets received incorrectly having a CRC error and a noninteger number of octets. On a serial line, this is usually the result of noise or other transmission problems.

overrun

Number of times the serial receiver hardware was unable to hand received data to a hardware buffer because the input rate exceeded the receiver’s ability to handle the data.

ignored

Number of received packets ignored by the interface because the interface hardware ran low on internal buffers. These buffers are different than the system buffers mentioned previously in the buffer description. Broadcast storms and bursts of noise can cause the ignored count to be incremented.

abort

Illegal sequence of ones bit on the interface.

watchdog

Number of times watchdog receive timer expired. It happens when receiving a packet with length greater than 2048.

multicast

Number of multicast packets received.

input packets with dribble condition detected

Dribble bit error indicates that a frame is slightly too long. This frame error counter is incremented just for informational purposes; the router accepts the frame.

packets output

Total number of messages transmitted by the system.

bytes (output)

Total number of bytes, including data and MAC encapsulation, transmitted by the system.

underruns

Number of times that the far-end transmitter has been running faster than the near-end router’s receiver can handle.

output errors

Sum of all errors that prevented the final transmission of datagrams out of the interface being examined. Note that this might not balance with the sum of the enumerated output errors, as some datagrams can have more than one error, and others can have errors that do not fall into any of the specifically tabulated categories.

collisions

Number of messages retransmitted because of an Ethernet collision. A packet that collides is counted only once in output packets.

interface resets

Number of times an interface has been completely reset. This can happen if packets queued for transmission were not sent within a certain interval. If the system notices that the carrier detect line of an interface is up, but the line protocol is down, it periodically resets the interface in an effort to restart it. Interface resets can also occur when an unrecoverable interface processor error occurred, or when an interface is looped back or shut down.

babbles

The transmit jabber timer expired.

late collision

Number of late collisions. Late collision happens when a collision occurs after transmitting the preamble. The most common cause of late collisions is that your Ethernet cable segments are too long for the speed at which you are transmitting.

deferred

Deferred indicates that the chip had to defer while ready to transmit a frame because the carrier was asserted.

lost carrier

Number of times the carrier was lost during transmission.

no carrier

Number of times the carrier was not present during the transmission.

output buffer failures

Number of times that a packet was not output from the output hold queue because of a shortage of MEMD shared memory.

output buffers swapped out

Number of packets stored in main memory when the output queue is full; swapping buffers to main memory prevents packets from being dropped when output is congested. The number is high when traffic is bursty.

Related Commands

Command

Description

interface multilink

Specifies a Fast EtherChannel and enters interface configuration mode.