Asynchronous Transfer Mode Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS Release 15M&T
Enhanced Voice and QoS for ADSL and G.SHDSL
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Enhanced Voice and QoS for ADSL and G.SHDSL

Contents

Enhanced Voice and QoS for ADSL and G.SHDSL

Last Updated: December 4, 2012

QoS features make it possible to effectively combine voice and data traffic in the same WAN connection without sacrificing quality and reliability. Service providers can increase revenue by building differentiated service options based on premium, standard, or best-effort service classes.

This document describes enhancements to the voice and quality of service (QoS) features for asymmetric digital subscriber lines (ADSLs) and single-pair high-bit-rate digital subscriber lines (G.SHDSLs). When the ADSL or G.SHDSL WAN interface cards (WICs) are installed, they support the integration of voice and data over the same ADSL or G.SHDSL circuit using Voice over IP (VoIP).

Feature History for Enhanced Voice and QoS for ADSL and G.SHDSL

Feature History

Release

Modification

12.2(2)XQ

This feature was introduced. The Cisco 1720 did not support voice.

12.2(2)XK

Support was added for Cisco 2610-2651, Cisco 3620, Cisco 3640, and Cisco 3660.

12.2(4)XL

Support was added for Cisco 1720, Cisco 1750, Cisco 1751, and Cisco 1760.

12.2(8)YN

Enhanced voice and QoS features were added for Cisco 1720, Cisco 1721, Cisco 1751, Cisco 1760, Cisco 2610XM-2651XM, Cisco 3640, Cisco 3640A, and Cisco 3660.

12.2(13)T

Enhanced voice and QoS features that were introduced in 12.2(2)XQ, 12.2(2)XK, and 12.2(4)XL were integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(13)T.

12.3(2)T

Enhanced voice and QoS features that were introduced in 12.2(8)YN were integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)T.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Prerequisites for Enhanced Voice and QoS for ADSL and G.SHDSL

To configure the voice and QoS features, you must first install and configure the ADSL WIC or G.SHDSL WIC on your platform. Refer to the installation and configuration instructions in the following documents:

  • Configuring an ADSL WAN Interface Card on Cisco 1700 Series Routers
  • Installing the G.SHDSL ATM WIC on the Cisco 1700 Series Router
  • 1-Port ADSL ATM WAN Interface Card for Cisco 2600 Series and 3600 Series Routers
  • 1-Port G.SHDSL WAN Interface Card for Cisco 2600 Series and 3600 Series Routers
  • ADSL WAN Interface Card for the Cisco 2600/3600/3700 Series
  • G.SHDSL WAN Interface Card for the Cisco 2600/3600/3700 Series

For analog voice interface support, you must install the appropriate voice interface card (VIC).

Restrictions for Enhanced Voice and QoS for ADSL and G.SHDSL

  • Analog and BRI voice on the NM-1V/2V cards are not supported over VoATM in AAL2.
  • F5 OAM CC segment functionality is not currently supported on Cisco DSLAMs.

Information About Enhanced Voice and QoS for ADSL and G.SHDSL

The table below lists the voice and QoS feature set, the specific feature, and the release in which the features are available.

Table 1 Voice and QoS Feature Set and the Available Cisco IOS Release

Voice/QoS Feature Set

Specific Feature

Release

Classification and Marking

ATM CLP Bit Marking

12.2(8)YN

Class-Based Packet Marking with Differentiated Services

12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Committed Access Rate (CAR)

12.2(2)XQ, 12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Dial-Peer DSCP and IP Precedence Marking

12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Local Policy Routing

12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Network-Based Application Recognition (NBAR)

12.2(8)YN

Policy-Based Routing

12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Queueing and Scheduling

Class-Based Weighted Fair Queueing (CBWFQ)

12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Low Latency Queueing

12.2(2)XQ, 12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Per-VC Queueing

12.2(2)XQ, 12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Congestion Avoidance

Class-Based WRED with DSCP (Egress)

12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP)

12.2(8)YN

Weighted Random Early Detection (WRED)

12.2(2)XQ, 12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Policing and Traffic Shaping

ATM Traffic Shaping

12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Class-Based Policing

12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Traffic Policing

12.2(2)XQ, 12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

VC Shaping for Variable Bit Rate-Nonreal Time (VBR-NRT)

12.2(2)XQ, 12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Link Efficiency

cRTP over an ATM Link with PPP Encapsulation

12.2(8)YN

Link Fragmentation and Interleaving (LFI)

12.2(2)XQ, 12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

MLP Bundling

12.2(8)YN

PPPoE MTU Adjustment

12.2(2)XQ, 12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Tunable Transmission Ring

12.2(8)YN

VC Bundling

12.2(2)XQ, 12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Other IP QoS

Access Control Lists

12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

IP QoS Map to ATM Class of Service (CoS)

12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Additional Voice/QoS

Analog Voice Interface Support

12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Clock Rate for AAL5 and AAL2

12.2(8)YN

Concurrent VoIP and VoATM

12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, and 12.2(8)YN

F5 OAM CC Segment Functionality

12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

FRF.5 and FRF.8

12.2(8)YN

H.323 and Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP) Testing

12.2(8)YN

ILMI

12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Multiple PVC Support

12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

OAM

12.2(2)XQ, 12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

PPPoE Client

12.2(2)XQ, 12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

PPPoE over ATM

12.2(2)XQ, 12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

RFC 1483 Bridging

12.2(2)XQ, 12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

RFC 1483 Routing

12.2(2)XQ, 12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)

12.2(8)YN

Survivable Remote Site Telephony (SRST)

12.2(8)YN

VoATM over AAL21

12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

VoATM over AAL51

12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

VoIP over AAL5

12.2(2)XQ, 12.2(2)XK, 12.2(4)XL, 12.2(8)YN, and 12.2(13)T

1 Not supported on the Cisco 1700 series.

Classification and Marking

The following Cisco IOS classification and marking features are supported on ADSL WICs and G.SHDSL WICs:

ATM CLP Bit Marking

When congestion occurs in an ATM network, ATM cells are discarded. One way to control which cells are discarded is to use the cell loss priority (CLP) bit in the ATM header of each cell. The CLP bit may be set to either 1 or 0. Those cells that have the CLP bit set to 1 are always discarded before any of the cells that have the CLP bit set to 0.

The ATM CLP Bit Marking feature allows you to control the CLP setting on Cisco routers. The marking of the CLP bit is implemented on a per-packet basis so that the CLP bit of every ATM cell that belongs to a particular packet is set to either 0 or 1.

For an example of output in which ATM CLP bit marking has been enabled, see the ATM CLP Bit Marking over G.SHDSL Example. For more information about ATM cell bit marking, refer to When Does a Router Set the CLP Bit in an ATM Cell

Class-Based Packet Marking with Differentiated Services

For information about class-based packet marking with differentiated services, refer to the "Quality of Service Overview" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

Committed Access Rate

For information about committed access rate (CAR), refer to the "Quality of Service Overview" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

Dial-Peer DSCP and IP Precedence Marking

For information about dial-peer differentiated services code points (DSCPs) and IP precedence marking, refer to the "Quality of Service for Voice over IP" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

Local Policy Routing

For information about local policy routing (LPR), refer to the following documents:

  • "Configuring IP Routing Protocol--Independent Features" chapter in the Cisco IOS IP Configuration Guide
  • "Configuring IP Routing Protocols" chapter in the Router Products Configuration Guide

Network-Based Application Recognition

For information about network-based application recognition (NBAR), refer to the following documents:

  • Network-Based Application Recognition
  • Using Content Networking to Provide Quality of Service
  • "Configuring Network-Based Application Recognition" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide

Policy-Based Routing

For information about policy-based routing (PBR), refer to the following documents:

  • "Quality of Service Overview" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide

Queueing and Scheduling

The following Cisco IOS queueing and scheduling features are supported on ADSL WICs and G.SHDSL WICs:

Class-Based Weighted Fair Queueing

For information about class-based weighted fair queueing (CBWFQ), refer to "Quality of Service Overview" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

Low Latency Queueing

For information about low latency queueing (LLQ), refer to the following documents:

  • "Congestion Management Overview" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

Note


Low latency queueing works in conjunction with setting the transmission (tx) ring. For more information about setting the tx ring, see the Tunable Transmission Ring.

Per-VC Queueing

Per-virtual circuit (per-VC) queueing is supported on ADSL and G.SHDSL interfaces at the driver level, similar to VC-queueing features on other ATM interfaces. This feature underlies many of the Cisco IOS QoS queueing features, such as LLQ.

For more information about per-VC queueing, refer to the following documents:

  • Understanding Weighted Fair Queuing on ATM
  • Per-VC Class-Based, Weighted Fair Queuing (Per-VC CBWFQ) on the Cisco 7200, 3600, and 2600 Routers

Congestion Avoidance

The following Cisco IOS congestion avoidance features are supported on ADSL WICs and G.SHDSL WICs:

Class-Based Weighted Random Early Detection with DSCP at Egress

Class-Based Weighted Random Early Detection (WRED) is supported on ADSL and G.SHDSL WICs. For more information about WRED, refer to the following documents:

  • "Quality of Service Overview" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide
  • Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Command Reference
  • DiffServ Compliant Weighted Random Early Detection

Resource Reservation Protocol

For information about Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP), refer to the following documents:

  • "Configuring RSVP" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide
  • "Configuring RSVP Support for LLQ" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide
  • "Configuring RSVP Support for Frame Relay" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide
  • "Configuring RSVP-ATM QoS Interworking" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide

Weighted Random Early Detection

For information about Weighted Random Early Detection (WRED), refer to the "Configuring Weighted Random Early Detection" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

Policing and Traffic Shaping

The following Cisco IOS policing and shaping features are supported on ADSL WICs and G.SHDSL WICs:

ATM Traffic Shaping

For information about ATM traffic shaping, refer to the following document:

  • Configuring Traffic Shaping on Frame Relay to ATM Service Interworking (FRF.8) PVCs
  • "Policing and Shaping Overview" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide

Class-Based Policing

For information about traffic classes and traffic policies, refer to the "Configuring Traffic Policing" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

Traffic Policing

For information about traffic policing, refer to the following documents:

  • "Configuring Traffic Policing" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide
  • Comparing Class-Based Policing and Committed Access Rate

VC Shaping for Variable Bit Rate-Nonreal Time

For information about VC shaping for variable bit rate-nonreal time (VBR-NRT), refer to Understanding the VBR-nrt Service Category and Traffic Shaping for ATM VCs .

Link Efficiency

The following link latency features are supported on ADSL WICs and G.SHDSL WICs:

cRTP over an ATM Link with PPP Encapsulation

The Compressed Real-Time Protocol (cRTP) feature reduces bandwidth consumption on real-time applications such as voice. Thus, by using cRTP, you can further improve voice quality. Configuring cRTP can save troubleshooting time by isolating potential cRTP issues. Based on RFC 2508, the RTP header compression feature compresses the IP, User Data Protocol (UDP), and Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) header (IP/UDP/RTP header) from 40 bytes to 2 or 4 bytes, reducing unnecessary bandwidth consumption. RTP header compression is a hop-by-hop compression scheme; therefore, cRTP must be configured on both ends of the link (unless the passive option is configured).

To configure cRTP, use the ip rtp header-compression command.

Because the compression process can be CPU intensive, RTP header compression was implemented in the fast-switching and Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) switching paths in Cisco IOS Release 12.0(7)T. Sometimes the cRTP implementations are broken, and if they are broken, the only way that cRTP will work is to use process switching. It is recommended that cRTP be used with links lower than 768 kbps unless the router is running at a low CPU utilization rate. Monitor the CPU utilization of the router, and disable cRTP if it is above 75 percent.

When you configure the ip rtp header-compression command, the router adds the ip tcp header-compression command to the configuration by default. The ip tcp header-compression command is used to compress the TCP/IP packets of the headers. Header compression is particularly useful on networks that have a large percentage of small packets, such as those supporting many Telnet connections. The TCP header compression technique, described fully in RFC 1144, is supported on serial lines that use High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC) or PPP encapsulation.

To compress the TCP headers without enabling cRTP, use the ip tcp header-compressioncommand.

To enable the cRTP over an ATM Link with PPP Encapsulation feature, see the Configuring cRTP over an ATM Link with ATM Encapsulation.

Link Fragmentation and Interleaving

For information about the Link Fragmentation and Interleaving (LFI) feature, refer to the "Configuring Link Fragmentation and Interleaving for Frame Relay and ATM Virtual Circuits" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

MLP Bundling

Multilink PPP (MLP), standardized in RFC 1990, is similar to load-balancing techniques in that it sends packets across the individual links in a round-robin fashion. However, MLP adds three significant capabilities:

  • Because MLP works at the link layer, it makes an MLP bundle appear as one logical link to the upper layer protocols in the router. Thus, only one network address needs to be configured for the entire MLP bundle.
  • MLP keeps track of packet sequencing and buffers packets that arrive early. With this ability, MLP preserves packet order across the entire MLP bundle.
  • Packet fragmentation can be enabled to split large data packets into smaller packet fragments that are individually transmitted across the links. In many circumstances, fragmentation can increase the efficiency of the MLP link.

Additionally, when more bandwidth is needed, additional links can be added to the bundle by simply configuring them as members of the bundle. No reconfiguration at the network layer, such as new addressing, is needed. This is also a significant factor when considering the use of advanced router services. For example, a specific QoS can be configured once for the bundle as a whole rather than on each link in the bundle.

The trade-off for the increased functionality is that MLP requires greater CPU processing than load-balancing solutions. Packet reordering, fragment reassembly, and the MLP protocol itself increase the CPU load.


Note


The fragment delay on the multilink interface should be configured on the basis of the desired maximum delay for interleaved packets. Interleaving is useful only at low bandwidths, usually below 1 Mbps, and it is dependent on the link bandwidths, not the bundle bandwidth.
  • It is recommended that IP CEF be turned on. IP CEF will result in better performance and ease of configuration.
  • The virtual template (VT) should be used (instead of the dialer interface) when configuring either authentication or dynamic address assignment for MLP with LFI.

To enable MLP bundling, see the section "Configuring MLP Bundling."

PPPoEMTUAdjustment

If a Cisco router terminates the PPP over Ethernet (PPPoE) traffic, a computer connected to the Ethernet interface may have a problem accessing websites. The solution is to manually reduce the maximum transmission unit (MTU) configured on the computer by constraining the TCP maximum segment size (MSS). To manually reduce the MTU configured on the computer, use the ip tcp adjust-msscommand. The mss argument value must be 1452 or less.

For more information about adjusting the PPPoE MTU, refer to Software Enhancements for the Cisco 800 Routers and SOHO Routers.

Tunable Transmission Ring

The transmission (tx) ring is the FIFO buffer used to hold frames before transmission at the DSL driver level. The tx ring defines the maximum number of packets that can wait for transmission at Layer 2.

The tx ring complements the ability of LLQ to minimize jitter and latency of voice packets. For maximum voice quality, a low tx ring setting should be used. For maximum data throughput, a high tx ring setting should be used.

You can configure the size of the tx ring for each permanent virtual circuit (PVC). The default value is 60. However, the value of the setting can be 1 through 60 on Cisco 1700 series routers and 3 through 60 on Cisco 2600 and Cisco 3600 series routers. A low tx ring setting, such as 2 or 3, is required for latency-critical traffic. For example, when the tx ring limit is configured as 3 and LLQ is configured on the PVC, the worst case delay for a voice packet is the time required to transmit three data packets. When the buffering is reduced by configuring the tx ring limit, the delay experienced by voice packets is reduced by a combination of the tx ring and LLQ mechanism.


Note


The size of the tx ring buffer is measured in packets, not particles.

VC Bundling

For information about virtual circuit (VC) bundling, refer to Configuring an ADSL WAN Interface Card on Cisco 1700 Series Routers .

Other IP QoS

The following IP QoS features are supported on ADSL WICs and G.SHDSL WICs:

Access Control Lists

For information about access control lists, refer to the "Configuring IP Services" chapter in the Cisco IOS IP Configuration Guide.

IP QoS Map to ATM Class of Service

For information about IP QoS map to ATM class of service (CoS), refer to the "Configuring IP to ATM Class of Service" chapter in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

Additional Supported Features

The following Cisco IOS features are supported on ADSL WICs and G.SHDSL WICs:

Analog Voice Interface Support


Note


The Analog Voice Interface Support feature requires an appropriate VIC.

For more information about analog voice interface support, refer to the Voice Port Testing Enhancements in Cisco 2600 and 3600 Series Routers and MC3810 Series Concentrators.

Clock Rate for AAL5 and AAL2

The communication between DSL WICs and a host in a router occurs through a device called the Serial Communication Controller (SCC). If a host wants to forward data or send any control traffic to a DSL WIC, it uses SCCs. In the same way, if a DSL WIC wants to forward incoming data from a line to the host, it also uses SCCs. Each DSL WIC installed in the router uses two SCCs. One SCC (SCC-A) is used for ATM adaptation layer 5 (AAL5) data traffic, and the other SCC (SCC-B) is used for ATM adaptation layer 2 (AAL2) and control traffic. The speed at which the SCC transfers data between a host and a WIC depends on the clock rate with which it has been configured. You can configure this clock rate on the basis of the DSL line rate. Even though the DSL upstream and downstream line rate may vary, the clock rate between the SCC and the DSL WIC is the same for both the transmitting and receiving direction. That is, the communication between the SCC and the DSL WIC is synchronous. Therefore, you need to configure only one clock rate for an SCC that will be used for both transmitting and receiving between an SCC and a DSL WIC.

It is always recommended that you configure the SCC clock rate slightly higher than the DSL line rate to accommodate overhead between the SCC and the DSL WIC. For an asynchronous DSL WIC (for example, ADSL), the SCC clock rate depends on either the downstream or the upstream line rate, whichever is the maximum rate. For a synchronous DSL WIC (for example, G.SHDSL), the bandwidth for upstream and downstream is the same. Therefore, the SCC clock rate configuration can be based on either the upstream or the downstream line rate.

To configure the clock, use the clock rate command, which is shown in the Configuring the Clock Rate for ADSL and G.SHDSL WICs.

Maximum Clock Rate Limits and Defaults

Because the maximum line rate for G.SHDSL is 2.312 Mbps, the default SCC clock rate of 2.6 Mbps for AAL5 and 1 Mbps for AAL2 should be sufficient. However, for ADSL, the clock rate may need to be configured on the basis of the current line rate. If AAL2 is used for voice traffic, the AAL2 SCC must be configured to the appropriate clock rate: 1 Mbps for ADSL and 2.6 Mbps for G.SHDSL.

The maximum data rate between an SCC and a DSL WIC depends primarily on the maximum clock rate that the SCC can support. For example, on the Cisco 2600 series mainboard, which supports two DSL WICs, the total SCC clock rate that can be configured for both WICs is 8 Mbps. Therefore, if only one DSL WIC is present on the mainboard, AAL5 and AAL2 clock rates can be configured to 7 Mbps and 1 Mbps, respectively. If two DSL WICs are supported on the mainboard, the total of 8 Mbps should be distributed among the four SCCs.

Network module SCCs also pose similar limitations. That is, on the Cisco 2600 series, the total clock rate for all four SCCs is 8 Mbps. The maximum AAL5 clock rate that may be configured on a network module is 5.3 Mbps. On the Cisco 1700 series, the maximum configurable SCC clock rate for both AAL5 and AAL2 is 8 Mbps.

If the clock rate is unconfigured, the SCC is reset to the default values. See the clock rate (interface ATM) command for a complete explanation of default values and maximum and minimum values.

Concurrent VoIP and VoATM

The Concurrent VoIP and VoATM feature allows you to make VoIP over ATM (aal5snap) and VoATM (aal5mux) calls concurrently over xDSL.


Note


This feature is not supported on the Cisco 1700 series.

F5 OAM CC Segment Functionality

For information about F5 Operation, Administration, and Maintenance Continuity Check (F5 OAM CC) segment functionality, refer to the following documents:

  • Cisco Product Bulletin No. 1518 about Cisco IOS Release 12.2(2)XJ
  • Release Notes for the Cisco 1700 Series Routers for Cisco IOS Release 12.2(2)XJ

FRF.5 and FRF.8

To communicate over WANs, end-user stations and the network cloud typically must use the same type of transmission protocol. This limitation has prevented differing networks such as Frame Relay and ATM from being linked. The Frame Relay-to-ATM service interworking feature allows Frame Relay and ATM networks to exchange data despite differing network protocols. The functional requirements for linking Frame Relay and ATM networks are provided by the Frame Relay/ATM PVC Service Interworking Implementation Agreement specified in Frame Relay Forum (FRF) documents FRF.5 and FRF.8. The FRF.5 and FRF.8 interworking functions involve multiplexing PVCs between Frame Relay and ATM networks and mapping the control bits between Frame Relay frame headers and ATM cell headers. FRF.5 and FRF.8 are necessary for ATM-based features to interwork with Frame-Relay-based IP class of service features.

To configure FRF.5 and FRF.8, see Configuring FRF.5 One-To-One Connections and Configuring FRF.8.

H.323 and Media Gateway Control Protocol

For information about H.323 and Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP) testing, refer to Cisco IOS H.323 Configuration Guide in the Cisco IOS Voice Configuration Library.

ILMI

For information about Integrated Local Management Interface (ILMI) protocol implementation for Cisco digital subscriber loop access multiplexers (DSLAMs) with N1-2 cards, refer to the "Configuring ILMI" chapter in the Configuration Guide for Cisco DSLAMS with N1-2 .

Multiple PVC Support


Note


The maximum number of PVCs that can be supported is 23.

For information about PVCs, refer to the following documents:

  • "Wide-Area Networking Overview" chapter in Cisco IOS Wide-Area Networking Configuration Guide
  • "Configuring ATM" chapter in the Cisco IOS Asynchronous Transfer Mode Configuration Guide

Refer to the following documents for caveat information for multiple PVCs by platform for Cisco IOS Release 12.2(2)XK:

  • Release Notes for the Cisco 1700 Series Routers for Cisco IOS Release 12.2(2)XK
  • Release Notes for Cisco 2600 Series for Cisco IOS Release 12.2 XK
  • Release Notes for Cisco 3600 Series for Cisco IOS Release 12.2 XK

Refer to the following documents for caveat information for multiple PVCs by platform for Cisco IOS Release 12.2(4)XL:

  • Release Notes for the Cisco 1700 Series Routers for Cisco IOS Release 12.2(4)XL
  • Release Notes for Cisco 2600 Series for Cisco IOS Release 12.2 XL
  • Release Notes for Cisco 3600 Series for Cisco IOS Release 12.2 XL

Refer to the Release Notes for the Cisco 1700 Series Routers for Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)YN document for caveat information for multiple PVCs.

OAM

For information about Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM), refer to the Configuring Operation, Administration, and Maintenance document.

PPPoE Client

For information about the Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE) Client feature, refer to the PPP over Ethernet Client document.

PPPoE over ATM

PPPoE over ATM enables PPP sessions to be transported using an Ethernet-connected PC over an ATM DSL link. For more information about the PPPoE over ATM feature, refer to the PPPoE on ATM document.

RFC 1483 Bridging

For information about RFC 1483 bridging, refer to the following documents:

  • Basic PVC Configuration Using Bridged RFC 1483
  • DSL Network Architectures

RFC 1483 Routing

For information about ATM and ATM adaptation layers (AALs), refer to the "Wide-Area Networking Overview" chapter in Cisco IOS Wide-Area Networking Configuration Guide.

Session Initiation Protocol

For information about Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), refer to Cisco IOS SIP Configuration Guide in the Cisco IOS Voice Configuration Library .

Survivable Remote Site Telephony

For information about Survivable Remote Site Telephony (SRST), refer to the Survivable Remote Site Telephony Cisco 2600/3600 Voice Technical Marketing solutions document.

VoATM over AAL2

For information about Voice over ATM over AAL2, refer to the following documents:

  • "Configuring Voice over ATM" chapter in the Cisco IOS Voice Configuration Library
  • Configuring AAL2 and AAL5 for the High-Performance ATM Advanced Integration Module on the Cisco 2600 Series

Note


The Voice over ATM over AAL2 feature is not supported on the Cisco 1700 series.

VoATM over AAL5

For information about Voice over ATM over AAL5, refer to the Cisco IOS Voice Configuration Library .


Note


This feature is not supported on the Cisco 1700 series.

VoIP over AAL5

For information about Voice over IP over AAL5, refer to the Cisco IOS Voice Configuration Library .

Benefits of QoS

QoS provides improved and more predictable network service for ADSL and G.SHDSL by

  • Supporting dedicated bandwidth.
  • Improving loss characteristics.
  • Avoiding and managing network congestion.
  • Shaping network traffic.
  • Setting traffic priorities across the network.
  • Decreasing delay for voice and real-time traffic.

How to Configure Enhanced Voice and QoS for ADSL and G.SHDSL

Configuring ATM CLP Bit Marking

This task shows you how to configure ATM CLP bit marking.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    ip cef

4.    class-map class-map-name

5.    match access-group access-group

6.    exit

7.    policy-map policy-map-name

8.    class name

9.    set atm-clp

10.    exit

11.    exit

12.    interface type slot / port . subinterface-number [multipoint | point-to-point]

13.    pvc vpi / vci

14.    service-policy output policy-map-name


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode. Enter your password if prompted.

 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
ip cef


Example:

Router(config)# ip cef

 

Enables Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF).

 
Step 4
class-map class-map-name


Example:

Router(config)# class-map abc

 

Creates a class map to be used for matching packets to a specified class and enters class map configuration mode. The class-map-name argument is the name of the class for the class map. The class name is used for both the class map and to configure policy for the class in the policy map.

 
Step 5
match access-group access-group


Example:

Router(config-cmap)# match access-group 199

 

Specifies the numbered access list against whose contents packets are checked to determine whether they belong to the class. Refer to the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide for other match options.

 
Step 6
exit


Example:

Router(config-cmap)# exit

 

Exits class map configuration mode.

 
Step 7
policy-map policy-map-name


Example:

Router(config)# policy-map anyrule

 

Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy and enters policy map configuration mode. The policy-map-name argument is the name of the policy map.

 
Step 8
class name


Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class abc

 

Specifies the name of a traffic class to classify traffic for the policy traffic and enters policy-map class configuration mode. The name argument should be the same as the class-map name in Step 4 of this configuration.

 
Step 9
set atm-clp


Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# set atm-clp

 

Controls the cell loss priority (CLP) bit setting on Cisco routers when a policy map is configured (changes the setting for all packets that match the specified class from 0 to 1).

 
Step 10
exit


Example:

Router(config-pmap-c)# exit

 

Exits policy-map class configuration mode.

 
Step 11
exit


Example:

Router(config-pmap)# exit

 

Exits policy-map configuration mode.

 
Step 12
interface type slot / port . subinterface-number [multipoint | point-to-point]


Example:

Router(config)# interface atm 0/1.299 multipoint

 

Configures an interface type and enters subinterface configuration mode.

The arguments and keywords are as follows:

  • type --To configure ATM CLP bit marking, use atm for the type argument.
  • slot --Number of the slot being configured. Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for slot and port information.
  • port --Number of the port being configured. Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for slot and port information.
  • subinterface-number --Subinterface number in the range 1 to 4294967293. The number that precedes the period (.) must match the number to which this subinterface belongs.
  • multipoint-- (Optional) Multipoint subinterface.
  • point-to-point --(Optional) Point-to-point subinterface.
 
Step 13
pvc vpi / vci


Example:

Router(config-subif)# pvc 1/1

 

Creates an ATM permanent virtual circuit (PVC) or assigns a name to an ATM PVC and enters ATM VC configuration mode.

The arguments are as follows:

  • vpi / --ATM network virtual path identifier (VPI) for this PVC. The absence of the "/" and a VPI value defaults the VPI value to 0.
  • vci --ATM network virtual channel identifier (VCI) for this PVC. The VCI is a 16-bit field in the header of the ATM cell. The VCI value is unique only on a single link, not throughout the ATM network, because it has local significance only.
Note    The vpi and vci arguments cannot both be set to 0; if one is 0, the other cannot be 0.
 
Step 14
service-policy output policy-map-name


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# service-policy output abc

 

Attaches a policy map to an interface to be used as the service policy for that interface.

The arguments and keywords are as follows:

  • output --Attaches the specified policy map to the output interface.
  • policy-map-name --Name of a service policy map (created using the policy-map command) to be attached.
 

Verifying ATM CLP Bit Marking

The following is sample output using the show atm pvc command on a Cisco 1721 router that show detailed information about the PVC. In this example, five packets are sent, with the CLP set to 1.

Router# show atm pvc 0/33
ATM0.1: VCD: 1, VPI: 0, VCI: 33
UBR, PeakRate: 2304
AAL5-LLC/SNAP, etype:0x0, Flags: 0x2000C20, VCmode: 0x0
OAM frequency: 0 second(s), OAM retry frequency: 1 second(s)
OAM up retry count: 3, OAM down retry count: 5
OAM END CC Activate retry count: 3, OAM END CC Deactivate retry count: 3
OAM END CC retry frequency: 30 second(s), 
OAM SEGMENT CC Activate retry count: 3, OAM SEGMENT CC Deactivate retry count: 3
OAM SEGMENT CC retry frequency: 30 second(s), 
OAM Loopback status: OAM Disabled
OAM VC state: Not Managed
ILMI VC state: Not Managed
InARP frequency: 15 minutes(s)
InPkts: 5, OutPkts: 5, InBytes: 560, OutBytes: 560
InPRoc: 5, OutPRoc: 5
InFast: 0, OutFast: 0, InAS: 0, OutAS: 0
InPktDrops: 0, OutPktDrops: 0/0/0 (holdq/outputq/total)
CrcErrors: 0, SarTimeOuts: 0, OverSizedSDUs: 0, LengthViolation: 0, CPIErrors: 0
Out CLP=1 Pkts: 5
OAM cells received: 0
F5 InEndloop: 0, F5 InSegloop: 0, 
F5 InEndcc: 0, F5 InSegcc: 0, F5 InAIS: 0, F5 InRDI: 0
F4 InEndloop: 0, F4 InSegloop: 0, F4 InAIS: 0, F4 InRDI: 0
OAM cells sent: 0
F5 OutEndloop: 0, F5 OutSegloop: 0, 
F5 OutEndcc: 0, F5 OutSegcc: 0, F5 OutRDI: 0
F4 OutEndloop: 0, F4 OutSegloop: 0, F4 OutRDI: 0
OAM cell drops: 0
Status: UP

Configuring the Clock Rate for ADSL and G.SHDSL WICs

To configure the clock between a WIC and the hosts that are used by the WIC, use the following commands beginning in global configuration mode.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    interface atm slot / port

4.    clock rate [aal2| aal5] clock-rate-value

5.   

6.   

7.   

8.   

9.    no clock rate aal5 | aal2


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode. Enter your password when prompted.

 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
interface atm slot / port


Example:

Router(config)# interface atm 0/1

 

Configures an ATM interface type and enters interface configuration mode.

 
Step 4
clock rate [aal2| aal5] clock-rate-value


Example:

Router(config-if)# clock rate aal2 4000000

 

Configures the clock rate between a WIC and the SCCs that are used by the WIC.

The keywords and arguments are as follows:

  • aal2 --Clock rate for the AAL2 channel.
  • aal5 --Clock rate for the AAL5 channel.
 
Step 5

 
  • clock-rate-value --The clock rate can be set as follows:
    • aal2--For Cisco 1700 series routers, the minimum value for ADSL and G.SHDSL is 4 Mbps. The default value for ADSL and G.SHDSL is 8 Mbps.

For Cisco 2600 and 3600 series routers, the minimum value for ADSL and G.SHDSL is 1 Mbps. The maximum value is 7 Mbps for mainboard slots and 5.3 Mbps for network modules. The default value for ADSL and G.SHDSL is 2.6 Mbps for both mainboard slots and network modules.

To make full use of the 2.3 Mbps bandwidth for VoATM non-switched trunk calls on G.SHDSL, you can change the 1 Mbps default value on Cisco 2600 series and Cisco 3600 series routers and configure the AAL2 clock rate as 2.6 Mbps.

 
Step 6

 

It is recommended, however, that you keep the ADSL SCC clock rate for AAL2 at the default value of 1 Mbps because the upstream of ADSL cannot exceed 1 Mbps.

 
Step 7

 
Note    Change the AAL2 default value on Cisco 2600 and Cisco 3600 series routers only if you are using G.SHDSL for VoATM non-switched trunk calls using a NM-HDV. All other times, the default for AAL2 should remain at 1 Mbps for ADSL and G.SHDSL.
 
Step 8

 
    • aal5 --For Cisco 1700 series routers, the minimum value for ADSL and G.SHDSL is 4 Mbps. The default value for ADSL and G.SHDSL is 8 Mbps.

For Cisco 2600 and 3600 series routers, the minimum value for ADSL and G.SHDSL is 1 Mbps. The maximum value is 7 Mbps for mainboard slots and 5.3 Mbps for network modules. The default value for ADSL and G.SHDSL is 2.6 Mbps for both mainboard slots and network modules.

Note    If you configure a clock rate that exceeds the maximum limit, the configuration will fail. (See the section Troubleshooting the Clock Setting for ADSL and G.SHDSL WICs.)
 
Step 9
no clock rate aal5 | aal2


Example:

Router(config-if)# no clock rate aal5

 

Disables the clock setting for AAL5 or AAL2, respectively, and changes the clock rate to the default setting.

The other method for changing the AAL5 or AAL2 clock rate into the default rate is to configure the clock rate to the actual default settings.

 

Verifying the Clock Setting for ADSL and G.SHDSL WICs

To verify the clock rate setting for an ADSL WIC or G.SHDSL WIC on a Cisco 1700, Cisco 2600, or Cisco 3600 series router, use the show running-config or the show controllers atmcommand in EXEC mode.

Cisco 1700 Series Router

Router# show running-config interface atm0/0
interface ATM0/0
 ip address 1.0.0.1 255.255.255.0
 no ip route-cache
 load-interval 30
 clock rate aal2 4000000
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 pvc 0/33
!
 dsl equipment-type CPE
 dsl operating-mode GSHDSL symmetric annex A
 dsl linerate AUTO

Cisco 1700 Series Router

Router# show controllers atm0/0
Interface: ATM0/0, Hardware: DSLSAR (with Globespan G.SHDSL module), State: 
up
IDB:     82201E98 Instance: 8220364C reg_dslsar:68030000 wic_regs: 
68030080
PHY Inst:822251DC Ser0Inst: 821FC328 Ser1Inst: 821FF41C us_bwidth:192
Slot:    0         Unit:     0         Subunit:   0         pkt Size: 4528
VCperVP: 256       max_vp:   256       max_vc:    65536     total vc: 1
rct_size:65536     vpivcibit:16        connTblVCI:8         vpi_bits: 8
vpvc_sel:3         enabled:  0         throttled: 0         cell drops: 
0
Parallel reads to TCQ:0  tx count reset = 0, periodic safe start = 0
Serial idb(AAL5) output_qcount:0 max:40
Serial idb(RAW) output_qcount:0, max:40
Sar ctrl queue: max depth = 9, current queue depth = 0, drops = 0, urun 
cnt = 0,
total cnt = 153
Serial idb tx count: AAL5: 0, RAW: 0, Drop count:AAL5: 0, RAW: 0
SCC Clockrates:
    SCC-A = 8000000
    SCC-B = 4000000

In the above example, SCC-A represents the SCC clock rate for AAL5 and SCC-B represents the SCC clock rate for AAL2.

Cisco 2600 Series Chassis WIC Slots

The following show controllers atm example from a Cisco 2621 router shows verification of the SCC clock rates for ATM interface 0/0 on mainboard slot 0 and ATM interface 0/1 on mainboard slot 1:

Router# show controllers atm 0/0
Interface: ATM0/0, Hardware: DSLSAR (with Globespan G.SHDSL module), State: up
IDB:     8295D918  Instance: 8295F0CC  reg_dslsar:67000000  wic_regs: 67000080
PHY Inst:82981024  Ser0Inst: 8294C2B4  Ser1Inst:  82954DD8  us_bwidth:2304    
Slot:    0         Unit:     0         Subunit:   0         pkt Size: 4528    
VCperVP: 256       max_vp:   256       max_vc:    65536     total vc: 2       
rct_size:65536     vpivcibit:16        connTblVCI:8         vpi_bits: 8       
vpvc_sel:3         enabled:  0         throttled: 0         cell drops: 0       
Parallel reads to TCQ:2  tx count reset = 0, periodic safe start = 0 
Serial idb(AAL5) output_qcount:0 max:40
Serial idb(RAW) output_qcount:0, max:40
Sar ctrl queue: max depth = 10, current queue depth = 0, drops = 0, urun cnt = 0, total cnt = 105
Serial idb tx count: AAL5: 90277249, RAW: 105, Drop count:AAL5: 0, RAW: 0
SCC Clockrates:
        SCC0 = 2600000 (ATM0/0)
        SCC1 = 2600000 (ATM0/1)
        SCC2 = 1000000 (ATM0/1)
        SCC3 = 1000000 (ATM0/0)

In the above example, the ADSL WIC in slot 0 uses SCC0 and SCC3. The AAL5 and AAL2 SCC clock rate of the WICs are 2 Mbps and 4 Mbps, respectively. The second WIC in slot 1 uses SCC1 and SCC2 for AAL5 and AAL2.

Cisco 2600 Series Network Router

The SCC assignment on a network module is different. The following show controllers atm example is from ATM interface 1/0, which is on network module slot 0. The example is from a Cisco 2650XM router.

Router# show controllers atm1/0
Interface: ATM0/0, Hardware: DSLSAR (with Globespan G.SHDSL module), State: up
IDB:     8295D918  Instance: 8295F0CC  reg_dslsar:67000000  wic_regs: 67000080
PHY Inst:82981024  Ser0Inst: 8294C2B4  Ser1Inst:  82954DD8  us_bwidth:2304    
Slot:    0         Unit:     0         Subunit:   0         pkt Size: 4528    
VCperVP: 256       max_vp:   256       max_vc:    65536     total vc: 2       
rct_size:65536     vpivcibit:16        connTblVCI:8         vpi_bits: 8       
vpvc_sel:3         enabled:  0         throttled: 0         cell drops: 0       
Parallel reads to TCQ:2  tx count reset = 0, periodic safe start = 0 
Serial idb(AAL5) output_qcount:0 max:40
Serial idb(RAW) output_qcount:0, max:40
Sar ctrl queue: max depth = 10, current queue depth = 0, drops = 0, urun cnt = 0, total cnt = 105
Serial idb tx count: AAL5: 90277249, RAW: 105, Drop count:AAL5: 0, RAW: 0
SCC Clockrates:
        SCC0 = 2600000 (ATM0/0)
        SCC1 = 2600000 (ATM0/1)
        SCC2 = 1000000 (ATM0/1)
        SCC3 = 1000000 (ATM0/0)

Troubleshooting the Clock Setting for ADSL and G.SHDSL WICs

The system limitation for Cisco 2600 and Cisco 3600 series routers is that the total SCC clock rate that can be configured for one or more WICs is 8 Mbps. The following troubleshooting tips for Cisco 2600 and Cisco 3600 routers explain situations for which warning and error messages can be received because of the 8 Mbps limitation.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    If you configure a clock rate that exceeds the maximum limit, the configuration will fail. In the following example (on a Cisco 2621 router), both the AAL5 SCC and the AAL2 SCC have been configured to 4 Mbps. Then an additional 7 Mbps are configured on the AAL5 SCC.

2.    If you have already configured your DSL WIC and then add a second WIC, you may exceed the maximum Mbps limit and receive a message such as the following, which shows that the failed DSL interface is shut down and that the clock rates are set to zero:

3.    Non-DSL WICs, such as serial WICs, do not restrict you from configuring more than the maximum SCC clock rate. If these non-DSL WICs coexist with DSL WICs, the dynamic SCC clock rate configuration for the non-DSL WIC is monitored and checked for the maximum limit. If the total SCC clock rate exceeds the maximum limit, the %DSLSAR-1-NO_SCC_CLK_ERR message is displayed and DSL interfaces are shut down. In this case, the SCC clock rates of the shut-down DSL interface are not reset to zero. If you reconfigure the SCC clock rate so that the current clock rate is less than or equal to the maximum limit, the shut-down interface is automatically brought up and the error message will cease to display.


DETAILED STEPS
Step 1   If you configure a clock rate that exceeds the maximum limit, the configuration will fail. In the following example (on a Cisco 2621 router), both the AAL5 SCC and the AAL2 SCC have been configured to 4 Mbps. Then an additional 7 Mbps are configured on the AAL5 SCC.

The following error message indicates that the maximum clock rate configured on the AAL5 SCC is 4 Mbps, including the existing clock rate:



Example:
Router (config)# interface atm 0/0
Router (config-if)# clock rate aal5 7000000
%error: insufficient clockrates, available (including current clock rate) = 4000000 bps
%Clockrate configuration failed
Step 2   If you have already configured your DSL WIC and then add a second WIC, you may exceed the maximum Mbps limit and receive a message such as the following, which shows that the failed DSL interface is shut down and that the clock rates are set to zero:

Example:
1d20h: %DSLSAR-1-NO_SCC_CLK_ERR: ATM1/0: Interface is DOWN because the sum of the clock rate values for both the WICs in slots 0 and 1 exceeded maximum capacity. Please configure clock rates using clock rate command in interface mode such that the sum of clock rate on both the WICs does not exceed 8000000 bps. For a DSL wic, please include aal5 and aal2 clock rate values while calculating the total.

If you add a second WIC, make sure that you reduce the clock rate of the existing DSL so that the combined clock rates do not exceed the maximum.

Step 3   Non-DSL WICs, such as serial WICs, do not restrict you from configuring more than the maximum SCC clock rate. If these non-DSL WICs coexist with DSL WICs, the dynamic SCC clock rate configuration for the non-DSL WIC is monitored and checked for the maximum limit. If the total SCC clock rate exceeds the maximum limit, the %DSLSAR-1-NO_SCC_CLK_ERR message is displayed and DSL interfaces are shut down. In this case, the SCC clock rates of the shut-down DSL interface are not reset to zero. If you reconfigure the SCC clock rate so that the current clock rate is less than or equal to the maximum limit, the shut-down interface is automatically brought up and the error message will cease to display.

Configuring cRTP over an ATM Link with ATM Encapsulation

This task shows you how to configure cRTP over an ATM link with ATM encapsulation.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    ip cef

4.    class-map [match-all] class-map-name

5.    match access-group name access-group-number

6.    class-map [match-all] class-map-name

7.    match access-group name access-group-number

8.    policy-map policy-map-name

9.    class class-name

10.    priority {bandwidth-kbps | percentpercentage}

11.    fair-queue [queue-limit queue-value]

12.    exit

13.    exit

14.    interface type interface-number

15.    ip address ip-address mask [secondary]

16.    interface atm slot / port

17.    no ip address

18.    load-interval seconds

19.    no atm ilmi-keepalive

20.    pvc vpi / vci

21.    vbr-rt peak-rate average-rate burst

22.    tx-ring-limit ring-limit

23.    protocol protocol {virtual-template {virtual-template-interface-number}| dialer}

24.    exit

25.    dsl equipment-type {co | cpe}

26.    dsl operating-mode auto gshdsl symmetric annex {A | B}

27.    dsl linerate {kbps | auto}

28.    exit

29.    interface virtual-template number

30.    ip unnumbered type-number

31.    ip tcp header-compression

32.    service-policy {input | output}

33.    ppp multilink

34.    ppp multilink fragment-delay delay-max

35.    ppp multilink interleave

36.    ip rtp header-compression [passive]

37.    ip rtp compression-connections number

38.    exit

39.    voice-port slot-number / subunit-number / port

40.    dial-peer voice tag {pots | voatm | vofr | voip}

41.    destination-pattern [+] string [T]

42.    port {slot-number / subunit-number / port}

43.    exit

44.    dial-peer voice tag {pots | voatm | vofr | voip}

45.    destination-pattern [+] string [T]

46.    session target {ipv4: destination-address}

47.    dtmf-relay [cisco-rtp] [h245-alphanumeric] [h245-signal]

48.    ip qos dscp [number | set-af | set-cs | default | ef] [media | signaling]

49.    ip qos dscp [number | set-af | set-cs | default | ef] [media | signaling]

50.    no vad


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode. Enter your password when prompted.

 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
ip cef


Example:

Router(config)# ip cef

 

Enables Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) on the Route Processor card.

 
Step 4
class-map [match-all] class-map-name


Example:

Router(config)# class-map match-all voice-traffic

 

Creates a class map to be used for matching packets to a specified class and enters class-map configuration mode.

 
Step 5
match access-group name access-group-number


Example:

Router(config-cmap)# match access-group 102

 

Configures the match criteria for a class map on the basis of the specified access control list (ACL).

 
Step 6
class-map [match-all] class-map-name


Example:

Router(config-cmap)# class-map match-all voice-signaling

 

Creates a class map to be used for matching packets to a specified class and enters class-map configuration mode.

 
Step 7
match access-group name access-group-number


Example:

Router(config-cmap)# match access-group 103

 

Configures the match criteria for a class map on the basis of the specified ACL.

 
Step 8
policy-map policy-map-name


Example:

Router(config-cmap)# policy-map VOICE-POLICY

 

Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy and enters policy-map configuration mode.

 
Step 9
class class-name


Example:

Router(config-pmap)# class voice-traffic

 

Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change or specifies the default class (commonly known as the class-default class) before you configure its policy.

 
Step 10
priority {bandwidth-kbps | percentpercentage}


Example:

Router(config-pmap)# priority 8 48

 

Gives priority to a class of traffic belonging to a policy map.

 
Step 11
fair-queue [queue-limit queue-value]


Example:

Router(config-pmap)# fair-queue

 

Specifies the number of queues to be reserved for use by a traffic class.

 
Step 12
exit


Example:

Router(config-pmap)# exit

 

Exits policy-map configuration mode.

 
Step 13
exit


Example:

Router(config-cmap)# exit

 

Exits class-map configuration mode.

 
Step 14
interface type interface-number


Example:

Router(config)# interface loopback1

 

Enters interface configuration mode. Use Loopback for the typeargument. Use 1 for the interface-number argument. Loopback 1 is a standard configuration for Multilink PPP (MLP) over ATM.

 
Step 15
ip address ip-address mask [secondary]


Example:

Router(config-if)# ip address 172.100.10.10 255.255.255.0

 

Sets a primary or secondary IP address for an interface.

 
Step 16
interface atm slot / port


Example:

Router(config-if)# interface atm 0/1

 

Configures an ATM interface type.

 
Step 17
no ip address


Example:

Router(config-if-atm)# no ip address

 

Removes an IP address or disables IP processing.

 
Step 18
load-interval seconds


Example:

Router(config-if-atm)# load-interval 15

 

Changes the length of time for which data is used to compute load statistics.

 
Step 19
no atm ilmi-keepalive


Example:

Router(config-if-atm)# no atm ilmi-keepalive

 

Disables ILMI keepalive.

 
Step 20
pvc vpi / vci


Example:

Router(config-if-atm)# pvc 1/100

 

Creates an ATM permanent virtual circuit (PVC) or assigns a name to an ATM PVC and enters ATM VC configuration mode.

 
Step 21
vbr-rt peak-rate average-rate burst


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# vbr-rt 1500 1500

 

Configures the real-time variable bit rate (VBR) for Voice over ATM connections.

 
Step 22
tx-ring-limit ring-limit


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# tx-ring-limit 3

 

Limits the number of particles or packets that can be used on a transmission ring on an interface. The ring-limit argument specifies the maximum number of allowable particles or packets that can be placed on the transmission ring.

 
Step 23
protocol protocol {virtual-template {virtual-template-interface-number}| dialer}


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# protocol ppp Virutal-Template1

 

Configures a static map for an ATM PVC, SVC, or VC class or enables Inverse Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) or Inverse ARP broadcasts on an ATM PVC. In this configuration, the protocol argument should be ppp. If ppp is shown as the protocol argument, the virtual-template keyword and the virtual-template-interface-numberargument must be used. The virtual-template-interface-number argument may be any number from 1 through 200.

 
Step 24
exit


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# exit

 

Exits ATM VC configuration mode.

 
Step 25
dsl equipment-type {co | cpe}


Example:

Router(config-if)# dsl co

 

Configures the DSL ATM interface to function as central office equipment or customer premises equipment.

 
Step 26
dsl operating-mode auto gshdsl symmetric annex {A | B}


Example:

Router(config-if)# dsl operating-mode gshdsl symmetric annex A

 

Specifies an operating mode of the digital subscriber line for an ATM interface. A specifies North America, and B specifies Europe. A is the default.

 
Step 27
dsl linerate {kbps | auto}


Example:

Router(config-if)# dsl linerate auto

 

Specifies a line rate for the DSL ATM interface.

 
Step 28
exit


Example:

Router(config-if)# exit

 

Exits interface configuration mode.

 
Step 29
interface virtual-template number


Example:

Router(config)# interface virtual-template 1

 

Creates a virtual template interface that can be configured and applied dynamically in creating virtual access interfaces.

 
Step 30
ip unnumbered type-number


Example:

Router(config-if)# ip unnumbered loopback1

 

Enables IP processing on a serial interface without assigning an explicit IP address to the interface.

Note    Use Loopback1 for the type-numberargument. Loopback is a standard configuration for MLP over ATM.
 
Step 31
ip tcp header-compression


Example:

Router(config-if)# ip tcp header-compression iphc-format

 

Enables TCP header compression.

Note    When you use the show running-config command, the format of the ip tcp header-compressioncommand will change to ip tcp header-compression iphc-format.
 
Step 32
service-policy {input | output}


Example:

Router(config-if)# service-policy output

 

Attaches a policy map to an input interface or virtual circuit (VC), or to an output interface or VC, to be used as the service policy for that interface or VC. For this configuration, use the output keyword.

 
Step 33
ppp multilink


Example:

Router(config-if)# ppp multilink

 

Enables MLP on an interface and, optionally, enables Bandwidth Allocation Control Protocol (BACP) and Bandwidth Allocation Protocol (BAP) for dynamic bandwidth allocation.

 
Step 34
ppp multilink fragment-delay delay-max


Example:

Router(config-if)# ppp multilink fragment-delay 3

 

Specifies a maximum size in units of time for packet fragments on a MLP bundle. The delay-max argument is the maximum amount of time, in milliseconds, that it should take to transmit a fragment. The range is from 1 to 1000 milliseconds.

 
Step 35
ppp multilink interleave


Example:

Router(config-if)# ppp multilink interleave

 

Enables interleaving of packets among the fragments of larger packets on a MLP bundle.

 
Step 36
ip rtp header-compression [passive]


Example:

Router(config-if)# ip rtp header-compression passive

 

Enables Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) header compression. The optional passive keyword compresses outgoing RTP packets only if incoming RTP packets on the same interface are compressed.

Note    When you enter the show running-config command, the format of the ip rtp header-compression command will change to ip rtp header-compression iphc-format.
 
Step 37
ip rtp compression-connections number


Example:

Router(config-if)# ip rtp compression-connections 3

 

Specifies the total number of Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) header compression connections that can exist on an interface.

 
Step 38
exit


Example:

Router(config-if)# exit

 

Exits interface configuration mode.

 
Step 39
voice-port slot-number / subunit-number / port


Example:

Router(config)# voice-port 0/1/0

 

Enters voice-port configuration mode. Enter this command for all ports.

 
Step 40
dial-peer voice tag {pots | voatm | vofr | voip}


Example:

Router(config)# dial-peer voice 2 voip

 

Enters dial-peer configuration mode and specifies the method of voice encapsulation, which in this case is POTS.

 
Step 41
destination-pattern [+] string [T]


Example:

Router(config-dial-peer)# destination-pattern 8...

 

Specifies either the prefix or the full E.164 telephone number (depending on your dial plan) to be used for a dial peer.

 
Step 42
port {slot-number / subunit-number / port}


Example:

Router(config-dial-peer)# port 1/1/0

 

Associates a dial peer with a specific voice port.

 
Step 43
exit


Example:

Router(config-dial-peer)# exit

 

Exits dial-peer configuration mode.

 
Step 44
dial-peer voice tag {pots | voatm | vofr | voip}


Example:

Router(config)# dial-peer voice 3 voip

 

Enters dial-peer configuration mode and specifies the method of voice encapsulation, which in this case is VoIP.

 
Step 45
destination-pattern [+] string [T]


Example:

Router(config-dial-peer)# destination-pattern 5...

 

Specifies either the prefix or the full E.164 telephone number (depending on your dial plan) to be used for a dial peer.

 
Step 46
session target {ipv4: destination-address}


Example:

Router(config-dial-peer)# session target ipv4:192.168.1.1

 

Specifies a network-specific address for a specified VoIP dial peer.

 
Step 47
dtmf-relay [cisco-rtp] [h245-alphanumeric] [h245-signal]


Example:

Router(config-dial-peer)# dtmf-relay cisco-rtp

 

Specifies how an H.323 gateway relays dual tone multifrequency (DTMF) tones between telephony interfaces and an IP network.

 
Step 48
ip qos dscp [number | set-af | set-cs | default | ef] [media | signaling]


Example:

Router(config-dial-peer)# ip qos dscp cs5 media

 

Specifies IP DSCP. In this case, choose the mediakeyword.

 
Step 49
ip qos dscp [number | set-af | set-cs | default | ef] [media | signaling]


Example:

Router(config-dial-peer)# ip qos dscp cs5 signaling

 

Specifies IP DSCP. In this case, choose the signaling keyword.

 
Step 50
no vad


Example:

Router(config-dial-peer)# no vad

 

Disables voice activity detection (VAD).

 

Verifying cRTP Statistics

To display cRTP statistics, use the show ip rtp header-compression command as is shown in the following example:

Router# show ip rtp header-compression
RTP/UDP/IP header compression statistics:
  Interface Virtual-Template1:
    Rcvd:    0 total, 0 compressed, 0 errors, 0 status msgs
             0 dropped, 0 buffer copies, 0 buffer failures
    Sent:    0 total, 0 compressed, 0 status msgs
             0 bytes saved, 0 bytes sent
    Connect: 3 rx slots, 3 tx slots,
             0 long searches, 0 misses 0 collisions, 0 negative cache hits
  Interface Virtual-Access4:
    Rcvd:    0 total, 0 compressed, 0 errors, 0 status msgs
             0 dropped, 0 buffer copies, 0 buffer failures
    Sent:    0 total, 0 compressed, 0 status msgs
             0 bytes saved, 0 bytes sent
    Connect: 3 rx slots, 3 tx slots,
             0 long searches, 0 misses 0 collisions, 0 negative cache hits
  Interface Virtual-Access5:
    Rcvd:    7264 total, 7244 compressed, 0 errors, 0 status msgs
             0 dropped, 0 buffer copies, 0 buffer failures
    Sent:    7414 total, 7392 compressed, 0 status msgs
             280706 bytes saved, 164178 bytes sent
             2.70 efficiency improvement factor
    Connect: 3 rx slots, 3 tx slots,
             0 long searches, 2 misses 1 collisions, 0 negative cache hits
             99% hit ratio, five minute miss rate 0 misses/sec, 0 max

To display the cRTP gain and to monitor the traffic flow on the actual interface, use the show interface atm command.

Router# show interface atm 0/0
ATM0/0 is up, line protocol is up
  Hardware is DSLSAR (with Globespan G.SHDSL module)
  MTU 4470 bytes, sub MTU 4470, BW 2304 Kbit, DLY 880 usec,
     reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
  Encapsulation ATM, loopback not set
  Encapsulation(s): AAL5 , PVC mode
  23 maximum active VCs, 256 VCs per VP, 1 current VCCs
  VC Auto Creation Disabled.
  VC idle disconnect time: 300 seconds
  Last input 00:11:57, output 00:00:00, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
  Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
  Queueing strategy: None
  30 second input rate 10000 bits/sec, 50 packets/sec
  30 second output rate 13000 bits/sec, 50 packets/sec
     54153 packets input, 2586202 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     5 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     38013 packets output, 2133672 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

Configuring FRF.5 One-To-One Connections

This task shows you how to configure FRF.5 for a one-to-one connection between two Frame Relay end users over an intermediate ATM network.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    frame-relay switching

4.    interface type slot / port

5.    encapsulation frame-relay [ietf]

6.    frame-relay interface-dlci dlci switched

7.    frame-relay intf-type [dce]

8.    exit

9.    interface type slot / port . subinterface-number {multipoint | point-to-point}

10.    pvc vpi / vci

11.    encapsulation aal5mux frame-relay

12.    exit

13.    exit

14.    connect connection-name {FR-interface FR-DLCI} ATM-interface ATM-VPI / VCI [network-interworking]

15.   Do one of the following:

  • clp-bit {0 | 1 | map-de}
  • de-bit map-clp


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode. Enter your password when prompted.

 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
frame-relay switching


Example:

Router(config)# frame-relay switching

 

Enables Frame Relay permanent virtual circuit (PVC) switching.

 
Step 4
interface type slot / port


Example:

Router(config)# interface serial0

 

Enters interface configuration mode.

 
Step 5
encapsulation frame-relay [ietf]


Example:

Router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay ietf

 

Enables Frame Relay encapsulation. Use the ietf keyword to set the encapsulation method to comply with the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standard (RFC 1490). Use the ietf keyword when connecting to another vendor's equipment across a Frame Relay network.

 
Step 6
frame-relay interface-dlci dlci switched


Example:

Router(config-if)# frame-relay interface-dlci 100 switched

 

Indicates that a Frame Relay data-link connection identifier (DLCI) is switched and enters Frame Relay dlci configuration mode. The dlciargument is the DLCI number to be used on the specified interface or subinterface.

 
Step 7
frame-relay intf-type [dce]


Example:

Router(config-fr-dlci)# frame-relay intf-type dce

 

Configures a Frame Relay switch type. Use the dce keyword if the router or access server functions as a switch connected to a router.

 
Step 8
exit


Example:

Router(config-if)# exit

 

Exits interface configuration mode.

 
Step 9
interface type slot / port . subinterface-number {multipoint | point-to-point}


Example:

Router(config)# interface atm 1/1.299 multipoint

 

Creates an ATM subinterface and enters subinterface configuration mode.

The arguments and keywords are as follows:

  • type --Type of interface. Use atm for this configuration.
  • slot --Number of the slot being configured. Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for slot and port information.
  • port --Number of the port being configured. Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for slot and port information.
  • subinterface-number --Subinterface number in the range 1 to 4294967293. The number that precedes the period (.) must match the number to which this subinterface belongs.
  • multipoint --Multipoint interface.
  • point-to-point --Point-to-point interface.
 
Step 10
pvc vpi / vci


Example:

Router(config-subif)# pvc 0/1

 

Creates an ATM PVC and enters ATM VC configuration mode.

The arguments are as follows:

  • vpi / --ATM network virtual path identifier (VPI) for this PVC. The absence of the "/" and a VPI value defaults the VPI value to 0.
  • vci --ATM network virtual channel identifier (VCI) for this PVC. The VCI is a 16-bit field in the header of the ATM cell. The VCI value is unique only on a single link, not throughout the ATM network, because it has local significance only.
Note    The vpi and vci arguments cannot both be set to 0; if one is 0, the other cannot be 0.
 
Step 11
encapsulation aal5mux frame-relay


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# encapsulation aal5mux frame-relay

 

Configures the ATM adaptation layer (AAL) and encapsulation type for an ATM permanent virtual circuit (PVC).

 
Step 12
exit


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# exit

 

Exits ATM VC configuration mode.

 
Step 13
exit


Example:

Router(config-subif)# exit

 

Exits interface configuration mode.

 
Step 14
connect connection-name {FR-interface FR-DLCI} ATM-interface ATM-VPI / VCI [network-interworking]


Example:

Router(config)# connect frf serial0 100 atm 0/33 network-interworking

 

Creates a connection to connect the Frame Relay DLCI to the ATM PVC, configures FRF.5 encapsulation, and enters FRF5 configuration mode.

The arguments and keywords are as follows:

  • connection-name --Connection name. Enter as a 15-character maximum string.
  • FR-interface --Frame Relay interface type and number, for example, serial1/0.
  • FR-DLCI --Frame Relay DLCI in the range from 16 to 1007.
  • ATM-interface --ATM interface type and number, for example, atm1/0.
  • ATM-VPI / VCI --ATM virtual path identifier/virtual channel identifier (VPI/VCI). If a VPI is not specified, the default VPI is 0.
  • network-interworking --(Optional) FRF.5 network interworking.
 
Step 15
Do one of the following:
  • clp-bit {0 | 1 | map-de}
  • de-bit map-clp


Example:

Router(config-frf5)# clp-bit 0

 

Sets the ATM cell loss priority (CLP) bit field in the ATM cell header.

or

Sets the discard eligible (DE) bit mapping from ATM to Frame Relay.

 

Configuring FRF.5 for Many-To-One Connections

This task shows you how to configure FRF.5 for a many-to-one connection between two Frame Relay end users over an intermediate ATM network.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    frame-relay switching

4.    interface type slot / port

5.    encapsulation frame-relay [ietf]

6.    frame-relay interface-dlci dlci switched

7.    frame-relay intf-type [dce]

8.    exit

9.    vc-group group-name

10.    interface type slot / port FR-DLCI FR-SSCS-DLCI

11.    exit

12.    interface atm slot / port . subinterface-number {multipoint | point-to-point}

13.    pvc vpi / vci

14.    encapsulation aal5mux frame-relay

15.    exit

16.    exit

17.    connect connection-name vc-group group-name ATM-interface ATM-VPI/VCI

18.   Do one of the following:

  • clp-bit {0 | 1 | map-de}
  • de-bit map-clp


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode. Enter your password when prompted.

 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
frame-relay switching


Example:

Router(config)# frame-relay switching

 

Enables Frame Relay permanent virtual circuit (PVC) switching.

 
Step 4
interface type slot / port


Example:

Router(config)# interface serial0

 

Enters interface configuration mode.

 
Step 5
encapsulation frame-relay [ietf]


Example:

Router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay

 

Enables Frame Relay encapsulation. Use the ietf keyword to set the encapsulation method to comply with the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standard (RFC 1490). Use the ietf keyword when connecting to another vendor's equipment across a Frame Relay network.

 
Step 6
frame-relay interface-dlci dlci switched


Example:

Router(config-if)# frame-relay interface-dlci 122 switched

 

Indicates that a Frame Relay data-link connection identifier (DLCI) is switched and enters Frame Relay dlci configuration mode. The dlciargument is the DLCI number to be used on the specified interface or subinterface.

 
Step 7
frame-relay intf-type [dce]


Example:

Router(config-fr-dlci)# frame-relay intf-type dce

 

Configures a Frame Relay switch type. Use the dce keyword if the router or access server functions as a switch connected to a router.

 
Step 8
exit


Example:

Router(config-if)# exit

 

Exits interface configuration mode.

 
Step 9
vc-group group-name


Example:

Router(config)# vc-group groupa

 

Assigns multiple Frame Relay DLCIs to a VC group and enters ATM-Frame Relay VC group configuration mode.

 
Step 10
interface type slot / port FR-DLCI FR-SSCS-DLCI


Example:

Router(config-vc-group)# serial 1/0 100 100

 

Specifies the Frame Relay DLCIs in the VC group and maps them to the Frame Relay-SSCS DLCIs.

 
Step 11
exit


Example:

Router (config-vc-group)# exit

 

Exits ATM-Frame Relay VC group configuration mode.

 
Step 12
interface atm slot / port . subinterface-number {multipoint | point-to-point}


Example:

Router(config)# interface atm 0/1.22 multipoint

 

Creates an ATM subinterface and enters subinterface configuration mode.

The arguments and keywords are as follows:

  • slot --Number of the slot being configured. Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for slot and port information.
  • port --Number of the port being configured. Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for slot and port information.
  • subinterface-number --Subinterface number in the range 1 to 4294967293. The number that precedes the period (.) must match the number to which this subinterfce belongs.
  • multipoint --Multipoint interface.
  • point-to-point --Point-to-point interface.
 
Step 13
pvc vpi / vci


Example:

Router(config-subif)# pvc 0/33

 

Creates an ATM permanent virtual circuit (PVC) or assigns a name to an ATM PVC.

The arguments are as follows:

  • vpi / --ATM network virtual path identifier (VPI) for this PVC. The absence of the "/" and a VPI value defaults the VPI value to 0.
  • vci -- ATM network virtual channel identifier (VCI) for this PVC. The VCI is a 16-bit field in the header of the ATM cell. The VCI value is unique only on a single link, not throughout the ATM network, because it has local significance only.

The vpi and vci arguments cannot both be set to 0; if one is 0, the other cannot be 0.

 
Step 14
encapsulation aal5mux frame-relay


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# encapsulation aal5mux frame-relay

 

Configures the ATM adaptation layer (AAL) and encapsulation type for an ATM permanent virtual circuit (PVC) and enters ATM VC configuration mode.

 
Step 15
exit


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# exit

 

Exits ATM VC configuration mode.

 
Step 16
exit


Example:

Router(config-if)# exit

 

Exits interface configuration mode.

 
Step 17
connect connection-name vc-group group-name ATM-interface ATM-VPI/VCI


Example:

Router(config)# connect frf5-v vc-group groupa atm0 0/33

 

Configures an FRF.5 one-to-one connection between two Frame Relay end users over an intermediate ATM network and enters FRF.5 configuration mode.

The arguments and keywords are as follows:

  • connection-name --A connection name. Enter as a 15-character maximum string.
  • vc-group --Specifies a VC group name for a many-to-one FRF.5 connection. Enter as an 11- character maximum string.
  • ATM-interface --The ATM interface type and number, for example, atm1/0.
  • ATM-VPI/VCI --The ATM virtual path identifier/virtual channel identifier (VPI/VCI). If a VPI is not specified, the default VPI is 0.
 
Step 18
Do one of the following:
  • clp-bit {0 | 1 | map-de}
  • de-bit map-clp


Example:

Router(config-frf5)# clp-bit 0

 

Sets the ATM cell loss priority (CLP) bit field in the ATM cell header.

or

Sets the discard eligible (DE) bit mapping from ATM to Frame Relay.

 

Verifying FRF.5

The following show command output is from a Cisco 1721 router. Use the show connection all or show connection id commands to check the state of the connection. Use the show frame-relay pvc command to verify the state of the Frame Relay PVC, and use the show atm pvc command to verify the state of the ATM PVC.

Router# show connection all
ID   Name               Segment 1            Segment 2           State       
========================================================================
1    frf5              Serial0 100          ATM0 0/33            UP          
Router# show connection id
 1
FR/ATM Network Interworking Connection: frf5
  Status    - UP
  Segment 1 - Serial0 DLCI 100
  Segment 2 - ATM0 VPI 0 VCI 33
  Interworking Parameters -
    fr-sscs-dlci 1022
    de-bit map-clp
    clp-bit map-de
Router# show frame-relay pvc 100
PVC Statistics for interface Serial0 (Frame Relay DCE)
DLCI = 100, DLCI USAGE = FRF.5, PVC STATUS = ACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0
  input pkts 5             output pkts 5            in bytes 520
  out bytes 520            dropped pkts 0           in pkts dropped 0
  out pkts dropped 0                out bytes dropped 0
  in FECN pkts 0           in BECN pkts 0           out FECN pkts 0
  out BECN pkts 0          in DE pkts 0             out DE pkts 0
  out bcast pkts 0         out bcast bytes 0
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  switched pkts 5         
  Detailed packet drop counters:
  no out intf 0            out intf down 0          no out PVC 0
  in PVC down 0            out PVC down 0           pkt too big 0
  shaping Q full 0         pkt above DE 0           policing drop 0
  pvc create time 00:25:00, last time pvc status changed 00:05:16
Router# show atm pvc 0/33
ATM0.1: VCD: 1, VPI: 0, VCI: 33
UBR, PeakRate: 2304
AAL5-FRATM, etype:0x3, Flags: 0xC22, VCmode: 0x0
OAM frequency: 0 second(s), OAM retry frequency: 1 second(s)
OAM up retry count: 3, OAM down retry count: 5
OAM END CC Activate retry count: 3, OAM END CC Deactivate retry count: 3
OAM END CC retry frequency: 30 second(s), 
OAM SEGMENT CC Activate retry count: 3, OAM SEGMENT CC Deactivate retry count: 3
OAM SEGMENT CC retry frequency: 30 second(s), 
OAM Loopback status: OAM Disabled
OAM VC state: Not Managed
ILMI VC state: Not Managed
InARP DISABLED
InPkts: 5, OutPkts: 5, InBytes: 540, OutBytes: 540
InPRoc: 0, OutPRoc: 0
InFast: 5, OutFast: 5, InAS: 0, OutAS: 0
InPktDrops: 0, OutPktDrops: 0/0/0 (holdq/outputq/total)
CrcErrors: 0, SarTimeOuts: 0, OverSizedSDUs: 0, LengthViolation: 0, CPIErrors: 0
Out CLP=1 Pkts: 0
OAM cells received: 0
F5 InEndloop: 0, F5 InSegloop: 0, 
F5 InEndcc: 0, F5 InSegcc: 0, F5 InAIS: 0, F5 InRDI: 0
F4 InEndloop: 0, F4 InSegloop: 0, F4 InAIS: 0, F4 InRDI: 0
OAM cells sent: 0
F5 OutEndloop: 0, F5 OutSegloop: 0, 
F5 OutEndcc: 0, F5 OutSegcc: 0, F5 OutRDI: 0
F4 OutEndloop: 0, F4 OutSegloop: 0, F4 OutRDI: 0
OAM cell drops: 0
Status: UP

Configuring FRF.8

This task shows you how to configure FRF.8.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    frame-relay switching

4.    interface serial slot / port

5.    encapsulation frame-relay [ietf]

6.    no fair-queue

7.    frame-relay interface-dlci dlci switched

8.    frame-relay intf-type dce

9.    exit

10.    interface type slot / port . subinterface-number {multipoint | point-to-point}

11.    pvc vpi / vci

12.    encapsulation aal5mux fr-atm-srv

13.    exit

14.    exit

15.    connect connection-name FR-interface FR-DLCI ATM-interface ATM-VPI/VCI service-interworking

16.   Do one of the following:

  • clp-bit {0 | 1 | map-de}
  • de-bit {0 | 1 | map-clp}
  • efci-bit {0 | map-fecn}


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode. Enter your password when prompted.

 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
frame-relay switching


Example:

Router(config)# frame-relay switching

 

Enables Frame Relay permanent virtual circuit (PVC) switching.

 
Step 4
interface serial slot / port


Example:

Router(config)# interface serial 0/1

 

Enters interface configuration mode.

 
Step 5
encapsulation frame-relay [ietf]


Example:

Router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay ietf

 

Enables Frame Relay encapsulation. Use the ietf keyword to set the encapsulation method to comply with the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standard (RFC 1490). Use this keyword when connecting to another vendor's equipment across a Frame Relay network.

 
Step 6
no fair-queue


Example:

Router(config-if)# no fair-queue

 

Deletes the configured number of queues from the traffic class.

 
Step 7
frame-relay interface-dlci dlci switched


Example:

Router(config-if)# frame-relay interface-dlci 199 switched

 

Indicates that a Frame Relay data-link connection identifier (DLCI) is switched and enters Frame Relay dlci configuration mode. The dlciargument is the DLCI number to be used on the specified interface or subinterface.

 
Step 8
frame-relay intf-type dce


Example:

Router(config-fr-dlci)# frame-relay intf-type dce

 

Configures a Frame Relay switch type. Use the dce keyword if the router or access server functions as a switch connected to a router.

 
Step 9
exit


Example:

Router(config-if)# exit

 

Exits interface configuration mode.

 
Step 10
interface type slot / port . subinterface-number {multipoint | point-to-point}


Example:

Router(config)# interface atm 0/1.299 multipoint

 

Configures an interface type and enters subinterface configuration mode.

The arguments and keywords are as follows:

  • type --To configure FRF.8, use atm for the type argument.
  • slot --Number of the slot being configured. Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for slot and port information.
  • port --Number of the port being configured. Refer to the appropriate hardware manual for slot and port information.
  • subinterface-number --Subinterface number in the range 1 to 4294967293. The number that precedes the period (.) must match the number to which this subinterface belongs.
  • multipoint --Multipoint interface.
  • point-to-point --Point-to-point interface.
 
Step 11
pvc vpi / vci


Example:

Router(config-subif)# pvc 1/1

 

Creates an ATM PVC, assigns a name to an ATM PVC, and enters ATM VC configuration mode.

The arguments are as follows:

  • vpi / --ATM network virtual path identifier (VPI) for this PVC. The absence of the "/" and a VPI value defaults the VPI value to 0.
  • vci --ATM network virtual channel identifier (VCI) for this PVC. The VCI is a 16-bit field in the header of the ATM cell. The VCI value is unique only on a single link, not throughout the ATM network, because it has local significance only.

The vpi and vci arguments cannot both be set to 0; if one is 0, the other cannot be 0.

 
Step 12
encapsulation aal5mux fr-atm-srv


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# encapsulation aal5mux fr-atm-srv

 

Configures the ATM adaptation layer (AAL) and encapsulation type for an ATM PVC.

 
Step 13
exit


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# exit

 

Exits ATM VC configuration mode.

 
Step 14
exit


Example:

Router(config-if) exit

 

Exits interface configuration mode.

 
Step 15
connect connection-name FR-interface FR-DLCI ATM-interface ATM-VPI/VCI service-interworking


Example:

Router(config)# connect frf8 serial0 100 atm0 0/33 service-interworking

 

Configures an FRF.8 one-to-one mapping between a Frame Relay DLCI and an ATM permanent virtual circuit (PVC) and enters FRF.8 configuration mode.

The arguments and keywords are as follows:

  • connection-name --Connection name. Enter as a 15-character maximum string.
  • FR-interface --Frame Relay interface type and number, for example, serial1/0.
  • FR-DLCI --Frame Relay data-link connection identifier (DLCI) in the range 16 to 1007.
  • ATM-interface -- ATM interface type and number, for example atm1/0.
  • ATM-VPI/VCI --ATM virtual path identifier/virtual channel identifier (VPI/VCI). If a VPI is not specified, the default VPI is 0.
  • service-interworking --FRF.8 service interworking.
 
Step 16
Do one of the following:
  • clp-bit {0 | 1 | map-de}
  • de-bit {0 | 1 | map-clp}
  • efci-bit {0 | map-fecn}


Example:

Router(config-frf8)# clp-bit 0

 

Sets the ATM cell loss priority (CLP) bit field in the ATM cell header.

or

Sets the Frame Relay discard eligible (DE) bit field in the Frame Relay header.

or

Sets the explicit forward congestion indication (EFCI) bit field in the ATM cell header.

 

Verifying FRF.8

The following show command output is from a Cisco 1721 router. Use the show connection all or show connection id commands to check the state of the connection. Use show frame-relay pvc command to verify the state of the Frame Relay PVC and use show atm pvc commandto verify the state of the ATM PVC.

Router# show connection all
ID   Name               Segment 1            Segment 2           State       
========================================================================
2    frf8              Serial0 100          ATM0 0/33            UP          
Router# show connection id 2
FR/ATM Service Interworking Connection: frf8
  Status    - UP
  Segment 1 - Serial0 DLCI 100
  Segment 2 - ATM0 VPI 0 VCI 33
Interworking Parameters -
    service translation
    efci-bit 0
    de-bit map-clp
    clp-bit map-de
Router# show frame-relay pvc
PVC Statistics for interface Serial0 (Frame Relay DCE)
              Active     Inactive      Deleted       Static
  Local          0            0            0            0
  Switched       1            0            0            0
  Unused         0            0            0            0
DLCI = 100, DLCI USAGE = FRF.8, PVC STATUS = ACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0
  input pkts 5             output pkts 5            in bytes 540       
  out bytes 520            dropped pkts 0           in pkts dropped 0         
  out pkts dropped 0                out bytes dropped 0         
  in FECN pkts 0           in BECN pkts 0           out FECN pkts 0         
  out BECN pkts 0          in DE pkts 0             out DE pkts 0         
  out bcast pkts 0         out bcast bytes 0         
  5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  switched pkts 5         
  Detailed packet drop counters:
  no out intf 0            out intf down 0          no out PVC 0         
  in PVC down 0            out PVC down 0           pkt too big 0         
  shaping Q full 0         pkt above DE 0           policing drop 0         
  pvc create time 00:08:57, last time pvc status changed 00:08:20
Router# show atm pvc 0/33
ATM0.1: VCD: 1, VPI: 0, VCI: 33
UBR, PeakRate: 2304
AAL5-FRATMSRV, etype:0x15, Flags: 0xC23, VCmode: 0x0
OAM frequency: 0 second(s), OAM retry frequency: 1 second(s)
OAM up retry count: 3, OAM down retry count: 5
OAM END CC Activate retry count: 3, OAM END CC Deactivate retry count: 3
OAM END CC retry frequency: 30 second(s), 
OAM SEGMENT CC Activate retry count: 3, OAM SEGMENT CC Deactivate retry count: 3
OAM SEGMENT CC retry frequency: 30 second(s), 
OAM Loopback status: OAM Disabled
OAM VC state: Not Managed
ILMI VC state: Not Managed
InARP DISABLED
InPkts: 5, OutPkts: 5, InBytes: 560, OutBytes: 560
InPRoc: 0, OutPRoc: 0
InFast: 5, OutFast: 5, InAS: 0, OutAS: 0
InPktDrops: 0, OutPktDrops: 0/0/0 (holdq/outputq/total)
CrcErrors: 0, SarTimeOuts: 0, OverSizedSDUs: 0, LengthViolation: 0, CPIErrors: 0
Out CLP=1 Pkts: 0
OAM cells received: 0
F5 InEndloop: 0, F5 InSegloop: 0, 
F5 InEndcc: 0, F5 InSegcc: 0, F5 InAIS: 0, F5 InRDI: 0
F4 InEndloop: 0, F4 InSegloop: 0, F4 InAIS: 0, F4 InRDI: 0
OAM cells sent: 0
F5 OutEndloop: 0, F5 OutSegloop: 0, 
F5 OutEndcc: 0, F5 OutSegcc: 0, F5 OutRDI: 0
F4 OutEndloop: 0, F4 OutSegloop: 0, F4 OutRDI: 0
OAM cell drops: 0
Status: UP

Configuring MLP Bundling

This task shows you how to configure MLP bundling using a multilink interface.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    interface multilink multilink-bundle-number

4.    ip address ip-address mask [secondary]

5.    service-policy {input | output} policy-map-name

6.    ppp multilink

7.    ppp multilink fragment-delay delay-max

8.    ppp multilink interleave

9.    interface virtual-template number

10.    no ip address

11.    ppp multilink

12.    ppp multilink multiclass

13.    ppp multilink group group-number

14.    exit

15.    interface type slot / port . subinterface-number [point-to-point]

16.    pvc vpi / vci

17.    vbr-rt peak-rate average-rate burst

18.    tx-ring-limit ring-limit

19.    protocol protocol protocol-address

20.    exit


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode. Enter your password when prompted.

 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
interface multilink multilink-bundle-number


Example:

Router(config)# interface multilink1

 

Creates a multilink bundle or enters multilink interface configuration mode. The multilink-bundle-number argument is the number of the multilink bundle (a nonzero number).

 
Step 4
ip address ip-address mask [secondary]


Example:

Router(config-if)# ip address 172.10.10.0

 

Sets a primary or secondary IP address for an interface.

 
Step 5
service-policy {input | output} policy-map-name


Example:

Router(config-if)# service-policy output green

 

Attaches a policy map to an input interface or virtual circuit (VC), or to an output interface or VC, to be used as the service policy for that interface or VC.

 
Step 6
ppp multilink


Example:

Router(config-if)# ppp multilink

 

Enables Multilink PPP (MLP) on an interface and, optionally, enables Bandwidth Allocation Control Protocol (BACP) and Bandwidth Allocation Protocol (BAP) for dynamic bandwidth allocation.

 
Step 7
ppp multilink fragment-delay delay-max


Example:

Router(config-if)# ppp multilink fragment-delay 10

 

Specifies a maximum size in units of time for packet fragments on a MLP bundle. The delay-max argument is the maximum amount of time, in milliseconds, that it should take to transmit a fragment. The range is from 1 to 1000 milliseconds.

 
Step 8
ppp multilink interleave


Example:

Router(config-if)# ppp multilink interleave

 

Enables interleaving of packets among the fragments of larger packets on an MLP bundle.

 
Step 9
interface virtual-template number


Example:



Example:

Router(config)# interface virtual-template10

 

Creates a virtual template interface that can be configured and applied dynamically in creating virtual access interfaces and enters interface configuration mode. The number argument is the number used to identify the virtual template interface. Up to 200 virtual template interfaces can be configured.

 
Step 10
no ip address


Example:

Router(config-if)# no ip address

 

Removes an IP address or disables IP processing.

 
Step 11
ppp multilink


Example:

Router(config-if)# ppp multilink

 

Enables MLP on an interface and, optionally, enables BACP and BAP for dynamic bandwidth allocation..

 
Step 12
ppp multilink multiclass


Example:

Router(config-if)# ppp multilink multiclass

 

Allows interleaving to be used on bundles that consist of more than one link. For Point-to-Point Protocol over ATM (PPPoA) and Point-to-Point Protocol over Frame Relay (PPPoFR), the command is entered on the virtual template.

 
Step 13
ppp multilink group group-number


Example:

Router(config-if)# ppp multilink group 299

 

Restricts a physical link to joining only a designated multilink-group interface. The group-number argument is a multilink-group number (a nonzero number).

 
Step 14
exit


Example:



Example:

Router(config-if)# exit

 

Exits interface configuration mode.

 
Step 15
interface type slot / port . subinterface-number [point-to-point]


Example:

Router(config)# interface atm 0/1.299

 

Configures an interface type and enters interface configuration mode. The type argument should be ATM.

 
Step 16
pvc vpi / vci


Example:

Router(config-if)# pvc 1/0

 

Creates an ATM PVC or assigns a name to an ATM PVC, specifies the encapsulation type on an ATM PVC, and enters ATM VC configuration mode.

 
Step 17
vbr-rt peak-rate average-rate burst


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# vbr-rt 640 640

 

Configures the real-time variable bit rate (VBR) for Voice over ATM connections.

 
Step 18
tx-ring-limit ring-limit


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# tx-ring-limit 55

 

Limits the number of packets that can be used on a transmission ring on the PVC.

The ring-limit argument is the maximum number of allowable packets that can be placed on the transmission ring.

The default value is 60. On Cisco 1700 series routers, possible values are 1 through 60. On Cisco 2600 and Cisco 3600 series routers, possible values are 3 through 60.

 
Step 19
protocol protocol protocol-address


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# protocol ppp virtual-template1

 

Configures a static map for an ATM PVC, switched virtual circuit (SVC), or VC class or enables Inverse Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) or Inverse ARP broadcasts on an ATM PVC. The protocol argument should be PPP. The protocol-addressargument should be virtual-template1 (the destination address that is being mapped to a PVC).

 
Step 20
exit


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# exit

 

Exits interface ATM VC configuration mode.

Note    Repeat Steps 13 through 18 to create another MLP bundle.
 

Verifying MLP Bundling

To verify your MLP bundling configuration, use the following show commands:

Router# show ppp multilink
Multilink1, bundle name is 3660
  Bundle up for 00:00:17E, 1/255 load, 2 receive classes, 2 transmit classes
  Receive Class 0:
    1 lost fragments, 1 reordered, 0 unassigned
    0 discarded, 0 lost received
    0x3 received sequence
  Receive Class 1:
    0 lost fragments, 0 reordered, 0 unassigned
    0 discarded, 0 lost received
    0x0 received sequence
  Transmit Class 0:
    0x2 sent sequence
  Transmit Class 1:
    0x0 sent sequence
  Member links: 2 active, 5 inactive (max not set, min not set)
    Vi8, since 00:00:17  480 weight, 472 frag size
    Vi9, since 00:00:17  480 weight, 472 frag size
Router# show interfaces multilink 1
Multilink1 is up, line protocol is up 
  Hardware is multilink group interface
  Interface is unnumbered. Using address of Loopback0 (2.2.2.2)
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1280 Kbit, DLY 100000 usec, 
     reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
  Encapsulation PPP, LCP Open, multilink Open
  Open: IPCP, loopback not set
  DTR is pulsed for 2 seconds on reset
  Last input 02:57:52, output never, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters 02:58:45
  Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
  Queueing strategy: weighted fair
  Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) 
     Conversations  0/1/256 (active/max active/max total)
     Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated)
     Available Bandwidth 860 kilobits/sec
  30 second input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  30 second output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     2 packets input, 28 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     2 packets output, 24 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 1 interface resets
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
     0 carrier transitions
Router# show interfaces atm 0/0
ATM0/0 is up, line protocol is up 
  Hardware is DSLSAR (with Alcatel ADSL Module)
  MTU 4470 bytes, sub MTU 4470, BW 800 Kbit, DLY 2560 usec, 
     reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
  Encapsulation ATM, loopback not set
  Encapsulation(s): AAL5  AAL2, PVC mode
  23 maximum active VCs, 256 VCs per VP, 1 current VCCs
  VC Auto Creation Disabled.
  VC idle disconnect time: 300 seconds
  Last input never, output 00:00:01, output hang never
  Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
  Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
  Queueing strategy: None
  30 second input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
  30 second output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
     2188 packets input, 30640 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
     4 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     2194 packets output, 48368 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
     0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
Router# show users
   Line       User       Host(s)              Idle       Location
*  0 con 0                idle                 00:00:00   
  Interface    User               Mode         Idle      Peer Address
  Vi4          3660           PPPoATM      00:09:25 
  Vi5          3660           PPPoATM      00:09:23 
  Mu1        3660              Sync PPP     00:09:25  2.2.2.2
Router# show policy-map interface mul 1
 Multilink1 
  Service-policy output: CISCO
    Class-map: VOICE (match-all)
      11117 packets, 234235 bytes
      30 second offered rate 25000 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: access-group 100
      Queueing
        Strict Priority
        Output Queue: Conversation 264 
        Bandwidth 100 (kbps) Burst 2500 (Bytes)
        (pkts matched/bytes matched) 17/748
        (total drops/bytes drops) 0/0
    Class-map: class-default (match-any)
      234453438 packets, 64564574574bytes
      30 second offered rate 645000 bps, drop rate 12000 bps
      Match: any
Router# show dsl interface atm 0/0
Alcatel 20150 chipset information
                ATU-R (DS)                      ATU-C (US)
Modem Status:    Showtime (DMTDSL_SHOWTIME)
DSL Mode:        ITU G.992.1 (G.DMT)
ITU STD NUM:     0x01                            0x1 
Vendor ID:       'ALCB'                          'GSPN'
Vendor Specific: 0x0000                          0x0002
Vendor Country:  0x00                            0x00
Capacity Used:   80%                             90%
Noise Margin:    11.5 dB                          9.0 dB
Output Power:     8.0 dBm                        12.0 dBm
Attenuation:      0.0 dB                          4.0 dB
Defect Status:   None                            None                        
Last Fail Code:  Handshake or init message invalid or had bad CRC
Selftest Result: 0x00
Subfunction:     0x15
Interrupts:      1333 (0 spurious)
PHY Access Err:  0
Activations:     1
Init FW:         embedded
Operation FW:    embedded
SW Version:      3.8129
FW Version:      0x1A04
                 Interleave             Fast    Interleave              Fast
Speed (kbps):          7616                0           800                 0
Reed-Solomon EC:          4                0          1326                 0
CRC Errors:               0                0             1                 0
Header Errors:            0                0             0                 0
Bit Errors:               0                0
BER Valid sec:            0                0
BER Invalid sec:          0                0
DMT Bits Per Bin
00: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 7 8 9 9 B B C C
10: B B C C B B A 9 9 9 9 8 8 9 0 0
20: 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 4 4 5 6 6 7 7 7 8
30: 8 8 9 9 9 9 A A A A A A A A 9 A
40: 0 B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B
50: B B B B B B B B B B B B B 8 B 2
60: B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B
70: B B B B B B 8 B B B B B 9 B B B
80: B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B
90: B B B B B B B B B B B 9 B B B B
A0: B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B
B0: B B B B B B A B B A 9 A A A A A
C0: A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A
D0: A A A A A A A A A 9 A A A A A A
E0: A A A A A A 9 A 9 9 8 8 7 5 5 5
F0: 4 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
          
DSL: Training log buffer capability is not enabled

Troubleshooting Tips for MLP Bundling

To troubleshoot your MLP bundling configuration, do the following:

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    Verify the status of the multilink interface using the show interface multilink command.

2.    If a multilink member is inactive, verify the status of the ATM interface using the show interface atmcommand.

3.    Check all Link Control Protocol (LCP) and Network Control Program (NCP) negotiation messages using the debug ppp negotiation command (see the following output example).

4.    Check all Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP) authentication messages using the debug ppp authentication command (see the following output example).

5.    Check all MLP bundle events using the debug ppp multilink events command (see the following output example).


DETAILED STEPS
Step 1   Verify the status of the multilink interface using the show interface multilink command.
  • If the multilink interface is down, verify the status of all multilink bundle members using the show ppp multilinkcommand.
  • If the multilink line protocol is down, verify the Network Control Protocol (NCP) and MLP messages using the debug ppp negotiation and debug ppp multilink eventscommands.
Step 2   If a multilink member is inactive, verify the status of the ATM interface using the show interface atmcommand.
  • If the ATM interface is down, verify the status of the corresponding DSL link using the show dsl interface atmcommand.
Step 3   Check all Link Control Protocol (LCP) and Network Control Program (NCP) negotiation messages using the debug ppp negotiation command (see the following output example).

Example:
Router# debug ppp negotiation
1d05h: ppp11 LCP: State is Open
1d05h: ppp11 PPP: Phase is FORWARDING, Attempting Forward
1d05h: Vi7 PPP: Phase is DOWN, Setup
1d05h: Vi7 PPP: Phase is DOWN, Setup
1d05h: ppp11 LCP: I TERMREQ [Open] id 2 len 4
1d05h: ppp11 LCP: O TERMACK [Open] id 2 len 4
1d05h: ppp11 PPP: Phase is TERMINATING
1d05h: ppp13 PPP: Treating connection as a dedicated line
1d05h: ppp13 PPP: Phase is ESTABLISHING, Active Open
1d05h: ppp13 LCP: O CONFREQ [Closed] id 1 len 29
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MagicNumber 0x0FD2BAA3 (0x05060FD2BAA3)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MRRU 1524 (0x110405F4)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    EndpointDisc 1 2600 (0x130B0132363531584D2D31)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MultilinkHdrFmt seq long classes 2 (0x1B040202)
1d05h: ppp14 PPP: Treating connection as a dedicated line
1d05h: ppp14 PPP: Phase is ESTABLISHING, Active Open
1d05h: ppp14 LCP: O CONFREQ [Closed] id 1 len 29
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MagicNumber 0x0FD2BB2D (0x05060FD2BB2D)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MRRU 1524 (0x110405F4)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    EndpointDisc 1 2600 (0x130B0132363531584D2D31)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MultilinkHdrFmt seq long classes 2 (0x1B040202)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP: TIMEout: State REQsent
1d05h: ppp13 LCP: O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 2 len 29
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MagicNumber 0x0FD2BAA3 (0x05060FD2BAA3)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MRRU 1524 (0x110405F4)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    EndpointDisc 1 2600 (0x130B0132363531584D2D31)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MultilinkHdrFmt seq long classes 2 (0x1B040202)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP: TIMEout: State REQsent
1d05h: ppp14 LCP: O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 2 len 29
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MagicNumber 0x0FD2BB2D (0x05060FD2BB2D)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MRRU 1524 (0x110405F4)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    EndpointDisc 1 2600 (0x130B0132363531584D2D31)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MultilinkHdrFmt seq long classes 2 (0x1B040202)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP: TIMEout: State REQsent
1d05h: ppp13 LCP: O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 3 len 29
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MagicNumber 0x0FD2BAA3 (0x05060FD2BAA3)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MRRU 1524 (0x110405F4)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    EndpointDisc 1 2600 (0x130B0132363531584D2D31)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MultilinkHdrFmt seq long classes 2 (0x1B040202)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP: TIMEout: State REQsent
1d05h: ppp14 LCP: O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 3 len 29
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MagicNumber 0x0FD2BB2D (0x05060FD2BB2D)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MRRU 1524 (0x110405F4)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    EndpointDisc 1 2600 (0x130B0132363531584D2D31)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MultilinkHdrFmt seq long classes 2 (0x1B040202)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP: TIMEout: State REQsent
1d05h: ppp13 LCP: O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 4 len 29
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MagicNumber 0x0FD2BAA3 (0x05060FD2BAA3)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MRRU 1524 (0x110405F4)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    EndpointDisc 1 2600 (0x130B0132363531584D2D31)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MultilinkHdrFmt seq long classes 2 (0x1B040202)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP: TIMEout: State REQsent
1d05h: ppp14 LCP: O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 4 len 29
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MagicNumber 0x0FD2BB2D (0x05060FD2BB2D)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MRRU 1524 (0x110405F4)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    EndpointDisc 1 2600 (0x130B0132363531584D2D31)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MultilinkHdrFmt seq long classes 2 (0x1B040202)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP: I CONFREQ [REQsent] id 1 len 29
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MagicNumber 0x36EBFBB7 (0x050636EBFBB7)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MRRU 1524 (0x110405F4)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    EndpointDisc 1 3660 (0x130B01333636302D746F70)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MultilinkHdrFmt seq long classes 2 (0x1B040202)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP: O CONFACK [REQsent] id 1 len 29
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MagicNumber 0x36EBFBB7 (0x050636EBFBB7)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MRRU 1524 (0x110405F4)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    EndpointDisc 1 3660 (0x130B01333636302D746F70)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MultilinkHdrFmt seq long classes 2 (0x1B040202)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP: I CONFREQ [REQsent] id 1 len 29
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MagicNumber 0x36EBFBB8 (0x050636EBFBB8)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MRRU 1524 (0x110405F4)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    EndpointDisc 1 3660 (0x130B01333636302D746F70)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MultilinkHdrFmt seq long classes 2 (0x1B040202)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP: O CONFACK [REQsent] id 1 len 29
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MagicNumber 0x36EBFBB8 (0x050636EBFBB8)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MRRU 1524 (0x110405F4)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    EndpointDisc 1 3660 (0x130B01333636302D746F70)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MultilinkHdrFmt seq long classes 2 (0x1B040202)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP: TIMEout: State ACKsent
1d05h: ppp13 LCP: O CONFREQ [ACKsent] id 5 len 29
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MagicNumber 0x0FD2BAA3 (0x05060FD2BAA3)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MRRU 1524 (0x110405F4)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    EndpointDisc 1 2600 (0x130B0132363531584D2D31)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MultilinkHdrFmt seq long classes 2 (0x1B040202)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP: I CONFACK [ACKsent] id 5 len 29
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MagicNumber 0x0FD2BAA3 (0x05060FD2BAA3)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MRRU 1524 (0x110405F4)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    EndpointDisc 1 2600 (0x130B0132363531584D2D31)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP:    MultilinkHdrFmt seq long classes 2 (0x1B040202)
1d05h: ppp13 LCP: State is Open
1d05h: ppp13 PPP: Phase is FORWARDING, Attempting Forward
1d05h: Vi8 PPP: Phase is DOWN, Setup
1d05h: Vi8 PPP: Phase is DOWN, Setup
1d05h: ppp13 PPP MLP: Queue packet code[192] id[0]
1d05h: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Virtual-Access8, changed state to up
1d05h: Vi8 PPP: Phase is ESTABLISHING, Finish LCP
1d05h: Vi8 PPP: Phase is VIRTUALIZED
1d05h: Mu1 MLP: Added first link Vi8 to bundle 3660
1d05h: Vi8 PPP: Process pending packets
1d05h: Vi8 MLP: Redirect packet to MLP
1d05h: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Multilink1, changed state to up
1d05h: Mu1 PPP: Phase is UP
1d05h: Mu1 IPCP: O CONFREQ [Closed] id 2 len 10
1d05h: Mu1 IPCP:    Address 2.2.2.2 (0x030602020202)
1d05h: Mu1 PPP: Process pending packets
1d05h: Mu1 PPP: Process pending packets
1d05h: Mu1 PPP: Treating connection as a dedicated line
1d05h: Mu1 IPCP: I CONFACK [REQsent] id 2 len 10
1d05h: Mu1 IPCP:    Address 2.2.2.2 (0x030602020202)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP: TIMEout: State ACKsent
1d05h: ppp14 LCP: O CONFREQ [ACKsent] id 5 len 29
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MagicNumber 0x0FD2BB2D (0x05060FD2BB2D)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MRRU 1524 (0x110405F4)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    EndpointDisc 1 2600 (0x130B0132363531584D2D31)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MultilinkHdrFmt seq long classes 2 (0x1B040202)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP: I CONFACK [ACKsent] id 5 len 29
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MagicNumber 0x0FD2BB2D (0x05060FD2BB2D)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MRRU 1524 (0x110405F4)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    EndpointDisc 1 2600 (0x130B0132363531584D2D31)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP:    MultilinkHdrFmt seq long classes 2 (0x1B040202)
1d05h: ppp14 LCP: State is Open
1d05h: ppp14 PPP: Phase is FORWARDING, Attempting Forward 
1d05h: Vi9 PPP: Phase is DOWN, Setup
1d05h: Vi9 PPP: Phase is DOWN, Setup
1d05h: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Virtual-Access9, changed state to up
1d05h: Vi9 PPP: Phase is ESTABLISHING, Finish LCP
 1d05h: Vi9 PPP: Phase is VIRTUALIZED
1d05h: Mu1 MLP: Added link Vi9 to bundle 3660
1d05h: Vi9 PPP: Process pending packets
1d05h: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Virtual-Access8, changed state to up
1d05h: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Multilink1, changed state to up
1d05h: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Virtual-Access9, changed state to up
1d05h: Mu1 IPCP: I CONFREQ [ACKrcvd] id 8 len 10
1d05h: Mu1 IPCP:    Address 2.2.2.3 (0x030602020203)
1d05h: Mu1 AAA/AUTHOR/IPCP: Start.  Her address 2.2.2.3, we want 0.0.0.0
1d05h: Mu1 AAA/AUTHOR/IPCP: Reject 2.2.2.3, using 0.0.0.0
1d05h: Mu1 AAA/AUTHOR/IPCP: Done.  Her address 2.2.2.3, we want 0.0.0.0
1d05h: Mu1 IPCP: O CONFACK [ACKrcvd] id 8 len 10
1d05h: Mu1 IPCP:    Address 2.2.2.3 (0x030602020203)
1d05h: Mu1 IPCP: State is Open
1d05h: Mu1 IPCP: Install route to 2.2.2.3
1d05h: Mu1 IPCP: Add link info for cef entry 2.2.2.3
Step 4   Check all Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP) authentication messages using the debug ppp authentication command (see the following output example).

Example:
Router# debug ppp authentication
1d06h: ppp295 PPP: Treating connection as a dedicated line
1d06h: ppp295 PPP: Authorization required
1d06h: ppp296 PPP: Treating connection as a dedicated line
1d06h: ppp296 PPP: Authorization required
1d06h: ppp295 CHAP: O CHALLENGE id 1 len 29 from "3660"
1d06h: ppp295 CHAP: I CHALLENGE id 1 len 29 from "2600"
1d06h: ppp295 CHAP: Using hostname from unknown source
1d06h: ppp295 CHAP: Using password from AAA
1d06h: ppp295 CHAP: O RESPONSE id 1 len 29 from "3660"
1d06h: ppp295 CHAP: I RESPONSE id 1 len 29 from "2600"
1d06h: ppp295 PPP: Sent CHAP LOGIN Request
1d06h: ppp295 PPP: Received LOGIN Response PASS
1d06h: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Virtual-Access4, changed state to up
1d06h: Vi4 CHAP: O SUCCESS id 1 len 4
1d06h: Vi4 CHAP: I SUCCESS id 1 len 4
1d06h: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Multilink1, changed state to up
1d06h: Mu1 PPP: Treating connection as a dedicated line
1d06h: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Virtual-Access4, changed state to up
1d06h: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Multilink1, changed state to up
1d06h: ppp296 CHAP: O CHALLENGE id 1 len 29 from "3660" ç
1d06h: ppp296 CHAP: I CHALLENGE id 1 len 29 from "2600" ç
1d06h: ppp296 CHAP: Using hostname from unknown source
1d06h: ppp296 CHAP: Using password from AAA
1d06h: ppp296 CHAP: O RESPONSE id 1 len 29 from "3660"
1d06h: ppp296 CHAP: I RESPONSE id 1 len 29 from "2600"
1d06h: ppp296 PPP: Sent CHAP LOGIN Request
1d06h: ppp296 PPP: Received LOGIN Response PASS ç
1d06h: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Virtual-Access5, changed state to up
1d06h: Vi5 CHAP: O SUCCESS id 1 len 4
1d06h: Vi5 CHAP: I SUCCESS id 1 len 4
1d06h: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Virtual-Access5, changed state to up
Step 5   Check all MLP bundle events using the debug ppp multilink events command (see the following output example).

Example:
Router# debug ppp multilink events
1d05h: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Virtual-Access8, changed state to up
1d05h: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Virtual-Access9, changed state to up
1d05h: Vi8 MLP: Request add link to bundle
1d05h: Vi9 MLP: Request add link to bundle
1d05h: Vi8 MLP: Adding link to bundle
1d05h: Mu1 MLP: Added first link Vi8 to bundle 3660 1d05h: Vi9 MLP: Adding link to bundle
1d05h: Mu1 MLP: Added link Vi9 to bundle 3660 
1d05h: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Multilink1, changed state to up
1d05h: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Virtual-Access8, changed state to up
1d05h: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Virtual-Access9, changed state to up
1d05h: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Multilink1, changed st

Configuring the Tx Ring Limit

This task shows you how to configure the tx ring limit.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.    enable

2.    configure terminal

3.    interface atm slot / port

4.    pvc [name] vpi / vci

5.   Do one of the following:

  • vbr-rt peak-rate average-rate burst
  • vbr-nrt output-pcr output-scr output-mbs [input-pcr] [input-scr] [input-mbs]

6.    tx-ring-limit ring-limit


DETAILED STEPS
  Command or Action Purpose
Step 1
enable


Example:

Router> enable

 

Enables privileged EXEC mode. Enter your password when prompted.

 
Step 2
configure terminal


Example:

Router# configure terminal

 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3
interface atm slot / port


Example:

Router(config)# interface atm 0/1

 

Configures an ATM interface type and enters interface configuration mode.

 
Step 4
pvc [name] vpi / vci


Example:

Router(config-if)# pvc 1/1

 

Creates an ATM permanent virtual circuit (PVC) or assigns a name to an ATM PVC, specifies the encapsulation type on an ATM PVC, and enters ATM VC configuration mode.

 
Step 5
Do one of the following:
  • vbr-rt peak-rate average-rate burst
  • vbr-nrt output-pcr output-scr output-mbs [input-pcr] [input-scr] [input-mbs]


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# vbr-rt 640 640

 

Configures the real-time variable bit rate (VBR) for Voice over ATM connections.

or

Configures the variable bit rate-nonreal time (VBR-NRT) quality of service (QoS) and specifies output peak cell rate (PCR), output sustainable cell rate (SCR), and output maximum burst cell size for an ATM permanent virtual circuit (PVC), PVC range, switched virtual circuit (SVC), VC class, or VC bundle member.

Note    The tx-ring-limit command needs to be used with either the vbr-rt command or the vbr-nrt command and also in conjunction with low latency queueing (LLQ).
 
Step 6
tx-ring-limit ring-limit


Example:

Router(config-if-atm-vc)# tx-ring-limit 3

 

Limits the number of packets that can be used on a transmission ring on the permanent virtual circuit (PVC).

The argument is as follows:

  • ring-limit --Maximum number of allowable packets that can be placed on the transmission ring.

The default value is 60. On Cisco 1700 series routers, possible values are 1 through 60. On Cisco 2600 and Cisco 3600 series routers, possible values are 3 through 60.

 

Verifying the Tx Ring Limit

The following output example is for a tx ring limit over ADSL configuration:

Router# show running-config

interface ATM0/0
 no ip address
 load-interval 30
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 pvc 1/100 
  vbr-rt 1500 1500
  tx-ring-limit 3
  protocol ppp Virtual-Template1
 !
 dsl equipment-type CPE
 dsl operating-mode GSHDSL symmetric annex A
 dsl linerate AUTO

Configuration Examples

ATM CLP Bit Marking over G.SHDSL Example

The following output is from a Cisco 1721 router. In this example, all output packets that have an IP precedence value of 0 are sent with the CLP set to 1.


Note


IP Cisco Express Forwarding (IP CEF) must be turned on using the ip cef command-line interface before ATM CLP bit marking is configured.
  • ATM CLP bit marking can be applied only as output policy for an interface.
ip cef
!
class-map match-all PREC0
 match ip precedence 0 
!
policy-map ATM_CLP
 class PREC0
  set atm-clp
!
interface ATM0
 no ip address
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 dsl equipment-type CPE
 dsl operating-mode GSHDSL symmetric annex A
 dsl linerate AUTO
!
interface ATM0.1 point-to-point
 ip address 10.0.0.1 255.255.255.0
 pvc 0/33 
  service-policy output ATM_CLP

Clock Rate for ADSL and G.SHDSL WICs Example

The following example from a Cisco 1760 router shows that the clock rate on the AAL5 channel is set to the minimum value of 4 Mbps on interface ATM 0/0:

interface atm 0/0
 clock rate aal5 4000000

The following example from a Cisco 1760 router shows that the clock rate on the AAL2 channel is set to the value of 5.3 Mbps on interface ATM 1/0:

interface atm 1/0
 clock rate aal2 5300000

The following example from a Cisco 2621 mainboard module shows that the clock rate on the AAL5 channel is set to the maximum value of 7 Mbps on interface ATM 0/0:

interface atm 0/0
 clock rate aal5 7000000

The following example from a Cisco 2621 network module shows that the clock rate on the AAL5 channel is set to the maximum value of 5.3 Mbps on interface ATM 1/0:

interface atm 1/0
 clock rate aal5 5300000

cRTP over an ATM Link with PPP Encapsulation Example

The following example shows that cRTP has been configured using Virtual Template over ATM:

ip cef
class-map match-all voice-traffic
 match access-group 102
class-map match-all voice-signalling
 match access-group 103
!
policy-map VOICE-POLICY
 class voice-traffic
  priority 48
 class voice-signalling
  bandwidth 8
 class class-default
  fair-queue
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0
!
interface ATM0/0
 no ip address
 load-interval 30
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 pvc 1/100
  vbr-rt 1500 1500
  tx-ring-limit 3
  protocol ppp Virtual-Template1
!
 dsl equipment-type CPE
 dsl operating-mode GSHDSL symmetric annex A
 dsl linerate AUTO
!
interface Virtual-Template1
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 ip tcp header-compression iphc-format
 service-policy output VOICE-POLICY
 ppp multilink
 ppp multilink fragment-delay 3
 ppp multilink interleave
 ip rtp header-compression iphc-format
 ip rtp compression-connections 3
!
access-list 102 permit udp any any range 16384 37276
access-list 103 permit tcp any eq 1720 any
access-list 103 permit tcp any any eq 1720
!
voice-port 1/0/0
!
voice-port 1/0/1
!
dial-peer voice 1 pots
 destination-pattern 7...
 port 1/0/0
!
dial-peer voice 2 voip
 destination-pattern 8...
 session target ipv4:192.168.1.1
dtmf-relay cisco-rtp
 ip qos dscp cs5 media
 ip qos dscp cs5 signaling
 no vad

FRF.5 over G.SHDSL Example

The following output is from a Cisco 1721 router. This example shows how to create an FRF.5 one-to-one connection using the the connect command with the network-interworking keyword.

frame-relay switching
!
interface ATM0
 no ip address
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 dsl equipment-type CPE
 dsl operating-mode GSHDSL symmetric annex A
 dsl linerate AUTO
!
interface ATM0.1 point-to-point
 pvc 0/33 
  encapsulation aal5mux frame-relay
!
interface Serial0
 no ip address
 encapsulation frame-relay IETF
 clockrate 2000000
 frame-relay interface-dlci 100 switched
 frame-relay intf-type dce
!
connect frf5 Serial0 100 ATM0 0/33 network-interworking
!

The following example shows how to create an FRF.5 many-to-one connection.

vc-group groupA
 Serial0 100 100
 Serial0 200 200
 Serial0 300 300
 Serial0 400 400
!
interface ATM0
 no ip address
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 pvc 0/33 
  encapsulation aal5mux frame-relay
!
 dsl equipment-type CPE
 dsl operating-mode GSHDSL symmetric annex A
 dsl linerate AUTO
!
connect frf5-v vc-group GroupA ATM0 0/33

Note


For FRF.5, you may need to match the maximum transmission unit (MTU) between the ATM and Frame Relay networks for large size packets.

FRF.8 over G.SHDSL Example

The following output is from a Cisco 1721 router. This example shows how to create an FRF.8 connection using the the connect command with the service-interworking keyword.

frame-relay switching
!
interface ATM0
 no ip address
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 dsl equipment-type CPE
 dsl operating-mode GSHDSL symmetric annex A
 dsl linerate AUTO
!
interface ATM0.1 point-to-point
 pvc 0/33 
  encapsulation aal5mux fr-atm-srv
!
interface Serial0
 no ip address
 encapsulation frame-relay IETF
 clockrate 2000000
 frame-relay interface-dlci 100 switched
 frame-relay intf-type dce
!
ip classless
no ip http server
!
connect frf8 Serial0 100 ATM0 0/33 service-interworking

Note


For FRF.8, you may need to match the maximum transmission unit (MTU) between the ATM and Frame Relay networks for large size packets.

MLP Bundling Example

The following output examples show how MLP DSL links can be bundled using a multilink interface. The configurations were created using devices in a specific laboratory environment. All of the devices started with a cleared (default) configuration. If you are working in a live network situation, make sure that you understand the potential impact of all commands before using them (refer to the command references for Cisco IOS Release 12.2).


Note


Before configuring MLP bundling, ensure that IP CEF is turned on for QoS.

The following example was configured on a Cisco 2600 router equipped with two xDSL WICs.

ip subnet-zero
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
!
class-map match-all VOICE
 match access-group 100
!
policy-map green
 class VOICE
  priority 100
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 10.2.2.2 255.255.255.0
!
interface Multilink1
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 load-interval 30
 service-policy output green
  ip nat outside
 no cdp enable
 ppp multilink
 ppp multilink fragment-delay 6
 ppp multilink interleave
 multilink-group 1
!
interface ATM0/0
 no ip address
 load-interval 30
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 dsl operating-mode auto
!
interface ATM0/0.1 point-to-point
 pvc 203/202 
  vbr-rt 640 640
  tx-ring-limit 3
  protocol ppp Virtual-Template1
!
interface FastEthernet0/0
ip address 10.3.202.48 255.0.0.0
 load-interval 30
 duplex auto
 speed auto
 no cdp enable
!
interface ATM0/1
 no ip address
 load-interval 30
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 dsl operating-mode auto
!
interface ATM0/1.1 point-to-point
 pvc 5/201 
  vbr-rt 640 640
  tx-ring-limit 3
  protocol ppp Virtual-Template1
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
 description ip address 10.6.6.6 255.0.0.0
 mac-address 0000.0000.0003
 ip address 10.1.1.30 255.255.255.0
 load-interval 30
 duplex auto
 speed auto
 no cdp enable
!
interface Virtual-Template1
 no ip address
 load-interval 30
 ppp authentication chap pap 
 ppp multilink
 ppp multilink multiclass
 multilink-group 1
!
ip classless
ip route 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 2.2.2.3
ip route 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.255 2.2.2.3
ip route 192.168.254.254 255.255.255.255 1.3.0.1
no ip http server
ip pim bidir-enable
!
access-list 100 permit udp any any precedence critical
access-list 100 permit tcp any any eq 1720
access-list 100 permit tcp any eq 1720 any
no cdp run
!
snmp-server manager
call rsvp-sync
!
voice-port 1/1/0
!
voice-port 1/1/1
!
mgcp profile default
!
dial-peer cor custom
!
dial-peer voice 101 voip
 incoming called-number 10.....
 destination-pattern 200....
 session target ipv4:2.2.2.3
 ip qos dscp cs5 media
 ip qos dscp cs5 signaling
 no vad
!
dial-peer voice 200 pots
 destination-pattern 100....
 port 1/1/0
 prefix 200
!
alias exec c conf t
alias exec s sh run
!
line con 0
 exec-timeout 0 0
 privilege level 15
line aux 0
line vty 0 4
 login
line vty 5 15
 login

The following example was configured on a Cisco 3660 or Cisco 7206 router:

ip subnet-zero
ip cef
!
no ip domain lookup
!
class-map match-all VOICE
 match access-group 100
!
policy-map PURPLE
 class VOICE
  priority 100
!
voice call carrier capacity active
!
fax interface-type fax-mail
mta receive maximum-recipients 0
!
interface Loopback0
 ip address 10.2.2.3 255.255.255.0
!
interface Multilink1
 ip unnumbered Loopback0
 load-interval 30
 service-policy output PURPLE
 no cdp enable
 ppp multilink
 ppp multilink fragment-delay 6
 ppp multilink interleave
 multilink-group 1
!
interface FastEthernet0/0
 mac-address 0000.0000.0004
 ip address 10.3.202.89 255.0.0.0
 load-interval 30
 duplex auto
 speed auto
 no cdp enable
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
 mac-address 0000.0000.0004
 ip address 10.1.1.20 255.255.255.0
 load-interval 30
 no keepalive
 duplex auto
 speed auto
 no cdp enable
!
interface ATM2/0
 no ip address
 load-interval 30
 atm clock INTERNAL
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
!
interface ATM2/0.1 point-to-point
 pvc 203/202 
  vbr-rt 640 640
  tx-ring-limit 3
  protocol ppp Virtual-Template1
!
interface ATM2/0.2 point-to-point
 pvc 5/201 
  vbr-rt 640 640
  tx-ring-limit 3
  protocol ppp Virtual-Template1
!
interface Virtual-Template1
 no ip address
 load-interval 30
 ppp authentication chap pap
 ppp multilink
 ppp multilink multiclass
 multilink-group 1
!
ip classless
ip route 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 2.2.2.2
ip route 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.255 2.2.2.2
ip route 192.168.254.254 255.255.255.255 1.3.0.1
ip http server
ip pim bidir-enable
!
access-list 100 permit udp any any precedence critical
access-list 100 permit tcp any any eq 1720
access-list 100 permit tcp any eq 1720 any
no cdp run
!
call rsvp-sync
!
voice-port 4/1/0
!
voice-port 4/1/1
!
mgcp profile default
!
dial-peer cor custom
dial-peer voice 101 voip
 incoming called-number 200....
 destination-pattern 10.....
 session target ipv4:2.2.2.2
 ip qos dscp cs5 media
 ip qos dscp cs5 signaling
 no vad
!
dial-peer voice 200 pots
 destination-pattern 200....
 port 4/1/0
 prefix 200
!
alias exec c conf t
alias exec s sh run
!
line con 0
 exec-timeout 0 0
 privilege level 15
 line aux 0
 line vty 0 4
 password green
 login

Tx Ring-Limit Tuning over ADSL Example

The following output is from a Cisco 1751 router. The tx ring limit is configured on an ATM PVC interface.

class-map match-all VOIP
 match ip dscp 32
class-map CRITICAL
 match access-group 100
!
policy-map 1751_ADSL
 class CRITICAL
  priority 48
 class VOIP
  bandwidth 64
  set ip precedence 6
!
interface Loopback1
ip address 10.0.0.10 255.255.255.252
!
interface ATM0/0
 no ip address
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
!
interface ATM0/0.1
 pvc 0/33
  vbr-rt 320 320 30
  tx-ring-limit 3
  protocol ppp Virtual-Template1
!
interface Virtual-Template1
 bandwidth 320
 ip unnumbered Loopback1
 ip mroute-cache
 service-policy output 1751_ADSL
 ppp multilink
 ppp multilink fragment-delay 4
 ppp multilink interleave

The following output is from a Cisco 2600 router that is configured for tx ring-limit tuning:

voice-card 1
 dspfarm
!
ip subnet-zero
!
ip cef
!
class-map match-all VOICE-CLASS
 match access-group 100
!
policy-map SERVICE-PACK-640
 class VOICE-CLASS
  priority 160
!
controller T1 1/0
 framing esf
 linecode b8zs
 ds0-group 0 timeslots 1-24 type e&m-wink-start
!
controller T1 1/1
 framing sf
 linecode ami
!
interface FastEthernet0/0
 ip address 10.3.214.50 255.255.0.0
 duplex auto
 speed auto
!
interface ATM0/1
 no ip address
 load-interval 30
 atm vc-per-vp 256
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 atm voice aal2 aggregate-svc upspeed-number 0
 dsl equipment-type CPE
 dsl operating-mode GSHDSL symmetric annex A
 dsl linerate AUTO
!
interface ATM0/1.1 point-to-point
 ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0
 pvc 11/201
  protocol ip 192.168.1.1 broadcast
  vbr-nrt 640 640
  tx-ring-limit 3
  oam-pvc manage
  service-policy output SERVICE-PACK-640
!
interface FastEthernet0/1
 ip address 10.10.11.1 255.255.255.0
 load-interval 30
 duplex auto
 speed auto
!
ip classless
ip route 10.10.11.254 255.255.255.255 192.168.1.1
ip route 192.168.254.254 255.255.255.255 1.3.0.1
ip http server
ip pim bidir-enable
!
ip director cache time 60
access-list 100 permit udp any any precedence critical
!
snmp-server manager
call rsvp-sync
!
voice-port 1/0:0
!
mgcp profile default
!
dial-peer cor custom
!
dial-peer voice 1 pots
 destination-pattern 7...
!
dial-peer voice 2 voip
 pattern 8...
 session target ipv4:192.168.1.1
 ip qos dscp cs5 media
 ip qos dscp cs5 signaling
 no vad
!
alias exec s sh run
alias exec c conf t
!
line con 0
 exec-timeout 0 0
 privilege level 15
line aux 0
line vty 0 4
 login
line vty 5 15
 login

Additional References

The following sections provide additional references related to Enhanced Voice and QoS for ADSL and G.SHDSL feature:

Related Documents

Related Topic

Document Title

AAL2

  • Configuring AAL2 and AAL5 for the High-Performance ATM Advanced Integration Module on the Cisco 2600 Series

Access control lists

  • The chapter "Configuring IP Services" in the Cisco IOS IP Configuration Guide

ADSL and G.SHDSL WAN interface cards

  • Configuring an ADSL WAN Interface Card on Cisco 1700 Series Routers
  • Installing the G.SHDSL WIC on the Cisco 1700 Series Router
  • 1-Port ADSL WAN Interface Card for Cisco 2600 Series and 3600 Series Routers, Release 12.2(4)T
  • 1-Port G.SHDSL WAN Interface Card for Cisco 2600 Series and 3600 Series Routers, Release 12.2(4)XL
  • ADSL WAN Interface Card for the Cisco 2600/3600/3700 Series
  • G.SHDSL WAN Interface Card for the Cisco 2600/3600/3700 Series

Analog voice interface support

  • Voice Port Testing Enhancements in Cisco 2600 and 3600 Series Routers and MC3810 Series Concentrators

ATM CLP bit marking

  • When Does a Router Set the CLP Bit in an ATM Cell?

ATM traffic shaping

  • Configuring Traffic Shaping on Frame Relay to ATM Service Interworking (FRF.8) PVCs
  • The chapter "Policing and Shaping Overview" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide

Class-based packet marking with DSCP

  • The chapter "Quality of Service Overview" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide

Class-based policing

  • The chapter "Configuring Traffic Policing" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide

Class-based weighted fair queueing

  • The chapter "Quality of Service Overview" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide

Class-based WRED with DSCP (egress)

  • The chapter "Quality of Service Overview" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide
  • Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Command Reference
  • DiffServ Compliant Weighted Random Error Detection

Committed access rate (CAR)

  • The chapter "Quality of Service Overview" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide

Dial-peer DSCPs and IP precedence marking

  • The chapter "Quality of Service for Voice over IP" in Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide

F5 OAM CC segment functionality

  • Cisco Product Bulletin No. 1518 about Cisco IOS software Release 12.2(2)XJ
  • Release Notes for the Cisco 1700 Series Routers for Cisco IOS Release 12.2(XJ)

H.323 and Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP)

  • The Cisco IOS H.323 Configuration Guide in the Cisco IOS Voice Configuration Library

IP QoS map to ATM CoS

  • The chapter "Configuring IP to ATM Class of Service" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide

Low latency queueing

  • The chapter "Congestion Management Overview" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide
  • The chapter "Quality of Service for Voice over IP" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide

Network-based application recognition (NBAR)

  • Network-Based Application Recognition
  • Using Content Networking to Provide Quality of Service
  • The chapter "Configuring Network-Based Application Recognition" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide

OAM

  • Configuring Operation, Administration, and Maintenance

Per-VC queueing

  • Understanding Weighted Fair Queuing on ATM
  • Per-VC Class-Based, Weighted Fair Queuing (Per-VC CBWFQ) on the Cisco 7200, 3600, and 2600 Routers

PPPoE client

  • PPP over Ethernet Client

PPPoE MTU adjustment (ip tcp adjust-mss command)

  • Software Enhancements for the Cisco 800 Routers and SOHO Routers
  • Cisco 827 - Acting as a PPPoE Client with a Dynamic IP Address

PPPoE over ATM

  • PPPoE on ATM

Policy-based routing

  • The chapter "Quality of Service Overview" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide

QoS configuration

  • Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide
  • Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Command Reference

QoS features on Cisco 1700 series routers

  • Cisco IOS Software Release 12.2(2)XQ1

Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP)

  • The chapter "Configuring RSVP" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide
  • The chapter "Configuring RSVP Support for LLQ" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide
  • The chapter "Configuring RSVP Support for Frame Relay" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide
  • The chapter "Configuring RSVP-ATM QoS Interworking" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide

RFC 1483 bridging

  • Basic PVC Configuration Using Bridged RFC 1483
  • DSL Network Architectures

Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)

  • The Cisco IOS SIP Configuration Guide in the Cisco IOS Voice Configuration Library

Survivable Remote Site Telephony (SRST)

  • Survivable Remote Site Telephony Cisco 2600/3600 Voice Technical Marketing

Traffic policer

  • The chapter "Configuring Traffic Policing" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide
  • Comparing Class-Based Policing and Committed Access Rate

VC bundling

  • Configuring an ADSL WAN Interface Card on Cisco 1700 Series Routers

VC shaping for VBR-NRT

  • Understanding the VBR-nrt Service Category and Traffic Shaping for ATM VCs

Voice configuration

  • Cisco IOS Voice Configuration Library

Voice over AAL5

  • Voice over ATM document in Cisco IOS Voice Configuration Library

VoATM

  • Voice over ATM document in Cisco IOS Voice Configuration Library

WRED

  • DiffServ Compliant Weighted Random Error Detection

Standards

Standards

Title

None

--

MIBs

MIBs2

MIBs Link

  • ATM-MIB
  • CISCO-AAL5-MIB
  • CISCO-ATM-EXT-MIB
  • CISCO-CAR-MIB
  • CISCO-CLASS-BASED-QOS-MIB
  • CISCO-IETF-ATM2-PVCTRAP-MIB
  • Entity-MIB
  • IF-MIB
  • Old-Cisco-Chassis MIB
  • RFC 1213 MIB

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs

2 Not all supported MIBs are listed.

RFCs

RFCs

Title

RFC 1213

Management Information Base for Network Management of TCP/IP-based internets: MIB-II

Technical Assistance

Description

Link

Technical Assistance Center (TAC) home page, containing 30,000 pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content.

http://www.cisco.com/public/support/tac/home.shtml

Command Reference

The following commands are introduced or modified in the feature or features documented in this module. For information about these commands, see the Cisco IOS Asynchronous Transfer Mode Command Reference. For information about all Cisco IOS commands, go to the Command Lookup Tool at http://tools.cisco.com/Support/CLILookup or to the Cisco IOS Master Commands List.

  • clock rate (interface ATM)
  • connect (FRF.5)
  • connect (FRF.8)
  • de-bit
  • ppp multilink multiclass
  • tx-ring-limit

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Any Internet Protocol (IP) addresses and phone numbers used in this document are not intended to be actual addresses and phone numbers. Any examples, command display output, network topology diagrams, and other figures included in the document are shown for illustrative purposes only. Any use of actual IP addresses or phone numbers in illustrative content is unintentional and coincidental.

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