Cisco 7600 Series Router SIP, SSC, and SPA Software Configuration Guide
Troubleshooting the IPSec VPN SPA
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Table of Contents

Troubleshooting the IPSec VPN SPA

General Troubleshooting Information

Interpreting Console Error Messages

Using debug Commands

Using show Commands

Monitoring the IPSec VPN SPA

Displaying IPSec VPN SPA Hardware and System Information

Displaying Information About IPSec VPN SPA Ports

Displaying Platform and Network Interface Controller Statistics for the IPsec VPN SPA

Displaying Information About Hardware Revision Levels

Displaying IPSec VPN SPA Configuration Information

Displaying Information About Access and Routed Ports That Are Connected

Displaying Information About the VLANs Allowed by a Trunk Port

Displaying the VPN Running State

Displaying Information About IKE Policies

Displaying Information About IPsec Transform Sets

Displaying Information About Crypto Maps

Displaying Information About IPsec Security Associations

Displaying Information About SAs at a Peer

Displaying HSRP Information

Displaying SSP Information

Displaying Information About a BFG Configuration

Displaying Information About RSA Public Keys

Displaying Information About Certificates

Displaying Information About Trustpoints

Displaying Information About the NHRP Cache

Displaying Information About Crypto Sessions

Displaying Tunnel Interface Information

Displaying Information About IP Multicast Over a GRE Tunnel

Troubleshooting Specific Problems on the IPSec VPN SPA

Clearing IPsec Security Associations

Troubleshooting Trunk Port Configurations

Troubleshooting IPsec Stateful Failover (VPN High Availability)

Checking HSRP Settings

Clearing Dormant SAs on Standby Routers

Enabling Debugging for HA

Troubleshooting a Blade Failure Group

Troubleshooting IKE Policy and Transform Sets

Using Crypto Conditional Debug

Crypto Conditional Debug Configuration Guidelines and Restrictions

Enabling Crypto Conditional Debug Filtering

Disabling Crypto Conditional Debugging

Enabling Crypto Error Debug Messages

Preparing for Online Insertion and Removal of a SPA

Troubleshooting the IPSec VPN SPA

This chapter describes techniques that you can use to troubleshoot the operation of your IPSec VPN SPAs in a Cisco 7600 series router.

It includes the following sections:


NoteFor detailed information on Cisco IOS IPSec cryptographic operations and policies, refer to the Cisco IOS Security Configuration Guide and Cisco IOS Security Command Reference.


For more information about the commands used in this chapter, refer to the Cisco IOS Software Releases 12.2SR Command Reference s and to the Cisco IOS Software Releases 12.2SX Command References . Also refer to the related Cisco IOS Release 12.2 software command reference and master index publications. For more information, see the “$paratext>” section.

General Troubleshooting Information

This section describes general information for troubleshooting the IPSec VPN SPA and the Cisco 7600 SSC-400 SIP. It includes the following sections:

Interpreting Console Error Messages

The Cisco 7600 series router can generate error messages and other system messages to inform the operator of events that might require attention. These messages can be displayed on the console, or sent to a logging host using the System Logging (Syslog) protocol or Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP).

System error messages are organized in the documentation according to the particular system facility that produces the messages. The IPSec VPN SPA and Cisco 7600 SSC-400 SIP use the following facility names in error messages:

  • IPSec VPN SPA—SPA_IPSEC_2G (also VPNSPA)
  • Cisco 7600 SSC-400—CAT6000_SSC (also C7600_SSC400)

To view the explanations and recommended actions for Cisco 7600 series router error messages, including messages related to service modules, refer to the following documents:

  • System Messages for 12.2S (for error messages in Release 12.2S) at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/iosswrel/ps1838/products_system_message_guides_list.html

Using debug Commands

For information about debug commands specific to the Cisco IOS software release 12.2SX, see the Cisco IOS Master Command List, Release 12.2SX at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/mcl/122sxmcl/12_2sx_mcl_book.html


Caution Because debugging output is assigned high priority in the CPU process, it can render the system unusable. For this reason, use debug commands only to troubleshoot specific problems or during troubleshooting sessions with Cisco technical support personnel. We recommend that you use debug commands during periods of lower network traffic and fewer users. Debugging during these periods decreases the likelihood that increased debug command processing overhead will affect system use.

For information about available crypto conditional debugging commands, see the “Using Crypto Conditional Debug” section.

For more information about other debug commands that can be used on a Cisco 7600 router see the Cisco IOS Debug Command Reference, Release 12.2 at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/12_2/debug/command/reference/122debug.html

Using show Commands

You can use several show commands to monitor and troubleshoot the IPSec VPN SPA on the Cisco 7600 series router.

For more information about show commands to verify and monitor the IPSec VPN SPA, see the “Displaying IPSec VPN SPA Configuration Information” section and the Cisco 7600 Series Cisco IOS Command Reference , 12.2 SR .

For more information about security-related show commands, see the Cisco IOS Security Command Reference.

Monitoring the IPSec VPN SPA

This section describes commands that can be used to display information about the IPSec VPN SPA hardware and configuration. It consists of the following subsections:

Displaying IPSec VPN SPA Hardware and System Information

To display hardware and system information, use the following commands:

Displaying Information About IPSec VPN SPA Ports

To display information about the type of SPAs that are installed in the router, use the show diagbus command.

The following example shows output from the show diagbus command on a Cisco 7600 series router with an IPSec VPN SPA installed in subslot 1 of a Cisco 7600 SSC-400 that is installed in slot 5:

Router# show diagbus
 
Slot 5: Logical_index 10
2-subslot Services SPA Carrier-400 controller
Board is analyzed ipc ready
HW rev 0.3, board revision A01
Serial Number: abc Part number: 73-6348-01
 
Slot database information:
Flags: 0x2004 Insertion time: 0x3DB5F4BC (4d20h ago)
 
Controller Memory Size:
248 MBytes CPU Memory
8 MBytes Packet Memory
256 MBytes Total on Board SDRAM
IOS (tm) cwlc Software (smsc-DWDBG-M), Experimental Version 12.2(20050623:231413)
 
SPA Information:
subslot 5/1: SPA-IPSEC-2G (0x3D7), status: ok
 

For information about the show module and show crypto eli commands, see the “Displaying the SPA Hardware Type” section.

Displaying Platform and Network Interface Controller Statistics for the IPsec VPN SPA

To display platform statistics and optionally display network interface controller statistics, use the show crypto engine accelerator statistic slot command.


NoteTheshow crypto engine accelerator statistic command is supported in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA and later releases.


The following example shows output from the show crypto engine accelerator statistic command on a Cisco 7600 series router with an IPSec VPN SPA in subslot 0 of a Cisco 7600 SSC-400 that is installed in slot 1. The output displays platform statistics for the IPSec VPN SPA and also displays the network interface controller statistics.

Router# show crypto engine accelerator statistic slot 1/0 detail
 
VPN module in slot 1/0
 
 
Decryption Side Data Path Statistics
====================================
Packets RX...............: 454260
Packets TX...............: 452480
 
IPSec Transport Mode.....: 0
IPSec Tunnel Mode........: 452470
AH Packets...............: 0
ESP Packets..............: 452470
GRE Decapsulations.......: 0
NAT-T Decapsulations.....: 0
Clear....................: 8
ICMP.....................: 0
 
Packets Drop.............: 193
Authentication Errors....: 0
Decryption Errors........: 0
Replay Check Failed......: 0
Policy Check Failed......: 0
Illegal CLear Packet.....: 0
GRE Errors...............: 0
SPD Errors...............: 0
HA Standby Drop..........: 0
 
Hard Life Drop...........: 0
Invalid SA...............: 191
SPI No Match.............: 0
Destination No Match.....: 0
Protocol No Match........: 0
 
Reassembly Frag RX.......: 0
IPSec Fragments..........: 0
IPSec Reasm Done.........: 0
Clear Fragments..........: 0
Clear Reasm Done.........: 0
Datagrams Drop...........: 0
Fragments Drop...........: 0
 
 
Decryption Side Controller Statistics
 
=====================================
Frames RX................: 756088
Bytes RX.................: 63535848
Mcast/Bcast Frames RX....: 2341
RX Less 128Bytes.........: 756025
RX Less 512Bytes.........: 58
RX Less 1KBytes..........: 2
RX Less 9KBytes..........: 3
RX Frames Drop...........: 0
 
Frames TX................: 452365
Bytes TX.................: 38001544
Mcast/Bcast Frames TX....: 9
TX Less 128Bytes.........: 452343
TX Less 512Bytes.........: 22
TX Less 1KBytes..........: 0
TX Less 9KBytes..........: 0
 
 
Encryption Side Data Path Statistics
====================================
Packets RX...............: 756344
Packets TX...............: 753880
IPSec Transport Mode.....: 0
IPSec Tunnel Mode........: 753869
GRE Encapsulations.......: 0
NAT-T Encapsulations.....: 0
LAF prefragmented........: 0
 
Fragmented...............: 0
Clear....................: 753904
ICMP.....................: 0
 
Packets Drop.............: 123
IKE/TED Drop.............: 27
Authentication Errors....: 0
Encryption Errors........: 0
HA Standby Drop..........: 0
 
Hard Life Drop...........: 0
Invalid SA...............: 191
 
Reassembly Frag RX.......: 0
Clear Fragments..........: 0
Clear Reasm Done.........: 0
Datagrams Drop...........: 0
Fragments Drop...........: 0
 
 
Encryption Side Controller Statistics
=====================================
Frames RX................: 454065
Bytes RX.................: 6168274/
Mcast/Bcast Frames RX....: 1586
RX Less 128Bytes.........: 1562
RX Less 512Bytes.........: 452503
RX Less 1KBytes..........: 0
RX Less 9KBytes..........: 0
RX Frames Drop...........: 0
 
Frames TX................: 753558
Bytes TX.................: 100977246
Mcast/Bcast Frames TX....: 2
TX Less 128Bytes.........: 3
TX Less 512Bytes.........: 753555
TX Less 1KBytes..........: 0
TX Less 9KBytes..........: 0
 
Router#

Displaying Information About Hardware Revision Levels

To display information about the hardware revision of the Cisco 7600 SSC-400 and the IPSec VPN SPA as well as the version of the field-programmable devices (FPDs) that are on the carrier card and the SPA, use the show hw-module slot fpd command. Cisco technical engineers might need this information to debug or troubleshoot problems with a SPA installation.

The following example shows output from the show hw-module slot command on a Cisco 7600 series router with an IPSec VPN SPA installed in subslot 0 of a Cisco 7600 SSC-400 that is installed in slot 6:

Router# show hw-module slot 2 fpd
 
==== ====================== ====== =============================================
H/W Field Programmable Current Min. Required
Slot Card Type Ver. Device: "ID-Name" Version Version
==== ====================== ====== ================== =========== ==============
2 7600-SSC-400 0.5 1-I/O FPGA 1.0 1.0
---- ---------------------- ------ ------------------ ----------- --------------
2/0 SPA-IPSEC-2G 0.3 1-PROM 1.1 1.1
==== ====================== ====== =============================================

Displaying IPSec VPN SPA Configuration Information

To display information about the IPSec VPN SPA configuration, use the following commands:

For a detailed description of the information displayed by the show commands, refer to the “IP Security and Encryption” chapter of the Cisco IOS Security Command Reference.

Displaying Information About Access and Routed Ports That Are Connected

To verify that an access or routed port is connected, use the show crypto vlan command. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show crypto vlan
 
Interface VLAN 2 on IPSec Service Module port GigabitEthernet2/0/1 connected to VLAN 502 with crypto map set mymap1

 

Router# show crypto vlan
 
Interface VLAN 2 on IPSec Service Module port GigabitEthernet2/0/1 connected to Gi2/8 with crypto map set mymap2
 

Displaying Information About the VLANs Allowed by a Trunk Port

To display information about the VLANs allowed by a trunk port, use the show interfaces trunk command. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show interfaces trunk
 
Port Mode Encapsulation Status Native vlan
Gi2/0/1 on 802.1q trunking 1
Gi2/0/2 on 802.1q trunking 1
 
Port Vlans allowed on trunk
Gi2/0/1 2
Gi2/0/2 502
 
Port Vlans allowed and active in management domain
Gi2/0/1 2
Gi2/0/2 502
 
Port Vlans in spanning tree forwarding state and not pruned
Gi2/0/1 2
Gi2/0/2 502
 

Displaying the VPN Running State

To display the VPN running state, use the show crypto vlan command. The following is sample output from the command:

In the following example, the interface VLAN belongs to the IPSec VPN SPA inside port:

Router# show crypto vlan
 
Interface VLAN 2 on IPSec Service Module port GigabitEthernet2/0/1 connected to Fa8/3
 

In the following example, VLAN 2 is the interface VLAN and VLAN 2022 is the hidden VLAN:

Router# show crypto vlan
 
Interface VLAN 2 on IPSec Service Module port GigabitEthernet2/0/1 connected to VLAN 2022 with crypto map set mymap2
 

In the following example, either the interface VLAN is missing on the IPSec VPN SPA inside port, the IPSec VPN SPA is removed from the chassis, or the IPSec VPN SPA was moved to a different subslot:

Router# show crypto vlan
 
Interface VLAN 2 connected to VLAN 3 (no IPSec Service Module attached)
 

Displaying Information About IKE Policies

To display information about IKE policies, use the show crypto isakmp policy command. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show crypto isakmp policy
 
Global IKE policy
Protection suite of priority 1
encryption algorithm: Three key triple DES
hash algorithm: Secure Hash Standard
authentication method: Rivest-Shamir-Adleman Signature
Diffie-Hellman group: #1 (768 bit)
lifetime: 86400 seconds, no volume limit
Default protection suite
encryption algorithm: DES - Data Encryption Standard (56 bit keys).
hash algorithm: Secure Hash Standard
authentication method: Rivest-Shamir-Adleman Signature
Diffie-Hellman group: #1 (768 bit)
lifetime: 86400 seconds, no volume limit
 

NoteIf a user enters an IKE encryption method that the hardware does not support, a warning message will be displayed in the show crypto isakmp policy command output:

WARNING:encryption hardware does not support the configured encryption method for ISAKMP policy
value


Displaying Information About IPsec Transform Sets

To display information about transform set configurations, use the show crypto ipsec transform-set command. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show crypto ipsec transform-set
 
Transform set combined-des-md5: {esp-des esp-md5-hmac}
will negotiate = {Tunnel,},
Transform set t1: {esp-des esp-md5-hmac}
will negotiate = {Tunnel,},
Transform set t100: {ah-sha-hmac}
will negotiate = {Transport,},
 

NoteIf a user enters an IPsec transform that the hardware (the IPsec peer) does not support, a warning message will be displayed in theshow crypto ipsec transform-set command output:

WARNING:encryption hardware does not support transform.


Displaying Information About Crypto Maps

To display information about crypto map configurations, use the show crypto map command. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show crypto map
 
Crypto Map "test" 10 ipsec-isakmp
Peer = 11.1.0.1
Extended IP access list 101
access-list 101 permit ip host 1.0.0.1 host 2.0.0.1
Current peer: 11.1.0.1
Security association lifetime: 4608000 kilobytes/3600 seconds
PFS (Y/N): N
Transform sets={
tset: { esp-3des } ,
}
Interfaces using crypto map test:
Vlan2
using crypto engine SPA-IPSEC-2G[2/0]
 

Displaying Information About IPsec Security Associations

To display information about IPsec security associations, use the show crypto ipsec sa command.


NoteWhen you first enter theshow crypto ipsec sa command, the packet counters will not show the correct values. Subsequent instances of the command will display the correct values.


The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show crypto ipsec sa
 
interface: Ethernet0
 
Crypto map tag: router-alice, local addr. 172.21.114.123
local ident (addr/mask/prot/port): (172.21.114.123/255.255.255.255/0/0)
remote ident (addr/mask/prot/port): (172.21.114.67/255.255.255.255/0/0)
current_peer: 172.21.114.67
PERMIT, flags={origin_is_acl,}
#pkts encaps: 10, #pkts encrypt: 10, #pkts digest 10
#pkts decaps: 10, #pkts decrypt: 10, #pkts verify 10
#send errors 10, #recv errors 0
 
local crypto endpt.: 172.21.114.123, remote crypto endpt.: 172.21.114.67
path mtu 1500, media mtu 1500
current outbound spi: 20890A6F
 
inbound esp sas:
spi: 0x257A1039(628756537)
transform: esp-des esp-md5-hmac,
in use settings ={Tunnel,}
slot: 0, conn id: 26, crypto map: router-alice
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec): (4607999/90)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
 
inbound ah sas:
 
outbound esp sas:
spi: 0x20890A6F(545852015)
transform: esp-des esp-md5-hmac,
in use settings ={Tunnel,}
slot: 0, conn id: 27, crypto map: router-alice
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec): (4607999/90)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
outbound ah sas:
 
interface: Tunnel0
 
Crypto map tag: router-alice, local addr. 172.21.114.123
local ident (addr/mask/prot/port): (172.21.114.123/255.255.255.255/0/0)
remote ident (addr/mask/prot/port): (172.21.114.67/255.255.255.255/0/0)
current_peer: 172.21.114.67
PERMIT, flags={origin_is_acl,}
#pkts encaps: 10, #pkts encrypt: 10, #pkts digest 10
#pkts decaps: 10, #pkts decrypt: 10, #pkts verify 10
#send errors 10, #recv errors 0
local crypto endpt.: 172.21.114.123, remote crypto endpt.: 172.21.114.67
path mtu 1500, media mtu 1500
current outbound spi: 20890A6F
 
inbound esp sas:
spi: 0x257A1039(628756537)
transform: esp-des esp-md5-hmac,
in use settings ={Tunnel,}
slot: 0, conn id: 26, crypto map: router-alice
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec): (4607999/90)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
 
inbound ah sas:
 
outbound esp sas:
spi: 0x20890A6F(545852015)
transform: esp-des esp-md5-hmac,
in use settings ={Tunnel,}
slot: 0, conn id: 27, crypto map: router-alice
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec): (4607999/90)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
 
outbound ah sas:

Displaying Information About SAs at a Peer

To display information about all current IKE SAs at a peer, use the show crypto isakmp sa command. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show crypto isakmp sa
dst src state conn-id slot status
11.0.0.1 21.0.0.1 QM_IDLE 68002 ACTIVE
21.0.0.1 11.0.0.1 QM_IDLE 68003 ACTIVE
10.0.0.1 11.0.0.1 QM_IDLE 68001 ACTIVE

Displaying HSRP Information

To display information about HSRP configurations, use the show crypto isakmp ha standby , show crypto ipsec ha , show ipsec sa , and show crypto ipsec sa standby commands.

Enter the show crypto isakmp ha standby command to view your ISAKMP standby or active SAs. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show crypto isakmp ha standby
 
dst src state I-Cookie R-Cookie
 
172.16.31.100 20.3.113.1 QM_IDLE 796885F3 62C3295E FFAFBACD
 
EED41AFF
 
172.16.31.100 20.2.148.1 QM_IDLE 5B78D70F 3D80ED01 FFA03C6D
 
09FC50BE
 
172.16.31.100 20.4.124.1 QM_IDLE B077D0A1 0C8EB3A0 FF5B152C
 
D233A1E0
 
172.16.31.100 20.3.88.1 QM_IDLE 55A9F85E 48CC14DE FF20F9AE
 
DE37B913
 
172.16.31.100 20.1.95.1 QM_IDLE 3881DE75 3CF384AE FF192CAB
 

Enter the show crypto ipsec ha command to view your IPsec high availability (HA) manager state. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show crypto ipsec ha
 
Interface VIP SAs IPSec HA State
 
FastEthernet0/0 172.16.31.100 1800 Active since 13:00:16 EDT Tue Oct 1 2002
 

Enter the show crypto ipsec sa command to view HA status of the IPsec SA (standby or active). The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show crypto ipsec sa
 
interface: FastEthernet0/0
 
Crypto map tag: mymap, local addr. 172.168.3.100
local ident (addr/mask/prot/port): (192.168.1.0/255.255.255.0/0/0)
remote ident (addr/mask/prot/port): (5.6.0.0/255.255.0.0/0/0)
current_peer: 172.168.3.1
PERMIT, flags={}
#pkts encaps: 0, #pkts encrypt: 0, #pkts digest 0
#pkts decaps: 0, #pkts decrypt: 0, #pkts verify 0
#pkts compressed: 0, #pkts decompressed: 0
#pkts not compressed: 0, #pkts compr. failed: 0, #pkts decompress failed: 0
#send errors 0, #recv errors 0
 
local crypto endpt.: 172.168.3.100, remote crypto endpt.: 172.168.3.1
path mtu 1500, media mtu 1500
current outbound spi: 132ED6AB
 
inbound esp sas:
spi: 0xD8C8635F(3637011295)
transform: esp-des esp-md5-hmac ,
in use settings ={Tunnel, }
slot: 0, conn id: 2006, flow_id: 3, crypto map: mymap
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec): (4499/59957)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
HA Status: STANDBY
 
inbound ah sas:
spi: 0xAAF10A60(2867923552)
transform: ah-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Tunnel, }
slot: 0, conn id: 2004, flow_id: 3, crypto map: mymap
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec): (4499/59957)
replay detection support: Y
HA Status: STANDBY
 
inbound pcp sas:
 
outbound esp sas:
spi: 0x132ED6AB(321836715)
transform: esp-des esp-md5-hmac ,
in use settings ={Tunnel, }
slot: 0, conn id: 2007, flow_id: 4, crypto map: mymap
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec): (4499/59957)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
HA Status: STANDBY
 
outbound ah sas:
spi: 0x1951D78(26549624)
transform: ah-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Tunnel, }
slot: 0, conn id: 2005, flow_id: 4, crypto map: mymap
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec): (4499/59957)
replay detection support: Y
HA Status: STANDBY
 
outbound pcp sas:
 

Enter the show crypto ipsec sa standby command to view your standby SAs. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show crypto ipsec sa standby
 
interface: FastEthernet0/0
Crypto map tag: mymap, local addr. 172.168.3.100
local ident (addr/mask/prot/port): (192.168.1.0/255.255.255.0/0/0)
remote ident (addr/mask/prot/port): (5.6.0.0/255.255.0.0/0/0)
current_peer: 172.168.3.1
PERMIT, flags={}
#pkts encaps: 0, #pkts encrypt: 0, #pkts digest 0
#pkts decaps: 0, #pkts decrypt: 0, #pkts verify 0
#pkts compressed: 0, #pkts decompressed: 0
#pkts not compressed: 0, #pkts compr. failed: 0, #pkts decompress failed: 0
#send errors 0, #recv errors 0
 
local crypto endpt.: 172.168.3.100, remote crypto endpt.: 172.168.3.1
path mtu 1500, media mtu 1500
current outbound spi: 132ED6AB
 
inbound esp sas:
spi: 0xD8C8635F(3637011295)
transform: esp-des esp-md5-hmac ,
in use settings ={Tunnel, }
slot: 0, conn id: 2006, flow_id: 3, crypto map: mymap
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec): (4499/59957)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
HA Status: STANDBY
 
inbound ah sas:
spi: 0xAAF10A60(2867923552)
transform: ah-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Tunnel, }
slot: 0, conn id: 2004, flow_id: 3, crypto map: mymap
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec): (4499/59957)
replay detection support: Y
HA Status: STANDBY
 
inbound pcp sas:
 
outbound esp sas:
spi: 0x132ED6AB(321836715)
transform: esp-des esp-md5-hmac ,
in use settings ={Tunnel, }
slot: 0, conn id: 2007, flow_id: 4, crypto map: mymap
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec): (4499/59957)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
HA Status: STANDBY
 
outbound ah sas:
spi: 0x1951D78(26549624)
transform: ah-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Tunnel, }
slot: 0, conn id: 2005, flow_id: 4, crypto map: mymap
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec): (4499/59957)
replay detection support: Y
HA Status: STANDBY
 
outbound pcp sas:
 

Displaying SSP Information

To display information about an SSP configuration, use the show ssp client , show ssp packet , show ssp peers , and show ssp redundancy commands.

Enter the show ssp client command to display the domain of interpretation (DOI), name, running version and available version of each client that is registered with SSP. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show ssp client
 
SSP Client Information
 
DOI Client Name Version Running Ver
 
1 IPSec HA Manager 1.0 1.0
 
2 IKE HA Manager 1.0 1.0
 

Enter the show ssp packet command to display the byte count and packet count for the current socket, the creation time of the socket, the server port number, and the port number used for SSP communication. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show ssp packet
 
SSP packet Information
 
Socket creation time: 01:01:06
 
Local port: 3249 Server port: 3249
 
Packets Sent = 38559, Bytes Sent = 2285020
 
Packets Received = 910, Bytes Received = 61472
 

Enter the show ssp peers command to display the IP address of the remote peer, the interface used, and the connection state. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show ssp peers
 
SSP Peer Information
 
IP Address Connection State Local Interface
 
40.0.0.1 Connected FastEthernet0/1
 

Enter the show ssp redundancy command to display the current SSP state, the HSRP group name, interface used, and the elapsed time since last state change. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show ssp redundancy
 
SSP Redundancy Information
 
Device has been ACTIVE for 02:55:34
 
Virtual IP Redundancy Name Interface
 
172.16.31.100 KNIGHTSOFNI FastEthernet0/0
 

Displaying Information About a BFG Configuration

To display information about a BFG configuration, use the show redundancy linecard-group and show crypto ace redundancy commands. The following is sample output from the commands:

Router# show redundancy linecard-group 1
 
Line Card Redundancy Group:1 Mode:feature-card
Class:load-sharing
Cards:
Slot:3 Subslot:0
Slot:5 Subslot:0
 
Router# show crypto ace redundancy
--------------------------------------
LC Redundancy Group ID :1
Pending Configuration Transactions:0
Current State :OPERATIONAL
Number of blades in the group :2
Slots
--------------------------------------
Slot:3 Subslot:0
Slot state:0x36
Booted
Received partner config
Completed Bulk Synchronization
Crypto Engine in Service
Rebooted 22 times
Initialization Timer not running
Slot:5 Subslot:0
Slot state:0x36
Booted
Received partner config
Completed Bulk Synchronization
Crypto Engine in Service
Rebooted 24 times
Initialization Timer not running
 

Displaying Information About RSA Public Keys

To display information the RSA public keys configured for your router, use the show crypto key mypubkey rsa command. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show crypto key mypubkey rsa
 
% Key pair was generated at: 06:07:50 UTC Jan 13 1996
 
Key name: myrouter.example.com
 
Usage: Encryption Key
 
Key Data:
 
00302017 4A7D385B 1234EF29 335FC973 2DD50A37 C4F4B0FD 9DADE748 429618D5
 
18242BA3 2EDFBDD3 4296142A DDF7D3D8 08407685 2F2190A0 0B43F1BD 9A8A26DB
 
07953829 791FCDE9 A98420F0 6A82045B 90288A26 DBC64468 7789F76E EE21
 

To display a list of all the RSA public keys stored on your router (including the public keys of peers that have sent your router their certificates during peer authentication for IPsec), or to display details of a particular RSA public key stored on your router, use the show crypto key pubkey-chain rsa command. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show crypto key pubkey-chain rsa
 
Codes: M - Manually Configured, C - Extracted from certificate
 
Code Usage IP-address Name
 
M Signature 10.0.0.l myrouter.example.com
 
M Encryption 10.0.0.1 myrouter.example.com
 
C Signature 172.16.0.1 routerA.example.com
 
C Encryption 172.16.0.1 routerA.example.com
 
C General 192.168.10.3 routerB.domain1.com
 

Displaying Information About Certificates

To display information about your certificate, the certificate of the CA, and any RA certificates, use the show crypto pki certificates command. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show crypto pki certificates
 
CA Certificate
 
Status: Available
Certificate Serial Number: 1244325DE0369880465F977A18F61CA8
Certificate Usage: Signature
 
Issuer:
CN = new-user
OU = pki new-user
O = cisco
L = santa cruz2
ST = CA
C = US
EA = user@example.com
 
Subject:
CN = new-user
OU = pki new-user
O = cisco
L = santa cruz2
ST = CA
C = US
EA = user@example.com
 
CRL Distribution Point:
http://new-user.example.com/CertEnroll/new-user.crl
 
Validity Date:
start date: 14:19:29 PST Oct 31 2002
end date: 14:27:27 PST Oct 31 2017
 
Associated Trustpoints: MS
 
Certificate
 
Status: Available
Certificate Serial Number: 193E28D20000000009F7
Certificate Usage: Signature
 
Issuer:
CN = new-user
OU = pki new-user
O = cisco
L = santa cruz2
ST = CA
C = US
EA = user@example.com
 
Subject:
Name: User1.Example.Com
 
CRL Distribution Point:
http://new-user.example.com/CertEnroll/new-user.crl
 
Validity Date:
start date: 12:40:14 PST Feb 26 2003
end date: 12:50:14 PST Mar 5 2003
renew date: 16:00:00 PST Dec 31 1969
 
Associated Trustpoints: MS
 

Displaying Information About Trustpoints

To display the trustpoints that are configured in the router, use the show crypto pki trustpoints command. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show crypto pki trustpoints
 
Trustpoint bo:
 
Subject Name:
 
CN = ACSWireless Certificate Manager
 
O = cisco.com
 
C = US
 
Serial Number:01
 
Certificate configured.
 
CEP URL:http://ACSWireless
 
CRL query url:ldap://ACSWireless
 

Displaying Information About the NHRP Cache

To display information about the Next Hop Resolution Protocol (NHRP) cache, use the show ip nhrp and the show crypto sockets commands. The following is sample output from the commands:

Router# show ip nhrp
 
10.10.1.75/32 via 10.10.1.75, Tunnel5 created 00:32:11, expire 00:01:46
 
Type: dynamic, Flags: authoritative unique registered
 
NBMA address: 172.16.175.75
 
10.10.1.76/32 via 10.10.1.76, Tunnel5 created 00:26:41, expire 00:01:37
 
Type: dynamic, Flags: authoritative unique registered
 
NBMA address: 172.16.175.76
 
10.10.1.77/32 via 10.10.1.77, Tunnel5 created 00:31:26, expire 00:01:33
 
Type: dynamic, Flags: authoritative unique registered
 
NBMA address: 172.17.63.20
 
Router# show crypto sockets
 
Number of Crypto Socket connections 1
 
Tu0 Peers (local/remote): 9.1.1.1/11.1.1.1
Local Ident (addr/mask/port/prot): (9.1.1.1/255.255.255.255/0/47)
Remote Ident (addr/mask/port/prot): (11.1.1.1/255.255.255.255/0/47)
IPSec Profile: "MyIpsecProf"
Socket State: Open
Client: "TUNNEL SEC" (Client State: Active)
 
Crypto Sockets in Listen state:
Client: "TUNNEL SEC" Profile: "MyIpsecProf" Map-name: "Tunnel0-head-0"
 
Router#
 

Displaying Information About Crypto Sessions

To display status information for active crypto sessions, use the show crypto session command. The output will include the following:

  • Interface
  • IKE peer description, if available
  • IKE SAs that are associated with the peer by which the IPsec SAs are created
  • IPsec SAs serving the flows of a session

The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show crypto session detail
 
Crypto session current status
 
Code: C - IKE Configuration mode, D - Dead Peer Detection
K - Keepalives, N - NAT-traversal, X - IKE Extended Authentication
 
Interface: Ethernet1/0
Session status: UP-NO-IKE
Peer: 10.2.80.179/500 fvrf: (none) ivrf: (none)
Desc: My-manual-keyed-peer
Phase1_id: 10.2.80.179
IPSEC FLOW: permit ip host 10.2.80.190 host 10.2.80.179
Active SAs: 4, origin: manual-keyed crypto map
Inbound: #pkts dec'ed 0 drop 0 life (KB/Sec) 0/0
Outbound: #pkts enc'ed 0 drop 0 life (KB/Sec) 0/0
 
Interface: Ethernet1/2
Session status: DOWN
Peer: 10.1.1.1/500 fvrf: (none) ivrf: (none)
Desc: SJC24-2-VPN-Gateway
Phase1_id: 10.1.1.1
IPSEC FLOW: permit ip host 10.2.2.3 host 10.2.2.2
Active SAs: 0, origin: crypto map
Inbound: #pkts dec'ed 0 drop 0 life (KB/Sec) 0/0
Outbound: #pkts enc'ed 0 drop 0 life (KB/Sec) 0/0
IPSEC FLOW: permit ip 10.2.0.0/255.255.0.0 10.4.0.0/255.255.0.0
Active SAs: 0, origin: crypto map
Inbound: #pkts dec'ed 0 drop 0 life (KB/Sec) 0/0
Outbound: #pkts enc'ed 0 drop 0 life (KB/Sec) 0/0
 
Interface: Serial2/0.17
Session status: UP-ACTIVE
Peer: 10.1.1.5/500 fvrf: (none) ivrf: (none)
Desc: (none)
Phase1_id: 10.1.1.5
IKE SA: local 10.1.1.5/500 remote 10.1.1.5/500 Active
Capabilities:(none) connid:1 lifetime:00:59:51
IPSEC FLOW: permit ip host 10.1.1.5 host 10.1.2.5
Active SAs: 2, origin: dynamic crypto map
Inbound: #pkts dec'ed 4 drop 0 life (KB/Sec) 20085/171
Outbound: #pkts enc'ed 4 drop 0 life (KB/Sec) 20086/171
 

Displaying Tunnel Interface Information

To display tunnel interface information, use the show interfaces tunnel command. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show interfaces tunnel 1
 
Tunnel4 is up, line protocol is down
Hardware is Routing Tunnel
Internet address is 10.1.1.1/24
MTU 1514 bytes, BW 9 Kbit, DLY 500000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
Encapsulation TUNNEL, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
Tunnel source 9.2.2.1, destination 6.6.6.2
Tunnel protocol/transport GRE/IP, key disabled, sequencing disabled
Tunnel TOS 0xF, Tunnel TTL 128
Checksumming of packets disabled, fast tunneling enabled
Last input never, output never, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
Queueing strategy, fifo
Output queue 0/0, 1 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
30 second input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
30 second output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets, 0 restarts
 

Table 36-1 describes significant fields shown in the display.

 

Table 36-1 show interfaces tunnel Field Descriptions

Field
Description

Tunnel is {up | down}

Interface is currently active and inserted into ring (up) or inactive and not inserted (down).

line protocol is {up | down | administratively down}

Shows line protocol up if a valid route is available to the tunnel destination. Shows line protocol down if no route is available, or if the route would be recursive.

Hardware

Specifies the hardware type.

MTU

Maximum transmission unit of the interface.

BW

Bandwidth of the interface in kilobits per second.

DLY

Delay of the interface in microseconds.

rely

Reliability of the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is 100 percent reliability), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

load

Load on the interface as a fraction of 255 (255/255 is completely saturated), calculated as an exponential average over 5 minutes.

Encapsulation

Encapsulation method is always TUNNEL for tunnels.

loopback

Indicates whether loopback is set or not.

Keepalive

Indicates whether keepalives are set or not.

Tunnel source

IP address used as the source address for the tunnel packets.

destination

IP address of the tunnel destination.

Tunnel protocol

Tunnel transport protocol (the protocol the tunnel is using). This is based on the tunnel mode command, which defaults to GRE.

key

(Optional) ID key for the tunnel interface.

sequencing

(Optional) Indicates whether the tunnel interface drops datagrams that arrive out of order.

Last input

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds (or never) since the last packet was successfully received by an interface and processed locally on the router. Useful for knowing when a dead interface failed.

This field is not updated by fast-switched traffic.

output

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds (or never) since the last packet was successfully transmitted by an interface.

output hang

Number of hours, minutes, and seconds (or never) since the interface was last reset because of a transmission that took too long. When the number of hours in any of the “last” fields exceeds 24 hours, the number of days and hours is displayed. If that field overflows, asterisks are displayed.

Last clearing

Time at which the counters that measure cumulative statistics (such as number of bytes transmitted and received) shown in this report were last reset to zero. Note that variables that might affect routing (for example, load and reliability) are not cleared when the counters are cleared.

Three asterisks (***) indicate the elapsed time is too large to be displayed.

0:00:00 indicates the counters were cleared more than 231 ms (and less than 232 ms) ago.

Output queue, drops
Input queue, drops

Number of packets in output and input queues. Each number is followed by a slash, the maximum size of the queue, and the number of packets dropped because of a full queue.

30 second input rate,
30 second output rate

Average number of bits and packets transmitted per second in the last 30 seconds.

The 30-second input and output rates should be used only as an approximation of traffic per second during a given 30-second period. These rates are exponentially weighted averages with a time constant of 30 seconds. A period of four time constants must pass before the average will be within two percent of the instantaneous rate of a uniform stream of traffic over that period.

packets input

Total number of error-free packets received by the system.

bytes

Total number of bytes, including data and MAC encapsulation, in the error-free packets received by the system.

no buffer

Number of received packets discarded because there was no buffer space in the main system. Compare with ignored count. Broadcast storms on Ethernet networks and bursts of noise on serial lines are often responsible for no input buffer events.

broadcasts

Total number of broadcast or multicast packets received by the interface.

runts

Number of packets that are discarded because they are smaller than the minimum packet size of the medium.

giants

Number of packets that are discarded because they exceed the maximum packet size of the medium.

CRC

Cyclic redundancy checksum generated by the originating LAN station or far-end device does not match the checksum calculated from the data received. On a LAN, this usually indicates noise or transmission problems on the LAN interface or the LAN bus itself. A high number of CRCs is usually the result of a station transmitting bad data.

frame

Number of packets received incorrectly having a CRC error and a noninteger number of octets.

overrun

Number of times the serial receiver hardware was unable to hand received data to a hardware buffer because the input rate exceeded the receiver’s ability to handle the data.

ignored

Number of received packets ignored by the interface because the interface hardware ran low on internal buffers. These buffers are different than the system buffers mentioned previously in the buffer description. Broadcast storms and bursts of noise can cause the ignored count to be increased.

abort

Illegal sequence of one bits on a serial interface. This usually indicates a clocking problem between the serial interface and the data link equipment.

packets output

Total number of messages transmitted by the system.

bytes

Total number of bytes, including data and MAC encapsulation, transmitted by the system.

underruns

Number of times that the far-end transmitter has been running faster than the near-end router’s receiver can handle. This may never be reported on some interfaces.

output errors

Sum of all errors that prevented the final transmission of datagrams out of the interface being examined. Note that this may not balance with the sum of the enumerated output errors, as some datagrams may have more than one error, and others may have errors that do not fall into any of the specifically tabulated categories.

collisions

Number of messages retransmitted because of an Ethernet collision. This usually is the result of an overextended LAN (Ethernet or transceiver cable too long, more than two repeaters between stations, or too many cascaded multiport transceivers). Some collisions are normal. However, if your collision rate climbs to around 4 or 5 percent, you should consider verifying that there is no faulty equipment on the segment and moving some existing stations to a new segment. A packet that collides is counted only once in output packets.

interface resets

Number of times an interface has been reset. The interface may be reset by the administrator or automatically when an internal error occurs.

restarts

Number of times that the controller was restarted because of errors.

Displaying Information About IP Multicast Over a GRE Tunnel

To display information about an IP multicast over a GRE tunnel configuration, enter the show crypto vlan and show ip mroute commands.

Enter the show crypto vlan command to check that the tunnel has been taken over by the IPSec VPN SPA. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show crypto vlan

Interface VLAN 100 on IPSec Service Module port Gi7/0/1 connected to Po1 with crypto map set map_t3
Tunnel15 is accelerated via IPSec SM in subslot 7/0
 

Enter the show ip mroute command and look for the H flag to check that the IP multicast traffic is hardware-switched. The following is sample output from the command:

Router# show ip mroute 230.1.1.5

IP Multicast Routing Table
Flags: D - Dense, S - Sparse, B - Bidir Group, s - SSM Group, C - Connected,
L - Local, P - Pruned, R - RP-bit set, F - Register flag,
T - SPT-bit set, J - Join SPT, M - MSDP created entry,
X - Proxy Join Timer Running, A - Candidate for MSDP Advertisement,
U - URD, I - Received Source Specific Host Report, Z - Multicast Tunnel
Y - Joined MDT-data group, y - Sending to MDT-data group
Outgoing interface flags: H - Hardware switched, A - Assert winner
Timers: Uptime/Expires
Interface state: Interface, Next-Hop or VCD, State/Mode
(*, 230.1.1.5), 01:23:45/00:03:16, RP 15.15.1.1, flags: SJC
Incoming interface: Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
Outgoing interface list:
Tunnel15, Forward/Sparse-Dense, 00:25:47/00:03:16

(120.1.0.3, 230.1.1.5), 01:23:46/00:03:25, flags: T
Incoming interface: GigabitEthernet8/1, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0, RPF-MFD
Outgoing interface list:
Tunnel15, Forward/Sparse-Dense, 00:25:47/00:03:16, H

Troubleshooting Specific Problems on the IPSec VPN SPA

This section provides additional information about troubleshooting specific problems related to the IPSec VPN SPA. It includes the following subsections:

Clearing IPsec Security Associations

You can clear (and reinitialize) IPsec security associations by using the clear crypto sa command.

Using the clear crypto sa command without parameters will clear out the full SA database, which will clear out active security sessions. You may also specify the peer , map , or entry keywords to clear out only a subset of the SA database. For more information, refer to the clear crypto sa command in the Cisco IOS Security Command Reference, Release 12.2.

If you want to also remove the IKE (phase 1) SAs, follow the clear crypto sa command with the clear crypto isa command. Alternatively, you can use the clear crypto session command to achieve the same result as the clear crypto sa and the clear crypto isa commands. The clear crypto session command supports many of the same parameters as the clear crypto sa command.

Troubleshooting Trunk Port Configurations


Caution When you configure an Ethernet port as a trunk port, all the VLANs are allowed on the trunk port by default. This default configuration does not work well with the IPSec VPN SPA and causes network loops. To avoid this problem, you must explicitly specify only the desirable VLANs.

For more information on trunk configuration guidelines, review the “Configuring a Trunk Port” section.

To verify which ports are assigned to the VLAN, enter the show vlan id number command, using the interface VLAN identifier. Following is an example of a trunk port configuration and the output of the show vlan id command:

 
Router# show run interface gi 1/3
Building configuration...
 
Current configuration : 175 bytes
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/3
switchport
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk allowed vlan 1,502-504,1002-1005
switchport mode trunk
no ip address
end
 
 
Router# show crypto vlan
 
Interface VLAN 2 on IPSec Service Module port Gi7/0/1 connected to VLAN 502 with crypto map set testtag_1
Interface VLAN 3 on IPSec Service Module port Gi7/0/1 connected to VLAN 503 with crypto map set testtag_2
Interface VLAN 4 on IPSec Service Module port Gi7/0/1 connected to VLAN 504 with crypto map set testtag_3
 
Router# show vlan id 2
 
VLAN Name Status Ports
---- -------------------------------- --------- -------------------------------
2 VLAN0002 active Gi7/0/1
 
VLAN Type SAID MTU Parent RingNo BridgeNo Stp BrdgMode Trans1 Trans2
---- ----- ---------- ----- ------ ------ -------- ---- -------- ------ ------
2 enet 100002 1500 - - - - - 0 0
 
Remote SPAN VLAN
----------------
Disabled
 
Primary Secondary Type Ports
------- --------- ----------------- ------------------------------------------
 
Router# show vlan id 502
 
VLAN Name Status Ports
---- -------------------------------- --------- -------------------------------
502 VLAN0502 active Gi1/3, Gi7/0/2
 
VLAN Type SAID MTU Parent RingNo BridgeNo Stp BrdgMode Trans1 Trans2
---- ----- ---------- ----- ------ ------ -------- ---- -------- ------ ------
502 enet 100502 1500 - - - - - 0 0
 
Remote SPAN VLAN
----------------
Disabled
 
Primary Secondary Type Ports
------- --------- ----------------- ------------------------------------------
 
Router#

Troubleshooting IPsec Stateful Failover (VPN High Availability)

If you find that either the active or standby IPsec stateful failover (VPN high availability) processes do not function as expected, you can perform the following checks:

  • Use the show ssp command to verify the SSP process is running.
  • Make sure that both routers share identical IPsec configurations. This is critical. If routers are configured differently, IPsec stateful failover (VPN high availability) will not work.

Note Support for IPsec stateful failover is removed in Cisco IOS Release 12.2SRA. The feature is supported in Cisco IOS Release 12.2SXF.


  • Verify that an IPsec connection can be formed with existing maps, transforms, and access lists.
  • Configure HSRP on the inside and outside interfaces and make the HSRP groups track one another. Verify this works properly by performing a shut command on either of the interfaces, then observe that the HSRP standby router takes active control from the active router.
  • Verify that SSP peers can see each other by performing a show ssp peer command on both the active and standby routers.
  • Bind the IKE and IPsec to SSP and send traffic over the tunnels. You can view high availability (HA) messages on the standby router as both the active and standby routers synchronize.
  • HSRP settings may require adjustments depending on the interface employed, such as Fast Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet.

Checking HSRP Settings

To check HSRP settings, perform this task:

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# show standby brief

Ensures that the interfaces are synchronized.

Step 2

Router # no standby delay timer

Leaves the delay timers at their default settings

Step 3

Router# show standby brief

When the other router comes online, enter the show standby brief command once again. If the output shows an interface on standby, you must set the standby router’s delay timer.

Clearing Dormant SAs on Standby Routers

To clear associated SA entries, perform this task:

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# clear crypto isakmp ha [ standby ][ resync ]

Clears all dormant (standby) entries from the device. If the resync keyword is used, all standby IKE SAs will be removed, and a resynchronization of state will occur.

Step 2

Router# clear crypto sa ha standb y [ peer ip address | resync ]

Clears all standby SAs for the device if peer is specified.

Enabling Debugging for HA

To enable debugging for HA, perform this task:

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# debug crypto isakmp ha [ detail | fsm | update ]

Enables basic debug messages related to the IKE HA Manager.

Step 2

Router# debug crypto ipsec ha [ detail | fsm | update ]

Enables IPsec HA debugging

Step 3

Router# debug ssp [ fsm | socket | packet | peers | redundancy | config ]

Enables SSP debugging.

Troubleshooting a Blade Failure Group

To enable IPSec VPN SPA debugging for a blade failure group, enter the debug crypto ace b2b command:

Router# debug crypto ace b2b
 
ACE B2B Failover debugging is on
 

Troubleshooting IKE Policy and Transform Sets

Any IPsec transforms or IKE encryption methods that the current hardware does not support should be disabled; they are ignored whenever an attempt to negotiate with the peer is made.

If a user enters an IPsec transform or an IKE encryption method that the hardware does not support, a warning message will be generated. These warning messages are also generated at boot time. When an encrypted card is inserted, the current configuration is scanned. If any IPsec transforms or IKE encryption methods are found that are not supported by the hardware, a warning message will be generated.

Using Crypto Conditional Debug

The crypto conditional debug feature provides three command-line interface (CLI) commands that allow you to debug an IP Security (IPsec) tunnel on the basis of predefined crypto conditions such as the peer IP address, connection-ID of a crypto engine, and security parameter index (SPI). By limiting debug messages to specific IPsec operations and reducing the amount of debug output, you can better troubleshoot a router with a large number of tunnels.

The crypto conditional debug commands ( debug crypto condition , debug crypto condition unmatched , and show crypto debug-condition ) allow you to specify conditions (filter values) in which to generate and display debug messages related only to the specified conditions.

Table 36-2 lists the supported condition types.

 

Table 36-2 Supported Condition Types for Crypto Conditional Debug Commands

Condition Type (Keyword)
Description

connid

An integer between 1 and 32766. Relevant debug messages will be shown if the current IPsec operation uses this value as the connection-ID to interface with the crypto engine.

flowid

An integer between 1 and 32766. Relevant debug messages will be shown if the current IPsec operation uses this value as the flow-ID to interface with the crypto engine.

fvrf

The name string of a virtual private network (VPN) routing and forwarding (VRF) instance. Relevant debug messages will be shown if the current IPsec operation uses this VRF instance as its front-door VRF (FVRF).

ivrf

The name string of a VRF instance. Relevant debug messages will be shown if the current IPsec operation uses this VRF instance as its inside VRF (IVRF).

peer group

A Unity group name string. Relevant debug messages will be shown if the peer is using this group name as its identity.

peer hostname

A fully qualified domain name (FQDN) string. Relevant debug messages will be shown if the peer is using this string as its identity.

peer ipv4

A single IP address. Relevant debug messages will be shown if the current IPsec operation is related to the IP address of this peer.

peer subnet

A subnet and a subnet mask that specify a range of peer IP addresses. Relevant debug messages will be shown if the IP address of the current IPsec peer falls into the specified subnet range.

peer username

A username string. Relevant debug messages will be shown if the peer is using this username as its identity.

spi

A 32-bit unsigned integer. Relevant debug messages will be shown if the current IPsec operation uses this value as the SPI.


NoteIfconnid, flowid, or spi is used as a debug condition, the debug messages for a related IPsec flow are generated. An IPsec flow has two connection-IDs, flow-IDs, and SPI values—one inbound and one outbound. Either one of the two connection-IDs, flow-IDs, and SPI values can be used as the debug condition that triggers debug messages for the IPsec flow.


Crypto Conditional Debug Configuration Guidelines and Restrictions

When configuring crypto conditional debug, follow these guidelines and restrictions:

  • This feature does not support debug message filtering for hardware crypto engines.
  • Although conditional debugging is useful for troubleshooting peer-specific or functionality-related Internet Key Exchange (IKE) and IPsec problems, conditional debugging may not be able to define and check large numbers of debug conditions.
  • Because extra space is needed to store the debug condition values, additional processing overhead is added to the CPU and memory usage is increased. Thus, enabling crypto conditional debugging on a router with heavy traffic should be used with caution.
  • Your router will perform conditional debugging only after at least one of the global crypto debug commands ( debug crypto isakmp , debug crypto ipsec , or debug crypto engine ) has been enabled. This requirement helps to ensure that the performance of the router will not be impacted when conditional debugging is not being used.

Enabling Crypto Conditional Debug Filtering

To enable crypto conditional debug filtering, perform the following tasks:

.

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Step 2

Router# debug crypto condition [ connid integer engine-id integer ] [ flowid integer engine-id integer ] [ fvrf string ] [ ivrf string ] [ peer [ group string ] [ hostname string ] [ ipv4 ipaddress] [ subnet subnet mask ] [ username string ]] [ spi integer ] [ reset ]

Defines conditional debug filters. See Table 36-2 for descriptions of values.

Step 3

Router# show crypto debug-condition {[ peer ] [ connid ] [ spi ] [ fvrf ] [ ivrf ] [ unmatched ]}

Displays crypto debug conditions that have already been enabled in the router.

Step 4

Router# debug crypto isakmp

Enables global IKE debugging.

Step 5

Router# debug crypto ipse c

Enables global IPsec debugging.

Step 6

Router# debug crypto engine

Enables global crypto engine debugging.

Step 7

Router# debug crypto condition unmatched [ isakmp | ipsec | engine ]

(Optional) Displays debug conditional crypto messages when no context information is available to check against debug conditions. If none of the optional keywords are specified, all crypto-related information will be shown.

Disabling Crypto Conditional Debugging

Before you disable crypto conditional debugging, you must first disable any crypto global debug CLIs that you have issued. You can then disable crypto conditional debugging. To disable crypto conditional debugging, enter the following command:

Router# debug crypto condition reset

Enabling Crypto Error Debug Messages

Enabling the debug crypto error command displays only error-related debug messages, which allows you to easily determine why a crypto operation, such as an IKE negotiation, has failed within your system. To enable crypto error debug messages, enter the following command from privileged EXEC mode:

Router# debug crypto {isakmp | ipsec | engine} error

NoteWhen enabling this command, ensure that global crypto debug commands are not enabled; otherwise, the global commands will override any possible error-related debug messages.


For complete configuration information for crypto conditional debug support, refer to this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/12_3t/12_3t2/feature/guide/gt_dbcry.html

Preparing for Online Insertion and Removal of a SPA

The Cisco 7600 series router supports online insertion and removal (OIR) of the SSC, in addition to each of the SPAs. You can remove an SSC with its SPAs still intact, or you can remove a SPA independently from the SSC, leaving the SSC installed in the router.

An SSC can remain installed in the router with one SPA remaining active while you remove another SPA from one of the SSC subslots. If you are not planning to immediately replace a SPA into the SSC, then be sure to install a blank filler plate in the subslot. The SSC should always be fully installed with either functional SPAs or blank filler plates.

For more information about activating and deactivating SPAs in preparation for OIR, see the “Preparing for Online Insertion and Removal of SIPs and SPAs” topic in the “Troubleshooting the SIPs and SSC” chapter in this guide.