Cisco 7600 Series Router SIP, SSC, and SPA Software Configuration Guide
Configuring the 8-Port Channelized T1/E1 SPA
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Table of Contents

Configuring the 8-Port Channelized T1/E1 SPA

Configuration Tasks

Required Configuration Tasks

Setting the Card Type

Enabling the Interfaces on the Controller

Verifying Controller Configuration

Setting the IP Address

Verifying Interface Configuration

Specifying the Interface Address on a SPA

Optional Configurations

Configuring Framing

Configuring Encapsulation

Configuring the CRC Size for T1

Configuring FDL

Configuring Multilink Point-to-Point Protocol (Hardware-based)

Configuring MLFR for T1/E1

Invert Data on the T1/E1 Interface

Changing a Channel Group Configuration

Configuring Multipoint Bridging

Configuring Bridging Control Protocol Support

Configuring BCP on MLPPP

FRF.12 Guidelines

LFI Guidelines

HW MLPPP LFI Guidelines

FRF.12 LFI Guidelines

Configuring QoS Features on Serial SPAs

Saving the Configuration

Verifying the Interface Configuration

Verifying Per-Port Interface Status

Configuration Examples

Framing and Encapsulation Configuration Example

CRC Configuration Example

Facility Data Link Configuration Example

MLPPP Configuration Example

MFR Configuration Example

Invert Data on the T1/E1 Interface Example

Configuring the 8-Port Channelized T1/E1 SPA

This chapter provides information about configuring the 8-Port Channelized T1/E1 SPA on the Cisco 7600 series router. It includes the following sections:

For information about managing your system images and configuration files, refer to the Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide, Release 12.2 and Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference, Release 12.2 publications.

For more information about the commands used in this chapter, refer to the Cisco IOS Software Releases 15.0SR Command References and to the Cisco IOS Software Releases 12.2SX Command References . Also refer to the related Cisco IOS Release 12.2 software command reference and master index publications. For more information, see the “$paratext>” section.

Configuration Tasks

This section describes how to configure the 8-Port Channelized T1/E1 SPA for the Cisco 7600 series router and includes information about verifying the configuration.

It includes the following topics:

Required Configuration Tasks

This section lists the required configuration steps to configure the 8-Port Channelized T1/E1 SPA. Some of the required configuration commands implement default values that might be appropriate for your network. If the default value is correct for your network, then you do not need to configure the command.


Note To better understand the address format used to specify the physical location of the SIP, SPA, and interfaces, see the “Specifying the Interface Address on a SPA” section.


Setting the Card Type

The SPA is not functional until the card type is set. Information about the SPA is not indicated in the output of any show commands until the card type has been set. There is no default card type.


Note Mixing of interface types is not supported. All ports on a SPA must be of the same type.


To set the card type for the 8-Port Channelized T1/E1 SPA, complete these steps:

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

Router(config)# card type {e1 | t1} slot subslot

Sets the serial mode for the SPA:

  • t1—Specifies T1 connectivity of 1.536 Mbps. B8ZS is the default line code for T1.
  • e1—Specifies a wide-area digital transmission scheme used predominantly in Europe that carries data at a rate of 1.984 Mbps in framed mode and a 2.048 Mbps in unframed E1 mode.
  • slot subslot —Specifies the location of the SPA. See the “Specifying the Interface Address on a SPA” section.

Step 3

Router(config)# exit

Exits configuration mode and returns to the EXEC command interpreter prompt.

Enabling the Interfaces on the Controller

To create the interfaces for the 8-Port Channelized T1/E1 SPA, complete these steps:

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router(config)# controller {t1 | e1} slot / subslot / port

Select the controller to configure and enter controller configuration mode.

Step 2

Router(config-controller)# clock source {internal | line}

Sets the clock source.

Note The clock source is set to internal if the opposite end of the connection is set to line and the clock source is set to line if the opposite end of the connection is set to internal.

  • internal—Specifies that the internal clock source is used.
  • line—Specifies that the network clock source is used. This is the default for T1 and E1.

Step 3

Router(config-controller)# linecode {ami | b8zs | hdb3}

Selects the linecode type.

  • ami—Specifies Alternate Mark Inversion (AMI) as the linecode type. Valid for T1 and E1 controllers.
  • b8zs—Specifies binary 8-zero substitution (B8ZS) as the linecode type. Valid for T1 controller only. This is the default for T1 lines.
  • hdb3—Specifies high-density binary 3 (hdb3) as the linecode type. Valid for E1 controller only. This is the default for E1 lines.

Step 4

For T1 controllers

Router(config-controller)# framing {sf | esf}

For E1 controllers

Router(config-controller)# framing {crc4 | no-crc4}

Selects the framing type.

  • sf—Specifies Super Frame as the T1 frame type.
  • esf—Specifies Extended Super Frame as the T1 frame type. This is the default for T1.
  • crc4—Specifies CRC4 as the E1 frame type. This is the default for E1.
  • no-crc4—Specifies no CRC4 as the E1 frame type.

Step 5

Router(config-controller)# channel-group t1 t1-number {timeslots range | unframed} [speed {56 | 64}]

Define the time slots that belong to each T1 or E1 circuit.

  • t1 t1-number— Channel-group number. When configuring a T1 data line, channel-group numbers can be values from 1 to 28. When configuring an E1 data line, channel-group numbers can be values from 0 to 30.
  • timeslots range— One or more time slots or ranges of time slots belonging to the channel group. The first time slot is numbered 1. For a T1 controller, the time slot range is from 1 to 24. For an E1 controller, the time slot range is from 1 to 31.
  • unframed—Unframed mode (G.703) uses all 32 time slots for data. None of the 32 time slots are used for framing signals.
  • speed—(Optional) Speed of the underlying DS0s.

56—

64—

Note The default is 64 is speed is not mentioned in the config.

Note Each channel group is presented to the system as a serial interface that can be configured individually.

Note Once a channel group has been created with the channel-group command, the channel group cannot be changed without removing the channel group. To remove a channel group, see the section Changing a Channel Group Configuration.

Step 6

Router(config)# exit

Exits configuration mode and returns to the EXEC command interpreter prompt.

Verifying Controller Configuration

Use the show controllers command to verify the controller configuration:

Router(config)# show controllers t1
T1 6/0/1 is up.
Applique type is Channelized T1
Cablelength is long gain36 0db
No alarms detected.
alarm-trigger is not set
Framing is ESF, Line Code is B8ZS, Clock Source is Line.
Data in current interval (395 seconds elapsed):
0 Line Code Violations, 0 Path Code Violations
0 Slip Secs, 0 Fr Loss Secs, 0 Line Err Secs, 0 Degraded Mins
0 Errored Secs, 0 Bursty Err Secs, 0 Severely Err Secs, 0 Unavail Secs
Total Data (last 24 hours)
0 Line Code Violations, 0 Path Code Violations,
0 Slip Secs, 0 Fr Loss Secs, 0 Line Err Secs, 0 Degraded Mins,
0 Errored Secs, 0 Bursty Err Secs, 0 Severely Err Secs, 0 Unavail Secs

Setting the IP Address

To set the IP address for the 8-Port Channelized T1/E1 SPA, complete these steps:

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router(config)# interface serial slot/ subslot/port:channel-group

Selects the interface to configure from global configuration mode.

Step 2

Router(config-if)# ip address address mask

Sets the IP address and subnet mask.

  • address—IP address.
  • mask—Subnet mask.

Step 3

Router(config)# exit

Exits configuration mode and returns to the EXEC command interpreter prompt.

Verifying Interface Configuration

Use the show interfaces command to verify the interface configuration:

Router(config)# show interfaces
.
.
.
Serial6/0/1:0 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is SPA-T1E1
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1536 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation PPP, crc 16, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
LCP Open, multilink Open
Last input 00:00:03, output 00:00:03, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters 5d17h
Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 3194905708
Queueing strategy: fifo
Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
30 second input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
30 second output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
74223 packets input, 1187584 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 0 broadcasts (0 IP multicast)
0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
74227 packets output, 1187751 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
4 carrier transitions no alarm present
Timeslot(s) Used:1-24, subrate: 64Kb/s, transmit delay is 0 flags
.
.

Specifying the Interface Address on a SPA

SPA interface ports begin numbering with “0” from left to right. Single-port SPAs use only the port number 0. To configure or monitor SPA interfaces, you need to specify the physical location of the SIP, SPA, and interface in the CLI. The interface address format is slot / subslot / port , where:

  • slot —Specifies the chassis slot number in the Cisco 7600 series router where the SIP is installed.
  • subslot —Specifies the secondary slot of the SIP where the SPA is installed.
  • port —Specifies the number of the individual interface port on a SPA.

The following example shows how to specify the first interface (0) on a SPA installed in the first subslot of a SIP (0) installed in chassis slot 3:

Router(config)# interface serial 3/0/0
 

This command shows a serial SPA as a representative example, however the same slot / subslot / port format is similarly used for other SPAs (such as ATM and POS) and other non-channelized SPAs.

For the 8-Port Channelized T1/E1 SPA, the interface address format is slot/subslot/port : channel-group , where:

  • channel-group—Specifies the logical channel group assigned to the timeslots within the T1 link.

For more information about identifying slots and subslots, see the “Identifying Slots and Subslots for SIPs, SSCs, and SPAs” section.

Configuring Framing

Framing is used to synchronize data transmission on the line. Framing allows the hardware to determine when each packet starts and ends. To configure framing, use the following commands.

 

Command
Purpose

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Router(config)# controller {t1 | e1} slot/ subslot/port

Selects the controller to configure.

For T1 controllers

Router(config-controller)# framing {sf | esf}

For E1 controllers

Router(config-controller)# framing {crc4 | no-crc4}

Set the framing on the interface.

  • sf—Specifies Super Frame as the T1 frame type.
  • esf—Specifies extended Super Frame as the T1 frame type. This is the default. for T1.
  • crc4—Specifies CRC4 frame as the E1 frame type. This is the default for E1.
  • no-crc4—Specifies no CRC4 frame as the E1 frame type.

Verifying Framing Configuration

Use the show controllers command to verify the framing configuration:

Router# show controllers t1
T1 6/0/0 is down.
Applique type is Channelized T1
Cablelength is long gain36 0db
Receiver has loss of frame.
alarm-trigger is not set
Framing is ESF, Line Code is B8ZS, Clock Source is Line.
Data in current interval (717 seconds elapsed):
0 Line Code Violations, 0 Path Code Violations
0 Slip Secs, 0 Fr Loss Secs, 0 Line Err Secs, 0 Degraded Mins
0 Errored Secs, 0 Bursty Err Secs, 0 Severely Err Secs, 717 Unavail Secs
Total Data (last 24 hours)
0 Line Code Violations, 0 Path Code Violations,
0 Slip Secs, 0 Fr Loss Secs, 0 Line Err Secs, 0 Degraded Mins,
0 Errored Secs, 0 Bursty Err Secs, 0 Severely Err Secs, 86400 Unavail Secs

Configuring Encapsulation

When traffic crosses a WAN link, the connection needs a Layer 2 protocol to encapsulate traffic. To set the encapsulation method, use the following commands:

 

Command
Purpose

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Router(config)# interface serial slot/ subslot/port:channel-group

Selects the interface to configure.

Router(config-if)# encapsulation encapsulation-type {hdlc | ppp | frame-relay}

Set the encapsulation method on the interface.

  • hdlc—High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC) protocol for serial interface. This encapsulation method provides the synchronous framing and error detection functions of HDLC without windowing or retransmission. This is the default for synchronous serial interfaces.
  • ppp—PPP (for serial interface).
  • frame-relay—Frame Relay (for serial interface).

Verifying Encapsulation

Use the show interfaces serial command to verify encapsulation on the interface:

Router# show interfaces serial 6/0/0:0
Serial6/0/0:0 is down, line protocol is down
Hardware is SPA-T1E1
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1536 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation PPP, crc 32, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
LCP Closed, multilink Closed
Last input 1w0d, output 1w0d, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters 6d23h
Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
Queueing strategy: weighted fair
Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops)
Conversations 0/0/256 (active/max active/max total)
Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated)
Available Bandwidth 1152 kilobits/sec
30 second input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
30 second output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 0 broadcasts (0 IP multicast)
0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
0 carrier transitions alarm present
Timeslot(s) Used:1-24, subrate: 64Kb/s, transmit delay is 0 flags

Configuring the CRC Size for T1

All 8-Port Channelized T1/E1 SPA interfaces use a 16-bit cyclic redundancy check (CRC) by default, but also support a 32-bit CRC. CRC is an error-checking technique that uses a calculated numeric value to detect errors in transmitted data. The designators 16 and 32 indicate the length (in bits) of the frame check sequence (FCS). A CRC of 32 bits provides more powerful error detection, but adds overhead. Both the sender and receiver must use the same setting.

CRC-16, the most widely used CRC throughout the United States and Europe, is used extensively with WANs. CRC-32 is specified by IEEE 802 and as an option by some point-to-point transmission standards. It is often used on Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS) networks and LANs.

To set the length of the cyclic redundancy check (CRC) on a T1 interface, use these commands:

 

Command
Purpose

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Router(config)# interface serial slot/ subslot/port:channel-group

Selects the interface to configure.

Router(config-if)# crc {16 | 32}

Selects the CRC size in bits.

  • 16—16-bit CRC. This is the default
  • 32—32-bit CRC.

Verifying the CRC Size

Use the show interfaces serial command to verify the CRC size set on the interface:

Router# show interfaces serial 6/0/0:0
Serial6/0/0:0 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is SPA-T1E1
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1536 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation PPP, crc 32, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
LCP Open, multilink Open
Last input 00:00:38, output 00:00:00, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters 01:46:16
Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
Queueing strategy: fifo
Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
30 second input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
30 second output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
1272 packets input, 20396 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 0 broadcasts (0 IP multicast)
0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
6 input errors, 3 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 3 abort
1276 packets output, 20460 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
0 carrier transitions no alarm present
Timeslot(s) Used:1-24, subrate: 64Kb/s, transmit delay is 0 flags

Configuring FDL

Facility Data Link (FDL) is a 4-kbps channel provided by the Extended Super Frame (ESF) T1 framing format. The FDL performs outside the payload capacity and allows you to check error statistics on terminating equipment without intrusion.

 

Command
Purpose

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Router(config)# controller t1 slot/ subslot/port

Selects the controller to configure.

Router(config-controller)# fdl [ansi | att | both ]

If the framing format was configured for esf, configures the format used for Facility Data Link (FDL).

  • ansi—Select ansi for FDL to use the ANSI T1.403 standard.
  • att—Select att for FDL to use the AT&T TR54016 standard.
  • both— Specifies support for both AT&T technical reference 54016 and ANSI T1.403 for ESF FDL exchange support.

Verifying FDL

Use the show controllers t1 command to verify the fdl setting:

Router# show controllers t1

T1 6/0/1 is up.
Applique type is Channelized T1
Cablelength is long gain36 0db
No alarms detected.
alarm-trigger is not set
Framing is ESF, FDL is ansi, Line Code is B8ZS, Clock Source is Line.
Data in current interval (742 seconds elapsed):
0 Line Code Violations, 0 Path Code Violations
0 Slip Secs, 0 Fr Loss Secs, 0 Line Err Secs, 0 Degraded Mins
0 Errored Secs, 0 Bursty Err Secs, 0 Severely Err Secs, 0 Unavail Secs
Total Data (last 73 15 minute intervals):
1278491 Line Code Violations, 3 Path Code Violations,
0 Slip Secs, 1 Fr Loss Secs, 177 Line Err Secs, 0 Degraded Mins,
3 Errored Secs, 0 Bursty Err Secs, 1 Severely Err Secs, 227 Unavail Secs
.
.
.

Configuring Multilink Point-to-Point Protocol (Hardware-based)

Multilink Point to Point Protocol (MLPPP) allows you to combine T1 or E1 lines into a bundle that has the combined bandwidth of multiple T1/E1 lines. You choose the number of bundles and the number of T1 or E1 lines in each bundle.

MLPPP for T1/E1 Configuration Guidelines

The required conditions are:

  • Only T1 or E1 links in a bundle
  • All links on the same SPA
  • Maximum of 12 links in a bundle.

Note Some notes about hardware-based MLPPP:

Only 3 fragmentation sizes are possible 128, 256 and 512 bytes

Fragmentation is enabled by default, default size is 512 bytes

Fragmentation size is configured using the ppp multilink fragment-delay command after using the interface multilink command. The least of the fragmentation sizes (among the 3 sizes possible) satisfying the delay criteria is configured. (For example, a 192 byte packet causes a delay of 1 millisecond on a T1 link, so the nearest fragmentation size is 128 bytes.)

The show ppp multilink command indicates the MLPPP type and the fragmentation size:

Router# show ppp multilink
Multilink1, bundle name is Patriot2
Bundle up for 00:00:13
Bundle is Distributed
0 lost fragments, 0 reordered, 0 unassigned
0 discarded, 0 lost received, 206/255 load
0x0 received sequence, 0x0 sent sequence
Member links: 2 active, 0 inactive (max not set, min not set)
Se4/2/0/1:0, since 00:00:13, no frags rcvd
Se4/2/0/2:0, since 00:00:10, no frags rcvd
Distributed fragmentation on. Fragment size 512. Multilink in Hardware.

Fragmentation is disabled explicitly by using the no ppp multilink fragmentation command after using the interface multilink command.


Create a Multilink Bundle

To create a multilink bundle, use the following commands:

 

Command
Purpose

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Router(config)# interface multilink group-number

Creates a multilink interface and enters multilink interface mode.

  • group-number—The group number for the multilink bundle.

Note Multilink interface creation is not supported beyond 65535. If you configure a multilink interface number that is more than 65535, on a switchover, you will experience a connectivity loss.

Router(config-if)# ip address address mask

Sets the IP address for the multilink group.

  • address—The IP address.
  • mask—The IP netmask.

Assign an interface to a Multilink Bundle

To assign an interface to a multilink bundle, use the following commands:

 

Command
Purpose

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Router(config)# interface serial slot/ subslot/port/t1-number:channel-group

Selects the interface to configure and enters interface configuration mode. See the “Specifying the Interface Address on a SPA” section.

  • slot/ subslot/port/t1-number:channel-group —Selects the interface to configure.

Router(config-if)# encapsulation ppp

Enables PPP encapsulation.

Router(config-if)# multilink-group group-number

Assigns the interface to a multilink bundle.

  • group-number—The multilink group number for the T1 or E1 bundle.

Router(config-if)# ppp m ultilink

Enables multilink PPP on the interface.

Repeat these commands for each interface you want to assign to the multilink bundle.

Configuring fragmentation size on an MLPPP Bundle (optional)

To configure the fragmentation size on a multilink PPP bundle, use the following commands:

 

Command
Purpose

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Router(config)# interface multilink slot/ subslot/port/t1-number:channel-group

Creates a multilink interface and enters multilink interface mode.

  • channel-group —The group number for the multilink bundle. Range 1 to 2147483647.

Router(config-if)# ppp multilink fragment-delay delay

Sets the fragmentation size satisfying the configured delay on the multilink bundle.

  • delay —delay in milliseconds

Disabling the fragmentation on an MLPPP Bundle (optional)

To assign an interface to a multilink bundle, use the following commands:

 

Command
Purpose

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Router(config)# interface multilink group-number

Creates a multilink interface and enters multilink interface mode.

  • group-number —The group number for the multilink bundle. Range 1 to 2147483647.

Router(config-if)# no ppp multilink fragmentation

Disables the fragmentation on the multilink bundle.

Verifying Multilink PPP

Use the show ppp multilink command to verify the PPP multilinks:

Router# show ppp multilink
Multilink1, bundle name is mybundle
Bundle up for 01:40:50
Bundle is Distributed
0 lost fragments, 0 reordered, 0 unassigned
0 discarded, 0 lost received, 1/255 load
0x0 received sequence, 0x0 sent sequence
Member links: 5 active, 0 inactive (max not set, min not set)
Se6/0/0/1:0, since 01:40:50, no frags rcvd
Se6/0/1/1:0, since 01:40:09, no frags rcvd
Se6/0/3/1:0, since 01:15:44, no frags rcvd
Se6/0/4/1:0, since 01:03:17, no frags rcvd
Se6/0/6/1:0, since 01:01:06, no frags rcvd
Se6/0/6:0, since 01:01:06, no frags rcvd

Configuring MLFR for T1/E1

Multilink Frame Relay (MLFR) allows you to combine T1/E1 lines into a bundle that has the combined bandwidth of multiple T1/E1 lines. You choose the number of bundles and the number of T1/E1 lines in each bundle. This allows you to increase the bandwidth of your network links beyond that of a single T1/E1 line.

MLFR for T1/E1 Configuration Guidelines

MLFR will function in hardware if all of the following conditions are met:

  • Only T1 or E1 member links
  • All links are on the same SPA
  • Maximum of 12 links in a bundle

Create a Multilink Bundle

To create a multilink bundle, use the following commands:

 

Command
Purpose

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Router(config)# interface mfr number

Configures a multilink Frame Relay bundle interface.

  • number—The number for the Frame Relay bundle.

Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink bid name

(Optional) Assigns a bundle identification name to a multilink Frame Relay bundle.

  • name—The name for the Frame Relay bundle.

Note The bundle identification (BID) will not go into effect until the interface has gone from the down state to the up state. One way to bring the interface down and back up again is by using the shut and no shut commands in interface configuration mode.


Note When you remove a linecard from a slot which has MFR or MLP configured, you should first remove the MFR or MLP configurations from the links before you add links from other slots. If you do not remove the configurations, then the links from other slots cannot be added to these bundles because it is already associated with another slot which is removed.


Assign an Interface to a Multilink Bundle

To assign an interface to a multilink bundle, use the following commands:

 

Command
Purpose

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Router(config)# interface serial slot/ subslot/port:channel-group

Selects the interface to assign.

Router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay mfr number [name]

Creates a multilink Frame Relay bundle link and associates the link with a bundle.

  • number—The number for the Frame Relay bundle.
  • name—The name for the Frame Relay bundle.

Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink lid name

(Optional) Assigns a bundle link identification name with a multilink Frame Relay bundle link.

  • name—The name for the Frame Relay bundle.

Note The bundle link identification (LID) will not go into effect until the interface has gone from the down state to the up state. One way to bring the interface down and back up again is by using the shut and no shut commands in interface configuration mode.

Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink hello seconds

(Optional) Configures the interval at which a bundle link will send out hello messages. The default value is 10 seconds.

  • seconds—Number of seconds between hello messages sent out over the multilink bundle.

Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink ack seconds

(Optional) Configures the number of seconds that a bundle link will wait for a hello message acknowledgment before resending the hello message. The default value is 4 seconds.

  • seconds—Number of seconds a bundle link will wait for a hello message acknowledgment before resending the hello message.

Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink retry number

(Optional) Configures the maximum number of times a bundle link will resend a hello message while waiting for an acknowledgment. The default value is 2 tries.

  • number—Maximum number of times a bundle link will resend a hello message while waiting for an acknowledgment.

Verifying Multilink Frame Relay

Use the show frame-relay multilink detailed command to verify the Frame Relay multilinks:

router# show frame-relay multilink detailed
 
Bundle: MFR49, State = down, class = A, fragmentation disabled
BID = MFR49
No. of bundle links = 1, Peer's bundle-id =
Bundle links:
 
Serial6/0/0:0, HW state = up, link state = Add_sent, LID = test
Cause code = none, Ack timer = 4, Hello timer = 10,
Max retry count = 2, Current count = 0,
Peer LID = , RTT = 0 ms
Statistics:
Add_link sent = 21, Add_link rcv'd = 0,
Add_link ack sent = 0, Add_link ack rcv'd = 0,
Add_link rej sent = 0, Add_link rej rcv'd = 0,
Remove_link sent = 0, Remove_link rcv'd = 0,
Remove_link_ack sent = 0, Remove_link_ack rcv'd = 0,
Hello sent = 0, Hello rcv'd = 0,
Hello_ack sent = 0, Hello_ack rcv'd = 0,
outgoing pak dropped = 0, incoming pak dropped = 0

Invert Data on the T1/E1 Interface

If the interface on the 8-Port Channelized T1/E1 SPA is used to drive a dedicated T1 line that does not have B8ZS encoding, you must invert the data stream on the connecting CSU/DSU or on the interface. Be careful not to invert data on both the CSU/DSU and the interface, as two data inversions will cancel each other out. To invert data on a T1/E1 interface, use the following commands:

 

Command
Purpose

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Router(config)# interface serial slot/ subslot/port:channel-group

Selects the serial interface.

Router(config-if)# invert data

Inverts the data stream.

Use the show running configuration command to verify that invert data has been set:
 
Router# show running configuration
.
.
.
interface Serial6/0/0:0
no ip address
encapsulation ppp
logging event link-status
load-interval 30
invert data
no cdp enable
ppp chap hostname group1
ppp multilink
multilink-group 1
!
.
.
.

Changing a Channel Group Configuration

To alter the configuration of an existing channel group, the channel group needs to be removed first. To remove an existing channel group, use the following commands:

 

Command
Purpose

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Router(config)# controller {t1 | e1} slot/subslot/port

Select the controller to configure and enter controller configuration mode.

Router(config-controller)# no channel-group t1 t1-number

Select the channel group you want to remove.

  • t1 t1-number—Channel-group number.

Follow the steps in the section: Enabling the Interfaces on the Controller.

Create a new channel group with the new configuration.

Configuring Multipoint Bridging

Multipoint bridging (MPB) enables the connection of multiple ATM PVCs, Frame Relay PVCs, BCP ports, and WAN Gigabit Ethernet subinterfaces into a single broadcast domain (virtual LAN), together with the LAN ports on that VLAN. This enables service providers to add support for Ethernet-based Layer 2 services to the proven technology of their existing ATM and Frame Relay legacy networks. Customers can then use their current VLAN-based networks over the ATM or Frame Relay cloud. This also allows service providers to gradually update their core networks to the latest Gigabit Ethernet optical technologies, while still supporting their existing customer base.

For MPB configuration guidelines and restrictions and feature compatibility tables, see the “Configuring Multipoint Bridging” section.

Configuring Bridging Control Protocol Support

The Bridging Control Protocol (BCP) enables forwarding of Ethernet frames over SONET networks and provides a high-speed extension of enterprise LAN backbone traffic through a metropolitan area. The implementation of BCP on the SPAs includes support for IEEE 802.1D, IEEE 802.1Q Virtual LAN (VLAN), and high-speed switched LANs.

For BCP configuration guidelines and restrictions and feature compatibility tables, see the “BCP Feature Compatibility by SIP and SPA Combination”.

Configuring BCP on MLPPP

BCP on MLPPP Configuration Guidelines

  • Only Distributed MLPPP is supported
  • Only channelized interfaces allowed, and member links must be from the same controller card
  • Only trunk port BCP is supported on MLPPP
  • Bridging can be configured only on the bundle interface

Note BCP on MLPPP operates only in trunk mode. For more inforation on trunk mode, see the “Configuring BCP in Trunk Mode” section.



Note When you manually configure the MTU and MRRU values on the bundle interface with BCP on MLPPP, you should set the MRRU value to atleast 20 bytes more than the MTU value. This configuration ensures that the packets wth size up to the configured MTU value on the multilink interface are not dropped because of the MRRU restrictions.


Configuring BCP on MLPPP Trunk Mode

To configure BCP on MLPPP trunk mode, perform these steps:

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

Router(config)# interface multilink

Selects the multilink interface.

Step 2

Router(config-if)# switchport

Puts an interface that is in Layer 3 mode into Layer 2 mode for Layer 2 configuration.

Step 3

Router(config-if)# switchport trunk allowed vlan 100

By default, no VLANs are allowed. Use this command to explicitly allow VLANs; valid values for vlan-list are from 1 to 4094.

Step 4

Router(config-if)# switchport mode trunk

Configures the router port connected to the switch as a VLAN trunk port.

Step 5

Router(config-if)# switchport nonegotiate

Puts the LAN port into permanent trunking mode but prevents the port from generating DTP frames

Step 6

Router(config-if)# no ip address

Removes the assigned IP address.

Step 7

Router(config-if)# ppp multilink

Enables this interface to support MLP.

Step 8

Router(config-if)# multilink-group 1

Assigns this interface to the multilink group.

Step 9

Router(config-if)# interface Serial1/0/0.1/1/1/1:0

Designates a serial interface as a multilink bundle.

Step 10

Router(config-if)# no ip address

Unassigns the IP address.

Step 11

Router(config-if)# encapsulation ppp

Enables PPP encapsulation.

Step 12

Router(config-if)# ppp multilink

Enables this interface to support MLP.

Step 13

Router(config-if)# multilink-group 1

Assigns this interface to the multilink group 1.

Step 14

Router(config-if)# interface Serial1/0/0.1/1/1/2:0

Designates a serial interface as a multilink bundle.

Step 15

Router(config-if)# no ip address

Unassigns the IP address.

Step 16

Router(config-if)# encapsulation ppp

Enables PPP encapsulation.

Step 17

Router(config-if)# ppp multilink

Enables this interface to support MLP.

Step 18

Router(config-if)# multilink-group 1

Assigns this interface to the multilink group 2.

Step 19

Router(config-if)# shutdown

Shuts down an interface.

Step 20

Router(config-if)# no shutdown

Reopens an interface.

Step 21

Router(config-if)# switchport trunk allowed vlan vlan-list

By default, no VLANs are allowed. Use this command to explicitly allow VLANs; valid values for vlan-list are from 1 to 4094.

Verifying BCP on MLPPP Trunk Mode

To display information about Multilink PPP, use the show ppp multilink command in EXEC mode.

 

Command
Purpose

Router(config-if)# show ppp multilink

Displays information on a multilink group.

The following shows an example of show ppp multilink :

 
Router# show ppp multilink
 
Multilink1, bundle name is group 1
Bundle is Distributed
0 lost fragments, 0 reordered, 0 unassigned, sequence 0x0/0x0 rcvd/sent
0 discarded, 0 lost received, 1/255 load
Member links: 4 active, 0 inactive (max no set, min not set)
Serial1/0/0/:1
Serial1/0/0/:2
Serial1/0/0/:3
Serial1/0/0/:4

FRF.12 Guidelines

FRF.12 functions in hardware. Note the following:

  • Only 3 fragmentation sizes are available: 128 bytes, 256 bytes, and 512 bytes.
    The supported fragment sizes - 128, 256 and 512 - include the FRF and NLPID headers in addition to the payload.
  • If you have a configuration where a C7600 router acts as a Provider Edge(PE) router between Customer Edge(CE) routers, you can configure C7600 in plain Frame Relay or Frame Relay Fragmentation mode. If you enable Frame Relay Fragmentation only at the CE routers and C7600 acts as a plain Frame Relay interface, the configuration works fine. In a configuration of C7600 with any of the three SPAs(8-Port Channelized T1/E1 SPA,1-Port Channelized OC-3/STM-1 SPA or 2 or 4-Port CT3 SPA), where Frame Relay is configured on the serial interface and Frame Relay Fragmentation is enabled in any of the sub interfaces, the fragmented packets may be dropped in the transparant DLCIs. If you want such a configuration to work, you should set the fragment size value on the main interface larger than any CE router fragmentation size using the command frame-relay fragment x end-to-end , where x is the fragmentation size on the main interface.

LFI Guidelines

LFI can function two ways—using FRF.12 or MLPPP. MLPPP LFI can be done in both hardware and software while FRF.12 LFI is done only in hardware.

HW MLPPP LFI Guidelines

LFI using MLPPP will function only in hardware if there is just one member link in the MLPPP bundle. The link can be a fractional T1 or full T1. Note the following:

  • The ppp multilink interleave command needs to be configured to enable interleaving.
  • Only three fragmentation sizes are supported: 128 bytes, 256 bytes, and 512 bytes.
  • Fragmentation is enabled by default, the default size being 512 bytes.
  • A policy-map having a priority class needs to applied to main interface.
  • When hardware-based LFI is enabled, fragmentation counters are not displayed.

FRF.12 LFI Guidelines

LFI using FRF.12 is always done is hardware. Note the following:

  • The fragmentation is configured at the main interface
  • Only 3 fragmentation sizes are available: 128 bytes, 256 bytes, and 512 bytes.
  • A policy-map having a priority class needs to applied to main interface.

Configuring QoS Features on Serial SPAs

The SIPs and SPAs support many QoS features using modular QoS CLI (MQC) configuration. For information about the QoS features supported by the serial SPAs, see the “Configuring QoS Features on a SIP” section.

Saving the Configuration


Caution When you swap a SPA-8XCHT1/E1-V2 (Pb-free) SPA with a SPA-8XCHT1/E1 (Pb) SPA or vice-versa, configuration is not retained.

To save your running configuration to nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM), use the following command in privileged EXEC configuration mode:

 

Command
Purpose

Router# copy running-config startup-config

Writes the new configuration to NVRAM.

For more information about managing configuration files, refer to the Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide, Release 12.2 and Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference, Release 12.2 publications.

Verifying the Interface Configuration

Besides using the show running-configuration command to display your Cisco 7600 series router configuration settings, you can use the show interfaces serial and the show controllers serial commands to get detailed information on a per-port basis for your 8-Port Channelized T1/E1 SPA.

Verifying Per-Port Interface Status

To find detailed interface information on a per-port basis for the 8-Port Channelized T1/E1 SPA, use the show interfaces serial command.

The following example provides sample output for interface port 0 on the SPA located in the first subslot of the SIP installed in slot 6 of a Cisco 7609 router:

Router# show interface serial 6/0/0:0
Serial6/0/0:0 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is SPA-T1E1
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1536 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation PPP, crc 32, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
LCP Open, multilink Open
Last input 00:00:38, output 00:00:00, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters 01:46:16
Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
Queueing strategy: fifo
Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)
30 second input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
30 second output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
1272 packets input, 20396 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 0 broadcasts (0 IP multicast)
0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
6 input errors, 3 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 3 abort
1276 packets output, 20460 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
0 carrier transitions no alarm present
Timeslot(s) Used:1-24, subrate: 64Kb/s, transmit delay is 0 flags

Configuration Examples

This section includes the following configuration examples:

Framing and Encapsulation Configuration Example

The following example sets the framing and encapsulation for the controller and interface:

! Specify the controller and enter controller configuration mode
!
Router(config)# controller t1 6/0/0
!
! Specify the framing method
!
Router(config-controller)# framing esf
!
! Exit controller configuration mode and return to global configuration mode
!
Router(config-controller)# exit
!
! Specify the interface and enter interface configuration mode
!
Router(config)# interface serial 6/0/0:0
!
! Specify the encapsulation protocol
!
Router(config-if)# encapsulation ppp
!
! Exit interface configuratin mode
!
Router(config-if)# exit
!
! Exit global configuration mode
!
Router(config)# exit

CRC Configuration Example

The following example sets the CRC size for the interface:

! Specify the interface and enter interface configuration mode
!
Router(config)# interface serial 6/0/0:0
!
! Specify the CRC size
!
Router(config-if)# crc 32
!
! Exit interface configuration mode and return to global configuration mode
!
Router(config-if)# exit
!
! Exit global configuration mode
!
Router(config)# exit

Facility Data Link Configuration Example

The following example configures Facility Data Link:

! Specify the controller and enter controller configuration mode
!
Router(config)# controller t1 6/0/0
!
! Specify the FDL specification
!
Router(config-controller)# fdl ansi
!
! Exit controller configuration mode and return to global configuration mode
!
Router(config-controller)# exit
!
! Exit global configuration mode
!
Router(config)# exit

MLPPP Configuration Example

The following example creates a PPP Multilink bundle:

! Enter global configuration mode
!
Router# configure terminal
!
! Create a multilink bundle and assign a group number to the bundle
!
Router(config)# interface multilink 1
!
! Specify an IP address for the multilink group
!
Router(config-if)# ip addres 123.456.789.111 255.255.255.0
!
! Enable Multilink PPP
!
Router(config-if)# ppp multilink
!
! Leave interface multilink configuration mode
!
Router(config-if)# exit
!
! Specify the interface to assign to the multilink bundle
!
Router(config)# interface serial 3/1//0:1
!
! Enable PPP encapsulation on the interface
!
Router(config-if)# encapsulation PPP
!
! Assign the interface to a multilink bundle
!
Router(config-if)# multilink-group 1
!
! Enable Multilink PPP
!
Router(config-if)# ppp multilink
!
! Exit interface configuration mode
!
Router(config-if)# exit
!
! Exit global configuration mode
!
Router(config)# exit

MFR Configuration Example

The following example configures Multilink Frame Relay (MFR):

! Create a MFR interface and enter interface configuration mode
!
Router(config)# interface mfr 49
!
! Assign the bundle identification (BID) name ‘test’ to a multilink bundle.
!
Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink bid test
!
! Exit interface configuration mode and return to global configuration mode
!
Router(config-if)# exit
!
! Specify the serial interface to assign to a multilink bundle
!
Router(config)# interface serial 5/1/3:0
!
! Creates a multilink Frame Relay bundle link and associates the link with a multilink bundle
!
Router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay mfr 49
!
! Assigns a bundle link identification (LID) name with a multilink bundle link
!
Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink lid test
!
! Configures the interval at which the interface will send out hello messages
!
Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink hello 15
!
! Configures the number of seconds the interface will wait for a hello message acknowledgement before resending the hello message
!
Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink ack 6
!
! Configures the maximum number of times the interface will resend a hello message while waiting for an acknowledgement
!
Router(config-if)# frame-relay multilink retry 5
!
! Exit interface configuration mode and return to global configuration mode
!
Router(config-if)# exit
!
! Exit global configuration mode
!
Router(config)# exit

Invert Data on the T1/E1 Interface Example

The following example inverts the data on the serial interface:

! Enter global configuration mode
!
Router# configure terminal
!
! Specify the serial interface and enter interface configuration mode
!
Router(config)# interface serial 5/1/3:0
!
! Configure invert data
!
Router(config-if)# invert data
!
! Exit interface configuration mode and return to global configuration mode
!
Router(config-if)# exit
!
! Exit global configuration mode
!
Router(config)# exit