AXP 1.6 User Guide
Cisco AXP Software Management
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Cisco AXP Software Management

Table Of Contents

Cisco AXP Software Management

Managing Resource Limits

Flexible Resource Allocation

Configuring Resource Utilization Limits

Installing and Upgrading Software

Clean Software Installation

Clean Software Installation including FTP Server Configuration

Upgrading and Downgrading Software

Forced Installation and Upgrade

Removing Software

Uninstalling Software

Verifying Software Installation

Software Recovery Using a Helper Image

Troubleshooting the Boot Helper File

Multi-disk Configuration on a Service Ready Engine System

Multi-disk Configuration using SRE

Selecting Disk Configuration Mode

Replacing a RAID-1 Disk

Multi-disk Configuration using the Boot Helper

Multi-Gigabit Ethernet Fabric Interface

Interface Naming

MGF Interface

IP Configuration of the MGF Interface

VLAN and Virtual Interfaces

Routing for a Static Route or for Source-Based Routing

Exposing the MGF interface


Cisco AXP Software Management


This chapter consists of the following sections:

Managing Resource Limits

Installing and Upgrading Software

Software Recovery Using a Helper Image

Multi-disk Configuration on a Service Ready Engine System

Multi-Gigabit Ethernet Fabric Interface

Managing Resource Limits

Setting Resource Limits

Cisco AXP provides a predictable and constant set of resources such as CPU, memory, and disk space, which are segmented to allow an application to run on the Cisco AXP service module without affecting the performance of other router features.

You can specify CPU, memory, and disk space limit (in MB), using the CLI with administrator privileges.


Note Refer to the documentation provided by your third-party vendor for any application-specific resource limits that may apply to your product.


Flexible Resource Allocation

Flexible resource allocation grants extra CPU, memory and disk resources to an application if these resources are available and allows these non-allocated resources to be shared between all virtual instances.

Flexible resource allocation is disabled by default. If it is not enabled, an application is installed only if resource limits are set before packaging the application.

Users can manually override any resource limits on a given application by using the resource limits CLI. If you override resource limits for an application, then flexible resource allocation cannot be applied to that application.

Flexible resource allocation occurs after these events:

Installing an add-on package

Upgrading an existing package

Uninstalling an installed package

Changing resource limits using the CLI

Swap Space and Memory Allocation

Swap space support allows processes or portions of processes to move between physical memory and disk. This frees up space in physical memory and allows more processes to run simultaneously.

Verifying the Utilization Limits

After "Configuring Resource Utilization Limits" section, refer to the "Verifying Resource Utilization Limits" section on page 129.

Reloading the Service Module and Virtual Instance

The new resource limits become effective only after executing the reload or reload apps command.

The reload command applies the new resource limits and reboots the Cisco AXP service module.

The reload apps command can reload the virtual instance and apply the new resource limits without rebooting the service module.

Configuring Resource Utilization Limits

Cisco AXP 1.5 or higher provides the flexible resource allocation feature as part of the resource management system. It provides developers the flexibility to package an application without completely determining the hardware's capability to support that application.

Use the limit memory utilization command to set memory limits. To set CPU and disk limits, use the limit cpu utilization and limit disk utilization commands.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. config t

2. app-service application-name

3. limit disk utilization megabytes

limit cpu utilization index

limit memory utilization megabytes

4. end

5. write memory

6. reload

or

reload apps

7. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

config t

Enters Cisco AXP configuration mode.

Step 2 

app-service application-name

Enters application service mode.

Step 3 

limit memory utilization megabytes

Modifies the memory limits.


limit cpu utilization index

Modifies the CPU utilization limit during application installation.

index—Platform CPU index.

The platform CPU index is relative to a value of 10000 that is assigned to a configuration of a 1.0 GHz Celeron M CPU on the application runtime engine of network module NME_APPRE_302-K9.

For example, the platform CPU index for the blade AIM2-APPRE-104-K9 is 5700.

The CPU utilization range varies between the minimum limit specified by the package to the maximum available by the system.


limit disk utilization megabytes

Modifies the disk utilization setup during installation.

megabytes—1 to 100000 MB

The disk utilization range varies between the minimum limit specified by the package to the maximum limit available by the system.

Step 4 

end

Exits Cisco AXP configuration mode.

Step 5 

write memory

Saves the new configured limit settings, rebalancing the resources.

Step 6 

reload

or

reload apps

reload—sets new resource limits that are effective after rebooting the service module.

reload apps—sets new resource limits that are effective without rebooting the service module.

Step 7 

exit

Exits Cisco AXP EXEC mode.

Installing and Upgrading Software

This chapter describes how to install, upgrade, and downgrade Cisco AXP software for versions 1.5 or higher.

To download Cisco AXP files using a file extractor tool for Windows such as WinZip, disable CR/LF conversion of tar files. (For example, in WinZip 9.0, select Configuration > Miscellaneous and uncheck "TAR file smart CR/LF conversion".)

To install Cisco AXP on a Cisco SRE service module, refer to the
Cisco SRE Service Module Configuration and Installation Guide.

To install Cisco AXP using the "software install clean" command, refer to the "Clean Software Installation" section.

Clean Software Installation


Warning A clean installation clears the startup configuration to the factory default setting. All previous configuration settings are erased.


Cisco AXP 1.5 or higher software must be downloaded to an FTP server before installation. Download the gzipped tar file for the appropriate platform to ensure all platform and package files required for installation are available.

If you need to configure the FTP server, refer to the "Clean Software Installation including FTP Server Configuration" section.

During a clean installation of the platform files, the following three installation files must exist in the same directory:

axp-k9.<platform>.<version>.pkg

axp-k9.<platform>.<version>.prt1

axp-installer-k9.<platform>.<version>.prt1

axp-timezone.<platform>.<version>.prt1

Use the software install clean command to perform a clean installation of:

Cisco AXP 1.5 or higher host OS

A bundle of Cisco AXP 1.5 or higher host OS + application package or

a bundle of Cisco AXP 1.5 or higher host OS + application package + Cisco AXP add-on packages.

To install this bundled package, use the software install clean command.

The system reboots after the software install clean command.


Note Use the software remove downloadfiles command to clear previously installed packages if you are installing new packages with the same name.


Prerequisites

Before you install the package, you need:

FTP or SFTP server user ID/username

FTP or SFTP server password

SUMMARY STEPS

1. software install clean {package-filename.pkg | url ftp://ftp-server-ip-address/package-filename.pkg | url sftp://sftp-server-ip-address/package-filename.pkg}[username username password password]

2. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

software install clean {package-filename.pkg | 
url 
ftp://ftp-server-ip-address/package-filename.pk
g|url 
sftp://sftp-server-ip-address/package-filename.
pkg}[username username password password] 

Example:

SE-module> software install clean url 
ftp://10.10.1.5/.../.../packagename.pkg 
username johndoe password johndoe123

Installs the Cisco AXP host OS (platform) file that was downloaded on the FTP server. The system reboots after the software install clean command.

package-filename—A single file or a bundle of files.

ftp-server-ip-address—FTP server address where the package is located.

package-filename—Cisco AXP package file name

username—FTP server ID/username

password—FTP server password

Note:

If an error displaying a mismatched sum occurs during installation, use the software remove all command to remove all residual files and reinstall the files using the software install clean command.

Step 2 

exit

Exits EXEC mode.

Clean Software Installation including FTP Server Configuration

To configure the FTP server and install software, perform the following steps.

Prerequisites

Before you install the package, you need:

FTP server user username

FTP server password

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure terminal

2. software download server url sftp-url | ftp-url[/ dir] username username password password

3. end

4. software install clean package-filename

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure terminal

Enters configuration mode.

Step 2 

software download server url sftp-url | ftp-url[/dir] username username password password

Example:
SE-Module(config)> software download server url 
ftp://10.10.1.5/.../.../packagename.pkg 
username johndoe password johndoe123

Configures the FTP server address.

ftp url—FTP server address where the package will be downloaded.

/dir—(Optional) FTP directory on the server

username—FTP server ID/username

password—FTP server password

Step 3 

end

Exits configuration mode.

Step 4 

software install clean url package-filename

Example:
SE-module> software install clean 
packagename.pkg 

Installs the Cisco AXP file that was downloaded on the FTP server. The system reboots after the software install clean command.

package-filename—Cisco AXP package filename

Upgrading and Downgrading Software

The software install package command automatically determines the packages that will be added or upgraded, based on what packages currently exist on the service module. A new software package such as a Cisco add-on package or an application package will be added or installed onto the service module. Newer versions of packages already installed on the service module will be upgraded.

Use the software install package command to:

Upgrade or downgrade Cisco AXP 1.5 or higher host OS software.

Install, upgrade, or downgrade new application and Cisco add-on packages.

Install, upgrade, or downgrade bundled packages that are a combination of Cisco AXP 1.5 or higher host OS, Cisco add-on packages, and application packages.

Before upgrading or downgrading Cisco AXP software:

The upgrade or downgrade package must have the same name as the package being upgraded.

The upgrade or downgrade package must have the same uuid as the package being upgraded.

The upgrade or downgrade package must have a different version than the package being upgraded.

During an upgrade or downgrade installation of the platform files, the following three installation files must exist in the same directory:

axp-k9.<platform>.<version>.pkg

axp-k9.<platform>.<version>.prt1

axp-installer-k9.<platform>.<version>.prt1


Note Use the software remove downloadfiles command to clear previously installed packages if you are installing new packages with the same name.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. Copy the installer payload file to the same FTP directory as the Cisco AXP package.

2. software install package {package-filename.pkg | url ftp://ftp-server-ip-addr/package-fileame.pkg | sftp://sftp-server-ip-address/package-filename.pkg}[username username password password]

3. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

Copy the installer payload file to the same FTP directory as the Cisco AXP package.

Copies the installer payload file (axp-installer.k9.<nme/aim.release-number>.prt1) to the same FTP directory as the Cisco AXP file.

The FTP directory contains a file such as axp-k9.nme.1.0.x.pkg and a corresponding payload file axp-k9.nme.1.0.x.prt1 with other add-on packages.

Step 2 

software install package {package-filename.pkg | url ftp://ftp-server-ip-addr/package-fileame.pkg| sftp://sftp-server-ip-address/package-filename. pkg}[username username password password]


Example:

SE-Module> software install package url ftp://10.10.1.5/pkgname.1.0.pkg

Installs the Cisco AXP file specified in the command. The system reboots after the software install package command.

package-filename—A single package or a bundle of packages.

When a new software release is installed over an existing one, the old installer from the previous release is first upgraded via a package such as axp-installer-k9.<nme/aim.1.5.x>.prt1, and then the new image is installed.

Step 3 

exit

Exits EXEC mode.

Forced Installation and Upgrade

Using the software install package command when the virtual instance is down will not preserve user configuration and application data and any previous configuration data during system startup does not occur. To force a package installation, upgrade, or downgrade, use the ignore-scripts keyword option in the software install package command.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. software install package { package-filename.pkg | url ftp://ftp-server-ip-addr/package-fileame.pkg | url sftp://sftp-server-ip-address/package-filename.pkg} ignore-scripts

2. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

software install package { package-filename.pkg | url ftp://ftp-server-ip-addr/package-fileame.pkg |url sftp://sftp-server-ip-address/package-filename. pkg} ignore-scripts


Example:

SE-Module> software install package url ftp://10.10.1.5/pkgname.1.0.pkg ignore-scripts

Forces a software package installation, upgrade, or downgrade when the virtual instance is down.

Step 2 

exit

Exits Cisco AXP EXEC mode.

Removing Software

To remove software files from the download cache, use the software remove command in
Cisco AXP EXEC mode.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. software remove {all | downgradefiles | downloadfiles}

2. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

software remove {all | downgradefiles| downloadfiles}

Example:

SE-module> software remove 

Removes software files from the download cache.

all—Removes all files

downloadfiles—Removes all files that have been downloaded.

Use the software remove downloadfiles command to clear previously installed packages if you are installing new packages with the same name.

Step 2 

exit

Exits Cisco AXP EXEC mode.

Uninstalling Software

To uninstall software, use the software uninstall command in Cisco AXP EXEC mode.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. software uninstall uid list

2. exit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

software uninstall uid-list

Example:

SE-module> software uninstall 

Uninstalls the Cisco AXP package files.

uid-list—List of unique identifiers (UIDs) of sub-systems to be uninstalled

Step 2 

exit

Exits Cisco AXP EXEC mode.

Verifying Software Installation

Use the show log name command to view the install.log file. Copy the install.log file to an FTP server using the copy log command.

Use the show software install history command in Cisco AXP EXEC mode to view a list of installed software packages.

Use the show software versions detail command to view a list of AXP modules and application packages with version numbers.

Software Recovery Using a Helper Image


Warning Installing software using the helper image overwrites all previously existing data on the Cisco AXP service module.


If the service module does not boot up with the regular image, you can install the software using a helper image.

Use the axp-helper-k9.<aim/nme>.<release-number> rescue helper image file to aid software installation of the Cisco AXP host OS files on a Cisco AXP service module when necessary.

To use the boot helper to reboot with a helper image, perform the following steps.


NoteConfigure the router before setting up the bootloader. The service module will not connect to the external network if the router is not configured correctly. If you have not configured the bootloader, see "Appendix 1: Configuring the Bootloader" section on page 133.

Using the helper image for installation clears the startup configuration to the factory default settings. All previous configuration settings are erased.



Step 1 Enter the following commands from the router CLI:

a. service-module Service-Engine 1/0 reset (wait about 10 seconds after using this command).

b. service-module Service-Engine 1/0 session (repeat this command if the first try fails).

Step 2 Wait for the following prompt: Please enter *** to change boot configuration.

Enter "***" to drop the service module into the bootloader.

Step 3 Enter the config command to configure the bootloader:

SE- boot-loader> config

Enter these parameters:

IP address—Service module IP address as configured on the host router

Subnet mask—Service module subnet mask as configured on the host router

TFTP server—IP address of the TFTP server with the helper image

Gateway—Gateway address as configured in the host router


Note For the Default Helper-file name, if you are pasting in the name, do not paste any extra whitespaces (newline, tabs) into the name. If whitespaces are included, they will also be present in the image name that is requested from the TFTP server.


Default Helper-file—name of the helper image.

Ethernet interfaceinternal


Note The internal interface is facing the router. The external interface may or may not be present on the service module.


External interface mediacopper

Default Bootdisk

Default bootloader—secondary


Note Always use the secondary bootloader; the primary bootloader is only for backup.


Step 4 Enter the show config command from the bootloader to verify that there are no empty values. (Check for any null/empty values as these may cause problems with the network boot sequence.)

SE- boot-loader> show config


Note Before entering the boot helper (in Step 5), do the following:

Check that the IP address you entered in Step 3 is the IP address of the service module as configured on the host router.

Check that the TFTP server you entered in Step 3 has connectivity to the service module. For example:

SE- boot-loader> ping TFTP-server-address


Step 5 To enter the boot helper, type: boot helper

The helper image starts and the following text appears:

Welcome to Cisco Systems Service Engine Helper Software
Please select from the following
1       Install software
2       Reload module
3       Disk cleanup
(Type '?' at any time for help)
Select 1 Install software: 

Step 6 Enter the following parameters:

Package Name—Cisco AXP package name

Server URL—FTP server location for the Cisco AXP package

Username—FTP username

Password—FTP password

Step 7 Enter y (yes) to clear disk contents.

After installation, the blade reboots with the new image.

Troubleshooting the Boot Helper File

Use a workstation to download the boot helper file from the TFTP server. This verifies that the TFTP server is running, the requested helper file exists, and there are no file access errors. File access errors are not displayed in boot helper.

Multi-disk Configuration on a Service Ready Engine System

The SM-SRE-900-K9 and SM-SRE-910-K9 service modules have two hard disk drives that can be configured in multi-disk configuration mode.

Multi-disk configuration is done during offline installation of Cisco AXP using one of the following two methods:

Multi-disk Configuration using SRE

Multi-disk Configuration using the Boot Helper


Note Multi-disk configuration cannot be done during online installation or upgrade. After an online installation or upgrade, the multi-disk configuration remains the same as it was before the installation or upgrade.


Both hard disk drives can be configured in one of the following two ways:

1. RAID 1 (Mirroring)

The two hard disk drives are exact copies of one another. This allows the system to survive the crash of one of the disk drives.

OR

2. Linear

The two hard disk drives are configured in a contiguous arrangement to provide a large disk capacity.


Note Only RAID 1 and Linear configurations are supported by Cisco AXP.


Multi-disk Configuration using SRE

Refer to the "Selecting Disk Configuration Mode" section for two examples showing multi-disk configuration using the SRE.

To replace a RAID-1 disk, refer to the "Replacing a RAID-1 Disk" section.

Selecting Disk Configuration Mode

These examples show multi-disk configuration using the Services Ready Engine (SRE) for a system with an SM-SRE-900-K9 service module.

Selecting Disk Configuration Mode: Example 1

In this example, during installation of Cisco AXP using SRE on a SM-SRE-900-K9 system, a prompt to enter either value 1 (RAID 1) or 2 (linear) appears. A value of 1 is entered and the disks are configured as RAID 1.

Router# service-module sm 1/0 install url ftp://192.168.1.2/pub/axp-k9.sme.1.5.2.pkg

Loading pub/axp-k9.sme.1.5.2.pkg.install.sre !

[OK - 2361/4096 bytes]

Please select disk configuration mode (1 = RAID-1, 2 = linear): 1

Resource requirements check completed successfully. Proceeding to Install....

Selecting Disk Configuration Mode: Example 2

In this example, to avoid having to enter a prompt of 1 or 2 as shown in the previous example, the disk-cfg-mode argument is set to 1. The disks are configured as RAID 1.

Router# service-module sm 1/0 install url ftp://192.168.1.2/pub/axp-k9.sme.1.5.2.pkg argument "disk-cfg-mode=1"

Loading pub/axp-k9.sme.1.5.2.pkg.install.sre !

[OK - 2361/4096 bytes]

Resource requirements check completed successfully. Proceeding to Install....

Replacing a RAID-1 Disk


Note If a system using a SM-SRE-900-K9 or SM-SRE-910-K9 service module has one functional disk and one non-functional disk, it will not boot properly. The service module's failed hard disk cannot be simply be removed. To make the system capable of booting, replace the failed hard disk with a blank functional disk.


If the system is configured with both disks as RAID 1 (mirroring), and there is a single disk failure (one of the two drives failed), replace the failed RAID 1 disk by performing the following steps:


Step 1 Disable the failed disk, by using the disk remove 0|1 command.

Step 2 Physically replace the failed disk with a blank, functional disk, either when the system is online or when the system is down (powered off).

Step 3 Enable the new disk by using the disk add 0|1 command.

The rebuild process begins after the disk add command is invoked.

Step 4 (Optional) Use the show disk stats command to monitor the disk status during the rebuild process.


Multi-disk Configuration using the Boot Helper

The following example shows the installation of Cisco AXP using the boot helper for a system with a SM-SRE-900-K9 service module:

	Welcome to Cisco Systems Service Engine Helper Software
Please select from the following
1       Install software
2       Reload module
3       Disk cleanup
4       Install License(s)

(Type `?' at any time for help)
Choice: 1
Package name: axp-k9.sme.eng_bld.pkg
Disk Configuration Mode: ?
Desired Disk Configuration Mode desired: (1 = RAID 1, 2 = linear)
Disk Configuration Mode: 1
Server url: ftp://192.168.1.2/pub
Username:
Password:


Note The logic for prompting the user is the same in the "Multi-disk Configuration using SRE" section.


Multi-Gigabit Ethernet Fabric Interface

The Multi-Gigabit Ethernet (MGF) Interface is explained in the following sections:

Interface Naming

MGF Interface

IP Configuration of the MGF Interface

VLAN and Virtual Interfaces

Routing for a Static Route or for Source-Based Routing

Exposing the MGF interface

Interface Naming

The naming of interfaces uses Linux terminology. For example, an interface is named eth0 instead of using a Cisco IOS software name such as interface FastEthernet 0 or GigabitEthernet 0.

On the ISM and SM service modules, MGF interfaces may be used. Refer to the "MGF Interface" section.

Table 5 shows the interface names for ISM and SM service modules.

Table 5 Interface Names for ISM and SM Service Modules

Module Type
Main Interface to Cisco IOS
External Interface
MGF Interface

ISM

ISM 0/0 (Cisco IOS)

eth0 (Linux)

— (Cisco IOS)

— (Linux)

ISM 0/1 (Cisco IOS)

mgf0 (Linux)

SM

SM x/0 (Cisco IOS)

eth0 (Linux)

— (Cisco IOS)

eth1 (Linux)

SM X/1 (Cisco IOS)

mgf0 (Linux)


"—" = Not Applicable

MGF Interface

SM and ISM service modules also have a first interface (X/0). This is a back-to-back interface used for management (by using a session to access the console from Cisco IOS software). AIM2 and NME service modules also have a first interface.

SM and ISM service modules also have a second interface (X/1) available on the Cisco ISR side—the MGF interface. The extra physical ethernet interface connects to the backplane switch of the
Cisco ISR (Cisco ISR G2). The backplane switch provides inter-module communication within the same chassis. From the point of view of an application running in a virtual instance, the mgf0 interface appears to be just another ethernet interface. The Cisco AXP host OS does not currently use the MGF interface.

A benefit of using the MGF interface is that network traffic handled by the MGF does not affect the load on the CPU of the Cisco ISR, and therefore allows more network throughput between modules within the same router.


Note The Cisco IOS features RITE and NAM, which are supported by the PCI interface (eth0), are not supported for the MGF interface.


IP Configuration of the MGF Interface

The IP configuration (address and netmask) of the MGF interface is not configurable from the AXP CLI. To configure the interface, use Cisco IOS commands as shown in the following example.

IP Configuration of the MGF Interface:Example

This example shows the configuration of the MGF interface.

In configuration mode,

interface SM 1/1
service-module ip address 192.168.1.3 255.255.255.0

On the service module, access the MGF interface:

interface mgf0

Enter one of the commands that are available from the sub-mode:

shutdown

or

no shutdown


Note Changing the IP Configuration for the mgf0 interface via the Cisco IOS CLI results in a message displayed on the console that notifies the administrator to reload the system for the new setting to take effect.


The MGF interface cannot be removed. This is similar to other physical interfaces such as eth0 and eth1.

The following command does not work—interface mgf0 is not removed.

no interface mgf0

VLAN and Virtual Interfaces

Cisco AXP provides commands to configure VLAN and virtual interfaces, which are derived from the physical interfaces eth0 and eth1.

However, it is not possible to configure VLAN and virtual interface from commands derived from the mgf0 interface.

The following Cisco AXP configuration mode command to create a VLAN interface does not work for the mgf0 interface:

interface mgf0.X

The following Cisco AXP configuration mode command to create a virtual interface does not work for the mgf0 interface:

interface mgf0:X

Routing for a Static Route or for Source-Based Routing

Use the MGF interface to communicate with other service modules inside the Cisco ISR chassis.

Routing can be done through the eth0 or eth1 interface, if required. There is no need to use the MGF interface for routing, so the following configuration mode commands do not apply for the mgf0 interface:

ip route A.B.C.D W.X.Y.Z interface mgf0 
ip route table N A.B.C.D W.X.Y.Z interface mgf0

Exposing the MGF interface

The MGF interface can be exposed to the virtual instance using one of the following two methods:

Using the netadmin Capability

Binding the mgf0 Interface to a Virtual Instance

Using the netadmin Capability

The virtual instance of an application can be granted the netadmin capability to access the network without limitations using the netadmin capability. (netadmin is also available in versions of Cisco AXP below 1.5.2.) This enables an application to gain direct access to any network interfaces that are also known by the Cisco AXP host OS, including the mgf0 interface. However, the application can also use raw Linux networking administration tools; for example, to create virtual interfaces and VLAN interfaces.

Binding the mgf0 Interface to a Virtual Instance

The following examples show how to configure the MGF interface on a Cisco IOS router and SM/ISM Cisco AXP service modules:

Configuring an MGF Interface (ISM): Example

On the Cisco IOS router:

interface GigabitEthernet0/0
  ip address 10.10.2.214 255.255.255.0
  ip nat outside
  ip virtual-reassembly
  duplex full
  speed auto
!
interface ISM0/0
  ip unnumbered GigabitEthernet0/0
  service-module ip address 10.10.2.220 255.255.255.0
  !Application: Online on SME
  service-module ip default-gateway 10.10.2.214
  hold-queue 60 out
!
interface ISM0/1
  no ip address
  service-module ip address 192.168.3.2 255.255.255.0
!

Next, the mgf0 interface is bound to a virtual instance on a service module of type ISM. The hostname of se-10-10-2-220 matches the IP address of interface ISM0/0 in the configuration on the Cisco IOS side above.

On the Cisco AXP service module:

app-service empty_1_5_2_eng 
  bind interface eth0
  bind interface mgf0
  hostname se-10-10-2-220
  exit

Configuring an MGF Interface (SM): Example

On the Cisco IOS router:

interface GigabitEthernet0/0
  ip address 10.10.2.214 255.255.255.0
  ip nat outside
  ip virtual-reassembly
  duplex full
  speed auto
!
interface SM1/0
  ip unnumbered GigabitEthernet0/0
  service-module ip address 10.10.2.223 255.255.255.0
  service-module ip default-gateway 10.10.2.214
  no keepalive
  hold-queue 60 out
!
interface SM1/1
  no ip address
  service-module ip address 192.168.3.3 255.255.255.0
!

Next, the mgf0 interface is bound to a virtual instance on a service module of type SM. The hostname of se-10-10-2-223 matches the IP address of interface SM1/0 in the configuration on the Cisco IOS side above.

On the Cisco AXP service module,

app-service empty_1_5_2_eng 
  bind interface eth0
  bind interface mgf0
  hostname se-10-10-2-220
  exit