Guest

Cisco Broadband Processing Engines

Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V Cable Interface Line Card Hardware Installation Guide

  • Viewing Options

  • PDF (1.9 MB)
  • Feedback
Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V Cable Interface Line Card Hardware Installation Guide

Contents

Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V Cable Interface Line Card Hardware Installation Guide

First Published: November 2010, OL-23814-01

Document Revision History

Document Revision Date Change Summary

OL-23814-01

November 29, 2010 Initial Version

Tip


Statement numbers (for example, Statement 1030) at the end of a Warning refer to specific warnings and their translations in the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco uBR10012 Universal Broadband Router document.

Overview

The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card transmits and receives RF signals between the subscriber and the headend over the hybrid fiber-coaxial (HFC) system. This DOCSIS 3.0 compliant line card is designed specifically for the Cisco uBR10012 universal broadband router and conforms to the Modular CMTS (M- CMTS) architecture.

The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card has the capacity to support 72 downstream (DS) and 60 upstream (US) channels, depending on the license purchased. The line card supports 15 cable MAC domains (cable interfaces), and the DS and US channels can be associated with any of these 15 MAC domains. Each MAC domain supports a maximum of 32 DS and 8 US channels.

The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card has 20 US spigots for RF connectivity, which are organized into 5 groups of 4 connectors each. Each connector group supports up to 12 frequency-stacked US channels, with a default configuration of 3 US channels per RF connector. The line card also provides the flexibility to configure lesser number of US spigots. For example, you can configure 10 US spigots with a frequency-stacking of 6 US channels per spigot.

The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card has six Gigabit Ethernet (GE) interface ports organized into three pairs for DS connectivity. Each pair supports 1+1 redundancy and supports 24 DS channels in Annex B mode by default. The GE interfaces connect to an external Edge Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (EQAM) device and provide M-CMTS compliant Downstream External PHY Interface (DEPI) data. This data is directed to only one GE interface, though both the GE interfaces can be active at the same time.

Upstream data from the subscriber comes through the upstream interfaces (US0–US59) on the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card. The line card processes and configures the data and sends it across the backplane to the WAN or backhaul card and out to the Internet.

Downstream data to the subscriber comes from the Internet through the WAN or backhaul card, and across the backplane to the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card. The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card processes and configures the data and sends it out through the appropriate GE interface ports (GE0–GE5) to the eQAM device to be sent to the HFC network.

The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card supports both DOCSIS and EuroDOCSIS cable modem networks. The card supports downstream channels in the 55 to 999 MHz range, and upstream channels in the 5 to 85 MHz range. The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card supports Annex A and Annex B RF data rates, channel widths, and modulation schemes and has DOCSIS MAC management and spectrum management capabilities. It also supports DOCSIS-3.0, A-TDMA, S-CDMA, downstream bonding, and upstream bonding rates.


Note


The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card provides a higher downstream frequency range and supports Annex A and Annex B RF data rates by interfacing with a DOCSIS 3.0 DRFI compliant EQAM, like the Cisco RF Gateway 10.

Note


You must ensure that two DOCSIS Timing, Communication and Control (DTCC) cards are configured in the DOCSIS Timing Interface (DTI) mode on the Cisco uBR10012 router to make the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card work with an EQAM device.

The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card uses a front panel display (FPD) to show the licensing status information of the US and DS channels.

Figure 1 shows the face plate of the line card. The product ID (PID) of this card is UBR-MC3GX60V.

Figure 1. Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V Cable Interface Line Card

Table 1 shows the supported DOCSIS modulation schemes.

Table 1 Supported DOCSIS and EuroDOCSIS Modulation Schemes
Cable Interface Line Card Downstream Modulation Upstream Modulation
Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V 64 QAM1, 256 QAM QPSK, 8 QAM, 16 QAM, 32 QAM, 64 QAM
1 QAM = Quadrature Amplitude Modulation

Benefits

The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card provides the following benefits:

  • Compatibility with existing DEPI deployments using the DOCSIS 3.0 SPA allowing seamless migration from SPA based deployment to Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card based deployment.
  • Direct connection for all the eight Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V line cards (7+1 line card high availability (LCHA) configuration or non-HA) to an EQAM device.
  • Hardware-based support for DOCSIS 2.0 and DOCSIS 3.0 features such as S-CDMA, Multiple Logical Channels, Upstream Channel Bonding, Per Service flow DS ID, and other DOCSIS 3.0 downstream features.
  • TDMA and S-CDMA multiple access support.
  • Dynamic Bandwidth Sharing (DBS) in US and DS between DOCSIS 3.0 and legacy CMs sharing the same channels.
  • The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card has three controllers. Each controller supports 32 Bonding Groups (BGs) consisting of 24 channels per DS BG and 4 channels per US BG.
  • Reduced downtime as the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V line card boots up to full functionality, after the reload or ISSU upgrade process, in about 30 seconds.
  • Expanded capacity of the Cisco uBR10012 universal broadband router, providing the highest port density available in Cisco cable interface line cards.
  • Additional flexibility for cable operators in partitioning the cable plant to address growing subscriber bandwidth demands; enables cost-effective scalability of services and subscribers.
  • Online insertion and removal (OIR), allowing key system components to be added or removed without powering off the chassis.

Onboard Failure Logging

The On-Board Failure Logging (OBFL) feature enables storage and collection of critical failure information in the nonvolatile memory of a Field Replaceable Unit (FRU), like a route processor (RP) or line card. The Cisco uBR10000 series universal broadband router supports OBFL on PRE4, the Cisco SIP-600 jacket card, Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V, Cisco UBR-MC20X20V, and the Cisco uBR-MC5X20H cable interface line cards.

The OBFL stored data assists in understanding and debugging field failures upon Return Material Authorization (RMA) of a RP or line card at repair and failure analysis sites. OBFL records operating temperatures, voltages, hardware uptime, and any other important events that assist board diagnosis in case of hardware failures.

For more information on the feature, see the Onboard Failure Logging feature guide.

Software Licensing

The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card supports software licensing for the US and DS functionality. The software license restricts the US and DS channels the customer can use to 10 to 60 US channels and 16 to 72 DS channels.

The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V line card uses a smart chip authentication device to prevent counterfeit line cards. A digital signature is embedded in the line card, and the Public Key Encryption techniques are used to verify the authenticity of the digital signature. The software licenses are physically stored on the line cards. You cannot transfer the software licenses between different line cards.

The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V line card has a front panel four-character alphanumeric display to show the licensing status information of the US and DS ports. The first two characters of the display represent the DS license count and the last two characters represent the US license count.

Table 1 shows some of the US and DS channel combinations supported on the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V line card and their corresponding license type.

Table 2 Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V Cable Interface Line Card License Information
Front Panel Display Downstream Upstream
3G60 72 60
2G40 48 40
1G20 24 20
3314 33 14
2010 20 10

Line Card Physical Description

Figure 1 shows the Cisco uBR10012 universal broadband router with the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line cards installed.

Figure 2. Cisco uBR10012 Router Chassis with Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V Cable Interface Line Cards

Table 1 describes the LEDs on the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V dense connector cable interface line card.

Table 3 Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V Line Card LEDs
LED Status Description
POWER

Green

Off

Card is powered on.

Card is not powered on.

STATUS

Green

Yellow

Off

Processor has booted and passed diagnostics, or is on standby.

In bootup mode.

No power to the line card.

MAINT

Yellow

Off

It is safe to remove the line card.

No action necessary.

US0 through US19

Green

Off

Upstream-enabled path is configured and able to pass traffic.

Upstream port is not enabled.

GE0 through GE5

Green

Off

DEPI port is configured and able to pass traffic.

DEPI port is not enabled.

LK/ACT0-LK/ACT5

Green (steady)

Green (blinking)

Off

Port is enabled; the link is working, and there is no US or DS traffic activity.

Port is enabled; the link is working, and there is US or DS traffic activity.

Ethernet link is not working.

Front Panel Display Number of licenses for US and DS channels (See Table 1 for license information)

Tools and Equipment

The dense connector configuration comes with the following equipment:

  • Universal cable holder (UCH)—UCH2
  • T-10 TORX driver tool

The cable holder shown in Figure 3 is used to group, hold, and protect the MCX cables when they are installed on the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card. Always use UCH2 when cabling the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card.

Figure 3. Universal Cable Holder (UCH): UCH2

The T-10 TORX driver tool (see Figure 4) and a 1/4-inch flathead screwdriver are used to remove and install the cable bar clamp on the UCH, and loosen the line card captive screws.

Figure 4. T-10 TORX Driver Tool

Cable Bundles for the Line Card

The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card uses bundled cables. The cables come in bundles of five cables. Quad-shield coaxial cable bundles for the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card can be purchased from Cisco, with the Universal Cable Holders (UCH) already connected to the coaxial cable bundles. Alternatively, custom-length quad-shield coaxial cable bundles can be purchased from third-party vendors, with the UCH either connected to the cable bundles or provided as separate components.

Figure 1 shows the cable bundle for Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card to EQAM or hybrid fiber-coaxial (HFC) plant that has 20 F connectors attached to one end and 2 UCH2 units attached to the other end. This cable is 9.84 feet (3 m) long and its part number is CABRFSW3G60QTIMF2.

Figure 5. Cable Bundle with UCH2 Units and F Connectors

1

F connector

2

UCH2

Figure 2 shows the cable bundle for the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card to the RF Switch, which has two UCH2 units attached to one end and two RF Switch header blocks attached to the other end. This cable is 3.2 feet (1 m) long and its part number is CABRFSW3G60QTIMM2.

Figure 6. Cable Bundle with UCH2 Units and RF Switch Header Blocks

1

RF Switch header blocks

2

UCH2

Figure 3 shows the cable bundle for the RF Switch to HFC plant, which has 2 RF Switch header blocks attached to one end and 20 F connectors attached to the other end. This cable is 9.84 feet (3 m) long and its part number is CABRFSW3G60QTPMF2.

Figure 7. Cable Bundle with RF Switch Header Blocks and F Connectors

1

F connectors

2

RF Switch header blocks


Note


Customers purchasing custom-length quad-shield coaxial cable bundles from third-party vendors can purchase spare Universal Cable Holders and spare RF Switch header blocks from Cisco. For the applicable Cisco part numbers, see Part Numbers.


Figure 4 shows a Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V dual-shielded cable bundle. This dual-shielded cable configuration can be used when you are cabling the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V line card directly to the cable plant.

If you are cabling the line card to the Cisco uBR 3X10 RF Switch, you must have MCX connectors at either end of the cable. See Figure 4.

Figure 8. 10-Bundle Dual-Shielded Cable with MCX Connectors


Caution


The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card must be used with the provided UCH2 for all cable connections to the line card. Failure to use the UCH2 may cause permanent damage to the line card connectors, resulting in low or no RF output in the downstream or upstream.


Note


The cable used with the dense connector UCH2 must be 75–ohm precision miniature video cable. For the applicable Cisco part numbers, see Table 1.


SFP Transceiver Modules for the Line Card

The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card has three pairs of GE ports that use small form-factor pluggable (SFP) modules for fiber-optic and copper links. The SFP modules are I/O devices that plug into a GE port, linking the port to an EQAM device or network through a network cable.

Figure 1 shows the SFP transceiver module that is used with fiber-optic LC connectors.

Figure 9. SFP Transceiver Module (Fiber-Optic LC Connector)

Figure 2 shows the 1000Base-T SFP transceiver module that is used with RJ-45 connectors.

Figure 10. 1000Base-T SFP Transceiver Module (RJ-45 Connector)

You can use any SFP module that the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V line card supports. Table 1 lists the SFP modules that are supported on the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V line card. The only restrictions are that each SFP module must match the wavelength specifications on the other end of the cable and that the cable must meet the stipulated cable length range for reliable communications.

Table 4 SFP Modules for the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V Line Card
SFP Module Product Number SFP Module Description
SFP-GE-T RJ-45 copper SFP module (1000BASE-T) Provides full-duplex Gigabit Ethernet connectivity to high-end workstations, and between wiring closets over an existing copper network infrastructure.
GLC-SX-MM Short wavelength (1000BASE-SX) Contains a Class 1 laser of 850 nm for 1000BASE-SX (short-wavelength) applications.
GLC-LH-SM Long wavelength/long haul (1000BASE-LX/LH) Contains a Class 1 laser of 1310 nm for 1000BASE-LX/LH (long-wavelength) applications.
GLC-ZX-SM Extended distance (1000BASE-ZX) Contains a Class 1 laser of 1550 nm for 1000BASE-ZX (extended-wavelength) applications.

Note


Use only Cisco SFP transceiver modules on your Cisco device. Each SFP transceiver module has an internal serial EEPROM that is encoded with security information. This encoding allows Cisco to identify and validate that the SFP transceiver module meets the requirements for the device.

The SFP transceiver modules provide duplex single-mode and multimode connections in supported devices. Table 2 lists the cable specifications for SFP module ports.

Table 5 SFP Transceiver Module Cabling Specifications

SFP Module Model Speed

Wavelength (nanometers)

Fiber Type

Core Size (micron)

Modal Bandwidth (MHz/km)

Cable Distance

SFP-GE-T (1000BASE-T)

Copper 328 feet (100 m)

GLC-SX-MM (1000BASE-SX)

850 MMF2

62.5

62.5

50.0

50.0

160

200

400

500

722 feet (220 m)

902 feet (275 m)

1640 feet (500 m)

1804 feet (550 m)

GLC-LH-SM (1000BASE-LX/LH)

1300 MMF3

SMF4

62.5

50.0

50.0

G.652

500

400

500

1804 feet (550 m)

1804 feet (550 m)

1804 feet (550 m)

32,810 feet (10 km)

GLC-ZX-SM (1000BASE-ZX)5

1550 SMF G.652

43.4 to 62 miles (70

to 100 km)

2 Multimode fiber (MMF)
3 A mode-conditioning patch cord is required at all times as per IEEE specifications.
4 Single-mode fiber (SMF)
5 For the GLC-ZX-SM, the minimum attenuation between the transmit bore (TX) and the receive bore (RX) is 8 dB. When using shorter distances of single-mode fiber cable, you might need to insert an inline optical attenuator in the link to avoid overloading the receiver.

Technical Specifications and Component Part Numbers

The following tables provide technical specifications and part number information for the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card.

Physical Specifications and Compliance Information

Table 6 lists the physical specifications for the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card.

Table 6 Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V Cable Interface Line Card Specifications
Description Specification
Card Dimensions
  • Width: 1.38 in. (3.50 cm)
  • Height: 21.5 in. (54.61 cm)
  • Depth: 17 in. (43.18 cm)
Weight 11.6 lb (5.26 kg)

Power Consumption

246W6 (839 BTU/hr7)

Thermal Heat Dissipation

246W (839 BTU/hr)

Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF)

Supports 5 9s availability. 100,748 hours
Temperature Range
  • Operating: 41 to 104°F (5 to 40°C)
  • Non-operating: –4 to 149°F (–20 to 65°C)
Relative Humidity
  • Operating: 10 to 90% non-condensing
  • Non-operating: 10 to 90%
Operating Altitude -196 to 13,123 ft. (-60 to 4000 m)

Standards, Compliance, Protocols

  • DOCSIS ITU J.112, ITU J.83 Annex A, Annex B
  • DOCSIS 1.1
  • DOCSIS MAC management
  • DOCSIS spectrum management
  • CableLabs ECR; RFI-R-98036
  • DOCSIS 2.0
  • DOCSIS 3.0

Software Requirements

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SCE or a later release
6 W = Watts
7 BTU/hr = British thermal units per hour

RF Specifications

Table 7 shows DOCSIS 3.0 input specifications.

Table 7 Supported Upstream Modulation Schemes (US0—US59)
Channel Width – MHz Symbol Rate – Msym/s Throughput–Mbps

Maximum Range

–dBmV8

QPSK

8 QAM

16 QAM

32 QAM

64 QAM

Max Nom Max Nom Max Nom Max Nom Max Nom
0.2 0.16 0.32 0.23 0.48 0.41 0.64 0.55 0.8 0.69 0.96 0.825 –16 to +14
0.4 0.32 0.64 0.55 0.96 0.82 1.28 1.1 1.6 1.38 1.92 1.65 –13 to +17
0.8 0.64 1.28 1.1 1.92 1.64 2.56 2.2 3.2 2.76 3.84 3.30 –10 to +20
1.6 1.28 2.56 2.2 3.84 3.24 5.12 4.4 6.4 5.52 7.68 6.60 –13 to +23
3.2 2.56 5.12 4.4 7.68 6.56 10.24 8.8 12.8 11.04 15.36 13.2 –10 to +26
6.4 5.12 10.24 8.8 15.36 13.12 20.48 17.6 25.6 22.08 30.72 26.4 –7 to +29
8 The DOCSIS specifications state that each channel width has a range that it can work within.

Note


These values (–13 to +23, –10 to +26, and –7 to +29) are new DOCSIS 3.0 levels and are backward compatible with old DOCSIS 2.0 levels.

Part Numbers

Table 1 lists the part numbers for the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card, cable kits, cables, connectors, tubing, and tools.

Table 8 Part Numbers
Description Part Numbers
  1. Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V line card
  2. Blank card slot cover

  1. UBR-MC3GX60V=
  2. UBR10-MC-COVER=

Universal Cable Holder (UCH)

  1. UCH2
  2. Universal Cable Holder for MCX connectors, qty 2 pcs
  1. CAB-520-UCH2, Cisco Systems
  2. CAB-520-MULT-UCH2, Cisco Systems

Cable Bundles

  1. Cable bundle for RF card to HFC plant—Two UCH2 units attached to one end and 20 F connectors attached to the other end, 9.84 feet (3 m) long.
  2. Cable bundle for RF card to RF Switch—2 UCH2 units attached to one end and 2 RF Switch header blocks attached to the other end, 3.2 feet (1 m) long.
  3. Cable bundle for RF switch to HFC plant—2 RF Switch header blocks attached to one end and 20 F connectors attached to the other end, 9.84 feet (3 m) long.

  1. CABRFSW3G60QTIMF2=
  2. CABRFSW3G60QTIMM2=
  3. CABRFSW3G60QTPMF2=
RF Switch header blocks for MCX connectors, qty 2 pcs CAB-RFSW-MULT-HB

Small Form-Factor Pluggable (SFP)

  1. Cisco 1000BASE-T
  2. 1000BASE-SX
  3. 1000BASE-LX/LH
  4. 1000BASE-ZX
  1. SFP-GE-T, Cisco Systems
  2. GLC-SX-MM
  3. GLC-LH-SM
  4. GLC-ZX-SM

MCX fixed pin connector

  1. Dual-shielded
  2. Quad-shielded
  1. PN-MCXFP, White Sands Engineering
  2. PN-MCXFPQ, White Sands Engineering

75–ohm precision miniature video cable

  1. Dual-shielded single cable
  2. Quad-shielded 5-pack
  1. YR46940, White Sands Engineering, single cable
  2. YR50386, White Sands Engineering, five pack

MCX connector strip tool

  1. Dual-shielded cables
  2. Quad-shielded cables
  1. PN-CPT-7538-125, White Sands Engineering
  2. PN-CPT-7538-200Q, White Sands Engineering
MCX connector to F connector adapter PN-53140137, White Sands Engineering

F connector strip tool

  1. Dual-shielded cables
  2. Quad-shielded cables
  1. PN-CPT-7538, White Sands Engineering
  2. PN-CPT7538Q, White Sands Engineering
MCX and F connector crimper tool PN-ACT- 483, White Sands Engineering

F connector

  1. Dual-shielded
  2. Quad-shielded
  1. PN-ASFP, White Sands Engineering
  2. PN-ASFPQ, White Sands Engineering

Shrink tubing

  • Size—1/4 inch
  • Shrink ratio—2:1
  • Recovered wall thickness—0.025 inch
  • Inside diameter after recovery—0.125 inch
Note    Do not use shrink tubing with Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V quad-shielded cables.

Nominal Attenuation

Table 1 shows the nominal attenuation for specified cable lengths.

Table 9 Nominal Attenuation for a 75-ohm Miniature Headend Coaxial Cable
MHz dB/100 ft MHz dB/100 ft MHz dB/100 ft
1 0.39 71 3.06 270 5.40
3.58 0.78 88 3.16 360 6.20
5 0.92 100 3.33 540 7.70
7 1.08 135 3.81 720 9.47
10 1.20 143 3.92 750 9.59
67.5 2.83 180 4.38 1000 10.50

Figure 11. Nominal Attenuation Graph for 75-ohm Miniature Headend Coaxial Cable

Safety Information and Warnings

Follow these safety guidelines when working with any equipment that connects to electrical power.

Electrical Equipment Guidelines

Follow these basic guidelines when working with any electrical equipment:

  • Before beginning any procedures requiring access to the chassis interior, locate the emergency power-off switch for the room in which you are working.
  • Disconnect all power and external cables before moving a chassis.
  • Do not work alone when potentially hazardous conditions exist.
  • Never assume that power has been disconnected from a circuit; always check.
  • Do not perform any action that creates a potential hazard to people or makes the equipment unsafe.
  • Carefully examine your work area for possible hazards such as moist floors, ungrounded power extension cables, and missing safety grounds.

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Electrostatic discharge (ESD) damage, which occurs when electronic cards or components are improperly handled, can result in complete or intermittent failures. The AC input power shelf and its AC power modules contain a printed circuit card that is fixed in a metal carrier. Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding and connectors are integral components of the carrier. Although the metal carrier helps to protect the cards from ESD, use an anti-static wrist strap each time you handle the modules.

Follow these guidelines for preventing ESD damage:

  • Always use an ESD-preventive wrist or ankle strap and ensure that it makes good skin contact. Before removing a card from the chassis, connect the equipment end of the strap to a bare metal, unpainted surface on the chassis or rack-mount. Ensure that the chassis and/or rack has a grounding cable installed. For more information, see the Cisco uBR10012 Universal Broadband Router Hardware Installation Guide.
  • Handle components by the carrier edges only; avoid touching the card components or any connector pins.
  • When removing a module, place it on an anti-static surface or in a static-shielding bag. If the module is returned to the factory, immediately place it in a static-shielding bag.
  • Avoid contact between the modules and clothing. The wrist strap protects the card from ESD voltages only on the body; ESD voltages on clothing can still cause damage.


Caution


For safety, periodically check the resistance value of the anti-static strap. The measurement should be between 1 and 10 megaohms (Mohm).

Warning Definition

Installing or Replacing a Line Card

Use the following procedure to install a Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card in the Cisco uBR10012 universal broadband router chassis.


Note


The following instructions describe the connection and removal process of the customized RF cables, and the maintenance of the Cisco preconfigured cable bundles.

Note


If you are returning a card to the factory, after removing the card from the chassis, place it immediately in an antistatic shielding bag.

Caution


For proper cooling and airflow, always install a blank cover on any empty slot in the Cisco uBR10012 universal broadband router chassis. Blank covers are available for all Cisco uBR10012 universal broadband router modules. For information about specific modules, see Related Documentation.

Tools and Equipment for Installing or Replacing a Line Card

To remove and replace an individual Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card, you need the following tools and equipment:

  • Replacement Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V card: UBR-MC3GX60V=
  • Blank Cisco uBR10012 slot cover (if required): UBR10-MC-COVER=
  • 1/4-inch flathead screwdriver
  • ESD-preventive wrist strap
  • Antistatic surface, such as a mat or antistatic bag

Unpacking the Line Card

To unpack the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card:


Caution


Ensure that you are properly grounded with an ESD-preventative ground strap.
Procedure
    Step 1   Remove the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card from the box.
    Step 2   Place the card on an antistatic surface.
    Step 3   Review the installation information for the card.


    Note


    For Class B emission compliance requirements, the two ferrites available in the Cisco uBR10012 router accessory kit must be installed on the input DC power harness of the chassis. These ferrite beads are clamp-on type and should be placed as close to the input DC power connector (DC input terminal connector) as possible.

    Removing UCH2 from the Line Card

    To remove the UCH2 from the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card:


    Note


    The UCH2 should be used with the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card. For more information, see Installing UCH2 on the Line Card.

    Caution


    Ensure that you are properly grounded with an ESD-preventative ground strap.
    Procedure
      Step 1   Carefully move the cables away from the front of the card so that you can easily reach the lead screw on the UCH2.
      Step 2   Use the flathead screwdriver to loosen the lead screw on the UCH2. Turn the lead screw counterclockwise. (See Figure 12.)

      Figure 12. Unscrewing the UCH2

      Step 3   Unscrew the lead screw until it is completely out of the faceplate on the line card.
      Step 4   Use the lead screw to pull the UCH2 and cables straight away from the card. (See Figure 13.)

      Figure 13. Removing the UCH2 from the Line Card

      Caution    Do not use the cables to pull the holder from the faceplate. Be careful not to bend the cables at right angles to the holder.

      Step 5   Move the cables and the UCH2 away from the front of the line card.
      Step 6   Repeat Step 1 to Step 5 for the other UCH2s.

      Removing the Line Card from the Card Slot

      To remove the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card from the card slot:

      Procedure
        Step 1   Using a T-10 TORX driver tool or flathead screwdriver, unscrew the top and bottom captive screws on the card.
        Step 2   Simultaneously pivot both ejector levers away from the cable interface line card to disengage the card from the backplane. (See Figure 14.)
        Figure 14. Unscrewing the Captive Screws and Opening the Ejector Levels

        Step 3   Slide the card out of the slot in the chassis and place it on an antistatic surface or in a static shielding bag with the component side up. (See Figure 15.)
        Caution    Dropping the card can damage the carrier rails and card guides, making it difficult to reinstall.
        Figure 15. Removing the Cable Interface Line Card from the Chassis

        Step 4   If you are installing a new or replacement card, see Installing the Line Card in the Card Slot. Otherwise, install a blank cover over the slot and screw down its captive screws.
        Note    For proper cooling and airflow, always install a blank card cover in unused line card slots.

        Removing the SFP Module From the Line Card

        To remove the SFP module from the SFP transceiver on the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card:

        Procedure
          Step 1   Disconnect the network cable from the SFP module connector. For optical SFP transceivers, immediately reinstall the dust plugs in the SFP transceiver optical bores.
          Step 2   Unlock and remove the SFP module from the socket connector.
          1. If the SFP transceiver has a Mylar tab latch, pull the tab gently in a slightly downward direction until the transceiver disengages from the socket connector, and then pull the SFP transceiver straight out of the socket. Do not twist or pull the Mylar tab as you could detach it from the SFP transceiver. (See Figure 1.)
            Figure 16. Removing an SFP Transceiver Equipped with a Mylar Tab

          2. If the SFP transceiver has an actuator button latch, gently press the actuator button on the front of the SFP transceiver until it clicks and the latch mechanism releases the SFP transceiver from the socket connector. Grasp the actuator button between your thumb and index finger, and carefully pull the SFP transceiver straight from the module slot. (See Figure 2.)

            Figure 17. Removing an SFP Transceiver Equipped with an Actuator/Button Latch

          3. If the SFP transceiver has a bale-clasp latch, pull the bale out and down to eject the SFP transceiver from the socket connector. If the bale-clasp latch is obstructed and you cannot use your index finger to open it, use a small, flat-blade screwdriver or a long narrow instrument to open the bale-clasp latch. Grasp the SFP transceiver between your thumb and index finger, and carefully remove it from the socket. (See Figure 3.)

            Figure 18. Removing an SFP Transceiver Equipped with a Bale-clasp Latch

          Step 3   Place the removed SFP module in an antistatic bag.

          Installing the Line Card in the Card Slot

          To install a Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V line card:


          Caution


          Ensure that you are properly grounded with an ESD-preventative ground strap.
          Procedure
            Step 1   Carefully align the upper and lower edges of the card with the upper and lower guides in the chassis.

            Caution    The Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card weighs 11.6 lbs. Use both hands when handling the card. Do not drop the card or otherwise damage the carrier rails. Bent or damaged rails can damage the card guides and prevent line card installation. When installing cards for the first time, or when all the captive screws of the card are loose, insert cards first in slot 5/1 and work towards slot 8/0 to prevent uneven gasket pressure.

            Step 2   Slide the card into the slot until you can feel it seat in the backplane connectors. (See Figure 19.)

            Figure 19. Cisco uBR10012 Router Chassis with Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V Cable Interface Line Cards

            Step 3   Close the ejector levers to secure the card in the backplane. (See Figure 20.)

            Figure 20. Closing the Ejector Levers

            Step 4   Engage and begin tightening the captive screws first by hand. Then, use either a T-10 Torx (included in the line card accessory kit) or a common flathead screwdriver to tighten the captive screws between 5 to 7 in-lbs.

            Caution    Always tighten the captive screws on each line card, but not more than the maximum of 7 in-lbs. These screws prevent accidental removal and provide proper grounding for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding.

            Note    When fully inserted, the line card cycles through its power-on self-test, and the POWER and STATUS LEDs turn on. (If either of those LEDs is flashing, see Troubleshooting the Line Card Installation section).


            Installing UCH2 on the Line Card

            After the cables are installed in the UCH2, perform the following steps to install UCH2 on the line card:


            Caution


            The UCH2 must be used for all cable connections to the line card. Failure to use a UCH2 may cause permanent damage to the line card connectors, resulting in low or no RF output in the downstream or upstream.
            Procedure
              Step 1   Position UCH2 so that the red line is on the same side as the red triangle on the card.
              Step 2   Align the end pins on UCH2 with the pin holes in the faceplate. (See Figure 21.)

              Figure 21. Aligning the UCH2 with the Cable Interface Card Dense Connector Ports

              Caution    When you are replacing the UCH2, be careful not to bend the cables in the holder at right angles.
              Step 3   Tighten the lead screw with your fingers while holding the UCH2 and cables in place on the faceplate. If the UCH2 and cables do not appear to settle securely in place on the faceplate, wiggle the holder to resettle the connectors. (See Figure 22.)

              Figure 22. Installing the UCH2 on the Faceplate

              Step 4   Use the flathead screwdriver to tighten the lead screw. Turn the lead screw clockwise until it will no longer turn (10 in-lbs, maximum torque 15 in-lbs).

              Caution    Torquing the lead screw to more than the maximum of 20 in-lbs can cause the lead screw to fail.

              Note    As you turn the lead screw clockwise, the outer shroud on the UCH2 moves to cover the red line on the top and the black line on the bottom of the UCH2. The half circles on the edge of the shroud appear to close as the shroud fits down over the UCH2. Full engagement is indicated by visible metal-to-metal contact between the UCH2 and the faceplate (check the half circle cutouts).
              Step 5   Repeat Step 4 and Step 5 for the other UCH2.
              Step 6   Configure the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card if required as described in Configuring the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V Cable Interface Line Card guide.

              Note    It is not necessary to configure the cable interface line card if you are installing a replacement card in the identical slot. After the reset cycle, the software detects all modules on each line card and generates the proper data structure for them.

              Installing the SFP Module on the Line Card

              To insert an SFP transceiver module into the GE interface port of the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card:


              Caution


              Ensure that you are properly grounded with an ESD-preventative ground strap.
              Procedure
                Step 1   Remove the SFP transceiver module from its protective packaging.
                Step 2   Find the transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) markings that identify the top side of the SFP transceiver module.
                Note    On some SFP transceivers, the Tx and Rx markings might be replaced by arrowheads pointing from the SFP transceiver connector (transmit direction or Tx) and towards the connector (receive direction or Rx).
                Step 3   Position the SFP transceiver module in front of the socket opening.
                Step 4   Insert the SFP transceiver module into the socket until you feel the SFP module connector snap into the socket connector (See Figure 23), and close the SFP latch.
                Figure 23. Inserting an SFP Module into a GE Interface Port

                Step 5   Remove the dust cap from the SFP transceiver module and save for future use.

                Step 6   Inspect and clean the LC connector fiber-optic end-faces.

                Step 7   Remove the dust plugs from the SFP transceiver optical bores.


                SFP Module Interface Cables

                After installing the SFP module in the GE port, you must attach the cables to the SFP module. The connector types used to attach interface cables to the SFP Module are given below:

                RJ-45 Connector

                The RJ-45 connector, shown in Figure 1, is used to provide full-duplex GE connectivity to high-end workstations and between wiring closets over an existing copper network infrastructure.

                Figure 24. RJ-45 Connector

                1 RJ-45 connector and port

                SC Fiber-Optic Connector

                The SC Fiber-Optic connector, shown in Figure 1, is used to connect fiber-optic module ports or transceivers with the external SMF or MMF network.


                Note


                Ensure that the optical connectors are clean before making the connections. Contaminated connectors can damage the fiber and cause data errors.
                Figure 25. SC Fiber-Optic Connector




                Note


                Always insert the network connector completely into the socket. A secure connection is especially important when you are establishing a connection between a module and a long distance (1.24 miles or 2 km) network or a module and a highly attenuated network. If the link LED does not light up, try removing the network cable plug and reinserting it firmly into the module socket. It is possible that dirt or skin oils have accumulated on the plug faceplate (around the optical-fiber openings) generating significant attenuation and reducing the optical power levels below threshold levels so that a link cannot be made.

                LC Fiber-Optic Connector

                The LC fiber-optic connector, shown in Figure 1, is a small form-factor fiber-optic connector that provides high density fiber connectivity. The line card connector can be used with either MMF or SMF cables. The line card connector uses a latching clip mechanism that is similar to the one used on the RJ-45 copper connector.


                Note


                Ensure that the optical connectors are clean before making the connections. Contaminated connectors can damage the fiber and cause data errors.
                Figure 26. LC Fiber-Optic Connector

                Connecting a Network Cable to an SFP Module

                To connect a network cable to an SFP module port:

                Procedure
                  Step 1   Insert the network cable (RJ-45 Connector, SC Fiber-Optic Connector, or LC Fiber-Optic Connector) into the SFP module port, and listen for the click sound to ensure proper seating. (See Figure 1.)
                  Step 2   Pull the network cable gently outwards to ensure that the cable connector is firmly in place.

                  Figure 27. Gigabit Ethernet Port Cabling

                  1 Cable connector 2 SFP transceiver module
                  Step 3   Insert the other end of the network cable into the receptacle of the EQAM device.

                  Installing or Replacing Cables in UCH2

                  The UCH2 is designed to stabilize the cables and hold them in place.

                  Tools and Equipment for Installing or Replacing Cables in UCH2

                  The tools listed below are designed to help you remove and install cables in the UCH2.

                  • T-10 TORX driver tool—Removes the cable clamp bar.
                  • Cable heat-shrink wrap—Adds strength to the dual-shielded cables and connector connection.

                    Caution


                    Do not use heat-shrink wrap on Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V quad-shielded cables.
                  • Cables—75–ohm precision miniature video cable, Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V dual-shielded or quad-shielded bonded foil 1855 type.

                  Removing Cables

                  To remove the old cables:

                  Procedure
                    Step 1   Use the T-10 TORX driver tool to loosen the UCH2 lock bar on the side from where you want to remove the cable. (See Figure 1.)
                    Figure 28. Using the T-10 TORX Driver Tool to Loosen the UCH2 Lock Bar

                    Step 2   Slide open the lock bar by hand, or with a flathead screwdriver if the bar is tight or hard to access. (See Figure 2.)
                    Figure 29. Using a Screwdriver to Slide Open the Lock Bar on the UCH2

                    Step 3   Carefully pull the cable completely out of the UCH2.

                    Caution    Be careful not to bend the cables at right angles.

                    Note    If the cable does not come loose from the UCH2, make sure the lock bar is completely open.

                    Step 4   Repeat Step 1 to Step 3 for each cable you are removing.

                    Installing Cables

                    Cisco cables are color-coded for easy reference and installation. The cable color corresponds to a specific port on the card. Table 1 lists the cable ports and associated cable color applicable when using Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V dual-shielded cables or quad-shielded cabling.


                    Note


                    Precision miniature video coaxial cables come in various colors and you can use any cable color combination. However, when you are connecting the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card to the Cisco RF Switch, we recommend that you install the cables in the UCH2 as listed in Table 1.


                    Table 10 Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V Dual-shielded and Quad-shielded Cable Ports and Cable Colors
                    Universal Cable Holder (1) RF Switch Header (1) Universal Cable Holder (2) RF Switch Header (2)
                    Line Card Port Cable Color RF Switch Port Cable Color Line Card Port Cable Color RF Switch Port Cable Color
                    US0 Red A Red US10 Red A Red
                    US1 White B White US11 White B White
                    US2 Blue C Blue US12 Blue C Blue
                    US3 Green D Green US13 Green D Green
                    US4 Yellow H Yellow US14 Yellow H Yellow
                    US5 Violet I Violet US15 Violet I Violet
                    US6 Orange J Orange US16 Orange J Orange
                    US7 Black K Black US17 Black K Black
                    US8 Gray E Gray US18 Gray E Gray
                    US9 Brown L Brown US19 Brown L Brown

                    Note


                    The cable kits and cabling color scheme of the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card is different from the earlier line cards like the Cisco UBR-MC20X20V and Cisco uBR10-MC5X20S/U/H. However, you can also use legacy cable kits with the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card. For applicable color schemes and cabling information for legacy cable kits, refer to Cabling the Cisco uBR10-MC5X20S/​U/​H Cable Interface Line Card with UCH2 - Quick Start Guide.

                    To replace cables or install new cables in a UCH2:


                    Caution


                    The UCH2 must be used for all cable connections to the line card. Failure to use a UCH2 may cause permanent damage to the line card connectors, resulting in low or no RF output in the downstream or upstream.


                    Note


                    Do not attempt to remove or install cables in the UCH2, when the UCH2 is attached to the faceplate.

                    Procedure
                      Step 1   Use the T-10 TORX driver tool to loosen the lock bar on the side where you want to install a cable. (See Figure 1.)
                      Step 2   Use a flathead screwdriver as a lever to slide open the lock bar. (See Figure 2.)
                      Step 3   Remove the ESD cap from a cable (see Figure 1 and Figure 2) and insert the cable into the hole in the UCH2. (See Figure 3.) Use Table 1 to determine the correct color and location for each colored cable.

                      Figure 30. Removing an ESD Cap from a MCX connector

                      Figure 31. Removing an ESD Cap from an F connector

                      Figure 32. Inserting Cables in the UCH2

                      Step 4   Insert and wiggle the connector into the hole.

                      Note    The cables fit loosely in the holes, and are not locked into place until the lock bar is closed in 6

                      Step 5   Repeat Step 3 and Step 4 for the remaining cables you are installing.

                      Note    Ensure the cables are aligned correctly and inserted completely or the slide bar will not close.

                      Step 6   Slide the lock bar close completely in the UCH2, and use the T-10 TORX driver tool to tighten the screws clockwise (torque 10 in-lbs, 1.13 Newton meters [Nm]).

                      Note    Clamp bar maximum torque is 15 in-lbs (1.70Nm).

                      Adding Heat-Shrink Tubing to Custom-built Cables

                      The heat-shrink tubing adds rigidity to the connection between the connector and the cable. The tubing is not required, but recommended. This procedure describes how to add heat-shrink tubing to the cables.


                      Note


                      Heat-shrink tubing should be used only with Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V dual-shielded cables. Do not use heat-shrink wrap with Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V quad-shielded cables.

                      Tools and Equipment for Heat-Shrink Tubing

                      • Heat-shrink tubing—See Technical Specifications and Component Part Numbers.
                      • MCX cable prep tool (cable stripper)—White Sands Engineering part number CPT-7538-125 (for dual-shielded cables).
                      • MCX cable crimping tool—White Sands Engineering part number ACT-483.
                      • MCX connectors—White Sands Engineering part number MCXFP (for dual-shielded cables).
                      • Cable—75–ohm precision miniature video cable, single strand bonded foil 1855 type.
                      • Heat source—To shrink the tubing around the cable (for example, a hand-held dryer).

                      Note


                      The heat-shrink tubing cannot be added if there is a connector on the end of the cable.

                      Adding Heat-Shrink Tubing

                      Procedure
                        Step 1   Cut the new cable to the desired length.
                        Step 2   Strip the cable with the MCX cable prep tool per manufacturer instructions.
                        Step 3   Cut a piece of heat-shrink tubing approximately 1-inch in length.

                        Note    The heat-shrink tubing has a 2:1 ratio for shrinkage (tubing has a 0.125-in. inside diameter with a 0.025-in. thick wall after recovery).

                        Step 4   Slide the tubing onto the cable.

                        Figure 33. Heat-Shrink Tubing on Cable Before Shrinking

                        Step 5   Install a MCX connector per manufacturers instructions.

                        Figure 34. Installing MCX Connectors

                        Step 6   Slide the heat-shrink tubing down the cable until the end is touching the connector.
                        Step 7   Use a heat source (hand-held dryer) to shrink the tubing around the cable.
                        Step 8   If the tubing overlaps the connector after it has shrunk, cut back the shrink tubing to the end of the connector.

                        Note    If the tubing overlaps the connector, the connector will be difficult to install in the UCH2 slot, and the UCH2 may not function properly.


                        Troubleshooting the Line Card Installation

                        If the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line card is not working properly, check the following:

                        1. Verify that the POWER LED is on (green). If the LED is off (not green):
                          • Verify that there is power to the system.
                          • Verify that the card is configured for the system.
                        2. Verify that the LEDs (see Table 1 for LED description) light up and go through the power on self test (POST) when the card is inserted in the chassis.
                        3. Verify that the captive screws and ejector levers are secure:
                          • Check that the captive screws are secure in the faceplate.
                          • Check that the ejectors levers are properly closed.
                        4. Verify that the card is properly seated in the chassis:
                          • Release the ejector levers and captive screws.
                          • Slide the card partially out of the chassis and then slide it back in, making sure that it is properly seated in the backplane.
                          • Close the ejector levers and tighten the captive screws.
                        5. Verify that the UCH2 is securely in place on the faceplate. Check that the lead screw is secure.

                          Note


                          The recommended maximum torque for a lead screw is 15 in-lbs (1.69 Nm).
                        6. Verify that the connectors are properly seated in the ports on the faceplate:
                          • Verify that no cables are broken at the connector.
                          • Verify that the cables are properly secured in the UCH2.
                          • Verify that all the MCX connectors are protruding the same distance out of the UCH2.

                          Note


                          Use the MCX to F connector adapter to easily adapt the MCX connection for testing the cables.
                        7. Verify that the lock bar on the UCH2 is in place and tightened.
                        8. Verify that the correct level of software licensing is available for the card.

                        Table 11 Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V Line Card LEDs
                        LED Status Description
                        POWER

                        Green

                        Off

                        Card is powered on.

                        Card is not powered on.

                        STATUS

                        Green

                        Yellow

                        Off

                        Processor has booted and passed diagnostics, or is on standby.

                        In bootup mode.

                        No power to the line card.

                        MAINT

                        Yellow

                        Off

                        It is safe to remove the line card.

                        No action necessary.

                        US0 through US19

                        Green

                        Off

                        Upstream-enabled path is configured and able to pass traffic.

                        Upstream port is not enabled.

                        GE0 through GE5

                        Green

                        Off

                        DEPI port is configured and able to pass traffic.

                        DEPI port is not enabled.

                        LK/ACT0-LK/ACT5

                        Green (steady)

                        Green (blinking)

                        Off

                        Port is enabled; the link is working, and there is no US or DS traffic activity.

                        Port is enabled; the link is working, and there is US or DS traffic activity.

                        Ethernet link is not working.

                        Front Panel Display Number of licenses for US and DS channels (See Table 1 for license information).

                        Broken Lead Screws

                        To remove a lead screw that has broken off in the faceplate of the card:

                        Procedure
                          Step 1   Remove the cable bundle and UCH2 from the faceplate.
                          1. Take hold of the entire bundle of cables with one hand, and hold the card in place with the other.
                          2. Pull the cables and UCH2 away from the card.
                            Note    If the UCH2 does not immediately come away from the faceplate, gently wiggle the UCH2 up and down while simultaneously pulling it away from the faceplate.
                          Step 2   Inspect the screw hole and blow away any debris.
                          Step 3   Insert a small flathead screwdriver into the lead screw hole.
                          Step 4   Press down and rotate the screwdriver counterclockwise until the broken part of the lead screw emerges from the hole.
                          Step 5   Use your fingers or needle-nose pliers to rotate the lead screw the rest of the way out of the hole.

                          Related Documentation

                          For more information about the Cisco uBR-MC3GX60V cable interface line cards, Cisco uBR10012 universal broadband router chassis, and software configuration, see the following documents:

                          Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request

                          For information on obtaining documentation, submitting a service request, and gathering additional information, see the monthly What's New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and revised Cisco technical documentation, at:

                          http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​en/​US/​docs/​general/​whatsnew/​whatsnew.html

                          Subscribe to the What's New in Cisco Product Documentation as a Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feed and set content to be delivered directly to your desktop using a reader application. The RSS feeds are a free service and Cisco currently supports RSS version 2.0.

                          Cisco and the Cisco logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cisco and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. To view a list of Cisco trademarks, go to this URL: http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​go/​trademarks. Third-party trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company. (1110R)