Cisco Wide Area Application Engine 7341, 7371, and 674 Hardware Installation Guide
Troubleshooting the System Hardware
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Troubleshooting the System Hardware

Table Of Contents

Troubleshooting the System Hardware

Identifying System Problems

Checking Connections and Switches

Using the System Diagnostic Programs

Diagnostic Tools Overview

POST Overview

Diagnostic Programs and Error Messages

Starting the Diagnostic Programs

Viewing the Test Log

Viewing Error Logs

Viewing Diagnostic Error Message Tables

Checking the Power Subsystem

Troubleshooting the Ethernet Controller

Network Connection Problems

Ethernet Controller Troubleshooting Chart

Identifying Problems Using Trouble Indicators and Status LEDs

Power Supply LEDs

System Error LED

Diagnostic Panel LEDs

Remind Button

Using Light Path Diagnostics

Undetermined Problems

Problem-Solving Tips

Symptoms and Solutions

Beep Symptoms

No Beep Symptoms

System Error LED and the Diagnostic Panel LEDs

Diagnostic Error Codes

Error Symptoms

POST Error Codes


Troubleshooting the System Hardware


This chapter provides basic troubleshooting information to help you identify some common problems that might occur with your Wide Area Application Engine (WAE).

This chapter contains the following sections:

Identifying System Problems

Checking Connections and Switches

Using the System Diagnostic Programs

Checking the Power Subsystem

Troubleshooting the Ethernet Controller

Identifying Problems Using Trouble Indicators and Status LEDs

Undetermined Problems

Symptoms and Solutions

Use the information in this chapter to determine whether a problem originates with the hardware or the software. For further assistance, contact your customer service representative.


Note The WAAS software does not support the use of a keyboard or mouse (Personal System/2 [PS/2] or Universal Serial Bus [USB]) for Linux and WAAS software troubleshooting. However, the keyboard and mouse are supported by the BIOS for power-on self-test (POST) and the diagnostic programs that are located in the device ROM.

When console redirection is enabled, all the tests available from a keyboard are accessible through the console connection as well. (Mouse support, however, is not available through the console connection.)


You can run all the diagnostics and tests that are supported by the BIOS, with a few exceptions. Tests for ports (such as the systems-management Ethernet connector and the SAS connector) that are not supported by the WAAS software are invalid.


Caution Customer-replaceable components include the Inline Network adapter, hard disk drives, and power supplies. All other components that are not orderable as spare hardware options can only be replaced by a qualified service technician. Once you have identified a faulty component, contact the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC).


Note Read the "Working Inside the WAE with the Power On" section on page 2-7 before opening the chassis cover.


Identifying System Problems

To identify system problems, follow these steps:


Step 1 Check the power supply LEDs. (See Table 6-1.)

Step 2 Power down the device and all external devices.

Step 3 Check all cables and power cords. (See the "Checking Connections and Switches" section.)

Step 4 Set all display controls on the terminal or display device to the middle position.

Step 5 Power up all external devices.

Step 6 Power up the device.

Step 7 Check the system error LED on the front panel (see Figure 1-1); if it is on, see the "System Error LED and the Diagnostic Panel LEDs" section.

Step 8 Record any POST error messages that are displayed on the screen. If an error is displayed, look up the first error in the "POST Error Codes" section.

Step 9 If you did not hear a single beep, indicating successful completion of POST, take one of the following actions:

If no beeps sounded, run the diagnostic programs. For information on how to use the diagnostic programs, see the "Using the System Diagnostic Programs" section.

If the diagnostic programs were completed successfully and you still suspect a problem, see the "Undetermined Problems" section.

If you hear more than a single beep, find the beep code in the "Beep Symptoms" section. If necessary, see the "Undetermined Problems" section.

Step 10 Check the system error log. If an error was recorded by the system, see the "Symptoms and Solutions" section.


Checking Connections and Switches

Improperly set switches and controls and loose or improperly connected cables are the most likely source of problems for the chassis or other external equipment. A quick check of all the switches, controls, and cable connections can easily solve these problems. (See Figure 1-1 for the location of front panel controls and indicators. See Figure 1-2 for the location of back panel connectors on the system.)

To check all the connections and switches, follow these steps:


Step 1 Power down the system, including any attached peripherals such as external drives. Disconnect all the power cables from their electrical outlets.

Step 2 If the system is connected to a power strip (or power distribution unit), turn the power strip off and then on again.

Is the power strip receiving power?

Yes. Go to Step 5.

No. Go to Step 3.

Step 3 Plug the power strip into another electrical outlet.

Is the power strip receiving power?

Yes. The original electrical outlet probably does not function. Use a different electrical outlet.

No. Go to Step 4.

Step 4 Plug a system that you know works into the electrical outlet.

Does the system receive power?

Yes. The power strip is probably not functioning properly. Use another power strip.

No. Go to Step 5.

Step 5 Reconnect the system to the electrical outlet or power strip.

Make sure that all connections fit tightly together.

Step 6 Power up the system.

Is the problem resolved?

Yes. The connections were loose. You have fixed the problem.

No. Call your customer service representative. (See the "Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines" section on page xiv.)


Using the System Diagnostic Programs

The device diagnostic programs are stored in read-only memory (ROM) on the system board. These programs are the primary method of testing the following major components of the device: the system board, Ethernet controller, RAM, serial ports, and hard disk drives. See the "Diagnostic Programs and Error Messages" section.

If you cannot determine whether a problem is caused by the hardware or by the software, you can run the diagnostic programs to confirm that the hardware is working properly.

When you run the diagnostic programs, a single problem might cause several error messages. When this situation occurs, you should correct the cause of the first error message. After the cause of the first error message is corrected, the other error messages might not occur the next time you run the test.

When troubleshooting, note the following points:

If multiple error codes are displayed, diagnose the first error code that is displayed.

If the device stops with a POST error, go to the "POST Error Codes" section.

If the device stops and no error message is displayed, go to the "Undetermined Problems" section.

For power supply problems, see the "Checking the Power Subsystem" section.

For safety information, see Chapter 2, "Preparing to Install the Wide Area Application Engine."

For intermittent problems, check the error log.

This section contains the following topics:

Diagnostic Tools Overview

POST Overview

Diagnostic Programs and Error Messages

Diagnostic Tools Overview

The following tools are available to help you identify and resolve hardware-related problems:

POST beep codes and error messages

The power-on self-test (POST) generates beep codes and messages to indicate successful test completion or the detection of a problem. See the next section, "POST Overview," for more information.

Error log

The POST error log contains the three most recent error codes and messages that the system has generated during POST. The system error log contains all the error messages that were issued during POST.

Diagnostic programs and error messages

The device diagnostic programs are stored in ROM on the system board. These programs are the primary method of testing the major components of your device. See the "Diagnostic Programs and Error Messages" section for more information.

Light Path Diagnostics

Your device has LEDs to help you identify problems with device components. These LEDs are part of the Light Path Diagnostics that are built into your device. By following the path of LEDs, you can quickly identify the type of system error that occurred. See the "Using Light Path Diagnostics" section for more information.

Error symptom charts

These charts list problem symptoms, along with suggested steps to correct the problems. See the "Error Symptoms" section for more information.

POST Overview

When you power up the device, it performs a series of tests to check the operation of device components and some of the hardware options installed in the device. This series of tests is called the power-on self-test, or POST.

If POST finishes without detecting any problems, a single beep sounds, and the first screen of your operating system or application program appears.

If POST detects a problem, more than one beep sounds, and an error message appears on your screen. See the "Beep Symptoms" section and "POST Error Codes" section for more information.


Note If you have a power-up password or administrator password set, you must enter the password and press Enter when prompted, before POST will continue.



Note A single problem might cause several error messages. When this situation occurs, you should correct the cause of the first error message. After you correct the cause of the first error message, the other error messages usually will not occur the next time that you run the test.


The POST error log contains the three most recent error codes and messages that the system generated during POST. The system error log contains all messages issued during POST and all system status messages from the service processor.

You can view the contents of the system error log from the diagnostic programs.

Diagnostic Programs and Error Messages

The device diagnostic programs are stored in ROM on the system board. These programs are the primary method of testing the major components of your device.

Diagnostic error messages indicate that a problem exists; they are not intended to be used to identify a failing part. Troubleshooting and servicing of complex problems that are indicated by error messages should be performed by trained service personnel.

Sometimes the first error to occur causes additional errors. In this case, the device displays more than one error message. Always follow the suggested action instructions for the first error message that appears.

The following sections contain the error codes that might appear in the detailed test log and summary log when the diagnostic programs are run.

The error code format is as follows:

fff-ttt-iii-date-cc-text message

The following are the meanings of the error message elements:

Error Message Element
Explanation

fff

3-digit function code that indicates the function being tested when the error occurred. For example, function code 089 is for the microprocessor.

ttt

3-digit failure code that indicates the exact test failure that was encountered. (These codes are for trained service personnel; see the "Diagnostic Error Codes" section.)

iii

3-digit device ID. (These codes are for trained service personnel; see the "Diagnostic Error Codes" section.)

date

The date that the diagnostic test was run and the error recorded.

cc

Check value that is used to verify the validity of the information.

text message

Message that indicates the reason for the problem.The format is as follows:

Function Name: Result (test-specific string)

where

Function Name is the name of the function being tested when the error occurred. This corresponds to the function code (fff) shown in the error code format in the previous section.

The result can be one of the following:

Passed—This result occurs when the diagnostic test is completed without any errors.

Failed—This result occurs when the diagnostic test discovers an error.

User Aborted—This result occurs when you stop the diagnostic test before it is complete.

Not Applicable—This result occurs when you specify a diagnostic test for a device that is not present.

Aborted—This result occurs when the test could not proceed, for example, because of the system configuration.

Warning—This result occurs when the test could not be run. There was no failure of the hardware that was being tested, but there might be a hardware failure elsewhere, or another problem prevented the test from running. For example, there might be a configuration problem, or the hardware might be missing or is not being recognized.

The test-specific string is additional information that you can use to analyze the problem.


This section contains the following topics:

Starting the Diagnostic Programs

Viewing the Test Log

Viewing Error Logs

Viewing Diagnostic Error Message Tables

Starting the Diagnostic Programs

To start the diagnostic programs, follow these steps:


Step 1 Power up the device and watch the console.


Note To run the diagnostic programs, you must start the device with the highest level password that is set. That is, if an administrator password is set, you must enter the administrator password, not the power-up password, to run the diagnostic programs.


Step 2 Press F2 when this message appears:

F2 for Diagnostics

Step 3 Enter the appropriate password and then press Enter.

Step 4 From the top of the window, choose either Extended or Basic.

Step 5 When the Diagnostic Programs window appears, choose the test that you want to run from the list that appears. Follow the instructions in the window:

Press F1 while running the diagnostic programs to obtain help information. You also can press F1 from within a help window to obtain online documentation from which you can choose different categories. To exit from the help information and return to your last location, press Esc.

If the device stops during testing and you cannot continue, restart the device and try running the diagnostic programs again. If the problem remains, the component that was being tested when the device stopped needs to be replaced.

If you run the diagnostic programs with no mouse attached to your device, you will not be able to navigate between test categories using the Next Cat and Prev Cat buttons. All other functions provided by mouse-selectable buttons are also available using the function keys. You can use the regular keyboard test to test a USB keyboard, and you can use the regular mouse test to test a USB mouse.


Note The WAAS software does not support USB peripheral devices, but you can use these devices with the diagnostic programs.


You can view device configuration information (such as system configuration, memory contents, interrupt request [IRQ] use, direct memory access [DMA] use, device drivers, and so on) by choosing Hardware Info from the top of the window.

If the diagnostic programs do not detect any hardware errors but the problem persists during normal device operations, a software error might be the cause. If you suspect a software problem, see the Cisco WAAS software documentation.


Viewing the Test Log

When the tests are completed, you can view the test log by choosing Utility > View Test Log.


Note You can view the test log only while you are in the diagnostic programs. When you exit the diagnostic programs, the test log is cleared. To save the test log to a file on the hard disk, click Save Log on the diagnostic programs screen and specify a location and name for the saved log file.


Viewing Error Logs

Start the diagnostic programs. Choose Hardware Info > System Error Log, and then follow the instructions in the window.

Viewing Diagnostic Error Message Tables

For descriptions of the error messages that might appear when you run the diagnostic programs, see the "Diagnostic Error Codes" section.


Note Depending on your device configuration, some of the error messages might not appear when you run the diagnostic programs.



Note If diagnostic error messages appear that are not listed in the tables, make sure that your device has the latest levels of BIOS and diagnostics microcode installed.


Checking the Power Subsystem

Power problems can be difficult to solve. For example, a short circuit can exist anywhere on any of the power distribution buses. Usually a short circuit will cause the power subsystem to shut down because of an overcurrent condition.

To perform a general procedure for troubleshooting power problems, follow these steps:


Step 1 Power down the device and disconnect all AC power cords.

Step 2 Check for loose cables in the power subsystem. Also check for short circuits. For example, check if there is a loose screw that is causing a short circuit on a circuit board.

Step 3 Remove adapters and disconnect the cables and power connectors to all internal and external devices until the device is at the minimum configuration required to start it.

Step 4 Reconnect all AC power cords and power up the device. If the device starts up successfully, replace adapters and devices one at a time until the problem is isolated. If the device does not start up from the minimal configuration, replace components of a minimal configuration one at a time until the problem is isolated.


To use this method, it is important to know the minimum configuration required for a system to start. The following are the minimum operating requirements:

One power supply

Power backplane

Power cord

One microprocessor

Two dual inline memory modules (2 GB DIMMs)

Table 6-1 describes the problems that are indicated by various combinations of the AC power-supply LEDs and the power-on LED on the operator information panel and suggested actions to correct the detected problems.

Table 6-1 Power Supply Troubleshooting

AC LED
DC LED
Power-on LED
Description
Action

Off

Off

Off

No power to the device or a problem with the AC power source.

1. Check the AC power to the device.

2. Make sure that the power cord is connected to a functioning power source.

3. Remove one power supply at a time.

Lit

Off

Off

DC source power problem.

1. Remove one power supply at a time.

2. View the system error logs (see the "Viewing Error Logs" section).

Lit

Lit

Off

Standby power problem.

1. View the system error logs (see the "Viewing Error Logs" section).

2. Remove one power supply at a time.

3. Replace the power backplane.

Lit

Lit

Lit

The power is good.

No action is necessary.


Troubleshooting the Ethernet Controller

This section provides troubleshooting information for problems that might occur with the 10/100/1000-Mbps Ethernet controller.

This section contains the following topics:

Network Connection Problems

Ethernet Controller Troubleshooting Chart

Network Connection Problems

If the Ethernet controller cannot connect to the network, check the following conditions:

Make sure that the cable is installed correctly.

The network cable must be securely attached at all connections. If the cable is attached but the problem remains, try a different cable.

If you set the Ethernet controller to operate at either 100 Mbps or 1000 Mbps, you must use Category 5 or higher cabling.

Determine whether the switch or device to which the WAE is connected supports autonegotiation. If it does not, try configuring the integrated Ethernet controller manually to match the speed and duplex mode of the switch.

Check the Ethernet controller LEDs on the device back panel. (See Figure 1-2.)

These LEDs indicate whether a problem exists with the connector, cable, or switch:

The Ethernet link status LED is on when the Ethernet controller receives a link pulse from the switch. If the LED is off, there might be a defective connector or cable or a problem with the switch.

The Ethernet activity LED is on when the Ethernet controller sends or receives data over the Ethernet network. If the Ethernet activity LED is off, make sure that the switch and network are operating and that the correct device drivers are installed.

Make sure that you are using the correct device drivers that are supplied with your device and that the device drivers on the client and the device are using the same protocol.

Check for operating system-specific causes for the problem.

Test the Ethernet controller.

The method used to test the Ethernet controller depends on which operating system that you are using (see the Ethernet controller device driver README files).

Ethernet Controller Troubleshooting Chart

Table 6-2 lists solutions to 10/100/1000-Mbps Ethernet controller problems.

Table 6-2 Ethernet Troubleshooting Chart 

Ethernet Controller Problem
Actions

Ethernet link status LED does not work.

Check the following:

Make sure that the switch to which the WAE is connected is powered on.

Check all connections at the Ethernet controller and the switch.

Use another port on the switch.

If the switch does not support autonegotiation, manually configure the Ethernet controller to match the switch.

If you manually configured duplex mode, make sure that you also manually configure the speed.

Run diagnostics on the LEDs.

Reseat or replace the adapter.

The Ethernet activity LED does not work.

Check the following:

The network might be idle. Try sending data from this device.

Run diagnostics on the LEDs.

Data is incorrect or sporadic.

Check the following:

Make sure that you are using Category 5 or higher cabling when operating the device at 100 Mbps or 1000 Mbps.

Make sure that the cables do not run close to noise-inducing sources such as fluorescent lights.

The Ethernet controller stopped working when another adapter was added to the device.

Check the following:

Make sure that the cable is connected to the Ethernet controller.

Make sure that your PCI system BIOS code is current.

Reseat the adapter.

Determine if the interrupt (IRQ) setting assigned to the Ethernet adapter is also assigned to another device in the system. Use the configuration/setup utility program to determine if this is the case.

Although interrupt sharing is allowed for PCI devices, some devices do not function well when they share an interrupt with a dissimilar PCI device. Try changing the IRQ assigned to the Ethernet adapter or the other device.

Reseat or replace the adapter.

The Ethernet controller stopped working without apparent cause.

Check the following:

Run diagnostics for the Ethernet controller.

Try a different connector on the switch.

Reseat or replace the adapter.


Identifying Problems Using Trouble Indicators and Status LEDs

If the system error LED on the front of the device is on, one or more LEDs inside the device or on the power supply will be on. Your device has LEDs to help you identify problems with some device components. These LEDs are part of the Light Path Diagnostics feature built into the device. By following the path of lights, you can quickly identify the type of system error that occurred.

Your device is designed so that any LEDs that are on remain on when the device shuts down as long as the AC power source is good and the power supply can supply +5 VDC current to the device. This feature helps you isolate the problem if an error causes the device to shut down. (See Table 6-8.)

This section contains the following topics:

Power Supply LEDs

System Error LED

Diagnostic Panel LEDs

Remind Button

Using Light Path Diagnostics

Power Supply LEDs

The AC and DC power LEDs on the power supply provide status information about the power supply. For details, see Table 6-1.

System Error LED

If the system error LED on the operator information panel (see Figure 6-1) is on, one or more LEDs inside the device might be on. Use the Light Path Diagnostic panel (see Figure 6-2) to quickly identify the type of error that occurred. For system board LED locations, see Figure 6-3. For riser-card LED locations, see Figure 6-4.

Figure 6-1 Operator Information Panel

Your device is designed so that LEDs remain on when the device shuts down as long as the power supply is operating properly. This feature helps you to isolate the problem even if an error causes the device to shut down.

Diagnostic Panel LEDs

To view the Light Path Diagnostics panel, slide the latch to the left on the front of the operator information panel and pull the panel forward to reveal the Light Path Diagnostics panel. Lit LEDs on this panel indicate the type of error that has occurred. Note any LEDs that are lit, and then push the Light Path Diagnostics panel back into the device.

Look at the system service label on the top of the device, which gives an overview of internal components that correspond to the LEDs on the Light Path Diagnostics panel.

Figure 6-2 shows the LEDs on the diagnostic panel inside the device. See Table 6-8 for information about identifying problems using these LEDs.

Figure 6-2 Diagnostic Panel LEDs

The Light Path Diagnostics LEDs are described in Table 6-3.

Table 6-3 Diagnostic Panel LEDs 

Diagnostic Panel LED
Description

OVER SPEC

The power supplies are using more power than their maximum rating.

PS1

The power supply in bay 1 failed.

PS2

The power supply in bay 2 failed.

CPU

A microprocessor failed.

VRM

An error occurred on the microprocessor voltage regulator module (VRM).

CNFG

A hardware configuration error has occurred.

MEM

A memory error has occurred.

NMI

A machine check error has occurred.

S ERR

Reserved.

SP

Service processor failure.

DASD

A hard disk drive error has occurred.

RAID

A RAID controller error has occurred.

FAN

A fan has failed, is operating too slowly, or has been removed.

Note: If you have two power supplies installed in the WAE-674, you must have 10 fans installed or the fan error LED will be lit.

TEMP

The system temperature has exceeded a threshold level.

BRD

An error has occurred on the system board.

PCI

An error has occurred on a PCI bus or on the system board.


Figure 6-3 System Board LED Locations

Power channel error LEDs indicate an overcurrent condition. Table 6-4 identifies the components associated with each power channel, and the order in which to troubleshoot the components.

Table 6-4 Power Channel LEDs

Power-Channel Error LED
Components

A

Fan 4, fan 6, fan 8, fan 9, microprocessor 1, system board (integrated voltage regulator)

B

Fan 1, fan 2, fan 3, fan 5, VRM1 , IDE2 CD/DVD cable, IDE CD/DVD media backplane, microprocessor 2, system board

C

ServeRAID SAS controller, DIMMs, system board

D

Low-profile PCI Express adapter (PCI slots 3 and 4), adapter on PCI riser card (PCI slots 1 and 2), system board

1 VRM = Voltage Regulator Module

2 IDE = Integrated Drive Electronics


Figure 6-4 shows the LEDs on the riser card.

Figure 6-4 Riser-Card LED locations

Remind Button

You can use the Remind button on the Light Path Diagnostics panel to place the front panel system error LED into the Remind mode. By pressing the button, you acknowledge the failure but indicate that you will not take immediate action. If a new failure occurs, the system error LED comes on again.

In the Remind mode, the system error LED flashes and remains in the Remind mode until one of the following situations occurs:

All known problems are resolved.

The system is restarted.

A new problem occurs.

You can use the Remind button to delay device maintenance until a later time. Also, resetting the system error LED enables the LED to react to another error. If the LED is still flashing from the first error, it masks additional errors.

Using Light Path Diagnostics

The system error LED on the front of the device is on when certain system errors occur. If the system error LED on your device is on, use Table 6-8 to help determine the cause of the error and the action needed. These actions should only be performed by trained and qualified personnel.

Undetermined Problems

Use the information in this section if the diagnostic tests did not identify the failure, the devices list is incorrect, or the system is inoperative.


Note Damaged data in CMOS can cause undetermined problems.



Note Damaged data in BIOS code can cause undetermined problems.


Check the LEDs on all the power supplies. If the LEDs indicate the power supplies are working correctly, follow these steps:


Step 1 Power down the device.

Step 2 Be sure the device is cabled correctly.

Step 3 Remove or disconnect the following devices (one at a time) until you find the failure (power up the device and reconfigure it each time):

Any external devices

Surge suppressor device (on the device)

Modem, printer, mouse, or non-Cisco devices

Each adapter

Disk drives

Memory modules (minimum requirement = 4 GB; two banks of 2 GB DIMMs)


Note Any component that is internal to the device, with the exception of customer-replaceable adapters, must be serviced by trained and qualified personnel. Contact your customer service representative.


Step 4 Power up the device. If the problem remains, check the following parts in the order listed:

a. Power backplane

b. System board


Note If the problem goes away when you remove an adapter from the system, and replacing that adapter does not correct the problem, check the system board.



Note If you suspect a networking problem and all the system tests pass, check if there is a network cabling problem external to the system.



Problem-Solving Tips

Because of the variety of hardware and software combinations that can be encountered, use the following information to assist you in identifying the problems. If possible, have this information available when requesting technical assistance.

Machine type and model

Microprocessor or hard disk upgrades

Failure symptom

Do diagnostics fail?

What, when, where; single or multiple systems?

Is the failure repeatable?

Has this configuration ever worked?

If it has been working, what changes were made before it failed?

Is this the original reported failure?

Diagnostics type and version level

Hardware configuration

Print (print screen) configuration currently in use

BIOS level

Operating system software type and version level

To eliminate confusion, identical systems are considered identical only if they meet all these conditions:

Are the exact machine type and models

Have the same BIOS level

Have the same adapters or attachments in the same locations

Have the same address jumpers, terminators, and cabling

Have the same software versions and levels

Have the same diagnostics code

Have the same configuration options set in the system

Have the same setup for the operating system control files

Comparing the configuration and software setup in working and nonworking systems might help to resolve the problem.

Symptoms and Solutions

This section lists symptoms, errors, and the possible causes. The most likely cause is listed first. Use this symptom-to-solution index to help you decide which components your service representative needs to have available when servicing the system.

The first column of the three-column tables in this section lists the error code or message, the second column describes the error, and the third column lists one or more suggested actions or components that need to be reseated or replaced. Use the table to identify possible causes for the error message and then call your service representative.

The POST BIOS code displays POST error codes and messages on the screen.

This section includes the following topics:

Beep Symptoms

No Beep Symptoms

System Error LED and the Diagnostic Panel LEDs

Diagnostic Error Codes

Error Symptoms

POST Error Codes

Beep Symptoms

Beep symptoms are short tones or a series of short tones separated by pauses (intervals without sound). See the examples in Table 6-5.

Table 6-5 Beep Examples

Beeps
Description

1-2-3

1. One beep

2. A pause (or break)

3. Two beeps

4. A pause (or break)

5. Three beeps

4

Four continuous beeps


One beep after a successful POST indicates that the system is functioning properly.

Table 6-6 lists the beep symptoms, describes the error, and suggests causes and possible actions to solve the problems. The most likely cause of the symptom is listed first.

Table 6-6 Beep Symptoms 

Beep Symptom
Error
Cause and Action

1-1-2

Microprocessor register test failed.

1. Check the optional microprocessor (if installed).

2. Check the microprocessor.

3. Check the system board.

1-1-3

CMOS1 write/read test failed.

1. Check the battery.

2. Check the system board.

1-1-4

BIOS EEPROM checksum failed.

1. Recover the BIOS.

2. Check the system board.

1-2-1

Programmable interval timer failed.

Check the system board.

1-2-2

DMA2 initialization failed.

Check the system board.

1-2-3

DMA page register write/read failed.

Check the system board.

1-2-4

RAM refresh verification failed.

1. Check the DIMMs.

2. Check the system board.

1-3-1

First 64K RAM test failed.

Check the DIMMs.

2-1-1

Secondary DMA register failed.

Check the system board.

2-1-2

Primary DMA register failed.

Check the system board.

2-1-3

Primary interrupt mask register failed.

Check the system board.

2-1-4

Secondary interrupt mask register failed.

Check the system board.

2-2-1

Interrupt vector loading failed.

Check the system board.

2-2-2

Keyboard3 controller failed.

Not applicable.

2-2-3

CMOS power failure and checksum checks failed.

1. Check the battery.

2. Check the system board.

2-2-4

CMOS configuration information validation failed.

1. Check the battery.

2. Check the system board.

2-3-1

Screen initialization failed.

Check the system board.

2-3-2

Screen memory failed.

Check the system board.

2-3-3

Screen retrace failed.

Check the system board.

2-3-4

Search for video ROM failed.

Check the system board.

2-4-1

Video failed; screen believed operable.

Check the system board.

3-1-1

Timer tick interrupt failed.

Check the system board.

3-1-2

Interval timer channel 2 failed.

Check the system board.

3-1-3

RAM test failed above address OFFFFH.

1. Check the DIMMs.

2. Check the system board.

3-1-4

Time of day clock failed.

1. Check the battery.

2. Check the system board.

3-2-1

Serial port failed.

Check the system board.

3-2-2

Parallel port failed.

Check the system board.

3-2-3

Math coprocessor test failed.

1. Check the microprocessors.

2. Check the system board.

3-2-4

Failure comparing CMOS memory size against actual.

1. Check the DIMMs.

2. Check the battery.

3-3-1

Memory size mismatch occurred.

1. Check the DIMMs.

2. Check the battery.

3-3-2

Critical SMBUS error occurred.

1. Check the power cord connection.

Disconnect the device power cord from the outlet, wait 30 seconds, and retry.

2. Check the DIMMs.

3. Check the hard disk drive backplane.

4. Check the power supply.

5. Check the system board.

3-3-3

No operational memory in system.

1. Check the memory modules.

The memory modules need to be installed or reseated and then a 3-boot reset needs to be performed. Contact your customer service representative.

2. Check the DIMMs.

3. Check the system board.

4-4-4

Optional system management adapter not installed or not functioning correctly.

Pertains to a nonavailable hardware option. Not applicable to the device.

Two short beeps

Information only, the configuration has changed.

1. Run diagnostics.

2. Run the configuration/setup utility program.

Three short beeps

Possible memory problem.

1. Check the DIMM.

2. Check the system board.

One continuous beep

Possible microprocessor problem.

1. Check the microprocessor.

2. Check the optional microprocessor (if installed).

3. Check the system board.

Repeating short beeps

Possible keyboard problem.

This error pertains to keyboards, which are not supported in the WAAS software.

One long and one short beep

Possible video controller problem.

1. Check the video adapter.

2. Check the system board.

One long and two short beeps

Possible video controller problem.

1. Check the video adapter.

2. Check the system board.

One long and three short beeps

Problem with the monitor or video controller.

1. Check the monitor and monitor cable.

2. Check the system board.

Two long and two short beeps

Problem with the optional video adapter.

Not applicable to the device.

1 CMOS = Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor

2 DMA = Direct Memory Access

3 WAAS software does not support keyboards. No keyboard errors are expected; however, if a keyboard error appears during bootup, contact your customer service representative.


No Beep Symptoms

Table 6-7 describes the no beep symptoms.

Table 6-7 No Beep Symptoms 

No Beep Symptom
Error
Cause and Action

No beep and the system operates correctly.

Possible problem with the operator information panel.

1. Check the operator information panel cable.

2. Check the system board.

No beeps occur after POST is successfully completed.

The power-on status is disabled.

1. Run the Configuration/Setup Utility program and choose Start Options. Set the Power-On Status to Enable.

2. Check the operator information panel cable.

3. Check the system board.

No beep and no video.

Unknown problem.

See the "Undetermined Problems" section.

No beep occurs, and the power-supply AC LED is off.

Possible power problem.

1. Check the power cord.

2. Check the power supplies and reseat them. (If two are installed, swap them to determine if one is defective.)

3. Disconnect the cable from the hard disk drive backplane power connector (J13) on the power backplane. If the AC power LED comes on, see the "Undetermined Problems" section.

No beep occurs, the device does not start, and the power-supply AC LED is lit.

Possible power problem.

See the "Checking the Power Subsystem" section.


System Error LED and the Diagnostic Panel LEDs

The system error LED is on when an error is detected. If the system error LED is on, remove the cover and check the diagnostic panel LEDs. Table 6-8 lists all the diagnostic panel LEDs followed by the component or action for correcting the problem. The information in the table is valid only when the system error LED
is on.

When checking the diagnostic panel LEDs, note the following information:

If a diagnostic panel LED is on and the front panel system error LED is off, there is probably an LED problem. Run the LED diagnostics.

To locate the LEDs on the system board, see Figure 6-3.

Check the system error log for additional information before replacing a component. (See the "Viewing Error Logs" section.)

The DIMM error LEDs, microprocessor error LEDs, and VRM error LEDs on the system board go off when the system is powered down.

Table 6-8 provides the diagnostic panel LED error definitions. The third column lists one or more suggested actions or components that need to be reseated or replaced. Use this table to identify possible causes for the error message and then call your customer service representative.

Table 6-8 Diagnostic-Panel LED Error Definitions 

Diagnostic-Panel LED
Description
Cause and Action

None, but the System Error LED is lit.

An error has occurred and cannot be diagnosed, The error is not represented by a light path diagnostics LED.

Use the Configuration/Setup utility program to check the system error log for information about the error. See Appendix C, "Using the Configuration/Setup Utility Program."

OVER SPEC

The power supplies are using more power than their maximum rating.

1. Remove optional devices from the WAE.

2. Replace the failing power supply.

PS1

The power supply in bay 1 has failed.

1. Check the DC good LED on power supply 1. If it is off, power supply 1 needs to be replaced.

2. Check that the power supply is correctly seated.

PS2

The power supply in bay 2 has failed.

1. Check the DC good LED on power supply 2. If it is off, power supply 2 needs to be replaced.

2. Check that the power supply is correctly seated.

CPU

The LED next to the failing CPU is on.

1. Verify that all microprocessors have identical cache sizes, dock speeds, and clock frequencies.

2. Check microprocessor 1 or 2.

3. Check the system board.

VRM

An error occurred on the microprocessor voltage regulator (VRM).

Check the voltage regulator module.

CNFG

A hardware configuration error has occurred.

1. Check the microprocessors just installed to be sure that they are compatible with each other and with the VRM

2. Check the system error logs for information about the error. Replace any components that are indicated. (See the "Viewing Error Logs" section.)

MEM

The LED next to the failing DIMM is on.

Replace the failing DIMM.

NMI

A machine check error has occurred.

Check the system error log. (See the "Viewing Error Logs" section.)

S ERR

Reserved

 

SP

The service processor has failed.

1. Unplug the device for 30 seconds, and then retry.

2. Reflash or update firmware for the BMC.

3. Check the system board.

DASD

A hard disk drive error has occurred.

The error pertains to DASD devices, which are not supported in the WAAS software.

RAID

A RAID controller error has occurred.

1. Check the RAID controller

2. Check the system error log. (See the "Viewing Error Logs" section.)

FAN

A fan has failed, is operating too slowly, or has been removed. The LED next to the failing fan is on. A failing fan can also cause the TEMP LED to be lit.

Replace the failing fan.

TEMP

The temperature has exceeded one of the following thresholds:

The internal temperature for CPU1 or CPU2 has exceeded 207°F (97°C).

The ambient temperature has exceeded 104°F (40°C).

A failing fan can cause the TEMP LED to be lit.

1. The ambient temperature must be within normal operating specifications. See the Appendix A, "Wide Area Application Engine Hardware Specifications."

2. Ensure that fans are operating correctly, and replace one if it has failed.

3. Ensure that the air vents are not blocked.

BRD

An error has occurred on the system board.

1. Check the LEDs on the system board to identify the component that is causing the error.

2. Check the system error log. (See the "Viewing Error Logs" section.)

PCI

An error has occurred on a PCI bus or on the system board. An additional LED will be lit next to a failing PCI slot.

1. Check the LEDs on the PCI slots to identify the component that is causing the error.

2. Check the system error log. (See the "Viewing Error Logs" section.)

3. If you cannot isolate the failing adapter through the LEDs and the information in the system error log, remove one adapter at a time from the failing PCI bus, and restart the device after each adapter is removed.

4. Check the PCI riser card.

5. Check the system board.


Diagnostic Error Codes

In the following error codes, if XXX is 000, 195, or 197, do not replace a component. The descriptions for these error codes are as follows:

000—The test passed.

195—The Esc key was pressed to stop the test.

197—Warning; a hardware failure might not have occurred.

For all remaining error codes, the solution is to check the component or take the action indicated. Table 6-9 lists all the diagnostic error codes. Use this table to identify a faulty component, and then call your customer service representative for assistance.

Table 6-9 Error Code Definitions 

Error Code
Problem
Action

001-XXX-000

Failed core tests.

Check the system board.

001-XXX-001

Failed core tests.

Check the system board.

001-250-000

Failed system board ECC.

Check the system board.

001-250-001

Failed system board ECC.

Check the system board.

005-XXX-000

Failed video test.

1. Reseat the video adapter.

2. Check the system board.

011-XXX-000

Failed COM1 serial port test.

Check the system board.

011-XXX-001

Failed COM2 serial port test.

Check the system board.

014-XXX-000

Failed parallel port test.

Check the system board.

015-XXX-001

USB1 interface not found; board damaged.

Not applicable. The USB interface is not supported in the WAAS software.

015-XXX-015

Failed USB1 external loopback test.

Not applicable. The USB interface is not supported in the WAAS software.

015-XXX-198

USB1 device connected during USB test.

Not applicable. USB peripheral devices are not supported in the WAAS software.

020-XXX-000

Failed PCI interface test.

1. Reseat the riser-card assembly.

2. Check the system board.

030-XXX-099

Failed internal SCSI interface test.

Check the system board.

035-285-001

Adapter Communication Error.

1. Update the ServeRAID SAS controller firmware.

2. Reseat the ServeRAID SAS controller.

3. Replace the ServeRAID SAS controller.

035-286-001

Adapter CPU Test Error.

1. Update the ServeRAID SAS controller firmware.

2. Reseat the ServeRAID SAS controller.

3. Replace the ServeRAID SAS controller.

035-287-001

Adapter Local RAM Test Error.

1. Update the ServeRAID SAS controller firmware.

2. Reseat the ServeRAID SAS controller.

3. Replace the ServeRAID SAS controller.

035-288-001

Adapter NVSRAM Test Error.

1. Update the ServeRAID SAS controller firmware.

2. Reseat the ServeRAID SAS controller.

3. Replace the ServeRAID SAS controller.

035-289-001

Adapter Cache Test Error.

1. Update the ServeRAID SAS controller firmware.

2. Reseat the ServeRAID SAS controller.

3. Replace the ServeRAID SAS controller.

035-292-001

Adapter Parameter Set Error.

1. Update the ServeRAID SAS controller firmware.

2. Reseat the ServeRAID SAS controller.

3. Replace the ServeRAID SAS controller.

035-230-001

Battery Low.

Replace the battery module on the ServeRAID SAS controller.

035-231-001

Abnormal Battery Temperature.

Replace the battery module on the ServeRAID SAS controller.

035-231-001

Battery Status Unknown.

Replace the battery module on the ServeRAID SAS controller.

089-XXX-00n

Failed microprocessor test.

n = APIC ID for failing microprocessor:

0, 1, 2, 3 = microprocessor 1

4, 5, 6, 7 = microprocessor 2

Check the microprocessor.

166-250-000

System Management: Failed. I2C cable is disconnected.

1. Check the I2C cable between the operator information panel assembly and the system board.

2. Check the system board.

166-400-000

System Management: Failed. BMC self-test failed.

1. Reflash or update firmware to the latest level.

2. Check the system board.

166-404-001

System Management: Failed. BMC indicates failure in I2C bus test.

1. Disconnect all power cords and external cables from the device, wait 30 seconds, reconnect, and retry.

2. Reflash or update firmware to the latest level.

3. Reseat the power backplane.

4. Check the system board.

166-406-001

System Management: Failed. BMC indicates failure in I2C bus test.

1. Disconnect all power cords and external cables from the device, wait 30 seconds, reconnect, and retry.

2. Reflash or update firmware to the latest level.

3. Reseat the hard disk drive signal cable and backplane.

4. Check the system board.

166-407-001

System Management: Failed. BMC indicates failure in I2C bus test.

1. Disconnect all power cords and external cables from the device, wait 30 seconds, reconnect, and retry.

2. Reflash or update firmware to the latest level.

3. Reseat the operator information panel cable.

4. Check the system board.

166-nnn-001

System Management: Failed. nnn indicates the failure type:

300 to 320: Self-test failure

400 to 420 (excluding 412, 414, and 415): I2C bus test failure

1. Disconnect all power cords and external cables from the device, wait 30 seconds, reconnect, and retry.

2. Reflash or update firmware to the latest level.

3. Check the system board.

166-412-001

System Management: Failed. I2C bus failure.

1. Disconnect all power cords and external cables from the device, wait 30 seconds, reconnect, and retry.

2. Reflash or update firmware to the latest level.

3. Reseat the power backplane.

4. Check the system board.

166-414-001

System Management: Failed. I2C bus failure.

1. Disconnect all power cords and external cables from the device, wait 30 seconds, reconnect, and retry.

2. Reflash or update firmware to the latest level.

3. Reseat the hard disk drive signal cable.

4. Check the system board.

166-415-001

System Management: Failed. I2C bus failure.

1. Disconnect all power cords and external cables from the device, wait 30 seconds, reconnect, and retry.

2. Reflash or update firmware to the latest level.

3. Reseat the operator information panel cable.

4. Check the system board.

180-XXX-000

Diagnostics LED failure.

Run diagnostic panel LED test for the failing LED.

180-XXX-001

Failed front LED panel test.

1. Reseat the operator information panel cable.

2. Check the system board.

180-XXX-002

Failed diagnostic LED panel test.

1. Reseat the operator information panel cable.

2. Check the system board.

180-361-003

Failed fan LED test.

1. Reseat the fan(s).

2. Check the system board.

180-XXX-003

Failed system board LED test.

Check the system board.

180-XXX-005

Failed hard disk drive backplane LED test.

1. Reseat the hard disk drive backplane cable and backplane.

2. Check the system board.

201-XXX-0nn

Failed memory test.

nn = slot number of failing DIMM.

1. Replace the DIMM in the slot identified by nn.

2. Check the system board.

201-XXX-n99

Multiple DIMM failure; see error text.

n = the number of the failing pair of DIMMs.

1. See the error text to identify the failing DIMM pair and replace it.

2. Check the system board.

202-XXX-00n

Failed system cache test.

n = APIC ID for failing microprocessor:

0, 1, 2, 3 = microprocessor 1

4, 5, 6, 7 = microprocessor 2

1. Reflash or update firmware to the latest level.

2. Check VRM if n = 4, 5, 6, or 7.

3. Check the indicated microprocessor.

215-XXX-000

Failed CD-RW/DVD drive test.

1. Run the test again with a different CD-RW/DVD drive.

2. Reseat the CD-ROM drive.

3. Reseat the operator information panel assembly.

217-198-XXX

Could not establish drive parameters.

1. Check the hard disk drive signal cable.

2. Reseat the hard disk drive.

3. Check the hard disk drive backplane.

4. Check the hard disk drive.

217-XXX-00n

Failed fixed disk test.

n is the number of the failed drive. The hard disk drive numbers are on the front bezel.

1. Reseat the hard disk drive indicated by n.

2. Replace the hard disk drive indicated by n.

301-XXX-000

Failed keyboard2 test.

After installing a USB keyboard, you might have to use the Configuration/Setup Utility program to enable keyboardless operation and prevent the POST error message 301 from being displayed during startup.

1. Reseat the keyboard cable.

2. Check the system board.

405-XXX-000

Failed Ethernet test on Ethernet controller.

1. Verify that Ethernet is not disabled in the BIOS.

2. Check the system board.

405-XXX-00n

Failed Ethernet test on adapter in PCI slot n.

1. Check the adapter in PCI slot n.

2. Check the system board.

1 USB = Universal Serial Bus. The WAAS software does not support USB peripheral devices.

2 The WAAS software does not support keyboards. No keyboard errors are expected; however, if a keyboard error appears during bootup, contact your customer service representative.


Error Symptoms

You can use the error symptom tables to find solutions to problems that have definite symptoms.

If you cannot find the problem in the error symptom tables, go to the "Starting the Diagnostic Programs" section to test the device.

If you have just added new software or a new hardware option and your device is not working, complete the following steps before using the error symptom tables:


Step 1 Remove the software or hardware option that you just added.

Step 2 Run the diagnostic tests to determine if your device is running correctly.

Step 3 Reinstall the new software or new hardware option.


In the following tables (Table 6-10 to Table 6-19), the first entry in the "Cause and Action" column is the most likely cause of the symptom.

Table 6-10 CD-RW/DVD Drive Problems 

Symptom
Cause and Action

CD-RW/DVD drive is not recognized.

1. Verify the following items:

a. The IDE channel to which the CD-RW/DVD drive is attached (primary) is enabled in the configuration/setup utility program.

b. All cables and jumpers are installed correctly.

c. The correct device driver is installed for the CD-RW/DVD drive.

2. Run the CD-RW/DVD drive diagnostic programs.

3. Check the CD-RW/DVD drive.

The CD-RW/DVD drive is not working correctly.

1. Clean the CD or DVD.

2. Run the CD-RW/DVD drive diagnostic programs.

3. Check the CD-RW/DVD drive.

The CD-RW/DVD drive tray is not working.

1. Make sure that the device is turned on.

2. Insert the end of a straightened paper clip into the manual tray-release opening.

3. Check the CD-RW/DVD drive.


Table 6-11 Hard Disk Drive Problems 

Symptom
Cause and Action

Not all drives are recognized by the hard disk drive diagnostic test (fixed disk test).

1. Remove the first drive not recognized and try the hard disk drive diagnostic test again.

2. If the remaining drives are recognized, the drive that you removed needs to be replaced.

System stops responding during hard disk drive diagnostic test.

1. Remove the hard disk drive being tested when the device stopped responding and try the diagnostic test again.

2. If the hard disk drive diagnostic test runs successfully, the drive that you removed needs to be replaced.

A hard disk drive was not detected while the operating system was being started.

Reseat all hard disk drives and cables. Run the hard disk drive diagnostic tests again.

A hard disk drive passes the diagnostic Fixed Disk Test, but the problem remains.

Run the diagnostic SCSI Attached Disk Test.


Table 6-12 General Problems

Symptom
Cause and Action

Problems such as broken cover locks or indicator LEDs not working.

Broken component. Call your customer service representative.


Table 6-13 Intermittent Problems 

Symptom
Cause and Action

A problem occurs only occasionally and is difficult to detect.

1. Verify the following items:

a. All cables and cords are connected securely to the rear of the device and attached hardware options.

b. When the device is powered on, air is flowing from the rear of the device at the fan grille. If there is no airflow, the fans are not working. This causes the device to overheat and shut down.

2. Check the system error log.

3. See the "Undetermined Problems" section.


Table 6-14 Memory Problems 

Symptom
Cause and Action

The amount of system memory displayed is less than the amount of physical memory installed.

1. Verify the following items:

a. No error LEDs are lit on the operator information panel.

b. The memory modules are seated properly.

c. The correct type of memory has been installed.

d. All banks of memory on the DIMMs are enabled. The device might have automatically disabled a DIMM bank when it detected a problem, or a DIMM bank could have been manually disabled.

2. Check the POST error log for error message 289:

a. If the DIMM was disabled by a system management interrupt (SMI), the DIMM needs to be replaced. Have the system serviced.

b. If the DIMM was disabled by the user or by POST, follow these steps:

Start the configuration/setup utility program.

Enable the DIMM.

Save the configuration and restart the device.

3. Run the memory diagnostics.

4. Check the DIMM.

5. Check the system board.


Table 6-15 Microprocessor Problems 

Symptom
Cause and Action

The device emits a continuous tone during POST, indicating that the microprocessor is not working correctly.

1. Correct any errors that are indicated by the LEDs (see the "Diagnostic Panel LEDs" section).

2. Check the microprocessor and the VRM.


Table 6-16 Hardware Option Problems 

Symptom
Cause and Action

A hardware option that was just installed does not work.

1. Verify the following items:

a. The hardware option is designed for the device.

b. You followed the installation instructions that came with the hardware option.

c. The hardware option is installed correctly.

d. You have not loosened any other installed hardware options or cables.

e. You updated the configuration information in the configuration/setup utility program. Whenever a hardware option is changed, you must update the configuration.

2. Check the hardware option that you just installed.

A hardware option that used to work does not work now.

1. Verify that all of the hardware options and cable connections are secure.

2. If the hardware option comes with its own test instructions, use those instructions to test the option.

3. Check for a failing hardware option and replace it if necessary.


Table 6-17 Power Problems 

Symptom
FRU or Action

The power-control button does not work, and the reset button does not work (the device does not start).

Note The power-control button will not function until 20 seconds after the device has been connected to power.

1. Verify the following items:

a. The power cables are properly connected to the device.

b. The electrical outlet functions properly.

c. The type of memory installed is correct.

d. The LEDs on the power supply do not indicate a problem (see the "Power Supply LEDs" section).

2. Make sure that the power-control button and the reset button are working correctly:

a. Disconnect the device power cords.

b. Reseat the operator information panel assembly cable.

c. Reconnect the power cords.

d. Press the power-control button to restart the device. If the button does not work, replace the operator information panel assembly.

e. Press the reset button (on the Light Path Diagnostics panel) to restart the device. If the button does not work, replace the operator information panel assembly.

3. If you just installed a hardware option, remove it, and restart the device.

4. Reseat the power backplane and restart the device.

5. Check the power backplane and the hot-swap power supplies.

6. See the "Checking the Power Subsystem" section and the "Undetermined Problems" section.

The OVER SPEC LED on the Light Path Diagnostics panel is lit, and the power channel A LED on the system board is lit.

1. Remove fans 4, 6, 8, and 9 and restart the device. If the OVER SPEC and power channel LEDs are still lit, do the following:

a. Check the hot-swap power supplies, replacing them one at a time. Restart the device each time that you reinstall a power supply.

b. Check the power backplane.

c. Check the system board.

2. Reinstall the fans listed in Step 1, one at a time, in the order shown. Restart the device each time that you reinstall a fan. If the power channel A LED is lit, the component that you just reinstalled is defective. Replace the defective component.

The OVER SPEC LED on the Light Path Diagnostics panel is lit, and the power channel B LED on the system board is lit.

1. Remove fans 1, 2, 3, 5, and the IDE CD/DVD cable, and restart the device. If the OVER SPEC and power channel LEDs are still lit, do the following:

a. Check the hot-swap power supplies, replacing them one at a time. Restart the device each time that you reinstall a power supply.

b. Check the power backplane.

c. Check the system board.

2. Reinstall the IDE CD/DVD cable and drive and restart the device. If the OVER SPEC and power channel LEDs are still off, replace the CD-RW/DVD drive.

3. Reinstall the components listed in Step 1, one at a time, in the order shown. Restart the device each time that you reinstall a component. If the power channel B LED is lit, the component that you just reinstalled is defective. Replace the defective component.

The OVER SPEC LED on the Light Path Diagnostics panel is lit, and the power channel C LED on the system board is lit.

1. Remove the DIMMs and the ServerRAID SAS controller, and restart the device. If the OVER SPEC and power channel LEDs are still lit, do the following:

a. Check the hot-swap power supplies, replacing them one at a time. Restart the device each time that you reinstall a power supply.

b. Check the power backplane.

c. Check the system board.

2. Restart the device. If the OVER SPEC and power channel LEDs are off, reinstall the DIMMs, one pair at a time. Restart the device each time that you reinstall a DIMM. If the power channel C LED is lit, the pair of DIMMs that you just reinstalled is defective. Replace the defective DIMMs.

3. Reinstall the ServeRAID SAS controller and restart the device. If the OVER SPEC and power channel LEDs are off, replace the ServeRAID SAS controller.

The OVER SPEC LED on the Light Path Diagnostics panel is lit, and the power channel D LED on the system board is lit.

1. Remove all PCI adapters (the low-profile PCI Express adapters in PCI slots 3 and 4, and the adapters on the PCI riser card in PCI slots 1 and 2). If the OVER SPEC and power channel LEDs are still lit, do the following:

a. Check the hot-swap power supplies, replacing them one at a time. Restart the device each time that you reinstall a power supply.

b. Check the power backplane.

c. Check the system board.

2. Reinstall the adapters, one at a time. Restart the device each time that you reinstall an adapter. If the power channel D LED is lit, the adapter that you just reinstalled is defective. Replace the defective adapter.

The device does not power down.

1. Turn off the device by pressing the power-control button for 5 seconds.

2. Restart the device.

3. If the device fails POST and the power-control button does not work, disconnect the power cord for 20 seconds. Reconnect the power cord and restart the device.

4. If the problem remains, check the system board.

The device unexpectedly shuts down, and the LEDs on the operator information panel are not lit.

See the "Undetermined Problems" section.


Table 6-18 Serial Port Problems 

Symptom
FRU or Action

A serial device does not work. For more information about the serial port, see the "Serial Port Connector" section on page 1-8.

1. Verify the following items:

a. The device is compatible with the WAE.

b. The serial port is enabled and is assigned a unique address.

c. The device is connected to the correct port (see the "Location of Ports and Connectors" section on page 1-7).

2. Check for a failing serial device.

3. Check the system board.


Table 6-19 Software Problems

Symptom
Cause and Action

Suspected software problem.

1. To determine if problems are caused by the software, verify the following items:

a. Your device has the minimum memory needed to use the software. For memory requirements, see the information that comes with the software.

Note If you have just installed an adapter or memory, you might have a memory address conflict.

b. The software is designed to operate on your device.

c. Other software works on your device.

d. The software that you are using works on another device.

2. If you received any error messages when using the software program, see the information that comes with the software for a description of the messages and suggested solutions to the problem.


POST Error Codes

In the error codes in Table 6-20, X can be any number or letter.

Table 6-20 POST Error Codes 

Error Code
Symptom
Cause and Action

062

Three consecutive startup failures using the default configuration.

1. Run the configuration/setup utility program.

2. Check the battery.

3. Check the microprocessor.

4. Check the system board.

101, 102

System and processor error.

Check the system board.

106

System and processor error.

Check the system board.

151

Real-time clock error.

1. Check the battery.

2. Check the system board.

161

Real-time clock battery error.

1. Check the battery.

2. Check the system board.

162

Device configuration error.

1. Run the Configuration/Setup Utility program, choose Load Default Settings, and save the settings.

2. Check the battery.

3. Check for failing device.

4. Check the system board.

163

Real-time clock error (time of day not set).

1. Run the Configuration/Setup Utility program, choose Load Default Settings, make sure that the date and time are correct, and save the settings.

2. Check the battery.

3. Check the system board.

175

Hardware error.

Check the system board.

184

Power-on password damaged.

1. Restart the device and enter the administrator password; then, run the Configuration/Setup Utility program, choose Load Default Settings, and save the settings.

2. Check the battery.

3. Check the system board.

187

VPD serial number not set.

Check the system board.

189

An attempt was made to access the device with invalid passwords.

Check your passwords.

289

DIMM disabled by POST or user.

Check for a disabled DIMM, if not disabled by the user.

301

Keyboard1 or keyboard controller error.

1. Reseat the keyboard cable in the USB connector.

2. Move the keyboard cable to a different USB connector.

3. Check the keyboard

4. Check the internal USB cable.

5. Check the system board.

303

Keyboard1controller error.

1. Reseat the keyboard cable in the USB connector.

2. Check the keyboard.

3. Check the system board.

1600

The service processor is not functioning.

Not applicable.

178X

Fixed disk error. (x is the drive that has the error.)

1. Run the hard disk drive diagnostic tests on drive x.

2. Check the hard disk drive.

3. Check the cable from the system board to the backplane.

4. Check the system board.

1800

No more hardware interrupts available for PCI adapter.

Check for failing adapter.

1801

An adapter has requested memory resources that are not available.

1. Check for failing adapter.

2. Check the system board.

1805

PCI option ROM checksum error.

1. Remove the adapter.

2. Reseat the adapter.

3. Reseat the riser card.

4. Check the adapter.

5. Check the riser.

6. Check the system board.

1810

PCI error.

1. Reseat the adapter.

2. Reseat the riser card.

3. Check the riser.

4. Check the system board.

1962

Drive does not contain a valid boot sector.

1. Verify that a startable operating system is installed.

2. Run the hard disk drive diagnostics.

3. Check the hard disk drive.

4. Check the hard disk drive backplane cable.

5. Check the hard disk drive backplane.

6. Check the system board.

00012000

Processor machine check error.

1. Check the microprocessor.

2. Check the system board.

00019701

Microprocessor 1 failed.

1. Check microprocessor 1.

2. Check the system board.

01298001

No update data for microprocessor 1.

Check microprocessor 1.

01298101

Bad update data for microprocessor 1.

Check microprocessor 1.

19990301

Hard disk drive boot sector error.

1. Check the hard disk drive.

2. Check the hard disk drive backplane cable.

3. Check the hard disk drive backplane.

4. Check the system board.

19990305

Hard disk sector error, no operating system installed.

Install the WAAS software on the hard disk.

19990650

AC power has been restored.

1. Check the power cable.

2. Check for interruption of power.

1 The WAAS software does not support keyboards. No keyboard errors are expected; however, if a keyboard error appears during bootup, contact your customer service representative.