Cisco Wide Area Application Engine 7326 Hardware Installation Guide
Chapter 1 - Introducing the Cisco Wide Area Application Engine
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Introducing the Cisco Wide Area Application Engine

Table Of Contents

Introducing the Cisco Wide Area Application Engine

Introduction

Software Functional Description

WAAS Software Description

ACNS Software Description

WAFS Software Description

Hardware Features

Front Panel Control Buttons

LED Indicators

Input/Output Ports and Connectors

Ethernet Port Connectors

Serial Port Connector

Ultra320 SCSI Controller System Board Connectors

Fibre Channel Connector

Inline Network Adapter Description

Form and Function

Ports and LED Indicators

Inline Network Adapter Cabling Requirements

Installation Scenarios and Cabling Examples for Fast Ethernet Connections


Introducing the Cisco Wide Area Application Engine


This chapter provides a basic functional overview of the Cisco Wide Area Application Engine 7326 (WAE-7326), and describes the hardware, major components, and front and back panel indicators and controls.

This chapter contains the following sections:

Introduction

Software Functional Description

Hardware Features

Introduction

The Wide Area Application Engine (WAE-7326) supports three different software installations that provide a comprehensive set of services for the remote office: Cisco Wide Area Application Services (WAAS) software, Cisco Wide Area File System (WAFS) software and Cisco Application and Content Networking System (ACNS) software.

The following software releases support the WAE-7326 appliance:

WAAS 4.0.1 and later

WAFS 3.0 and later

ACNS 5.3.3 and later

When WAAS software is installed, the WAE appliance can function as either a Central Manager or as an Application Acceleration Engine. When ACNS software is installed, the WAE appliance functions as a Content Engine or one of the other ACNS device modes (Content Router or Content Distribution Manager). When WAFS software is installed, the WAE appliance functions as a File Engine. (See Figure 1-1.)

Figure 1-1 Wide Area Application Engine 7326—Front View

The WAE-7326 has a baseboard management controller that provides environmental monitoring for the appliance. If environmental conditions exceed thresholds or if system components fail, LEDs on the baseboard management indicate the problem. The error log also lists all critical errors. The baseboard management controller also provides remote server management capabilities through the OSA SMBridge management utility program.


Note The baseboard management controller is also known as the service processor.


The WAE-7326 includes two integrated Broadcom Gigabit Ethernet controllers, which support connection to a 10-Mbps, 100-Mbps, or 1000-Mbps network.

The WAE includes large data-storage and hot-swap capability. The WAE-7326 supports up to six 25.4 mm (1-inch) slim, 3.5-inch hot-swap hard disk drives installed on Ultra-Slim hard disk drive trays in the hot-swap bays. With the hot-swap feature, you can add, remove, or replace hard disk drives without powering down the appliance.


Note The WAE-7326 hardware supports installing (hot-swapping) hard disk drives without powering off the device. However, Cisco software applications that run on the WAE-7326 appliance do not support hot-swapping. You must reload the WAE appliance before the software recognizes the new hard disk drives.


The Active Memory feature of your WAE-7326 improves the reliability of memory through memory mirroring and online spare memory. Memory mirroring stores data in two pairs of DIMMs simultaneously. Online spare memory disables a failed pair of DIMMs from the system configuration and activates a pair of online spare memory DIMMs.

Your WAE also includes a large system-memory capacity. The memory bus supports up to 16 GB of system memory. The memory controller supports error correcting code (ECC) for up to eight industry-standard, 1.8 V, 240-pin, double-data rate (DDR) II, PC3200, registered SDRAM DIMMs.

The addition of an optional network interface card (NIC) in the WAE-7326 provides a failover capability to a redundant Ethernet connection. If a problem occurs with the primary Ethernet connection, all Ethernet traffic associated with this primary connection is automatically switched to the redundant Ethernet connection. If the applicable device drivers are installed, this switching occurs without data loss and without user intervention.

The WAE-7326 supports up to two Intel Xeon microprocessors. If the appliance comes with only one microprocessor, you can install an additional microprocessor to enhance performance and provide symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) capability.

Software Functional Description

The operation of the WAE is dependent on the software application that is installed on it. This section describes WAAS, ACNS and WAFS software:

WAAS Software Description

ACNS Software Description

WAFS Software Description

WAAS Software Description

With WAAS software installed, the WAE appliance functions as either a WAAS Central Manager or a WAAS Application Acceleration Engine. The WAAS Central Manager provides a graphical user interface to monitor and configure all Acceleration Engines. The WAAS Acceleration Engine is deployed in remote branch offices and in the data center to accelerate TCP applications that access data across the network.

The Application Acceleration Engine functionality operates at different levels based on the software licenses purchased. WAAS 4.x, software offers the WAAS Transport License or the WAAS Enterprise License options.

Cisco WAAS software helps enterprises meet the following objectives:

Provide branch office employees with LAN-like access to information and applications across a geographically distributed network.

Migrate application and file servers from branch offices into centrally managed data centers.

Minimize unnecessary WAN bandwidth consumption through the use of advanced compression algorithms.

Provide print services to branch office users. Cisco WAAS allows you to configure a WAE as a print server so you do not need to deploy a dedicated system to fulfill print requests.

Improve application performance over the WAN by addressing the following common issues:

Low data rates (constrained bandwidth)

Slow delivery of frames (high network latency)

Higher rates of packet loss (low reliability)

ACNS Software Description

With ACNS software installed, the WAE appliance functions as a Content Distribution Manager, Content Engine, or Content Router. The Content Distribution Manager provides a graphical user interface to manage registered Content Engines and Content Routers. The ACNS solution addresses the need to distribute and receive high-bandwidth, media-rich content across the Internet or an intranet without performance losses or content-delivery delays.

ACNS software offers the following content-based services:

Content caching and hosting

Proxy services

Content replication

Video streaming

In Content Engine mode, the WAE operates either as a component of an ACNS network or as a standalone content-caching device and is generally positioned on the WAN edge between your enterprise network and the Internet.


Note The WAE-7326 supports device-mode configuration and can be configured with ACNS 5.x software to operate as a Content Engine, a Content Router, a Content Distribution Manager, or an IP/TV Program Manager.


To deploy Cisco Content Engines with Cisco ACNS software within your existing network, your network must support Cisco IOS software and the Web Cache Communication Protocol (WCCP). WCCP transparently redirects HTTP requests to a Content Engine, and the Content Engine responds to those requests.

WAFS Software Description

With WAFS software installed, the WAE appliance functions as a File Engine. The File Engine is an Internet file delivery device that provides the following file-based services:

Segment-level file and metadata caching

Protocol-specific latency reduction

WAN transport-level optimization

Policy-based prepositioning

Global locking and coherency

Native end-to-end CIFS/NFS support

Web-based centralized control and management

Branch file server replacement

Hardware Features

This section illustrates and describes the front and back panel controls, ports, and LED indicators on the WAE-7326. It contains the following topics:

Front Panel Control Buttons

LED Indicators

Input/Output Ports and Connectors

Inline Network Adapter Description

Figure 1-2 shows the WAE-7326 front panel controls and LEDs.

Figure 1-2 Wide Area Application Engine 7326 Front Panel

1

Rack release latch

6

Release latch

2

Hard disk drive activity LED

7

Disk drive activity LED

3

Hard disk drive status LED

8

DVD-ROM drive activity LED

4

Operator information panel

9

DVD-ROM drive eject button

5

Disk eject button

   

Front Panel Control Buttons

Table 1-1 describes the front panel control buttons.

Table 1-1 Front Panel Control Buttons 

Item
 
Description
4

Power control button (Operator information panel)

Powers up and powers down the system. A power control button shield comes installed on the system to prevent it from being powered-down accidentally.

5

Disk eject button

Releases a disk from the disk drive.

8

DVD eject button

Releases a DVD from the DVD-ROM drive.


LED Indicators

Table 1-2 describes the front panel LEDs and their functions.

Table 1-2 Front Panel LEDs 

LED
 
Color
State
Description
2

Hard disk drive activity

Green

Flashing

Hard disk drive is in use.

3

Hard disk drive status

Amber

On

Drive has failed.

Flashing slowly (One flash per second)

Drive is being rebuilt.

Flashing rapidly (Three flashes per second)

Controller is identifying the drive.

4

Operator information panel:

System-error

Information

System locator


SCSI activity

Power-on


Green

Green

Green


Green

Green


On

On

On


On

On
Flashing

Off


System error has occurred.

Noncritical error has occurred.

Visually locates appliance among other appliances.

There is activity on the SCSI or IDE bus.

Appliance is powered on.
Appliance is powered off and still connected to an AC power source.
AC power is not present. Power supply or LED has failed.

7

Disk drive activity

Green

On

Disk drive is in use.

8

DVD-ROM drive activity

Green

On

DVD-ROM drive is in use.


Figure 1-3 shows the location of back panel LEDs and connectors, and Table 1-3 describes the LED functions.

Figure 1-3 Back Panel LEDs and Connectors

1

Ethernet link status LED

7

Power cord connector and LED

2

Ethernet activity LED

8

USB connectors (not supported)

3

System locator LED

9

Video connector (not supported)

4

ASM connector (not supported)

10

Mouse connector1

5

Remote Supervisor Adapter II connector (not supported)

11

Keyboard connector1

6

SCSI connector

12

Serial port connector

1 Not required for normal operation. Can be used for troubleshooting purposes.


Table 1-3 Back Panel LEDs 

LED
 
Color
State
Description
1

Ethernet link status

Green

On

Active link connection on the 10BASE-T, 100BASE-TX, or 1000BASE-TX interface for the Ethernet port.

2

Ethernet activity

Green

On

Server is transmitting to or receiving signals from the Ethernet LAN that is connected to the Ethernet port.

3

System locator

Green

On

Visually locate the device among other devices.

7

AC Power

Green

On

AC power supply is on. During typical operation, both the AC and the DC power LEDs are on.


Figure 1-4 shows LEDs for the Fibre Channel adapter card, and Table 1-4 describes their function.

Figure 1-4 Fibre Channel Adapter LEDs


Note On the adapter, the top LED is green, and the bottom LED is amber.


Table 1-4 Fibre Channel Adapter LEDs 

LED
State
Description

Green

Amber

On

On

Power is on.

Green

Amber

On

Off

Fibre Channel adapter is on line.

Green

Amber

Off

On

Signal has been acquired. (The Fibre Channel adapter firmware is performing or waiting to perform Fibre Channel loop initialization.)

Green

Amber

Off

Flashing

Loss of synchronization.

Green

Amber

Flashing

Flashing

Firmware error.


Input/Output Ports and Connectors

Your WAE appliance supports the following I/O connectors on the front and back of the device:

Two Ethernet

One serial

One Ultra320 SCSI controller (LVD) SCSI


Warning To avoid electric shock, do not connect safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits to telephone-network voltage (TNV) circuits. LAN ports contain SELV circuits, and WAN ports contain TNV circuits. Some LAN and WAN ports both use RJ-45 connectors. Use caution when connecting cables. Statement 1021


Figure 1-5 shows the WAE appliance back panel ports and connectors.


Note The Fibre Channel adapter is supported in PCI slot 3.


Figure 1-5 Back Panel Connectors and LEDs

1

Ethernet connector

7

Power cord connector and LED

2

Ethernet connector

8

USB connectors (not supported)

3

System locator LED

9

Video connector (not supported)

4

ASM connector (not supported)

10

Mouse connector (not supported)

5

Remote Supervisor Adapter II connector (not supported)

11

Keyboard connector (not supported)

6

SCSI connector

12

Serial port connector



Warning To avoid electric shock, do not connect safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits to telephone-network voltage (TNV) circuits. LAN ports contain SELV circuits, and WAN ports contain TNV circuits. Some LAN and WAN ports both use RJ-45 connectors. Use caution when connecting cables. Statement 1021


Ethernet Port Connectors

Connect a Category 3, 4, or 5 unshielded twisted-pair cable to this connector. 100BASE-TX and 1000BASE-T Fast Ethernet standards require Category 5 or higher cabling.

The WAE-7326 has three Ethernet connectors. Two of the Ethernet connectors are attached to the Ethernet controllers. The Ethernet controllers are integrated on the system board. They provide an interface for connecting to a 10-Mbps, 100-Mbps, or 1-Gbps network and provide full-duplex (FDX) capability, which enables simultaneous transmission and reception of data on the network. If the Ethernet ports in the server support auto-negotiation, the controllers detect the data-transfer rate (10BASE-T, 100BASE-TX, or 1000BASE-T) and duplex mode (full-duplex or half-duplex) of the network and automatically operate at that rate and mode. You do not have to set any jumpers or configure the controllers. However, you must install a device driver to enable the operating system to address the controllers.

The third Ethernet connector is the Remote Supervisor Adapter II SlimLine Ethernet connector. Use this connector to enable remote server management through a network. This connector is active only if an optional Remote Supervisor Adapter II SlimLine is installed.

Figure 1-6 Ethernet Port Connector

Serial Port Connector

Your WAE has one serial port connector. Use the serial port connector to connect a serial device.

Figure 1-7 Serial Port Connector

Ultra320 SCSI Controller System Board Connectors

The WAE-7326 has one SCSI LVD port connector located on the back panel. The integrated dual-channel SCSI controller with integrated RAID supports two independent Ultra320 SCSI channels: one external and one internal. Each channel supports up to 15 SCSI devices. You can use the external LVD SCSI channel connector on the rear of the server to connect different types of SCSI devices, such as drives or printers.

This controller uses the following features to perform these actions:

Double-transition clocking to achieve up to 320 MB-per-second data-transfer rates.

Domain-name validation to negotiate compatible data-transfer speeds with each device.

Cyclic redundancy checking (CRC), instead of the usual parity checking, to improve data reliability.

An active terminator for SCSI bus termination.

The WAE-7326 has one SCSI cable, which connects the internal connector on the system board to the standard hot-swap-drive backplane. If you plan to attach external SCSI devices, you must order additional cables. To select and order the correct cables for use with external devices, contact your Cisco marketing representative or authorized reseller.

SCSI IDs

Each SCSI device that is connected to a SCSI controller must have a unique SCSI ID. This ID enables the SCSI controller to identify the device and ensures that different devices on the same SCSI channel do not attempt to transfer data simultaneously. SCSI devices that are connected to different SCSI channels can have duplicate SCSI IDs. Table 1-5 lists the SCSI IDs for the hard disk drives and backplanes that are connected to one channel.

Table 1-5 SCSI IDs  

Device
SCSI ID

Drive bay 1

0

Drive bay 2

1

Drive bay 3

2

Drive bay 4

3

Drive bay 5

4

Drive bay 6

5

Controller

7

Backplane

8


Figure 1-8 shows a connector that conforms to the SCSI standard.

Figure 1-8 SCSI Connector

Fibre Channel Connector

The Fibre Channel connector is an LC-style connector that supports non-OFC, multimode fiber-optic cabling using a small form factor (SFF) fiber-optic transceiver module. The Fibre Channel adapter uses LC-LC Fibre Channel cables. Total cable length cannot exceed 1640 feet (500 meters). Fibre Channel cables are not supplied by Cisco Systems.

Inline Network Adapter Description

This section describes the following features of the WAE inline network adapter:

Form and Function

Ports and LED Indicators

Inline Network Adapter Cabling Requirements

Installation Scenarios and Cabling Examples for Fast Ethernet Connections

For adapter specifications, see Table A-3 in Appendix A.

Form and Function

Your appliance supports one optional 4-port Ethernet inline network adapter. The inline network adapter is a full-height, three-quarter-length PCI-X network interface card that contains four independent Gigabit Ethernet ports. (See Figure 1-9.)

Figure 1-9 Inline Network Adapter

The Cisco WAE inline network adapter provides inline traffic interception capability for your appliance. When your appliance is configured for inline interception mode, you can set attributes to control which interfaces are to be used over which VLANs. By default, the adapter operates on all inline-capable interfaces and VLANs. You can configure the inline redirection feature using the WAAS 4.0.7 CLI or the WAAS 4.0.7 Central Manager GUI.

The WAAS software defines two new interface types: A group interface that represents an inline pair grouping and a port interface that represents the individual port. These interfaces are referred to as inlineGroup and inlinePort, respectively.

InlineGroup interfaces are numbered using the format slot/group. The slot number is the slot in which the adapter is inserted. (In the WAE 500 series and 600 series appliances, the adapter must be installed in slot 1 only.) The group number is either 0 or 1 (each adapter has 2 group pairs). The group number is displayed on the adapter label.

InlinePort interfaces are numbered slot/group/lan or slot/group/wan. The last attribute is the LAN or WAN designator.

The inline network adapter also includes an onboard programmable Watch Dog Timer (WDT) controller. You can set the time to wait after a failure event, such as a power outage or a kernel crash, before the unit begins to operate in mechanical bypass mode. In mechanical bypass mode, traffic is bridged between the LAN and WAN ports of each group. Mechanical bypass mode prevents the WAE from becoming a single point of failure and allows traffic to continue to flow between the router and the client while it passes through an unresponsive WAE without being processed.

For more information about configuring the inline network adapter, see the Cisco Wide Area Application Services Configuration Guide.

Ports and LED Indicators

Figure 1-10 shows the inline network adapter port numbers, interface designations, and LEDs. Table 1-6 describes the LED functions.

Figure 1-10 Inline Network Adapter Port Numbering and LEDs

0

Port 0; Group 1 WAN interface

1

Port 1; Group 1 LAN interface

2

Port 2; Group 0 WAN interface

3

Port 3: Group 0 LAN interface


The inline network adapter has three LEDs that correspond to each port (the 0 LEDs correspond to Port 0, and so forth). Table 1-6 describes the LEDs.

Table 1-6 Inline Network Adapter LEDs 

LEDs
State
Description

Link / Activity

On

The 10/100/1000BASE-T interface is receiving power.

Blinking

The Ethernet link is transmitting data.

100

On

The speed of the Ethernet connection is 100BASE-TX.

1000

On

The speed of the Ethernet connection is 1000BASE-TX.

Bypass

Both the 100 and 1000 LEDs are on

The corresponding ports are in mechanical bypass mode.


Inline Network Adapter Cabling Requirements

Your inline network adapter ships with two types of cables: crossover and straight-through. When you connect the WAE inline network adapter, proper cabling depends on the link speed (Gigabit Ethernet or Fast Ethernet) and the types of devices (DCE or DTE) being connected.


Note You must retain the same link speed from one end of the connection to the other end. Inline adapter interfaces are able to autonegotiate link speeds. If any of your connecting interfaces are configured for Fast Ethernet (whether on a switch or a router), your WAE inline adapter uses Fast Ethernet. If any of your connecting interfaces are configured for Gigabit Ethernet, your WAE inline adapter uses Gigabit Ethernet. Speed and duplex settings are port-specific, so two inline ports can negotiate different speeds independently.


If you are connecting a WAE inline appliance between two devices using Gigabit Ethernet, you can use either straight-through cables, crossover cables, or any combination of the two cable types, regardless of the type of device. However, for consistency, we recommend that you use straight-through cables for all Gigabit Ethernet connections.

Table 1-7 shows the cable requirements for WAE and non-WAE connections when you are using Gigabit Ethernet end to end.

Table 1-7 Cable Requirements for WAE Connections Using Gigabit Ethernet 

Connection
Required Cable

Switch to switch (no WAE)

Crossover or Straight-through

Switch to router (no WAE)

Crossover or Straight-through

Router to router (no WAE)

Crossover or Straight-through

Switch to WAE and

WAE to Router

Crossover or Straight-through

Crossover or Straight-through

Switch to WAE and

WAE to Switch

Crossover or Straight-through

Crossover or Straight-through

Router to WAE and

WAE to Router

Crossover or Straight-through

Crossover or Straight-through

WAE to WAE

Crossover or Straight-through


Some switches support automatic medium-dependent interface crossover (MDIX). You can configure MDIX by using the mdix auto global configuration switch command. If your switch supports MDIX, you do not need to follow these cabling rules because MDIX automatically adjusts transmit and receive pairs when an incorrect cable type (crossover or straight-through) is installed on a 10/100 Fast Ethernet port. However, when you configure MDIX, you must also configure the port to use autosense (not manual selection of speed/duplex).


Caution If you are connecting to Fast Ethernet ports on both the LAN and the WAN sides of the WAE inline appliance, you must consider the types of devices that are being connected, and you must use the correct cables. You must follow these cabling instructions for the inline network adapter to work properly. (See Table 1-8. For illustrations and examples, see the "Installation Scenarios and Cabling Examples for Fast Ethernet Connections" section.)

To connect the inline network adapter using the correct cables for Fast Ethernet connections, follow these steps:


Step 1 Determine which type of cable you would use for a direct connection between your two end devices (without a WAE inline network appliance connected between them) by using the following standard cabling rules:

When you are directly connecting two network devices that are similar, such as two switches, use a crossover cable.

When you are directly connecting two network devices that are different, such as a switch and router, use a straight-through cable.


Note Because the inline network adapter has an internal crossover connection that becomes active when the InlineGroup interface is placed in mechanical bypass mode, you must figure out which cable you would use to connect the two network devices directly, and then you must install the other cable type (on one side, usually the WAN side of the inline appliance) instead.


Table 1-8 shows the cable requirements for WAE and non-WAE connections when you are using Fast Ethernet end to end.

Table 1-8 Cable Requirements for WAE Connections Using Fast Ethernet

Connection
Required Cable

Switch to switch (no WAE)

Crossover

Switch to router (no WAE)

Straight-through

Router to router (no WAE)

Crossover

Switch to WAE and

WAE to Router

Straight-through

Crossover

Switch to WAE and

WAE to Switch

Straight-through

Straight-through

Router to WAE and

WAE to Router

Straight-through

Straight-through

WAE to WAE

Crossover


Step 2 Connect Fast Ethernet ports on both the LAN and the WAN sides of the WAE inline appliance by using the following cable types:

On the LAN side of the connection, use a straight-through cable between the WAE inline appliance and the network device.

On the WAN side of the connection, use the cable that is different from the cable that you would use to connect the two network devices directly (as determined in Step 1).

For example, if you are connecting a router and a switch (two different devices) through the WAE inline appliance, use a straight-through cable on the LAN side of the connection and use a crossover cable on the WAN side of the connection. (If you were connecting the two different devices directly, you would use a straight-through cable, so use the crossover cable instead.)

If you are connecting two switches (or two similar devices), use straight-through cables on both the LAN and the WAN sides of the WAE inline appliance.

Figure 1-11 through Figure 1-13 show the cables to use for the WAE LAN and WAN connections between Fast Ethernet ports.


Installation Scenarios and Cabling Examples for Fast Ethernet Connections

WAE appliances can be installed physically between two network devices (such as the branch office router and branch office LAN switch) by connecting the WAE inline network adapter ports to the network devices using the proper cables.

If you are connecting a WAE inline appliance between two devices using Gigabit Ethernet, you can use either straight-through cables, crossover cables, or any combination of the two cable types, regardless of the type of device. This section shows cabling examples for Fast Ethernet connections only, because Fast Ethernet has specific cabling requirements.

The inline network adapter has four ports that are divided into two inline groups (see the "Ports and LED Indicators" section). The WAE can be physically placed inline between two distinct network paths, creating redundant WAN links. (See Figure 1-11.)

Two WAEs with inline network adapters can also be installed back-to-back in a serial fashion between two network devices for failover purposes. In this type of serial cluster configuration, if one WAE fails, the other WAE can provide optimization. (See Figure 1-12.)


Note When you connect two WAE inline appliances to each other in serial fashion, always use a crossover cable between the two WAEs. (See Figure 1-13.)


Figure 1-11 Cabling for a Single Inline WAE with Redundant WAN Connections

1

Connection: Management

Gigabit Ethernet: 1/0

Cable type: Straight-through (recommended)

2

Connection: WAE to LAN switch
(using InlineGroup 1/0)

Fast Ethernet: LAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/lan)

Cable type: Straight-through

3

Connection: WAE to LAN switch
(using InlineGroup 1/1)

Fast Ethernet: LAN1 (InlinePort 1/1/lan)

Cable type: Straight-through

4

Connection: WAE to WAN router A
(using InlineGroup 1/0)

Fast Ethernet: WAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/wan)

Cable type: Crossover

5

Connection: WAE to WAN router B
(using InlineGroup 1/1)

Fast Ethernet: WAN1 (InlinePort 1/1/wan)

Cable type: Crossover

   

Figure 1-12 Cabling for Serial Cluster Inline WAEs with a Single WAN Connection

1

Connection: WAE 1 to LAN switch

Fast Ethernet: LAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/lan)

Cable type: Straight-through

2

Connection: WAE 1 to WAE 2

Fast Ethernet: WAE1 WAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/wan) to WAE 2 LAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/lan)

Cable type: Crossover

3

Connection: WAE 2 to WAN router

Fast Ethernet: WAE 2 WAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/wan)

Cable type: Crossover

   

Figure 1-13 Cabling Between Two Inline WAEs

1

Connection: WAE 1 to LAN switch

Fast Ethernet: WAE 1 LAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/lan)

Cable type: Straight-through

2

Connection: WAE 1 to WAE 2

Fast Ethernet: WAE 1 WAN0
(InlinePort 1/0/wan) to WAE 2 LAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/lan)

Cable type: Crossover

3

Connection: WAE 2 to WAN router

Fast Ethernet: WAE 2 WAN0 (InlinePort 1/0/wan)

Cable type: Crossover