Cisco DistributedDirector 2500 Series Install and Config Guide
Maintaining the Cisco DistributedDirector 2500 Series
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Maintaining the Cisco DistributedDirector 2500 Series

Table Of Contents

Maintaining the Cisco DistributedDirector 2500 Series

Reading the LEDs

Opening the Chassis

Tools Required

Removing the Chassis Cover

Upgrading the Boot ROMs

Tools and Equipment Required

Replacing the Boot ROMs

Upgrading the DRAM SIMM

Tools and Equipment Required

Installing the DRAM SIMMs

Replacing the System-Code SIMMs

Tools and Equipment Required

Preparing to Install the System-Code SIMM

Replacing the System-Code SIMMs

Closing the Chassis

Tools Required

Replacing the Cover

Recovering Lost Passwords

Virtual Configuration Register Settings

Changing Configuration Register Settings

Virtual Configuration Register Bit Meanings

Enabling Booting from Flash Memory

Copying a Cisco DistributedDirector System Sotware Image to Flash Memory


Maintaining the Cisco DistributedDirector 2500 Series


This appendix contains information about maintenance procedures you might need to perform on your Director as your internetworking needs change.

This appendix includes the following sections:

Reading the LEDs

Opening the Chassis

Upgrading the Boot ROMs

Upgrading the DRAM SIMM

Replacing the System-Code SIMMs

Closing the Chassis

Recovering Lost Passwords

Virtual Configuration Register Settings

Copying a Cisco DistributedDirector System Sotware Image to Flash Memory


Caution   
Before opening the chassis, be sure that you have discharged all static electricity from your body and the power is OFF. Before performing any procedures described in this appendix, review the section " Safety Recommendations" in the chapter " ."


Warning   

Before working on a chassis or working near power supplies, unplug the power cord on AC units; disconnect the power at the circuit breaker on DC units. (To see translated versions of this warning, refer to the appendix ".")


Reading the LEDs

The LEDs indicate the current operating condition of the Director. You can observe the LEDs, note any fault condition that the Director is encountering, and then contact your system administrator or Cisco customer service, if necessary. describes the LEDs, which are located on the rear panel of the Director. The LEDs are shown in in the chapter "."

Table A-1 LEDs  

LED
State
Description

System OK

On

The Director is working properly.

 

Off

An error has occurred. Disconnect the power cord, and then reconnect it to reestablish power to the Director. If the LED remains off, contact Cisco customer service.

Synchronous serial

Flickering

The synchronous serial connection is transmitting and receiving data normally.

The synchronous serial connection is not transmitting or receiving data. Check the serial transition cable connection.

 

Off

Ethernet AUI

Flickering

The Ethernet LAN connection is transmitting and receiving data normally.

 

Off

The Ethernet LAN connection is not transmitting or receiving data. Check the Ethernet cable connection.


For troubleshooting information, refer to the System Error Messages and Debug Command Reference publications. Additional Director debug command information is contained in the chapter "." You can also access "Technical Assistance" at the World Wide Web URL http://www.cisco.com (Cisco Connection Online) for a list of frequently asked questions and other technical tips.

Opening the Chassis

This section describes the procedure for opening the chassis by removing the chassis cover.


Warning   

Do not touch the power supply when the power cord is connected. For systems with a power switch, line voltages are present within the power supply even when the power switch is OFF and the power cord is connected. For systems without a power switch, line voltages are present within the power supply when the power cord is connected. (To see translated versions of this warning, refer to the appendix ".")


Tools Required

You will need the following tools to open the chassis:

Medium-size flat-blade screwdriver (1/4 inch [0.625 cm])

Size M 3.5 (metric) hex-head nut driver (optional)

Removing the Chassis Cover

You must open the Director chassis to access to its interior components: the system card, boot ROMs, DRAM SIMMs, and system-code SIMMs. When opening the chassis, refer to Parts A and B in Figure A-1.


Warning   

Before opening the chassis, disconnect the telephone-network cables to avoid contact with telephone-network voltages. (To see translated versions of this warning, refer to the appendix ".")


Take the following steps to remove the chassis cover:


Step 1 Power OFF the Director.

Step 2 Disconnect all cables from the rear panel of the Director.

Step 3 Turn the unit upside down so that the top of the chassis is resting on a flat surface, and the front of the chassis is facing toward you. (See Figure A-1, Part A.)

Step 4 Remove the single screw located on the bottom of the chassis (on the side closest to you). Note that the chassis is comprised of two sections: top and bottom.

Step 5 If required, insert a medium-size flat-blade screwdriver into the slots shown in Figure A-1, Part A, and gently rotate the blade so that the top and bottom sections separate slightly.

Step 6 Holding the chassis with both hands, position it as shown in Figure A-1, Part B.

Step 7 Pull the top section away from the bottom section. (See Figure A-1, Part B.) The fit is snug, so it may be necessary to pry the chassis sections apart at one end and then the other until they separate.

Figure A-1 Chassis Cover Removal

Step 8 When the top cover is off, set it aside. shows the layout of the system card for the Cisco DistributedDirector 2500 Series.

Figure A-2 System Card Layout—Cisco DistributedDirector 2501 and 2502

Upgrading the Boot ROMs

This section describes how to upgrade the boot ROMs. To upgrade the boot ROM software with a new software image, you must remove the existing boot ROMs and replace them with new boot ROMs.

Tools and Equipment Required

The following tools and equipment are required to replace the boot ROMs:

Plastic leaded chip carrier (PLCC) extraction tool

ESD-preventive wrist strap

Two boot ROMs

Replacing the Boot ROMs

Take the following steps to replace the boot ROMs:


Step 1 Power OFF the Director.

Step 2 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap.

Step 3 Open the cover following the instructions in the section "Opening the Chassis" earlier in this appendix.

Step 4 Locate the boot ROMs (labeled FW1 and FW2) on the system card. (See .)


Caution   
The correct placement of the boot ROMs is crucial. If the ROMs are installed in the wrong sockets, they could be damaged when the system is powered ON. Be careful not to damage or scratch the printed circuit card under the ROMs.

Step 5 Using a PLCC extraction tool, gently remove the boot ROMs (see ) and set them aside on a nonconductive surface.

Figure A-3 Extracting and Inserting Boot ROMs

Step 6 Insert the new boot ROMs, label side up, in their respective sockets so that the beveled edge of the ROM chip is on the same side as the flat corner on the ROM socket (see ), being careful not to bend or crush any of the bottom pins. If you inadvertently bend a pin, use needlenose pliers to straighten it.


Caution   
Installing boot ROMs with the label side down will damage the ROM.

Figure A-4 Orienting Boot ROMs to the Socket

Step 7 Replace the Director cover. Follow the instructions in the section "Closing the Chassis" later in this appendix.

Upgrading the DRAM SIMM

This section describes how to upgrade the DRAM SIMM on the system card.

To see how much memory is installed in the Director, enter the show version command. Near the middle of the resulting output, a message similar to the following display:

Cisco XXXX(68030) processor (revision X) with 4092K/2048K bytes of memory.

This line shows how much memory is installed (in this example, 4092K/2048K). The first number represents primary memory and the second number represents shared memory.

Tools and Equipment Required

You will need the following tools to remove and replace the DRAM SIMM on the Director:

Medium-size flat-blade screwdriver (1/4 inch [0.625 cm])

ESD-preventive wrist strap

The DRAM SIMM required for your planned upgrade

Installing the DRAM SIMMs

Take the following steps to install the DRAM SIMMs:


Step 1 Power OFF the Director.

Step 2 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap.

Step 3 Open the cover, following the instructions in the section "Opening the Chassis" earlier in this appendix.

Step 4 Remove the existing DRAM SIMM by pulling outward on the connectors to unlatch them, as shown in Figure A-5. Be careful not to break the holders on the SIMM connector.


Caution   
To prevent damage, do not press on the center of the SIMMs. Handle each SIMM carefully.

Step 5 Position the new SIMM so that the polarization notch is located at the left end of the SIMM socket. (See .)

Figure A-5 Removing and Replacing the DRAM SIMM

Step 6 Insert the new DRAM SIMM by sliding the end with the metal fingers into the SIMM connector socket at approximately a 45-degree angle to the system card. Gently rock the SIMM back into place until the latch on either side snaps into place. Do not use excessive force because the connector may break.

Step 7 Replace the Director cover. Follow the instructions in the section "Closing the Chassis" later in this appendix.

Replacing the System-Code SIMMs

The system code (Director operating system software) is stored in Flash memory SIMMs. The 80-pin Flash memory SIMMs must be purchased from Cisco Systems. For ordering information, refer to the Cisco Product Catalog or contact Cisco customer service.

Tools and Equipment Required

You will need the following tools to remove and replace the system-code SIMMs on the Director:

Medium-size flat-blade screwdriver (1/4 inch [0.625 cm])

ESD-preventive wrist strap

System-code SIMM(s)

Preparing to Install the System-Code SIMM

There are two system-code (Flash memory) SIMM sockets on the system board. If you want to install system-code SIMMs in both sockets, the SIMMs must be the same size. For example, if a 4-MB system-code SIMM is already installed in your Director, the new SIMM must also be 4 MB. This upgrade would give you a total of 8 MB. You can verify how much Flash memory is already installed in your Director by entering the show flash EXEC command.


Caution   
The system code is stored on the Flash memory SIMMs, but new system-code SIMMs are shipped without preinstalled software. Before proceeding with this procedure, use the copy flash tftp EXEC command to back up the system code to a TFTP server.


Note   For more information about the copy flash tftp command and other related commands, refer to the Cisco IOS configuration and command reference publications.


Replacing the System-Code SIMMs

Take the following steps to upgrade the system-code Flash memory SIMMs:


Step 1 If you have not already done so, enter the copy flash tftp EXEC command to back up the system code.

Step 2 Power OFF the Director.

Step 3 Remove all cables from the rear panel of the Director.

Step 4 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist or ankle strap.

Step 5 Open the chassis cover following the procedure in the section "Opening the Chassis" earlier in this appendix.

Step 6 Locate the system-code SIMMs on the system card, labeled CODE0 and CODE1. (See Figure A-2.)

Step 7 If necessary, remove the existing system-code SIMM by pulling outward on the connector holders to unlatch them. The connector holds the SIMM tightly, so be careful not to break the holders on the SIMM connector. (See Figure A-6.)

If you are installing system-code SIMMs in both sockets (CODE0 and CODE1), both SIMMs must be the same size. For example, if a 4-MB system-code SIMM is already installed in your Director, the new SIMM must also be 4 MB. Populate the SIMM socket labeled CODE0 first; then populate CODE1.


Caution   
To prevent damage, do not press on the center of the SIMMs. Handle each SIMM carefully.

Figure A-6 Removing and Replacing the System-Code SIMM

Step 8 Position the new SIMM so that the polarization notch is located at the left end of the SIMM socket.


Caution   
To prevent damage, note that some Flash memory SIMMs have the components mounted on the rear side; therefore, when inserting the SIMM, always use the polarization notch as a reference and not the position of the components on the SIMM.

Step 9 Insert the new SIMM by sliding the end with the metal fingers into the appropriate SIMM connector socket (labeled CODE0 or CODE1) at approximately a 45-degree angle to the system card. Gently rock the SIMM back into place until the latches on both sides snap into place. Do not use excessive force because the connector may break.

Step 10 Replace the Director cover following the procedure in the next section, "Closing the Chassis."

Closing the Chassis

This section describes the procedure for closing the chassis by replacing the cover.

Tools Required

You will need the following tools to replace the cover:

Medium-size flat-blade screwdriver (1/4 inch [0.625 cm])

Size M 3.5 hex-head nut driver (optional)

Replacing the Cover

Take the following steps to replace the cover:


Step 1 Position the two chassis sections, as shown in Figure A-7.

Step 2 Referring to Figure A-7, press the two chassis sections together and ensure the following:

The top section fits into the rear of the bottom section. (See A in Figure A-7.)

The bottom section fits into the front of the top section. (See B in Figure A-7.)

Each side of the top and bottom sections fits together. (See C in Figure A-7.)


Caution   
To fit the two sections together, it may be necessary to work them together at one end and then the other, working back and forth; however, use care to prevent bending the chassis edges.

Figure A-7 Replacing the Chassis Cover

Step 3 When the two sections fit together snugly, turn the chassis so that the bottom is facing up, with the front panel toward you.

Step 4 Replace the cover screw. (See .) Tighten the screw to no more than 8 or 9 inch/pounds of torque.

Step 5 Reinstall the chassis on the wall, rack, desktop, or table.

Step 6 Replace all cables.

Recovering Lost Passwords

This section explains how to recover the following types of passwords:

An enable secret password (a very secure, encrypted password).

An enable password (a less secure, nonencrypted password)—Used when the enable secret password does not exist.

A console password—Prevents unauthorized users from attempting to change the Director configuration. When a console password is set, you must provide a password to log in to the console and access user EXEC mode.

The key to recovering a lost enable password is to set the configuration register so that the contents of NVRAM are ignored (0x142), which allows you to see the password. The enable secret password is encrypted and cannot be recovered; it must be replaced. The enable and console passwords might be encrypted or clear text.

Take the following steps to recover a lost password:


Step 1 Plan for about one-half hour of system downtime. The password recovery procedure requires a system reload.

Step 2 Connect a terminal to the console port on the rear panel of the Director. Make sure the terminal is configured to operate at 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, and 2 stop bits.

Step 3 Enter the show version command to display the existing configuration register value. The configuration register value is on the last line of the display. Note whether the configuration register is set to enable or disable Break.

The factory-default configuration register value is 0x2102. Notice that the third digit from the left in 0x2102 is 1, which disables Break. If the third digit is not 1, Break is enabled.

Step 4 If the configuration register is set to disable Break, power cycle the Director. (Turn the Director OFF, wait five seconds, and then turn the Director ON again.) Within 60 seconds of turning ON the Director, press the Break key or send a Break signal. The ROM monitor prompt (>) appears.

If the configuration register is set to enable Break, press the Break key or send a Break signal to the Director.


Note   If your keyboard does not have a Break key, refer to your terminal or terminal emulation software documentation for information about how to send a Break signal to the Director.


Step 5 Enter the o/r command to reset the configuration register to boot from the boot ROMs and ignore NVRAM:

> o/r 0x142

Step 6 Enter the initialize command to initialize the Director:

> initialize

The Director power cycles and the configuration register is set to 0x142. The Director boots the system image in Flash memory and the System Configuration Dialog appears:

--- System Configuration Dialog --- 

Step 7 Enter no in response to the System Configuration Dialog prompts until the following message appears:

Press RETURN to get started! 

Step 8 Press Return.

Step 9 Enter privileged EXEC mode and then enter the show startup-config command to display the passwords in the configuration file:

DD> enable 
DD# show startup-config

Step 10 Scan the configuration file displayed for the passwords (the enable and enable secret passwords are usually near the beginning of the file, and the console password is near the end of the file). An example display follows:

enable secret 5 $1$ORPP$s9syZt4uKn3SnpuLDrhuei 
enable password sand 
. 
. 
line con 0
password seashells

Proceed to Step 11 to replace an enable, enable secret, or console password. If there is no enable secret password, note the enable and console passwords, if they are not encrypted, and proceed to Step 14.


Caution   
Do not take the next three steps unless you have determined that you must change or replace the enable, enable secret, or console passwords. Failure to follow the steps as shown might cause you to erase your Director configuration.

Step 11 Enter the configure memory command to modify or replace passwords in NVRAM:

DD# configure memory

Step 12 Enter the configure terminal command to enter configuration mode:

DD# configure terminal

Step 13 Change only the passwords that are necessary for your configuration. The following example shows how to change all three types of passwords. The first two lines show how to change the enable secret and enable passwords. The last two lines show how to change the console password:

DD(config)# enable secret pail 
DD(config)# enable password shovel 
DD(config)# line con 0 
DD(config-line)# password con1 

For maximum security, be sure the enable secret and enable passwords are different.

You can remove individual passwords by using the no form of these commands. For example, enter the no enable secret command to remove the enable secret password.

Step 14 Configure all interfaces to be administratively up. In the following example, the Ethernet 0 port is configured to be administratively up:

DD(config-line)# interface ethernet 0 
DD(config-if)# no shutdown

Enter the equivalent commands for all interfaces that were originally configured.

Step 15 Set the configuration register to the original value you noted in Step 3 or the factory-default value (0x2102). The following example shows how to set the configuration register to the factory-default value:

DD(config-if)# config-register 0x2102 
DD(config)# 

Step 16 Press Ctrl-Z to exit configuration mode.


Caution   
Do not take the next three steps unless you have changed or replaced a password or you might erase your Director configuration. If you did not change or replace a password, proceed to Step 20 and log in.

Step 17 Enter the copy running-config startup-config command to save the new configuration to NVRAM. This command copies the changes you just made to the running configuration to the startup configuration. The following message appears:

DD# copy running-config startup-config
Building configuration...
[OK]
DD#

Step 18 Reboot the Director:

DD# reload
Proceed with reload? [confirm]

Step 19 Press Return to confirm. When the Director reboots it will use the new configuration register value you set in Step 15.

Step 20 Log in to the Director with the new or recovered passwords.

Virtual Configuration Register Settings

The Director has a 16-bit virtual configuration register, which is written into NVRAM. You might want to change the virtual configuration register settings for the following reasons:

Set and display the configuration register value

Force the system into the ROM monitor or boot ROM

Select a boot source and default boot filename

Enable or disable the Break function

Control broadcast addresses

Set the console terminal baud rate

Recover a lost password (ignore the configuration file in NVRAM)

Enable TFTP server boot

lists the meaning of each of the virtual configuration memory bits, and defines the boot field names.


Caution   
To avoid confusion and possibly halting the Director, remember that valid configuration register settings might be combinations of settings and not just the individual settings listed in . For example, the factory default value of 0x2102 is a combination of settings.

Table A-2 Virtual Configuration Register Bit Meanings  

Bit No. 1
Hexadecimal
Meaning

00-03

0x0000-0x000F

Boot field

06

0x0040

Causes system software to ignore the contents of NVRAM (startup-config)

07

0x0080

OEM bit is enabled

08

0x0100

Break is disabled

10

0x0400

IP broadcast with all zeros

11-12

0x0800-0x1000

Console line speed

13

0x2000

Load the boot ROM software if a Flash boot fails five times

14

0x4000

IP broadcasts do not have network numbers

15

0x8000

Enable diagnostic messages and ignore the contents of NVRAM

1 The factory default value for the configuration register is 0x2102. This value is a combination of the following: bit 13 = 0x2000, bit 8 = 0x0100, and bits 00 to 03 = 0x0002.



Changing Configuration Register Settings

Take the following steps to change the configuration register while running the Cisco DistributedDirector System Software (Cisco IOS Release 11.1 IA):


Step 1 Enter the enable command and your password to enter privileged mode:

DD> enable
Password: 
DD#

Step 2 Enter the configure terminal command at the privileged EXEC prompt (DD#):

DD# configure terminal

Step 3 To set the contents of the configuration register, enter the configuration command config-register value, where value is a hexadecimal number preceded by 0x (see and ):

config-register 0xvalue

(The virtual configuration register is stored in NVRAM.)

Table A-3 Explanation of Boot Field (Configuration Register Bits 00 to 03) 

Boot Field
Boot Process

0x0

Stops the boot process in the ROM monitor

0x1

Stops the boot process in the boot ROM monitor

0x3-0xF

Specifies a default filename for booting over the network from a TFTP server
Enables boot system commands that override the default filename for booting over the network from a TFTP server

0x2

Full boot process, which loads the Cisco DistributedDirector System Software image into Flash memory


Step 4 Press Ctrl-Z to exit configuration mode. The new settings will be saved to memory; however, the new settings do not take effect until the system software is reloaded by rebooting the Director.

Step 5 To display the configuration register value currently in effect and the value that will be used at the next reload, enter the show version EXEC command. The value displays on the last line of the screen display:

Configuration register is 0x142 (will be 0x102 at next reload)

Step 6 Reboot the Director. The new value takes effect. Configuration register changes take effect only when the Director restarts, which occurs when you switch the power OFF and ON or when you enter the reload command.

Virtual Configuration Register Bit Meanings

The lowest four bits of the virtual configuration register (bits 3, 2, 1, and 0) form the boot field. (See .) The boot field specifies a number in binary form. If you set the boot field value to 0, you must boot the operating system manually by entering the b command at the bootstrap prompt, as follows:

> b [tftp] flash filename

The b command options are as follows:

b—Boots the default system software from ROM

b flash—Boots the first file in Flash memory

b filename [host]Boots from the network using a TFTP server

b flash [filename]Boots the file filename from Flash memory

For more information about the command b [tftp] flash filename, refer to the Cisco IOS configuration guide and command reference publications.

If you set the boot field value to a value of 0x2 to 0xF, and a valid system boot command is stored in the configuration file, the Director boots the system software as directed by that value. If you set the boot field to any other bit pattern, the Director uses the resulting number to form a default boot filename for booting from the network using a TFTP server. (See .)

Table A-4 Default Boot Filenames  

Action or Filename
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0

bootstrap mode

0

0

0

0

ROM software

0

0

0

1

cisco2-igs

0

0

1

0

cisco3-igs

0

0

1

1

cisco4-igs

0

1

0

0

cisco5-igs

0

1

0

1

cisco6-igs

0

1

1

0

cisco7-igs

0

1

1

1

cisco10-igs

1

0

0

0

cisco11-igs

1

0

0

1

cisco12-igs

1

0

1

0

cisco13-igs

1

0

1

1

cisco14-igs

1

1

0

0

cisco15-igs

1

1

0

1

cisco16-igs

1

1

1

0

cisco17-igs

1

1

1

1


In the following example, the virtual configuration register is set to boot the Director from Flash memory and to ignore Break at the next reboot of the Director:

DD> enable
password: enablepassword
DD# conf term
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
Edit with DELETE, CTRL/W, and CTRL/U; end with CTRL/Z 
config-register 0x102
boot system flash [filename]
^Z
DD# 

The Director creates a default boot filename as part of the automatic configuration processes. The boot filename consists of cisco, plus the octal equivalent of the boot field number, a hyphen, and the processor type.


Note   A boot system configuration command in the Director configuration in NVRAM overrides the default boot filename.


Bit 8 controls the console Break key. Setting bit 8 (the factory default) causes the processor to ignore the console Break key. Clearing bit 8 causes the processor to interpret the Break key as a command to force the system into the bootstrap monitor, thereby halting normal operation. A break can be sent in the first 60 seconds while the system reboots, regardless of the configuration settings.

Bit 10 controls the host portion of the IP broadcast address. Setting bit 10 causes the processor to use all zeros; clearing bit 10 (the factory default) causes the processor to use all ones. Bit 10 interacts with bit 14, which controls the network and subnet portions of the broadcast address. (See .)

Table A-5 Configuration Register Settings for Broadcast Address Destination  

Bit 14
Bit 10
Address (<net> <host>)

Off

Off

<ones> <ones>

Off

On

<zeros> <zeros>

On

On

<net> <zeros>

On

Off

<net> <ones>


Bits 11 and 12 in the configuration register determine the baud rate of the console terminal.
shows the bit settings for the four available baud rates. (The default baud rate is 9600.)

Table A-6 System Console Terminal Baud Rate Settings  

Baud
Bit 12
Bit 11

9600

0

0

4800

0

1

1200

1

0

2400

1

1


Bit 13 determines the server response to a bootload failure. Setting bit 13 causes the server to load operating software from ROM after five unsuccessful attempts to load a boot file from the network. Clearing bit 13 causes the server to continue attempting to load a boot file from the network indefinitely. The default setting for bit 13 is 1.

Enabling Booting from Flash Memory

To disable Break and enable the boot system flash command, enter the config-register command with the value shown in the following example:

DD> enable
Password: enablepassword
DD# config term
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
Edit with DELETE, CTRL/W, and CTRL/U; end with CTRL/Z
config-reg 0x2102
^Z
DD#

Copying a Cisco DistributedDirector System Sotware Image to Flash Memory

You may need to copy a new Cisco DistributedDirector System Sotware image to Flash memory whenever a new image or maintenance release becomes available. Use the copy tftp flash command for the copy procedure.

Take the following steps to copy a new image to Flash memory:


Step 1 Enter the show flash command to make sure there is enough space available before copying a file to Flash memory. Compare the size of the file you want to copy to the amount of available Flash memory displayed.

Step 2 Make a backup copy of the current image.

Step 3 Enter enable mode and then enter the copy tftp flash command to copy the new image into Flash memory:

DD> enable
Password: enablepassword
DD# copy tftp flash

The following messages appear:

                        ****  NOTICE  ****
Flash load helper vX.0
This process will accept the copy options and then terminate
the current system image to use the ROM based image for the copy.
Routing functionality will not be available during that time.
If you are logged in via telnet, this connection will terminate.
Users with console access can see the results of the copy operation.
                         ---- ******** ----
Proceed? [confirm]

Step 4 Press Return to confirm. If there is an image already in Flash memory, the Director displays the name and size of the file. Then the Director prompts you for the IP address or name of the remote host:

Address or name of remote host [hostname]?

The remote host can be a server or another Director with a valid Flash system software image.

Step 5 Enter the IP address or name of the remote host. The Director then prompts you for the name of the source file:

Source file name?

Step 6 Enter the name of the source file. The following prompt displays:

Destination file name [filename]?

Step 7 Press Return to accept the default filename or enter a different filename. Messages similar to the following display:

Accessing file 'master/igs-w3-l.111-9.0' on hostname...
Loading master/igs-w3-l.111-9.0 from 172.16.72.1 (via Ethernet0): ! 
[OK]

Erase flash device before writing? [confirm] yes

Step 8 Enter yes to erase the contents of Flash memory. The following message displays:

Flash contains files. Are you sure you want to erase? [confirm] yes

Step 9 Enter yes to confirm that you want to erase the contents of Flash memory. Messages similar to the following display:

%SYS-5-RELOAD: Reload requested

%FLH: master/igs-w3-l.111-9.0 from 172.16.72.1 to flash ...

System flash directory:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   3459776 username/igs-w3-l
[3459840 bytes used, 4928768 available, 8388608 total]Configuration 
mapped ip address 172.16.72.1 to hostname
Accessing file 'master/igs-w3-l.111-9.0' on hostname...
Loading master/igs-w3-l.111-9.0 from 172.16.72.1 (via Ethernet0): ! 
[OK]

Erasing device... eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee ...erased
Loading master/igs-w3-l.111-9.0 from 172.16.72.1 (via Ethernet0): 
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
[OK - 6196336/8388608 bytes]

Verifying checksum...  OK (0x2997)
Flash copy took 0:03:38 [hh:mm:ss]
%FLH: Re-booting system after download

The system reboots using the new image in Flash memory.


Note   For more information about the copy tftp flash command and other related commands, refer to the Cisco IOS configuration guide and command reference publications.