Cisco DistributedDirector 2500 Series Install and Config Guide
Configuring Cisco DistributedDirector Interfaces
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Configuring Cisco DistributedDirector Interfaces

Table Of Contents

Configuring Cisco DistributedDirector Interfaces

Booting the Director for the First Time

Configuring the Director for the First Time

Using the System Configuration Dialog

Configuring the Ethernet Interface

Configuring the Token Ring Interface

Using Configuration Mode

Cisco IOS Software Basics

Cisco IOS Modes of Operation

Getting Context-Sensitive Help

Saving Configuration Changes

Checking the Director Configuration

Verifying Network Connectivity

Specifying the Boot Method

Getting More Information


Configuring Cisco DistributedDirector Interfaces


This chapter describes the initial configuration for Cisco DistributedDirector System Software for the Cisco DistributedDirector 2500 Series, and contains the following sections:

Booting the Director for the First Time

Configuring the Director for the First Time

Cisco IOS Software Basics

Checking the Director Configuration

Verifying Network Connectivity

Specifying the Boot Method

Getting More Information

This chapter provides just enough information to get the Director up and running. Detailed software configuration information is available in other chapters in this guide.

Booting the Director for the First Time

Each time you power on the Director, it goes through the following boot sequence:

1 The Director goes through power-on self-test diagnostics to verify basic operation of the CPU, memory, and interfaces.

2 The system bootstrap software (boot image) executes and searches for a valid Cisco DistributedDirector image (Cisco DistributedDirector System Software). The source of the Cisco DistributedDirector image (Flash memory or a Trivial File Transfer Protocol [TFTP] server) is determined by the configuration register setting. The factory-default setting for the configuration register is 0x2102, which indicates that the Director should attempt to load a Cisco DistributedDirector image from Flash memory.

3 If after five attempts a valid Cisco DistributedDirector image is not found in Flash memory, the Director reverts to boot ROM mode (which is used to install or upgrade a Cisco DistributedDirector image).

4 If a valid Cisco DistributedDirector image is found, then the Director searches for a valid configuration file.

5 If a valid configuration file is not found in NVRAM, the Director runs the System Configuration Dialog so you can configure it manually. For normal Director operation, there must be a valid Cisco DistributedDirector image in Flash memory and a configuration file in NVRAM.

The first time you boot your Director, you will need to configure the Director interfaces and then save the configuration to a file in NVRAM.

Configuring the Director for the First Time

You can configure the Director using one of the following procedures, which are described in this section:

System Configuration Dialog—Recommended if you are not familiar with Cisco IOS commands.

Configuration mode—Recommended if you are familiar with Cisco IOS commands.


Timesaver   

Acquire the correct network addresses from your system administrator or consult your network plan to determine the correct addresses before you begin to configure the Director.


Proceed with the procedure that best fits the needs of your network configuration and Cisco IOS software experience level. If you will be using the configuration mode to configure the Director, and you would like a quick review of the Cisco IOS software, refer to the section "Cisco IOS Software Basics" later in this chapter. Otherwise, proceed with the next section "Using the System Configuration Dialog."

Using the System Configuration Dialog

If your Director does not have a configuration (setup) file the Cisco DistributedDirector System Software will automatically start the setup command facility. An interactive dialog called the System Configuration Dialog appears on the console screen. This dialog helps you navigate through the configuration process by prompting you for the configuration information necessary for the Director to operate.

Many prompts in the System Configuration Dialog include default answers, which are included in square brackets following the question. To accept a default answer, press Return; otherwise, enter your response.

This section gives an example configuration using the System Configuration Dialog. When you are configuring your Director, respond as appropriate for your network.

At any time during the System Configuration Dialog, you can request help by typing a question mark (?) at a prompt.

Before proceeding with the System Configuration Dialog, obtain from your system administrator the node addresses and the number of bits in the subnet field (if applicable) of the Director port. For more information about IP addresses and subnets, refer to the Internetworking Technology Overview publication.

Take the following steps to configure the Director using the System Configuration Dialog:


Step 1 Connect a console terminal to the console port on the rear panel of your Director, and then power ON the Director. (For more information, refer to the section "Connecting the Console Terminal and Modem" in the chapter "".)


Note   The default parameters for the console port are 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, and 2 stop bits.


Step 2 After about 30 seconds, information similar to the following is displayed on the console screen:

Cisco DistributedDirector System Software
IOS (tm) 4500 Software (C4500-W3-MZ),
ROM:System Bootstrap, Version X.X(XXXX) [XXXXX XX], RELEASE 
SOFTWARE
ROM:4500 Bootstrap Software (C4500-BOOT-M), Version XX.X(X), 
RELEASE SOFTWARE
Copyright (c) 1986-199X by Cisco Systems
cisco 4700 (R4K) processor with 32768K/16384K bytes of memory

Notice: NVRAM invalid, possibly due to write erase.

F3: 5797928+162396+258800 at 0x3000060

              Restricted Rights Legend

Use, duplication, or disclosure by the Government is
subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph
(c) of the Commercial Computer Software - Restricted
Rights clause at FAR sec. 52.227-19 and subparagraph
(c) (1) (ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer
Software clause at DFARS sec. 252.227-7013.

           Cisco Systems, Inc.
           170 West Tasman Drive
           San Jose, California 95134-1706

Cisco DistributedDirector System Software 
IOS (tm) X000 Software (XXX-X-X), Version XX.X(XXXX) [XXXXX XXX]
Copyright (c) 1986-199X by Cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Fri 20-Oct-9X 16:02 by XXXXX
Image text-base: 0x03030FC0, data-base: 0x00001000
Cisco 25XX (68030) processor (revision A) with 4092K/2048K bytes of 
memory.
Processor board ID 00000000
Bridging software.
SuperLAT software copyright 1990 by Meridian Technology Corp).
X.25 software, Version X.X, NET2, BFE and GOSIP compliant.
TN3270 Emulation software (copyright 1994 by TGV Inc).
X Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interface.
32K bytes of non-volatile configuration memory.
8192K bytes of processor board System flash (Read ONLY)

Notice: NVRAM invalid, possibly due to write erase.
         --- System Configuration Dialog ---

At any point you may enter a question mark '?' for help.
Refer to the 'Getting Started' Guide for additional help.
Use ctrl-c to abort configuration dialog at any prompt.
Default settings are in square brackets '[]'.
Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes]: 


Note   The standard Cisco IOS start up message mentions a "Getting Started" guide. There is no Cisco DistributedDirector "Getting Started" guide.


Step 3 Press Return or enter yes to begin the configuration process.

Step 4 When the System Configuration Dialog asks whether you want to view the current interface summary, press Return or enter yes:

First, would you like to see the current interface summary? [yes]: 

Any interface listed with OK? value "NO" does not have a valid 
configuration

Interface     IP-Address     OK?   Method     Status    Protocol
Ethernet0     unassigned     NO    not set    up        down
Serial0       unassigned     NO    not set    down      down

Step 5 Configure the global parameters. A typical prompt follows:

Configuring global parameters:

  Enter host name [DD]: 

Next, you are prompted to enter an enable secret password. There are two types of privileged-level passwords:

Enable secret password (a very secure, encrypted password)

Enable password (a less secure, nonencrypted password)

The enable password is used when the enable secret password does not exist.

For maximum security, be sure the passwords are different. If you enter the same password for both, the Director will accept your entry, but will display a warning message indicating that you should enter a different password.

Step 6 Enter an enable secret password:

The enable secret is a one-way cryptographic secret used
instead of the enable password when it exists.

  Enter enable secret: pail

The enable password is used when there is no enable secret
and when using older software and some boot images.

Step 7 Enter the enable and virtual terminal passwords:

Enter enable password: shovel
Enter virtual terminal password: vterm1

Step 8 Press Return to accept Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) management, or enter no to refuse it:

Configure SNMP Network Management? [yes]: no

Step 9 Press Return or enter yes to configure the DD for IP:

Configure IP? [yes]:
  Configure IGRP routing? [yes]:
  Your IGRP autonomous system number [1]: 15

Configuring the Ethernet Interface

The Ethernet interface is configured to allow connection to a LAN. To configure the interface parameters, you need to know your Ethernet interface network addresses.

Take the following steps to configure an Ethernet interface to allow communication over a LAN:


Step 1 Press Return or enter yes to configure the LAN interface:

Configuring interface Ethernet0:
  Is this interface in use? [yes]:

Step 2 Press Return or enter yes to configure the IP protocol:

  Configure IP on this interface? [yes]:
    IP address for this interface: 172.16.72.1
    Number of bits in subnet field [8]: 8
    Class B network is 172.16.0.0, 8 subnet bits; mask is 
    255.255.255.0

Configuring the Token Ring Interface

The Token Ring interface is configured to allow connection to a LAN. To configure the interface parameters, you need to know your Token Ring interface network addresses.

Take the following steps to configure a Token Ring interface to allow communication over a LAN:


Step 1 Press Return or enter yes to configure the LAN interface:

Configuring interface TokenRing 0:
  Is this interface in use? [yes]:

Step 2 Press Return or enter yes to configure the IP protocol:

  Configure IP on this interface? [yes]:
    IP address for this interface: 172.16.72.1
    Number of bits in subnet field [8]: 8
    Class B network is 172.16.0.0, 8 subnet bits; mask is 
    255.255.255.0

Using Configuration Mode

You can configure the Director manually if you prefer not to use the prompt-driven System Configuration Dialog. Take the following steps to configure the Director manually:


Step 1 Connect a console terminal and then power ON the Director.

Step 2 When you are prompted to enter the initial dialog, enter no to go into the normal operating mode of the Director:

Would you like to enter the initial dialog? [yes]: no

Step 3 After a few seconds you will see the user EXEC prompt (DD>). Enter the enable command to enter privileged EXEC mode. You can only make configuration changes in privileged EXEC mode:

DD> enable

The prompt changes to the privileged EXEC prompt:

DD#

Step 4 Enter the configure terminal command at the privileged EXEC prompt to enter configuration mode:

DD# configure terminal

You can now enter any changes you want to the configuration. You will probably want to perform the following tasks:

(a) Assign a host name for the Director using the hostname command. (The default assigned name is DD.)

(b) Enter an enable secret password using the enable password command.

(c) Assign addresses to the interfaces using the protocol address command.

(d) Specify which protocols to support on the interfaces.

Refer to the rest of this installation and configuration guide for more information about the commands you can use to configure the Director.

Step 5 When you are finished configuring the Director, enter the exit command until you return to the privileged EXEC prompt. (If you have not assigned a new host name, the prompt will be DD#.)

Step 6 To save the configuration changes to NVRAM, enter the copy running-config startup-config command at the privileged EXEC prompt.

DD# copy running-config startup-config
********

The Director is now configured and will boot with the configuration you entered.

Cisco IOS Software Basics

This section provides you with some basic information about the Cisco IOS software and includes the following sections:

Cisco IOS Modes of Operation

Getting Context-Sensitive Help

Saving Configuration Changes

Cisco IOS Modes of Operation

The Cisco IOS software provides access to several different command modes. Each command mode provides a different group of related commands.

For security purposes, the Cisco IOS software provides two levels of access to commands: user and privileged. The unprivileged user mode is called user EXEC mode. The privileged mode is called privileged EXEC mode and requires a password. The commands available in user EXEC mode are a subset of the commands available in privileged EXEC mode.

describes some of the most commonly used modes, how to enter the modes, and the resulting prompts. The prompt helps you identify which mode you are in and, therefore, which commands are available to you.

Table 4-1 Cisco IOS Operating Modes 

Mode of Operation
Usage
Access Method
Prompt
Exit Method

User EXEC

User EXEC commands allow you to connect to remote devices, change terminal settings on a temporary basis, perform basic tests, and list system information. The EXEC commands available at the user level are a subset of those available at the privileged level.

Log in.

DD>

Use the logout command.

Privileged EXEC

Privileged EXEC commands set operating parameters. The privileged command set includes those commands contained in user EXEC mode, and also the configure command through which you can access the remaining command modes. Privileged EXEC mode also includes high-level testing commands, such as debug.

From user EXEC mode, use the enable EXEC command.

DD#

To exit back to user EXEC mode, use the disable command.

To enter global configuration mode, use the configure privileged EXEC command.

Global configuration

Global configuration commands apply to features that affect the system as a whole.

From privileged EXEC mode, use the configure privileged EXEC command.

DD(config)#

To exit to privileged EXEC mode, use the exit or end command or press Ctrl-Z.

To enter interface configuration mode, enter an interface configuration command.

Interface configuration

Interface configuration commands modify the operation of an interface such as an Ethernet port. Many features are enabled on a per-interface basis. Interface configuration commands always follow an interface global configuration command, which defines the interface type.

From global configuration mode, enter by specifying an interface with an interface type number command. For example, enter the interface ethernet 0 command to configure the Ethernet 0 interface.

DD(config-if)#

To exit to global configuration mode, use the exit command.

To exit to privileged EXEC mode, use the exit command or press Ctrl-Z.

Key chain configuration

From key chain configuration mode, you can manage authentication keys. To enter this configuration mode, you must first enable the DRP server agent.

From global configuration mode, use the key chain command.

DD(config- keychain)#

To exit to global configuration mode, use the exit command.

Key chain key configuration

Once you define a key chain, use the key chain key configuration mode to configure the keys on the key chain.

From key chain configuration mode, use the key command.

DD(config- keychain-key)#

To exit to key chain configuration mode, use the exit command.

ROM monitor

ROM monitor commands are used to perform low-level diagnostics. You can also use the ROM monitor commands to recover from a system failure and stop the boot process in a specific operating environment.1

From privileged EXEC mode, use the reload EXEC command. Press Break during the first 60 seconds while the system is booting.

>

To exit to user EXEC mode, type continue.

1 You can modify the configuration register value using the config-reg configuration command. Refer to the appendix "" for more information.


Almost every configuration command also has a no form. In general, use the no form to disable a feature or function. Use the command without the keyword no to reenable a disabled feature or to enable a feature that is disabled by default. For example, the Director cache enabled by default. To disable the cache, enter the no ip director cache command and enter ip director cache to reenable it. The "" chapter provides the complete syntax for Director configuration commands and describes what the no form of a command does. Additional system commands are documented in the Cisco IOS software command references.

Getting Context-Sensitive Help

In any command mode, you can get a list of available commands by entering a question mark (?).

DD> ?

To obtain a list of commands that begin with a particular character sequence, type in those characters followed immediately by the question mark (?). Do not include a space. This form of help is called word help, because it completes a word for you.

DD# co?
configure  connect  copy

To list keywords or arguments, enter a question mark in place of a keyword or argument. Include a space before the question mark. This form of help is called command syntax help, because it reminds you which keywords or arguments are applicable based on the command, keywords, and arguments you have already entered.

DD# configure ?
  memory    Configure from NV memory
  network   Configure from a TFTP network host
  terminal  Configure from the terminal
  <cr>

You can also abbreviate commands and keywords by entering just enough characters to make the command unique from other commands. For example, you can abbreviate the show command to sh.

Saving Configuration Changes

You must save changes made to the Director configuration to memory, otherwise they will be lost if there is a system reload or power outage. There are two types of configuration files: the running (current operating) configuration and the startup configuration. The running configuration is stored in RAM; the startup configuration is stored in NVRAM.

To display the current running configuration, enter the show running-config command. Enter the copy running-config startup-config command to save the current running configuration to the startup configuration file in NVRAM.

DD> enable
DD# copy running-config startup-config

To display the startup configuration, enter the show startup-config command. Enter the copy startup-config running-config command to write the startup configuration to the running configuration:

DD> enable
DD# copy startup-config running-config

To erase both configuration files (and start over), enter the write erase and reload commands:

DD> enable
DD# write erase
DD# reload

Caution   
This command sequence will erase the entire Director configuration in RAM and NVRAM and reload the Director.

Checking the Director Configuration

When you have configured an interface (for example, and Ethernet interface), use the show interfaces command to check the network interface statistics. Options to the show interface command include the type of interface (for example, Token Ring, Ethernet, and so on), and the unit number of the interface. The following example shows the output of show interfaces ethernet 0:

DD> show interfaces ethernet 0

Ethernet 0 is up, line protocol is up
  Hardware is MCI Ethernet, address is aa00.0400.0134 (bia 0000.0c00.4369)
  Internet address is 193.195.74.236, subnet mask is 255.255.255.248
  MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000 Kbit, DLY 1000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
  Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive not set
  ARP type: ARPA, PROBE, ARP Timeout 4:00:00
  Last input 0:00:01, output 0:00:10, output hang never
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 2 drops
  Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
  Five minute input rate 61000 bits/sec, 4 packets/sec
  Five minute output rate 1000 bits/sec, 2 packets/sec
     2922 packets input, 5844 bytes, 0 no buffer
     Received 192450 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants
     0 input errors, 3 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
     0 packets output, 185562 bytes, 0 underruns
     0 output errors, 0 collisions, 1 interface resets, 0 restarts

The field underruns in the output of the show interface command may be nonzero in approximately one of 250,000 packets.

To display the current internal status of a network processor module, use the show controller command with the interface type and unit number options. The following is the output of the show controller ethernet 0 command:

DD# show controller e 0

LANCE unit 0, NIM slot 0, NIM type code 9, NIM version 2
Media Type is 10BaseT, Link State is Up, Squelch is Normal
idb 0x6061CD2C, ds 0x6061EB30, eim_regs = 0x3C000000
IB at 0x40006DAC: mode=0x0000, mcfilter 0000/0000/0100/0000
station address 0000.0c14.1228  default station address 0000.0c14.1228
buffer size 1524
RX ring with 32 entries at 0x40006DF0
Rxhead = 0x40006ED8 (29), Rxp = 0x6061EBBC (29)
00 pak=0x60625F48 ds=0xA80220A6 status=0x80 max_size=1524 pak_size=316
01 pak=0x60625D88 ds=0xA80219EE status=0x80 max_size=1524 pak_size=296
02 pak=0x60625BC8 ds=0xA8021336 status=0x80 max_size=1524 pak_size=306
03 pak=0x60625A08 ds=0xA8020C7E status=0x80 max_size=1524 pak_size=305
04 pak=0x60625848 ds=0xA80205C6 status=0x80 max_size=1524 pak_size=94
TX ring with 32 entries at 0x40007028, tx_count = 0
tx_head = 0x40007100 (27), head_txp = 0x6061ECC8 (27)
tx_tail = 0x40007100 (27), tail_txp = 0x6061ECC8 (27)
00 pak=0x000000 ds=0xA816C872 status=0x03 status2=0x0000 pak_size=60
01 pak=0x000000 ds=0xA8180996 status=0x03 status2=0x0000 pak_size=308
02 pak=0x000000 ds=0xA816C872 status=0x03 status2=0x0000 pak_size=60
03 pak=0x000000 ds=0xA816C872 status=0x03 status2=0x0000 pak_size=60
0 missed datagrams, 0 overruns
0 transmitter underruns, 0 excessive collisions
0 single collisions, 0 multiple collisions
0 dma memory errors, 0 CRC errors
 
0 alignment errors, 0 runts, 0 giants
0 tdr, 0 spurious initialization done interrupts
0 no enp status, 0 buffer errors, 0 overflow errors
0 tx_buff, 0 throttled, 0 enabled
Lance csr0 = 0x73

Note   If the cable is DCE, the output of the show controller command displays the clock rate. For complete command descriptions and instructions, refer to the Cisco IOS command reference publications.


Verifying Network Connectivity

After you have installed and configured the Director, you can use the following commands in user EXEC mode to verify network connectivity:

telnet—Logs in to a remote node

ping—Sends a special datagram to the destination device, then waits for a reply datagram from that device

trace—Discovers the routes that packets take when traveling from one Director to another

For troubleshooting information, refer to the Cisco IOS System Error Messages and Debug Command Reference publications. You can also access "Technical Assistance" at the World Wide Web URL http://www.cisco.com (Cisco Connection Online) for a list of frequently asked questions and technical tips.

Specifying the Boot Method

You can enter multiple boot commands in the configuration in NVRAM to provide a backup method for loading the Cisco DistributedDirector image onto the Director. The Director boots using the first boot command that succeeds. If you enter multiple boot commands, the Director executes them in the order they are entered. There are two ways to load the Cisco DistributedDirector image: from Flash memory or from a TFTP server on the network.

Flash memory

Information stored in Flash memory is not vulnerable to network failures that might occur when you load system software from servers. In the following example, replace filename with the filename of the Cisco DistributedDirector image:

DD> enable
Password: enablepassword
DD# configure terminal
DD (config)# boot system flash filename
DD (config)# Ctrl-Z
DD# copy running-config startup-config
Building configuration ...
[OK]
DD# exit
DD>

TFTP server

If Flash memory is not available, or if Flash memory does not contain a valid Cisco DistributedDirector image, you can specify that system software be loaded from a TFTP server on your network as a backup boot method for the Director. In the following example, replace filename with the filename of the Cisco DistributedDirector image, and replace ipaddress with the IP address of the TFTP server:

DD> enable
Password: enablepassword
DD# configure terminal
DD (config)# boot system tftp filename ipaddress
DD (config)# Ctrl-Z
DD# copy running-config startup-config
Building configuration ...
[OK]
DD# exit
DD>

Getting More Information

For more information about Director software configuration refer to the chapter "."

In addition, the Cisco IOS configuration guide and command reference publications are available on the Documentation CD-ROM, Cisco's online library of product information. To order the Documentation CD, or paper documentation, refer to the Cisco Information Packet publication that accompanied your Director.


Note   The Cisco Information Packet publication was previously called Cisco Warranty, Service, and Support.