Cisco GSS Administration Guide (Software Version 3.1(1))
Configuring SNMP
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Configuring SNMP

Table Of Contents

Configuring SNMP

Overview

Supported MIBs and Notifications

Configuring SNMP on the GSS

Configuring SNMP Server Notifications

Configuring the CPU Performance Threshold Values

Configuring SNMP Server Trap Limits

Specifying Recipients for SNMP Notification Operations

Viewing the SNMP Status

Viewing MIB Files on the GSS


Configuring SNMP


This chapter describes how to configure Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) to query GSS devices for standard MIB resources.

It contains the following major sections:

Overview

Supported MIBs and Notifications

Configuring SNMP on the GSS

Configuring SNMP Server Notifications

Configuring the CPU Performance Threshold Values

Configuring SNMP Server Trap Limits

Specifying Recipients for SNMP Notification Operations

Viewing the SNMP Status

Viewing MIB Files on the GSS

Overview

SNMP is a set of network management standards for IP-based internetworks. SNMP includes a protocol, a database-structure specification, and a set of management data objects. SNMP implementations typically consist of a management application running on one or more network management systems (NMSs), and agent applications, usually executing in firmware on various network devices.

SNMP obtains information from the network through a Management Information Base (MIB). The MIB is a database of code blocks called MIB objects. Each MIB object controls one specific function, such as counting how many bytes are transmitted through an agent's port. The MIB object consists of MIB variables, which define the MIB object name, description, and default value.

Each GSS or GSSM contains an SNMP agent, net-snmp version 5.1.2, that network management systems query for MIB resources. SNMP runs on GSS port 161 by default. The SNMP agent receives instructions from the SNMP manager and also sends management information back to the SNMP manager as events occur.

Supported MIBs and Notifications

Table 6-1 identifies the supported MIBs for the GSS.

Table 6-1 SNMP MIB Support 

MIB Support
Capability MIB

CISCO-GSLB-DNS-MIB

CISCO-GSLB-DNS-CAPABILITY

Description: Defines objects for status and statistics information of DNS-related Global Server Load Balancing (GSLB) operations.

Note the following conditions:

DNS global statistics, answer MIB table, and domain MIB table are implemented in GSS software version 3.1. Beginning software version 2.0, the GSS supports the traps defined in this MIB.

When an answer state goes to "Operational Suspend" due to the Manual Reactivation (MR) feature, the cgdAnswerStatus MIB reports the answer status as "other" until the MIB is enhanced to incorporate the new "Operational Suspend" value. This condition is applicable only when the MR feature is enabled.

CISCO-GSLB-HEALTH-MON-MIB

CISCO-GSLB-HEALTH-MON-
CAPABILITY

Description: The GSS does not currently support any OIDs for this MIB, but it does support the related MIB SNMP traps (see Table 6-2).

CISCO-GSLB-SYSTEM-MIB

CISCO-GSLB-SYSTEM-CAPABILITY

Description: Defines the objects for network and system information of the GSLB as a network device. The MIB objects define information about GLSB status, GSLB peers (other GSLB devices on the same network that it interacts with) information and status, GSLB proximity information related statistics, and more. This MIB also defines the related notifications.

CISCO-IMAGE-MIB

CISCO-IMAGE-CAPABILITY

Description: Provides a list of the features supported by the software image running in the GSS.

CISCO-PROCESS-MIB

CISCO-PROCESS-CAPABILITY

Description: Defines the objects for monitoring CPU usage and active system processes. The CPU utilization MIBs provide aggregate CPU utilization for dual-code GSS devices.

Note the following conditions:

The OIDs that are implemented in this MIB provide GSS-specific information only for the following processes: Boomerang, Nodemgr, Crdirector, Crm, Selector (DNS server), Database, Tomcat (GUI server), Keep alive engine, Proximity, Sticky, and Drp.

The cpmProcessRespawnCount OID provides information about the number of times the process re-spawned since the last system reboot. This information does not include intentional, user-initiated process restarts that are a result of using one of the following CLI commands: reload, gss start/restart, restore-factory-defaults, gss disable/enable, or shutdown.

   

CISCO-SYSTEMS-EXT-MIB

CISCO-SYSTEM-EXT-CAPABILITY

Description: Monitors high availability (HA), SNMP SET errors, and bandwidths. This MIB also provides information about the core files that the GSS generates.

ENTITY-MIB

CISCO-ENTITY-CAPABILITY

Description: Provides comprehensive device information, including hardware and software details.



Note When the GSS is not running, you cannot query CISCO-GSLB and CISCO-PROCESS MIB values using SNMP requests even if the SNMP agent is enabled.


The following URL provides details about the objects that the GSS supports for each MIB type:

http://www.cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml

From this site, choose the GSS from the Cisco Secure and VPN Products drop-down list and then click on the associated Capability MIB. This site provides information about the supported GSS MIBs, Capability MIBs, and notifications. To find the actual MIB OIDs implemented in a MIB, see the corresponding Capability MIB, which describes both the capabilities of an agent with respect to the corresponding MIB module and the variations in the MIB implementations (if any).

In addition to the MIBs listed in Table 6-1, the GSS supports the following generic MIBs:

SNMPv2-MIB

IF-MIB

RFC1213-MIB

IP-MIB

TCP-MIB

UDP-MIB

HOST-RESOURCES-MIB (partially supported)

UCD-SNMP-MIB (partially supported)

Table 6-2 identifies the supported SNMP notifications (traps) for the GSS. The GSS generates the notifications only when you enable them using the GSS CLI (see the "Configuring SNMP Server Notifications" section).

Table 6-2 SNMP Trap Support 

Notification Name
Notification Location

authenticationFailure

SNMPv2-MIB

Description: Indicates that the SNMP entity has received a protocol message that is not properly authenticated.

coldStart

SNMPv2-MIB

Description: Indicates that the SNMP entity, supporting a notification originator application, is reinitializing itself and that its configuration may have been altered.

ciscoGslbAnswerEventStatusChange

CISCO-GSLB-DNS-MIB

Description: Indicates a change in the status of an answer element.

ciscoGslbDnsEventClause

CISCO-GSLB-DNS-MIB

Description: Indicates when a transition occurs from the use of one clause to another for selecting an answer on a DNS rule match. For example, a transition occurs when a DNS rule uses a clause identified by the cgdSecondClauseId object instead of the cgdFirstClauseId object. The cgdFirstClauseId object contains the clause number used for selecting the most recent answer for a DNS rule. The cgdSecondClauseId object contains the clause number that was previously used to select an answer for the DNS rule

ciscoGslbKalEventStatus

CISCO-GSLB-HEALTH-MON-MIB

Description: Indicates a change in the status of a keep alive associated with an answer element.

ciscoGslbSystemPeerEventStatus

CISCO-GSLB-SYSTEM-MIB

Description: Indicates a change in the status of a GSS peer device. This notification is reported only by a GSS device with a cgsNodeService object value of "primary."

cpmCPUFallingThreshold

CISCO-PROCESS-MIB

Description: Indicates when the CPU usage drops below the specified threshold.

cpmCPURisingThreshold

CISCO-PROCESS-MIB

Description: Indicates when the CPU usage exceeds the specified threshold.

cseFailSwCoreNotifyExtended

CISCO-SYSTEM-EXT-MIB

Description: Indicates when the software becomes unresponsive and a core file is generated.


Configuring SNMP on the GSS

Before you use SNMP to monitor the GSS or GSSM, you must enable the SNMP agent on each GSS device. In addition to enabling the SNMP agent on the GSS device, you also specify an SNMP community name, name of the contact person, and the physical location for the GSS device.


Note Be aware that existing, pre-v2.0, SNMP community, contact, and location configurations are retained after a v3.0 software upgrade. For example, if you have configured a company contact in v1.3 and then upgrade to GSS v3.0, that contact will be retained after the v3.0 upgrade is completed.



Note In the pre-v2.0 GSS software, a default community string is set to public after you enable SNMP. After a v2.0 software upgrade, however, no default community string is set when you enable SNMP.

You can add the public community string manually in the v2.0 software or higher as explained in the steps that follow. Any community strings that you configured in the pre-v2.0 GSS software will be retained after a v3.0 software upgrade.


Use the snmp-server command in global configuration mode to enable and configure SNMP on your GSS device.

To configure SNMP for a GSS device, perform the following steps:

1. Log in to the CLI and enable privileged EXEC mode.

gss1.example.com> enable
gss1.example.com# 

If you are accessing the GSS remotely using Telnet or SSH, the CLI prompts you for the enable password. The default password is default. For more information about the enable password and configuring a new password, see the Cisco Global Site Selector Getting Started Guide.

2. Access global configuration mode.

gss1.example.com# config
gss1.example.com(config)# 

3. Enable the SNMP agent by using the following command.

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server enable

4. Specify an SNMP community name for this GSS device by using the snmp community-string command. Each GSS device then becomes part of the named community. To change the SNMP community string, enter an unquoted text string with no space and a maximum length of 32 characters. In the v2.0 software or higher, SNMP does not allow `@' text string in the community string settings.

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server community-string public

5. Configure a contact for this GSS device using the snmp-server contact command. Enter an unquoted text string with a maximum of 255 characters without any spaces.

gss-pilot1.cisco.com(config)# snmp-server contact JoeSmith-jsmith@cisco.com

6. Specify a location by using the location command and the location itself. The maximum length of the location is 255 characters.

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server location Boxborough

To disable SNMP or any of the parameters outlined above, use the no form of the snmp command. For example, to disable the SNMP contacts for the GSS, enter:

gss1.example.com(config)# no snmp-server contact JoeSmith-jsmith@cisco.com

Configuring SNMP Server Notifications

You can enable traps on your GSS device by using the snmp-server enable-traps command in global configuration mode. To disable traps, use the no form of this command.

To configure SNMP server notifications for a GSS device, perform the following steps:

1. Log in to the CLI and enable privileged EXEC mode.

gss1.example.com> enable
gss1.example.com# 

If you are accessing the GSS remotely using Telnet or SSH, the CLI prompts you for the enable password. The default password is default. For more information about the enable password and configuring a new password, see the Cisco Global Site Selector Getting Started Guide.

2. Access global configuration mode.

gss1.example.com# config
gss1.example.com(config)# 

3. Enable the SNMP agent by using the following command:

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server enable

4. Enable SNMP server notifications by entering the snmp-server enable-traps command and following it with one of the available options:

gslb—Enables all SNMP GSLB notifications.

gslb ans—Enables SNMP GSLB answer-status change notifications only.

gslb dns—Enables SNMP GSLB DNS clause transition notifications only.

gslb kal—Enables SNMP GSLB keepalive-status change notifications only.

gslb peer-status—Enables SNMP GSLB peer-status change notifications only.

core—Enables SNMP core-file discovery notifications.

performance—Enables SNMP CPU usage rising and falling threshold notifications for monitoring CPU performance. By default, both of these threshold values are set to an average utilization rate of the 80 percent of the total CPU utilization. To configure the CPU usage rising and falling threshold values, see the "Configuring the CPU Performance Threshold Values" section.

performance cpu-falling-threshold—Enables only SNMP CPU usage falling threshold notification for monitoring CPU performance. By default, the threshold value is set to 80 percent of the total CPU utilization. To configure the CPU usage falling threshold value, see the "Configuring the CPU Performance Threshold Values" section.

performance cpu-rising-threshold—Enables only SNMP CPU usage rising threshold notifications for monitoring CPU performance. By default, the threshold value is set to 80 percent of the total CPU utilization. To configure the CPU usage rising threshold value, see the "Configuring the CPU Performance Threshold Values" section.

snmp—Enables all SNMP agent notifications.

snmp authentication—Enables only SNMP agent authentication notifications.

snmp cold-start—Enables only SNMP agent cold start notifications.

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server enable-traps kal

5. (SNMP v1 notifications only) Specify the GSS interface address associated with one of its Ethernet interfaces as the Agent-Address (trap source) to send in the trap. To specify the trap source, use the snmp-server trap-source ethernet interface command where the interface keyword specifies GSS interface 0 (the default) or 1.

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server trap-source ethernet 0

To disable SNMP server notifications, use the no form of the snmp-server enable-traps command. For example, to disable SNMP GSLB keepalive notifications, enter:

gss1.example.com(config)# no snmp-server enable-traps gslb kal

Configuring the CPU Performance Threshold Values

You can configure the GSS to issue SNMP traps that enable you to monitor CPU performance. The GSS can issue CPU performance notification traps when one or both of the following conditions exist:

CPU usage rising—The GSS issues a CPU rising notification when the CPU usage exceeds the specified threshold. The GSS does not issue a second CPU rising threshold notification if the CPU usage remains above the usage rising threshold value for two consecutive monitoring intervals. The GSS issues another notification only after the CPU usage drops below the specified threshold value and then exceeds the threshold during subsequent monitoring intervals.

CPU usage falling—The GSS issues a CPU falling notification when the CPU usage falls below the specified threshold. The GSS does not issue a second CPU falling threshold notification if the CPU usage remains below the usage falling threshold value for two consecutive monitoring intervals. The GSS issues another notification only after the CPU usage rises above the specified threshold value and then falls below the threshold during subsequent monitoring intervals.

The GSS monitors CPU usage every five seconds.

You can configure the CPU usage rising threshold value that determines when the GSS issues a CPU rising threshold crossing notification. Configure the rising threshold value by using the snmp-server cpu-rising-threshold command in global configuration mode.

The syntax of this command is as follows:

snmp-server cpu-rising-threshold rising_threshold

The rising_threshold argument is the threshold value as a percentage of the total CPU utilization. Enter a percentage value from 1 to 100. By default, the threshold value is set to 80 percent of the total CPU utilization. Use the no form of this command to return the threshold to its default value.

You can configure the CPU usage falling threshold value that determines when the GSS issues a CPU falling threshold crossing notification. Configure the falling threshold value using the snmp-server cpu-falling-threshold command in global configuration mode.

The syntax of this command is as follows:

snmp-server cpu-falling-threshold falling_threshold

The falling_threshold argument is the threshold value as a percentage of the total CPU utilization. Enter a percentage value from 1 to 100. By default, the threshold value is set to 80 percent of the total CPU utilization. Use the no form of this command to return the threshold to its default value.


Note You must enable the SNMP performance trap type to enable the GSS to issue the CPU usage rising and falling threshold notifications (see the "Configuring SNMP Server Notifications" section).


To configure the CPU usage rising and falling threshold values, perform the following steps:

1. Log in to the CLI and enable privileged EXEC mode.

gss1.example.com> enable
gss1.example.com# 

If you are accessing the GSS remotely using Telnet or SSH, the CLI prompts you for the enable password. The default password is default. For more information about the enable password and configuring a new password, see the Cisco Global Site Selector Getting Started Guide.

2. Access global configuration mode.

gss1.example.com# config
gss1.example.com(config)# 

3. Enable the SNMP agent by using the following command:

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server enable

4. Enable the SNMP CPU performance notifications by using the following command:

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server enable-traps performance

5. Configure the CPU usage rising threshold value by using the following command:

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server cpu-rising-threshold 75

6. Configure the CPU usage falling threshold value by using the following command:

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server cpu-falling-threshold 75

To view the current CPU usage, use the show processes | grep CPU command. The command output displays the CPU usage as a percentage of the total CPU usage over a 5-second interval, 1-minute interval, and 5-minute interval.

Configuring SNMP Server Trap Limits

You can configure the maximum rate at which SNMP traps are set on your GSS device by using the snmp-server trap-limit command in global configuration mode. To set the default trap rate, use the no form of this command. The default is 25 traps per minute.

To configure SNMP server trap limits for a GSS device, perform the following steps:

1. Log in to the CLI and enable privileged EXEC mode.

gss1.example.com> enable
gss1.example.com# 

If you are accessing the GSS remotely using Telnet or SSH, the CLI prompts you for the enable password. The default password is default. For more information about the enable password and configuring a new password, see the Cisco Global Site Selector Getting Started Guide.

2. Access global configuration mode.

gss1.example.com# config
gss1.example.com(config)# 

3. Enable the SNMP agent by using the following command:

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server enable

4. Enable SNMP server trap limits by entering the snmp-server trap-limit command and following it with one of the available options and a specified value:

answer-trap value—Configures a rate-limit for the answer trap.

dns-clause-trap value—Configures the rate-limit for DNS clause traps.

keepalive-trap value—Configures the rate-limit for the keepalive trap.

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server trap-limit answer trap 10

To set the trap rate back to its default rate, use the no form of the snmp-server trap-limit command as follows:

gss1.example.com(config)# no snmp-server trap-limit answer-trap

Specifying Recipients for SNMP Notification Operations

You can specify the recipient of an SNMP notification operation by using the snmp-server host command in global configuration mode. To remove the specified host, use the no form of this command.

To specify the recipient of an SNMP notification operation, perform the following steps:

1. Log in to the CLI and enable privileged EXEC mode.

gss1.example.com> enable
gss1.example.com# 

If you are accessing the GSS remotely using Telnet or SSH, the CLI prompts you for the enable password. The default password is default. For more information about the enable password and configuring a new password, see the Cisco Global Site Selector Getting Started Guide.

2. Access global configuration mode.

gss1.example.com# config
gss1.example.com(config)# 

3. Enable the SNMP agent by entering the following command:

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server enable

4. Specify the recipients of SNMP notification operations by using the snmp-server host command and a host-address and a community-string.

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server host 10.1.1.1 MyCommunity

5. Send SNMP traps to the specified host by entering the following command:

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server host 10.1.1.1 MyCommunity traps

Note You can configure a maximum of 10 hosts for traps notification.


6. Specify the version of the SNMP protocol used to send the traps by entering the version command and one of the available keywords:

1—Specifies SNMPv1 (the default).

2—Specifies SNMPv2c.

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server host 10.1.1.1 MyCommunity traps version 2

7. Specify the host UDP port to use by entering the udp-port command and the port number.

gss1.example.com(config)# snmp-server host 10.1.1.1 MyCommunity traps version 2 
udp-port 500

To remove the recipient of an SNMP notification, use the no form of the snmp-server host command. For example, to disable all SNMP notifications for sample IP address 10.1.1.1, UDP port 100, enter:

gss1.example.com(config)# no snmp-server host 10.1.1.1 MyCommunity traps version 2 
udp-port 100

Viewing the SNMP Status

When SNMP is enabled, you can display the SNMP status on your GSS device by using the show snmp command.

The syntax of this command is as follows:

show snmp

Verify that your SNMP agent, net snmp agent version 5.1.2, is enabled or disabled, as well as the configured names of the community-string, location, and contact.


Note You can also use the show services command to verify if SNMP is enabled or disabled.
You can also use the show running-configuration command to display the complete SNMP configuration.


For example, enter:

gss1.example.com# show snmp 
SNMP is enabled
sys contact: JSmith jsmith@cisco.com
sys location: Boxborough

0 SNMP packets input
        0 Bad SNMP versions
        0 Unknown community name
        0 Illegal operation for community name supplied
        0 Encoding errors
        0 Number of requested variables
        0 Number of altered variables
        0 Get-request PDUs
        0 Get-next PDUs
        0 Set-request PDUs
0 SNMP packets output
        0 Too big errors
        0 No such name errors
        0 Bad values errors
        0 General errors
			0 Trap PDUs

Community
---------
public

Host                            Port Version  Type
----                            ---- -------  ----
16.1.1.11                       162  v2c      trap

Trap type	Enabled
---------	-------
GSLB KAL transition	Yes
GSLB DNS clause change	Yes
GSLB answer transition	Yes
GSLB system core file discovery	Yes
GSLB system peer transition	Yes
SNMP authentication	Yes
Cold Start 	Yes
Cpu Rising Threshold	Yes
Cpu Falling Threshold	Yes

Trap type	Threshold value
---------	-------
Cpu Rising Threshold	0
Cpu Falling Threshold	0

Trap type	Trap Limit
---------	-------
GSLB answer transition	0
GSLB DNS clause change	0
GSLB KAL transition	0

gss1.example.com#

See the "Configuring SNMP on the GSS" section to change the status of your SNMP agent running on the GSS device.

Viewing MIB Files on the GSS

You can view the generic MIB files contained in the /mibs directory on the GSS by using the dir command. If you want to copy the MIB files from the /mibs directory on the GSS to another location on the GSS or to a remote network location, use the scp command.

For example, enter:

gss1.example.com# dir /mibs
total 1100
drwxr-xr-x    2 root   root    4096 Jul 18 08:45 .
drwxrwxrwx   19 root   root    4096 Jul 18 08:46 ..
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   17455 Jul 18 08:45 AGENTX-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   19850 Jul 18 08:45 DISMAN-SCHEDULE-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   64311 Jul 18 08:45 DISMAN-SCRIPT-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   50054 Jul 18 08:45 EtherLike-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    4660 Jul 18 08:45 HCNUM-TC.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   52544 Jul 18 08:45 HOST-RESOURCES-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   10583 Jul 18 08:45 HOST-RESOURCES-TYPES.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    4015 Jul 18 08:45 IANA-ADDRESS-FAMILY-NUMBERS-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    4299 Jul 18 08:45 IANA-LANGUAGE-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   15661 Jul 18 08:45 IANAifType-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    5066 Jul 18 08:45 IF-INVERTED-STACK-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   71691 Jul 18 08:45 IF-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    6260 Jul 18 08:45 INET-ADDRESS-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   26781 Jul 18 08:45 IP-FORWARD-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   23499 Jul 18 08:45 IP-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   15936 Jul 18 08:45 IPV6-ICMP-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   48703 Jul 18 08:45 IPV6-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    2367 Jul 18 08:45 IPV6-TC.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    7257 Jul 18 08:45 IPV6-TCP-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    4400 Jul 18 08:45 IPV6-UDP-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    1174 Jul 18 08:45 RFC-1215.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    3067 Jul 18 08:45 RFC1155-SMI.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   79667 Jul 18 08:45 RFC1213-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root  147822 Jul 18 08:45 RMON-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    4628 Jul 18 08:45 SMUX-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   15490 Jul 18 08:45 SNMP-COMMUNITY-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   20750 Jul 18 08:45 SNMP-FRAMEWORK-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    5261 Jul 18 08:45 SNMP-MPD-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   19083 Jul 18 08:45 SNMP-NOTIFICATION-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    8434 Jul 18 08:45 SNMP-PROXY-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   21495 Jul 18 08:45 SNMP-TARGET-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   38035 Jul 18 08:45 SNMP-USER-BASED-SM-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   33430 Jul 18 08:45 SNMP-VIEW-BASED-ACM-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    8263 Jul 18 08:45 SNMPv2-CONF.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   25052 Jul 18 08:45 SNMPv2-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    8924 Jul 18 08:45 SNMPv2-SMI.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   38034 Jul 18 08:45 SNMPv2-TC.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    3981 Jul 18 08:45 SNMPv2-TM.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   10765 Jul 18 08:45 TCP-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    2058 Jul 18 08:45 UCD-DEMO-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    3131 Jul 18 08:45 UCD-DISKIO-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    2928 Jul 18 08:45 UCD-DLMOD-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    8037 Jul 18 08:45 UCD-IPFWACC-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root   30343 Jul 18 08:45 UCD-SNMP-MIB.txt
-rw-r--r--    1 root   root    4076 Jul 18 08:45 UDP-MIB.txt