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Cisco ACE 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliances

Device Manager GUI Quick Configuration Note vA1(7), Cisco ACE 4700 Series Appliance

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Cisco ACE 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Device Manager GUI Quick Configuration Note

Table Of Contents

Cisco ACE 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Device Manager GUI Quick Configuration Note

ACE Features and Functionality Overview

Configuration Overview

Establishing a Console Connection on the ACE

Using the Setup Script to Enable Connectivity

Logging Into the Device Manager GUI

Configuring a Second Gigabit Ethernet Interface Port

Configuring the Server-Side VLAN Interface

Configuring a Virtual Server for Layer 7 Load Balancing

Viewing Server Status Information

Viewing Virtual Server Information

Viewing Real Server Information

Activating a Real Server

Configuring Advanced Features

Related Documentation

Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines


Cisco ACE 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Device Manager GUI Quick Configuration Note


Software Version A1(7)

This document describes how to initially configure the Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine (ACE) appliance using the Device Manager graphical user interface (GUI) to allow traffic and perform basic Layer 7 virtual IP (VIP) load balancing among multiple real servers. By completing the quick configuration procedures in this document, your ACE will be able to perform the following tasks:

Receive network traffic

Allow network connectivity

Match VIP-destined traffic flows

Load-balance traffic to a server farm

Before performing the procedures in this document, ensure that you have completed the ACE installation instructions as described in the Cisco Application Control Engine Appliance Hardware Installation Guide.


Note If you intend to use the command-line interface (CLI) to configure the ACE, see the Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance CLI Quick Configuration Note.


This document contains the following sections.

ACE Features and Functionality Overview

Configuration Overview

Establishing a Console Connection on the ACE

Using the Setup Script to Enable Connectivity

Logging Into the Device Manager GUI

Configuring a Second Gigabit Ethernet Interface Port

Configuring the Server-Side VLAN Interface

Configuring a Virtual Server for Layer 7 Load Balancing

Viewing Server Status Information

Configuring Advanced Features

Related Documentation

Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines

ACE Features and Functionality Overview

The ACE performs high-performance server load balancing (SLB) among groups of servers, server farms, firewalls, and other network devices, based on Layer 3 and Layer 4 through Layer 7 packet information. The ACE provides the following major features and functionality. For details, see the Online Help system provided with the GUI and the Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Device Manager GUI Configuration Guide.

Ethernet Interfaces—The ACE provides four physical Ethernet ports that provide an interface for connecting to 10-Mbps, 100-Mbps, or 1000-Mbps networks. Each Layer 2 Ethernet port supports autonegotiate, full-duplex, or half-duplex operation on an Ethernet LAN and can carry traffic within a designated VLAN interface.

Routing and Bridging—You configure the corresponding VLAN interfaces on the ACE as either routed or bridged. When you configure an IP address on an interface, the ACE automatically configures it as a routed mode interface. When you configure a bridge group on an interface VLAN, the ACE automatically configures it as a bridged interface.

Traffic Policies—The ACE allows you to perform advanced administration tasks such as using traffic policies to classify traffic flow and the action to take for the type of traffic. Traffic policies consist of class maps, policy maps, and service policies.

Redundancy—Redundancy provides fault tolerance for the stateful switchover of flow and offers increased uptime for a more robust network.

Virtualization—Virtualization allows you to manage ACE system resources and users and the services provided to your customers. Multiple contexts use virtualization to partition your ACE into multiple virtual devices or contexts.

Server Load Balancing— Server load balancing (SLB) on the ACE provides network traffic policies for SLB, real servers and server farms, health monitoring through probes, and firewall load balancing. HTTP compression is also supported.

ACE Security Features—The ACE contains several security features including ACLs, NAT, user authentication and accounting, HTTP deep packet inspection, FTP command request inspection, and application protocol inspection of DNS, HTTP, ICMP, or RTSP.

Secure Sockets Layer—The SSL protocol on the ACE provides encryption technology for the Internet, ensuring secure transactions.

Application Acceleration and Optimization—The ACE includes several optimization technologies to accelerate web application performance, optimize network performance, and improve access to critical business information.

Device Manager GUI Interface—The ACE Device Manager GUI resides in Flash memory on the appliance to provide a browser-based interface for configuring and managing the ACE.

Command-Line Interface—The CLI is a line-oriented user interface that provides commands for configuring, managing, and monitoring the ACE.

Configuration Overview

The following steps summarize the tasks that are required to perform a basic configuration of an ACE network:

1. Connect to the ACE and run the setup script to establish connectivity through a Gigabit Ethernet port and a management VLAN.

2. Log into the ACE Device Manager GUI.

3. Configure a second Gigabit Ethernet port for server-side connectivity.

4. Configure a server-side VLAN interface.

5. Create a virtual server and set up a default load-balancing service.

6. Confirm the server operational status.

The configuration procedures in this document describe a two-VLAN networking configuration that logically distinguishes the VLAN that faces the client-side and the VLAN that connects to the servers. Figure 1 shows the two-VLAN networking configuration example used in this document.


Note The procedures in this document assume that your network configuration includes two servers. Ensure that you specify the IP address assigned to the server-side VLAN (see the "Configuring the Server-Side VLAN Interface" section) as the default route on the physical real servers.


Figure 1 Two-VLAN (Client-Side and Server-Side) Networking Configuration

Keep in mind that the network configuration described in this document is suitable for a test environment but should never be used in production for the following reasons:

The management VLAN interface should not also be used as the client interface of the ACE.

An extended IP access list that allows IP traffic originating from any other host addresses should never be applied on a management interface of the ACE

For security reasons, always change the administrative password.

If you configure virtualization, we recommend that you do not configure server load balancing in the Admin virtual context and only in the various configured user virtual contexts. We recommend that you maintain a clean Admin virtual context which primarily deals with resource allocation, VLAN allocation, and Fault Tolerance configuration, and so on.

Establishing a Console Connection on the ACE

The ACE has one standard RS-232 serial port located on its rear panel that operates as the console port. You establish a direct serial connection between your terminal or a PC and the ACE by making a serial connection to this console port. The integrated serial port uses a 9-pin male D-shell connector. Use a straight-through cable to connect the ACE to the terminal or a PC. For instructions on connecting a console cable to your ACE appliance, see the Cisco Application Control Engine Appliance Hardware Installation Guide.

Any device connected to this port must be capable of asynchronous transmission. Connection requires a terminal configured as 9600 baud, 8 data bits, hardware flow control on, 1 stop bit, no parity.


Note Only the Admin context is accessible through the console port; all other contexts can be reached through Telnet or SSH sessions on the Ethernet ports.


Once connected, you can use any terminal communications application to access the ACE Device Manager (or the ACE CLI). The following procedure uses HyperTerminal for Windows.

To access the ACE by using a direct serial connection, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Launch HyperTerminal. The Connection Description window appears.

Step 2 Enter a name for your session in the Name field.

Step 3 Click OK. The Connect To window appears.

Step 4 From the drop-down list, choose the COM port to which the device is connected.

Step 5 Click OK. The Port Properties window appears.

Step 6 Set the port properties:

Baud Rate = 9600

Data Bits = 8

Hardware Flow Control = On

Parity = none

Stop Bits = 1

Step 7 Click OK to connect.

Step 8 Press Enter to access the CLI prompt.

switch login: 


Using the Setup Script to Enable Connectivity

When you boot the ACE for the first time and the ACE does not detect a startup-configuration file, a setup script guides you through the process of configuring a management VLAN on the ACE through one of its Gigabit Ethernet ports to enable connectivity to the Device Manager GUI. After you specify a Gigabit Ethernet port, port mode, and management VLAN, the setup script automatically applies the following default configuration:

Management VLAN allocated to the specified Ethernet port.

Extended IP access list that allows IP traffic originating from any other host addresses.

Traffic classification (class map and policy map) created for management protocols HTTP, HTTPS, ICMP, SSH, Telnet, and XML-HTTPS. HTTPS is dedicated for connectivity with the Device Manager GUI.

VLAN interface configured on the ACE and a policy map assigned to the VLAN interface.

The ACE provides a default answer in brackets [ ] for each question in the setup script. To accept a default configuration prompt, press Enter, and the ACE accepts the setting. To skip the remaining configuration prompts, press Ctrl-C any time during the configuration sequence.


Note The script configuration process described in this section is identical to the script configuration process performed using the setup CLI command.


To configure the ACE from the setup script, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Ensure that you have established a direct serial connection between your terminal or a PC and the ACE (see the "Establishing a Console Connection on the ACE" section).

Step 2 Press the power button on the front of the ACE and the boot process occurs. See the Cisco Application Control Engine Appliance Hardware Installation Guide for details.

Step 3 At the login prompt, log into the ACE by entering the login username and password. By default, the username and password are admin. For example, enter:

switch login: admin
Password: admin

---- Basic System Configuration Dialog ----

This setup utility will guide you through the basic configuration of
the system. Setup configures only enough connectivity to the
ACE appliance Device Manager GUI of the system.

*Note: setup is mainly used for configuring the system initially,
when no configuration is present. So setup always assumes system
defaults and not the current system configuration values.

Press Enter at anytime to skip a dialog. Use ctrl-c at anytime
to skip the remaining dialogs.

Would you like to enter the basic configuration dialog (yes/no): 

Step 4 At the prompt "Would you like to enter the basic configuration dialog? (yes/no):", type yes to continue the setup.

Step 5 At the prompt "Which port is used to carry Management vlan (1 - 4)? [1]:", specify the Ethernet port that you want to use to access the Device Manager GUI. Valid entries are 1 through 4. The default is Ethernet port 1. For this example configuration, specify 2 for Ethernet port 2. Press Enter. Ethernet interface port 2 will be used as both the management port and for client-side connectivity.

Step 6 At the prompt "Configure GigabitEthernet port mode (Access/Trunk) [Trunk]:", identify whether the Ethernet port is to be configured as a VLAN access port or as a VLAN trunk port. The default is Trunk. For this example configuration, leave this selection set to Trunk. Press Enter.

Step 7 At the prompt "Which vlan is used as Management vlan (2 - 4094)? [10]:", specify the number that you want to assign to the VLAN interface. Valid values are from 2 to 4094. The default is VLAN 10. For this example configuration, specify 102 for VLAN 102. Press Enter.

Step 8 At the prompt "What is the Management vlan ip address [192.168.1.10]:", assign an IP address to the management VLAN interface. When you assign an IP address to a VLAN interface, the ACE automatically makes it a routed mode interface. For this example configuration, the IP address is 172.16.2.151. Press Enter.

Step 9 At the prompt "What is the Management vlan ip netmask [255.255.255.0]:", assign a subnet mask to the management VLAN interface. For this example configuration, the subnet mask is 255.255.255.0. Press Enter.

Step 10 At the prompt "Configure the default gateway? (yes/no) [y]:", choose whether to assign an IP address of the gateway router (the next-hop address for this route). If you specify yes, enter the IP address of the default gateway. The gateway address must be in the same network as specified in the IP address for a VLAN interface. For this example configuration, the default gateway is 172.16.2.1. Press Enter.

Step 11 After you configure the Ethernet port, port mode, and management VLAN, the setup script automatically applies the appropriate configuration:


The following configuration will be applied:
interface gigabitEthernet 1/2
  switchport trunk allowed vlan 102
  no shut
access-list ALL extended permit ip any any
class-map type management match-any remote_access
  match protocol xml-https any
  match protocol icmp any
  match protocol telnet any
  match protocol ssh any
  match protocol http any
  match protocol https any
policy-map type management first-match remote_mgmt_allow_policy
  class remote_access
    permit
interface vlan 102
  ip address 172.16.2.151 255.255.255.0
  access-group input ALL
  service-policy input remote_mgmt_allow_policy
  no shutdown
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 172.16.2.1

Step 12 At the prompt "Would you like to edit the configuration? (yes/no) [n]:", enter one of the following replies:

Type y to modify the configuration at the CLI.

Type n to accept the configuration without any additional changes. This setting is the default.

Step 13 At the prompt "Use this configuration? (yes/no) [y]:", enter one of the following replies:

Type y to instruct the ACE to boot using the newly created running-configuration file. This setting is the default.

Type n to bypass using the newly created running-configuration file and boot with an empty configuration.

Step 14 At the prompt "Would you like to save the running-config to startup-config? (yes/no) [n]:", enter one of the following replies:

Type y to save the running-configuration to the startup-configuration file.

Type n to bypass saving the running-configuration to the startup-configuration file.


Note If you choose no to bypass saving the running-configuration to the startup-configuration file, after a reboot of the ACE you may loose all of the setup script configuration changes, which will require you to rerun the setup script before you can access the ACE Device Manager GUI.



Logging Into the Device Manager GUI

You access the ACE Device Manager GUI through a web-based interface. To log in to the Device Manager, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Use a web browser and navigate to the Device Manager login screen by typing the IP address or hostname of the ACE. Enter the secure HTTP address of your ACE in the address field. For example, enter:

https://172.16.2.151/ or https://ace_name/

Step 2 Click Yes at the prompt to accept (trust) and install the signed certificate from Cisco Systems, Inc. To avoid approving the signed certificate every time you log in to the Device Manager, accept the certificate. For instructions on trusting certificates from a particular owner or website, see the online help included with your browser.

The Device Manager GUI Login screen appears (Figure 2).

Figure 2 Device Manager GUI Login Screen

Step 3 In the User Name field, type admin for the admin user account.

Step 4 In the Password field, type admin.


Note For security reasons, you should change the administrative password. If you do not change the administrative password, security on your ACE can be compromised because the administrative password is configured to be the same for every ACE shipped from Cisco Systems. For details, see the Online Help system provided with the GUI and the Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Device Manager GUI Configuration Guide.


Step 5 Click Login. When you log in, the default window that appears is the Virtual Contexts screen as shown in Figure 3. The first time that you access the All Virtual Contexts table, you will see only the Admin context.

Figure 3 All Virtual Contexts Table (Admin Context)



Configuring a Second Gigabit Ethernet Interface Port

The following procedure describes how to configure a second Gigabit Ethernet interface port that is used to connect to the servers. You previously defined a Gigabit Ethernet interface port (port 2) using the setup script (see the "Using the Setup Script to Enable Connectivity" section). For this example configuration, you will configure Gigabit Ethernet interface port 3.

To configure a second Gigabit Ethernet interface port, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Choose Config > Virtual Contexts > Network > GigabitEthernet Interfaces. The GigabitEthernet Interfaces table appears (Figure 4).

Figure 4 GigabitEthernet Interfaces Table

Step 2 By default, the gigabitEthernet 1/1 checkbox is checked in the GigabitEthernet Interfaces Table. Uncheck the gigabitEthernet 1/1 checkbox, check the gigabit ethernet interface1/3 checkbox, then click Edit () to define attributes for the port. The GigabitEthernet Interfaces page appears (Figure 5).

Figure 5 GigabitEthernet Interfaces Page

Step 3 Enter the following attributes for port 3. Leave the remaining attributes blank or at their default state.

Admin Status—Up

Speed—Auto

Port Operation Mode—Switchport

Switchport type—Access

Access VLAN—202


Note For background details about these attributes, see the Online Help system provided with the GUI and the Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Device Manager GUI Configuration Guide.


Step 4 Click Deploy Now to save your entries and to return to the GigabitEthernet Interfaces table. Note that both Gigabit Ethernet interface ports 2 and 3 are configured in the table (Figure 6).

Figure 6 GigabitEthernet Interfaces Table With Both Ethernet Ports Configured



Configuring the Server-Side VLAN Interface

The following procedure describes how to configure a server-side VLAN interface for the admin context. You previously defined the client-side VLAN interface VLAN 102 using the setup script (see the "Using the Setup Script to Enable Connectivity" section). For this example configuration, you will configure VLAN 202.

To configure the server-side VLAN interface, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Choose Config > Virtual Contexts > Network > VLAN Interfaces. The VLAN Interfaces table appears (Figure 7).

Figure 7 VLAN Interfaces Table

Step 2 Click Add () to add a new VLAN interface. The VLAN Interfaces page appears (Figure 8).

Figure 8 VLAN Interfaces Page

Step 3 Enter the following VLAN attributes. Leave the remaining attributes blank or at their default state.

VLAN—202

IP Address—IP address assigned to this interface

Netmask—Subnet mask to be used

Admin Status—Up

Ensure that you also specify the IP address assigned to the server-side VLAN as the default route on the physical real servers.


Note For background details about these attributes, see the Online Help system provided with the GUI and the Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Device Manager GUI Configuration Guide.


Step 4 Click Deploy Now at the bottom of the screen to save your entries and to return to the VLAN Interfaces table. Note that both VLAN interfaces 102 and 202 are configured in the table (Figure 9).

Figure 9 VLAN Interface Table With Two VLANs Configured



Configuring a Virtual Server for Layer 7 Load Balancing

In a load-balancing environment, a virtual server is a construct that allows multiple physical servers to appear as one for load-balancing purposes. A virtual server is bound to physical services running on real servers in a server farm and uses IP address and port information to distribute incoming client requests to the servers in the server farm according to a specified load-balancing algorithm.

Real servers are dedicated physical servers that you typically configure in groups called server farms. These servers provide services to clients, for example, HTTP or XML content. You identify real servers with names and characterize them with IP addresses, connection limits, and weight values.


Note This procedure assumes that your network configuration includes two servers. Ensure that you specify the IP address assigned to the server-side VLAN as the default route on the physical real servers (see the "Configuring the Server-Side VLAN Interface" section).


To add virtual servers to the ACE Device Manager for load-balancing purposes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Choose Config > Virtual Contexts. The All Virtual Contexts table appears (see Figure 3).

Step 2 Choose the Admin context, then choose Load Balancing > Virtual Servers to create a virtual server. The Virtual Servers table appears (Figure 10).

Figure 10 Virtual Servers Table

Step 3 Click Add () to add a new virtual server. The Virtual Server configuration screen appears (Figure 11). The Properties configuration subset is open by default.

The Virtual Server configuration screen includes with several configuration subsets. The subsets that you see depend on whether you use the Basic View or the Advanced View and on the configuration entries that you make in the Properties subset. For this example, choose Basic View by using the View object selector at the top of the configuration pane.

Figure 11 Virtual Server Configuration Screen—Properties Configuration Subset

Step 4 In the Properties configuration subset of the Virtual Server configuration screen, enter the following virtual server attributes. Leave the remaining attributes blank or at their default state.

VIP Name—Enter the name for this virtual server

VIP IP—Enter the IP address for this virtual server

Protocol—TCP

Application Protocol—HTTP

Port—80

VLAN—102 (for all incoming traffic from the client)


Note For background details about these attributes, see the Online Help system provided with the GUI and the Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Device Manager GUI Configuration Guide.


Step 5 In the L7 Load-Balancing configuration subset of the Virtual Server configuration screen (Figure 12), in the Primary Action drop-down list, choose the loadbalance option.

Figure 12 Virtual Server Configuration Screen—L7 Load-Balancing Configuration Subset

Step 6 In the Server Farm drop-down list, choose *New* to configure a new server farm.

Step 7 Enter the following server farm attributes. Leave the remaining attributes blank or at their default state.

Name—serverfarm

Type—Host

Predictor—Roundrobin


Note For background details about these attributes, see the Online Help system provided with the GUI and the Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Device Manager GUI Configuration Guide.


Step 8 Click Add to add a new entry to the Real Servers table. The Real Servers table appears (Figure 13).

Figure 13 Virtual Server Configuration Screen—Real Servers Table

Step 9 Enter the following attributes for the first real server to be configured. Leave the remaining attributes blank or at their default state.

IP Address—IP address of the first real server

Name—rserv1

Port—80

Weight—8

State—Inservice


Note For background details about these attributes, see the Online Help system provided with the GUI and the Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Device Manager GUI Configuration Guide.


Step 10 Click OK below the Real Servers table, then click Add to add a second entry to the Real Servers table.

Step 11 Enter the following attributes for the second real server to be configured. Leave the remaining attributes blank or at their default state.

IP Address—IP address of the second real server

Name—rserv2

Port—80

Weight—8

State—Inservice


Note For background details about these attributes, see the Online Help system provided with the GUI and the Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Device Manager GUI Configuration Guide.


The Real Servers configuration screen should appear similar to the example shown in Figure 14.

Figure 14 Virtual Server Configuration Screen—Real Servers Configuration Screen with Two Real Servers

Step 12 Click OK to refresh the contents of the Real Servers table.

Step 13 Click Deploy Now at the bottom of the screen to finalize and save your entries for the virtual server. The Virtual Servers table appears (Figure 15). The configured virtual server in the table and is in the Inservice state.

Figure 15 Virtual Servers Table with Configured Real Server

Step 14 Open a second browser window and attempt to "hit" the VIP. For example, enter:

http://172.16.2.152/

This action will force the ACE to perform VIP load balancing with the two real servers.


Viewing Server Status Information

After you have created a virtual server, you can view the status information associated with the configured virtual server and real servers. This section contains the following procedures:

Viewing Virtual Server Information

Viewing Real Server Information

Viewing Virtual Server Information

To view status information associated with the configured virtual server, perform the following procedure:


1. Choose Config > Operations > Virtual Servers to view all virtual servers. The Virtual Servers table appears (Figure 16) with the following information for each server:

Server name, grouped by virtual context

Configured state

VIP address

Port

VLANs

Server farms

Virtual context

Figure 16 Virtual Servers Table

2. Verify that the virtual server is in the Inservice state. This state indicates that the virtual server is in use. If a virtual server is in a different State (for example, Failed or Out of Service), verify that you have properly configured the virtual server as described in the "Configuring a Virtual Server for Layer 7 Load Balancing" section.

3. Click the Details button at the bottom of the screen. The Virtual Servers Details screen appears (Figure 16) displaying the virtual server status.

Figure 17 Virtual Servers Details Page


Viewing Real Server Information

To view status information associated with the configured real servers, perform the following procedure:


Step 1 Choose Config > Operations > Real Servers. The Real Servers table appears (Figure 18) with the following information:

Real server name

IP address

Port

Configured status, such as In Service, Out of Service, or In Service Standby

Current operational state

Number of current connections

Server weight

Associated server farm

Associated virtual context

Figure 18 Real Servers Table

Step 2 Verify that both real servers (rserv1 and rserv2) are in the Inservice state. This state indicates a server is in use as a destination for server load balancing. If a real server is in a different state (for example, Failed or Out of Service), verify that you have properly performed the following:

Configured load balancing for the named real servers as described in the "Configuring a Virtual Server for Layer 7 Load Balancing" section.

Activated the real server as described in the "Activating a Real Server" section. If the state still indicates a Failed or Out of Service state, this failure could be due to networking issues.


Note Note that the quick configuration procedures in this document do not use health monitoring probes to check the health and availability of a real server. With probes configured, the ACE periodically sends a probe to the real server. Depending on the server response, the ACE determines whether to include the server in its load-balancing decision. The State field would inform you when your real servers are in a probe failed state.The ACE appliance can take a real server out of service due to a probe failure. In this instance, no new connections will be assigned to this server until a probe to this server succeeds.



Activating a Real Server

If it is necessary for you to activate a real server, perform the following procedure:


Step 1 Choose Config > Operations > Real Servers. The Real Servers table appears (Figure 18).

Step 2 Choose the servers that you want to activate, then click Activate. The Activate Server screen appears.

Step 3 In the Task field, confirm that this is the server that you want to activate.

Step 4 In the Reason field, enter a reason for this action. Do not enter a password in this field.

Step 5 Click Deploy Now to activate the server and to return to the Real Servers table. The server appears in the table with the status Inservice.

If the state still indicates a Failed or Out of Service state, this failure could be due to networking issues.



Configuring Advanced Features

After you have completed the quick configuration procedures in this guide, you can configure the following advanced features on the ACE Device Manager GUI:

Application acceleration and optimization

Application protocol inspection

Connection persistence using HTTP-cookie, HTTP header, or IP netmask stickiness

Health monitoring including probes

Layer 7 server load-balancing traffic policy for virtual servers configured for HTTP or HTTPS

Redundancy

SSL

TCP/IP normalization

Virtualization and role-based access control (RBAC)

For details on configuring all of the ACE features from the GUI, see the:

Online Help system provided with the Device Manager GUI

Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Device Manager GUI Configuration Guide

You can access the ACE appliance documentation on www.cisco.comat:

http:/www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps7027/tsd_products_support_series_home.html

Related Documentation

To familiarize yourself with the ACE appliance hardware and software, see the following documents:

Release Note for the Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance

Cisco Application Control Engine Appliance Hardware Installation Guide

Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco Application Control Engine Appliance

For detailed configuration information on the ACE Device Manager GUI, see the following software documents:

Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Device Manager GUI Configuration Guide

Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Online Help

For detailed configuration information on the ACE command-line interface (CLI), see the following software documents:

Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Administration Guide

Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Application Acceleration and Optimization Configuration Guide

Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance CLI Quick Configuration Note

Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Command Reference

Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Routing and Bridging Configuration Guide

Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Security Configuration Guide

Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Server Load-Balancing Configuration Guide

Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance SSL Configuration Guide

Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance System Message Guide

Cisco 4700 Series Application Control Engine Appliance Virtualization Configuration Guide

Cisco CSS-to-ACE Conversion Tool User Guide

Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines

For information on obtaining documentation, obtaining support, providing documentation feedback, security guidelines, and also recommended aliases and general Cisco documents, see the monthly What's New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and revised Cisco technical documentation, at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/general/whatsnew/whatsnew.html