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Cisco Unified Communications Manager (CallManager)

Checking SQL Server or MSDE Version and Service Pack Level

Document ID: 25784

Updated: Apr 22, 2008

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Introduction

This document describes how to check the version and service pack (SP) level for the various types of Microsoft Structured Query Language (SQL) servers used with certain Cisco IP Telephony products such as Cisco CallManager and Cisco Unity.

The Microsoft SQL server types are SQL Server 7.0, Microsoft SQL Desktop Edition (MSDE), Microsoft SQL Server 2000, and MSDE 2000.

Refer to Microsoft article 321185 leavingcisco.com for more information.

Prerequisites

Requirements

There are no specific requirements for this document.

Components Used

The information in this document is based on these software and hardware versions:

  • Microsoft Windows 2000 Server

  • Microsoft SQL Server 7.0, MSDE, Microsoft SQL Server 2000, and MSDE 2000

  • Cisco CallManager 3.x or 4.0, Cisco Unity 3.x or 4.x, Cisco Conference Connection 1.x, IP Contact Center (IPCC) Express Edition, also known as Customer Response Solutions (CRS) or Customer Response Applications (CRA) (all versions)

The information in this document was created from the devices in a specific lab environment. All of the devices used in this document started with a cleared (default) configuration. If your network is live, make sure that you understand the potential impact of any command.

Conventions

Refer to Cisco Technical Tips Conventions for more information on document conventions.

Use Query Analyzer with Microsoft SQL Server 2000

Note: Cisco Unity 3.0, 3.1, 4.0, and 4.0.4 and Cisco CallManager 3.3 and 4.0 use Microsoft SQL Server 2000. If CRS 3.0(1), CRS 3.0(2), and CRS 3.0(3a) are in a co-located installation with Cisco CallManager, it defaults to Cisco CallManager SQL 2000.

The easiest method to find the current version and SP level is to use the SQL Query Analyzer and run the SQL query in step 4 for servers that run Microsoft SQL Server 2000.

  1. Select Programs > Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager.

  2. Select Tools > SQL Query Analyzer.

  3. Select the local instance of your SQL server in the initial SQL Query Analyzer popup window.

    You also need to select your connection authentication method. Use either SQL Server authentication or Windows authentication for your server. Windows authentication is the easier method in most cases because it uses the credentials of the account that you are currently logged in with. Supply an SQL Server login name such as SA and the associated password if you select SQL Server authentication.

    The account that you are logged into does not have the necessary rights to connect to the SQL server if you attempt a connection and receive the error Not Associated with a Trusted SQL Server Connection when you use Windows authentication. Log off the server and log on again as a different user with the correct rights or use SQL Server authentication instead.

    check_sql_msde_ver-1.gif

    The Windows authentication method is selected in this case. Click OK.

  4. Enter the SQL query string as this example shows:

    SELECT SERVERPROPERTY('productversion'), SERVERPROPERTY 
    ('productlevel'), SERVERPROPERTY ('edition')
    
  5. Select the Parse Query tool check_sql_msde_ver-2.gif to verify the syntax.

    The message Command(s) complete successfully displays. Modify the syntax until the parser allows it to run without errors if the syntax is incorrect.

  6. Select the Execute Query tool check_sql_msde_ver-3.gif to run your query.

    Output similar to the text in this image displays:

    check_sql_msde_ver-4.gif

    The server runs Standard Edition, build number 8.00.760, SP 3 in this case.

  7. Close the SQL Query Analyzer. You are prompted to save the current query. Save the query to a local folder if you want to be able to run this again at a later time. Otherwise, answer no to finish the close.

  8. Close the Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager.

Use Query Analyzer with Microsoft SQL Server 7.0

Note: Cisco CallManager 3.1 and 3.2 use Microsoft SQL Server 7.0. CRS 3.0(1), CRS 3.0(2), and CRS 3.0(3a) use MSDE 1.0 (which reports as SQL Server 7.0) in a stand-alone installation.

The query that comes with Microsoft SQL Server 2000 does not work on SQL Server 7.0. The only option available is to use the select @@version query that provides the build number. You can look the build number up in the table once you have it.

The initial steps that you use to start the SQL Query Analyzer for Microsoft SQL Server 7.0 are the same as for Microsoft SQL Server 2000.

  1. Select Programs > Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager.

  2. Select Tools > SQL Query Analyzer.

  3. Select the local instance of your SQL server in the initial SQL Query Analyzer popup window. Also select your connection authentication method.

    Use either SQL Server authentication or Windows authentication as appropriate for your server. Windows authentication is the easier method in most cases because it uses the credentials of the account that you are currently logged in with. Supply an SQL Server login name such as SA and the associated password if you select SQL Server authentication.

    The account that you are logged into does not have the necessary rights to connect to the SQL server if you attempt a connection and receive the error Not Associated with a Trusted SQL Server Connection when you use Windows authentication. Log off the server and log on again as a different user with the correct rights or use SQL Server authentication instead.

    check_sql_msde_ver-5.gif

    The Windows authentication method is selected in this case. Click OK.

  4. Enter the SQL query string as this example shows:

    USE MASTER SELECT @@VERSION
    
  5. Select the Parse Query tool check_sql_msde_ver-2.gif to verify the syntax.

    The message Command(s) complete successfully displays. Modify the syntax until the parser allows it to run without errors if the syntax is incorrect.

  6. Select the Execute Query tool check_sql_msde_ver-3.gif to run your query.

    Output similar to the text below displays:

    Microsoft SQL Server 7.00 - 7.00.1077 (Intel X86) Sep 6
     2002 15:10:15 Copyright (c) 1988-2002 Microsoft Corporation 
    Standard Edition on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: Service Pack 3)

    The SQL engine is Microsoft SQL Server 7.00, Standard Edition. The build number in this case is 7.00.1077. This build number corresponds to SQL Server 7.0 SP 4 + SQL7-MS02-061 (Microsoft Knowledge Base articles Q263968 and Q326573) in the table.

    This server has had SP 4 applied as well as an additional hot fix for Q263968 and Q326573 in this case.

  7. Close the SQL Query Analyzer.

    You are prompted to save the current query. Save the query to a local folder if you want to be able to run this again at a later time. Otherwise, answer no to finish the close.

  8. Close the Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager.

Use OSQL for MSDE

Note: Cisco Unity 3.0, 3.1, and 4.0 systems with 32 ports or fewer use MSDE.

Use the Microsoft command-line query tool osql.exe to determine the current SQL version if MSDE is installed on the server.

  1. Select Start > Run > cmd [enter] to start a command prompt window.

  2. The syntax of the query string is C:\>osql.exe -U <userid> -P <password> -Q "USE master SELECT @@version" -p.

    You must substitute a user ID (account user name) that is configured on the server for the value <userid> and the password for this user for the value <password> . You are prompted to enter the password when you execute the query if you enter a user ID without a password.

    The account that you use is dependent on how you have the security options configured for MSDE. The options are:

    • Windows and SQL Server authentication

    • Windows authentication only

  3. Use the Windows 2000 administrator account and password to run the query as this example shows:

    C:\>osql.exe -U administrator -Q "USE master SELECT @@version" -p [enter]
    

    Proceed to Interpret a Successful OSQL Version Query if the query is successful.

    Use the SQL Server SA account and password to try the query again if the query fails:

    C:\>osql.exe -U sa -Q "USE master SELECT @@version" -p [enter]
    

    Proceed to Interpret a Successful OSQL Version Query if the query is successful.

    Proceed to the Troubleshoot OSQL Queries section if the query fails.

Interpret a Successful OSQL Version Query

Output similar to this displays when the query runs successfully:

Microsoft SQL Server 2000 - 8.00.760 (Intel X86) Dec 17 2002 
14:22:05 Copy right (c) 1988-2003 Microsoft Corporation Desktop Engine on 
Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: Service Pack 3)

The SQL engine is Microsoft SQL Server 2000 / Desktop Engine, which is MSDE 2000. The build number is 8.00.760 in this case. This build number corresponds to MSDE 2000 SP 3 in the table.

Troubleshoot OSQL Queries

Common Problems

The OSQL query can fail for these reasons:

  • Syntax error in the query string— Try the query again and verify that the syntax is correct.

  • Login failure due to an incorrect WIN2K user ID or password — Try the query again and verify that the WIN2K user ID and password are correct. See the next problem if your login fails again.

  • Login failure due to a problem with WIN2K user account rights— If you try to use the WIN2K administrator account and password and your login fails with the error Not Associated with a Trusted SQL Server Connection, this usually means that:

    • The SQL server probably uses Windows authentication.

    • The account that you are logged in with does not have the necessary rights to connect to the SQL server.

    Log off the server and log on again as a different WIN2K user with the correct rights.

    You must use the SQL SA account and password when you run the query if you do not have an alternative WIN2K user that can run this query. You do not need to log off and log back on to do this. Return to step 2 under Use OSQL for MSDE. Use the SQL SA account and password and try the query again.

    You must determine how SQL authentication is configured on your server if you are unable to run this query with the SQL SA account. You might also have to reset the password for the SQL SA account. See the Verify the Current SQL Authentication Method section to determine how security is set up for your SQL server.

Verify the Current SQL Authentication Method

Complete these steps to verify the current SQL authentication method:

  1. Select Start > Programs > Microsoft SQL Server > Enterprise Manager.

    check_sql_msde_ver-6.gif

  2. Expand the Microsoft SQL Servers section so that you can see the levels that appear in this image.

    check_sql_msde_ver-7.gif

  3. Right-click the (local) (Windows NT) server and select Properties.

    check_sql_msde_ver-8.gif

  4. Select the Security tab.

    The SA account password might have been changed if the SQL server and Windows is currently selected as the authentication method and you cannot use the SQL SA account to run the query. You must either find somebody that knows the current password or reset it. See the Reset the SQL SA Account Password section if you need to reset the password.

    Change the authentication method to SQL Server and Windows if the authentication method is Windows only.

    check_sql_msde_ver-9.gif

  5. Click OK and close all of the open SQL windows.

  6. Return to step 2 under Use OSQL for MSDE and use the SQL SA account and password to try the query again.

Reset the SQL SA Account Password

Complete these steps to reset the SQL SA account password:

  1. Select Start > Programs > Microsoft SQL Server > Enterprise Manager.

    check_sql_msde_ver-6.gif

  2. Expand the Microsoft SQL Servers section so that you can see the levels that this image shows.

    check_sql_msde_ver-10.gif

  3. Right-click SA account in the right pane and select Properties.

    check_sql_msde_ver-11.gif

  4. Enter the new SA account password and click OK.

  5. Confirm the new password and click OK.

    check_sql_msde_ver-12.gif

  6. Return to step 2 under Use OSQL for MSDE and use the SQL SA account and the new password to try the query again .

    Note: In IPCC 4.x, the SQL server is configured to run in Windows Authentication mode. The connection to the SQL server must be made using Windows Authentication mode, not SQL Server Authentication mode. Therefore, in this case, there is no need for the SA password.

Access the ERRORLOG File

The final method used to determine the current SQL server version is to view the latest ERRORLOG file.

The latest ERRORLOG file C:\MSSQL7\log\ERRORLOG contains most of the information necessary to verify which version and SP level of SQL server or MSDE runs. The build number that is available toward the top of the ERRORLOG files corresponds to a combination of the SQL engine, SPs, and hot fixes that are installed. You can look up the build number in the table once you have it.

You can find this file in the folder C:\MSSQL7\lLOG\ for SQL 7.0. This includes MSDE 7.0.

You can find this file in the folder C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL\LOG\ for SQL 2000. This includes MSDE 2000.

Note: Make certain that you open the latest file. You might have log files that pre-date the installation if the SP was installed recently.

Use Windows Notepad to open this file, which is in the Start menu under Programs > Accessories. Then, see the table.

Find the Build Number

The build number is located at the beginning of the ERRORLOG file in the first four lines. The build number is in bold font in this table. The table lists the versions and SP levels that are currently available. Match the values in the ERRORLOG file to the appropriate entry.

SQL Server Version SQL Server Service Pack Level
Microsoft SQL Server 7.00— 7.00.623 (Intel X86) Nov 27 1998 22:20:07 Copyright © 1988-1998 Microsoft Corporation Standard Edition on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 2) SQL Server 7.0
Microsoft SQL Server 7.00— 7.00.699 (Intel X86) Nov 27 1998 22:20:07 Copyright © 1988-1998 Microsoft Corporation Standard Edition on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 2) SQL Server 7.0 SP 1
Microsoft SQL Server 7.00— 7.00.842 (Intel X86) Nov 27 1998 22:20:07 Copyright © 1988-1998 Microsoft Corporation Standard Edition on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 2) SQL Server 7.0 SP 2
Microsoft SQL Server 7.00— 7.00.996 (Intel X86) Nov 27 1998 22:20:07 Copyright © 1988-1998 Microsoft Corporation Standard Edition on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 2) SQL Server 7.0 SP 3
Microsoft SQL Server 7.00— 7.00.1063 (Intel X86) Apr 9 2002 14:18:16 Copyright © 1988-2002 Microsoft Corporation Standard Edition on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 3) SQL Server 7.0 SP 4
Microsoft SQL Server 7.00— 7.00.1077 (Intel X86) Sep 6 2002 15:10:15 Copyright © 1988-2002 Microsoft Corporation Standard Edition on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 3) SQL Server 7.0 SP 4 + SQL7-MS02-061 (Microsoft KB - Q263968 and Q326573)
Microsoft SQL Server 2000— 8.00.194 (Intel X86) May 23 2001 00:02:52 Copyright © 1988-2000 Microsoft Corporation Standard Edition on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 2) SQL Server 2000
Microsoft SQL Server 2000— 8.00.384 (Intel X86) May 23 2001 00:02:52 Copyright © 1988-2000 Microsoft Corporation Standard Edition on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 2) SQL Server 2000 SP 1
Microsoft SQL Server 2000— 8.00.534 (Intel X86) May 23 2001 00:02:52 Copyright © 1988-2000 Microsoft Corporation Standard Edition on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 2) SQL Server 2000 SP 2
Microsoft SQL Server 2000— 8.00.760 (Intel X86) Dec 17 2002 14:22:05 Copyright © 1988-2003 Microsoft Corporation Standard Edition on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 2) SQL Server 2000 SP 3
Microsoft SQL Server 7.00— 7.00.623 (Intel X86) Nov 27 1998 22:20:07 Copyright © 1988-1998 Microsoft Corporation MSDE on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 2) MSDE
Microsoft SQL Server 7.00— 7.00.699 (Intel X86) May 21 1999 14:08:18 Copyright © 1988-1998 Microsoft Corporation MSDE on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 2) MSDE SP 1
Microsoft SQL Server 7.00— 7.00.842 (Intel X86) Mar 2 2000 06:49:37 Copyright © 1988-1998 Microsoft Corporation MSDE on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 2) MSDE SP 2
Microsoft SQL Server 7.00— 7.00.961 (Intel X86) Oct 24 2000 18:39:12 Copyright © 1988-1998 Microsoft Corporation MSDE on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 2) MSDE SP 3
Microsoft SQL Server 2000— 8.00.194 (Intel X86) Aug 6 2000 00:57:48 Copyright © 1988-2000 Microsoft Corporation Desktop Engine on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 2) MSDE 2000
Microsoft SQL Server 2000— 8.00.384 (Intel X86) May 23 2001 00:02:52 Copyright © 1988-2000 Microsoft Corporation Desktop Engine on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 2) MSDE 2000 SP 1
Microsoft SQL Server 2000— 8.00.534 (Intel X86) Nov 19 2001 13:23:50 Copyright © 1988-2000 Microsoft Corporation Desktop Engine on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 2) MSDE 2000 SP 2
Microsoft SQL Server 2000— 8.00.760 (Intel X86) Dec 17 2002 14:22:05 Copyright © 1988-2003 Microsoft Corporation Desktop Engine on Windows NT 5.0 (Build 2195: SP 3) MSDE 2000 SP 3

Note: The SP version of the output indicates the version of the current Microsoft Windows 2000 SP installed on the server. This is not the SQL SP version.

Verify the Use of the Appropriate Version and Service Pack Level

Ensure that the version and SP level are supported for use with the Cisco IP Telephony product installed.

Ensure that your Cisco CallManager server is patched to the latest operating system and SQL versions mentioned in Cisco IP Telephony Operating System, SQL Server, Security Updates.

Refer to the product-specific documentation for recommended versions for other Cisco IP Telephony application servers such as Cisco Unity and CRS.

Related Information

Updated: Apr 22, 2008
Document ID: 25784