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Cisco Unified Communications Manager (CallManager)

Voice Dial Plan Interactive Voice Network Configuration Example

Cisco - Interactive Voice Network Configuration and Troubleshooting

Document ID: 82038

Updated: Apr 16, 2007

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Introduction

This series of interactive documents uses a typical head office and branch office in order to demonstrate some common voice network configurations. This interactive diagram allows you to view network configurations:

Click to view configurations and troubleshooting.
Click to view configurations and troubleshooting.
Click to view configurations and troubleshooting.
Click to view configurations and troubleshooting.
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This image is interactive!
Click a component to view configuration
and troubleshooting information.

Refer to Unified CallManager Interactive Voice Network Configuration and Troubleshooting Case Study for requirements assumed by this series of interactive documents.

Requirements

Ensure that you meet these requirements before you attempt the configuration described in this document.

San Jose Requirements
User
Phone
Extension
Role
COS
DID
Peter Smart

1

5001
5002
Manager
Intercom
International
(408) 501-5001
John Doe

2

5005
Employee
Local
(408) 501-5002
Carolyn Smith

3

5010
5011
5020
Assistant
Proxy Line
Intercom
International
(408) 501-5003
Extension Mobility

Any Phone

5500

Local

(408) 501-5500

RTP Requirements
User
Phone
Extension
COS
DID
Bob Smith 1 4001 International (919) 501-4001
Robert Green 2 4002 Long Distance (919) 501-4002
Suzanne White 4003 Internal / 911 (919) 501-4003

Configure

In order to satisfy the need for different classes of service that are applied to different users, this example uses the line and device approach as described in detail in Cisco Unified Communications SRND Based on Cisco Unified CallManager 4.x. You can also use the traditional approach due to the small number of sites required. Please refer to Cisco Unified Communications SRND Based on Cisco Unified CallManager 4.x for differences between the two methods and recommendations on each approach

The Line/Device approach uses unrestricted Calling Search Space at the Device level and applies blocking at the line level by using translation patterns, as depicted in this diagram:

Because this configuration uses two sites (San Jose and RTP) and four classes of services (internal, local, national, and international), you must create a total of six Calling Search Spaces: one for each site and four global.

In addition, you must create these partitions:

  • Internal_DN (assigned to phone DNs)
  • SanJose_Ptn
  • RTP_Ptn
  • Block_Local (assigned to translation pattern that blocks all PSTN, except 911 calls)
  • Block_National (assigned to translation pattern that blocks all national calls, but permits 911 and local PSTN calls)
  • Block_International (assigned to translation pattern that blocks international calls, but permits 911, local, and national PSTN calls)
  • No_Block (no restrictions)

This image shows the parititions that you must create:

This image shows the route patterns that are created for the San Jose and RTP sites.


Note: The number nine (9) is used to indicate PSTN access that gets stripped by the route group configuration.

For international calls, two route patterns exist for each site:

  • one pattern that ends with an exclamation point (!), which means wait for T302 timer (15 seconds) to expire
  • one pattern that ends with a pound sign (#), which means dial immediately after the user presses #

For each site, a route group that contains the MGCP gateway is created, as well as a route list that contains the local route group. The route lists are then used for the route patterns.

This image shows an example of the route group and route list that are created for the San Jose site:

Note: In order to implement digit manipulation at the route group level, this configuration discards PreDot, which is the digit 9 for PSTN access, as shown in this image:

You can implement digit manipulation at the route pattern configuration; however, you have more control over dialing destinations when digit manipulation is used at the route group level. That is, you can use one route pattern that points to a route list and contains two route groups: one route group implements digit manipulation and the other route group uses different digit manipulation.

In order to create different classes of service, this configuration uses translation patterns that block unwanted dialing patterns. These translation patterns are included in the appropriate Calling Search Spaces that are applied at the line level, directory number (DN).

This configuration uses a total of 4 translation patterns that are placed in the appropriate partition:

Next, the different Calling Search Spaces are created for each site at the device level.

This image shows the San Jose Calling Search Space that is applied at the device level:

Note: The Internal_DN partition is included at the device level instead of at the line level on each Calling Search Space.

This image shows the RTP Calling Search Space that is applied at the device level:

Note: This configurations includes the Internal_DN partition at the device level instead of at the line level on each Calling Search Space.

Finally, the four Calling Search Spaces that contain the blocked translation patterns are created and then are applied at the line level as shown in this image:


 

Note: Although this configuration includes Internal_DN (all phone DNs), it is redundant if the device already includes it in the device Calling Search Space. This is relevant only if you apply this to a DN that does not have a device CSS (for example, Voice Mail Pilot Calling Search Space).
 


Updated: Apr 16, 2007
Document ID: 82038